Teitl Casgliad: Cambrian news and Merionethshire standard

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Mae hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn eiddo i Cambrian News Ltd.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 2 o 8 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
15 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
Advertising

FOOD PRODUCTION. &< 1 Important to Farmers & Others. =- "\Q dl,, Mr. A. M. HAKTLEYT .o. Queen Street, ABERYSTWYTH, Has secured an Exceptionally Large Quantity 01 Seed r otatoes From the North of England and Scotland. Owing to a Probable rtage, Buyers should place their —- ORDERS] EARLY. -adII CORRY'S TOBACCO POWDER. For Lice and all Skin troubles in- Cattle Horses, Pigs, etc., for preventing Fly striking on Sheep and Warble Fly in Cattle, also for Fleas, etc., on Dogs, Cats, Poultry and their ne^ts. NON-POISONOUS. No risks from Chill as by Washing. Free of Duty Since 1866. Approved by Board of Agriculture. In Tins, Is. and 2s.; also in Bulk. Sold by all Agricultural Chemists. Manufactured by CORRY and CO., LTD., Shad Thames, London, S.E. d974 HQDINE: ■ Fascinating and Fatal. Not a rat fl 6d., 2, 5/ Post 3d. HARLEY, CHEMIST, PERTH. LOCAL AGENTS P. Wynne, Chemist, Aberystwyth; J. W. Evans, Chemist, Llandyssul; T. Jones' Chemist. Tregaron R Evans, Chemist. Lam peter; J B.Jones.Chemist,NewcastleEmlyn E. Lima Jon » s, Chemist, Aberayron I-I.Davies Machynlleth; W. J. Evans, New Quay; D, SFones, Llanfyllin; J. Davies. Llanybyther. Moles! Moles! Moles) Farmers who are troubled with this pest on the land can get certain and speedy relief by using KILMOL, r In Packets, with full directions, from JOHN J DAVIES, M.PS. • Chemist, Llanybyther. Small size, Is., Large size 2s. 61., Post Free Kilmol kills Moles and Rats. MOLE SKINS. MOLE SKINS. R WATSON and CO., Pioneers of the • Mole Skin Industry, the oldest and largest collectors in Great Britain, still continue to pay the highest price for Mole, Otter, Fox, Cat. and Badger Skins, z tm Pheasant Tails, Piumage, etc. Cash for- warded immediately on receipt of goods. Write for our new price list before sending elsewhere. Note our only address—R. Watson and Co. (Dept. R), the "All-British"' Firm. Dalkeith House, Far- ringdon-street, London. E.C. e23 IMPORTANT TO HOME & FOREICN BUYERS Celebrate ]Plynlymon CbEmpioii (Champion of England and Wales) Trotting Speed 19 miles per hour (Bate witnessed by D. E. Davies, Esq., Barmouth, also by Dr James, Borth. Mr Compton Evans is open to sell the above horse. Failing to sell locally, Plynlymon Champion will be sold at Islington Shire Sales. The best judges value Plynlvnion Champion at 1.000 guineas. £450 was refused at Dalis f».ir, offered by Mr Har.cock Lostick €500 offered last Friday witnessed by G. J. Hughes, Esq., Brynhafod, TrgYIon: Breeder and owner, Compton Evans, Aberystwyth. Mr Evans intends taking up of the business of Auctioneer d514 Cupiss' Constitution Balis. ■f For Grea-e, ',welled u v 2 TT Lees, CraGked Heels, go HOrSftSc -h.. Colds, sore 2 4J.W1 OCO Tijro.ts, Disordered o 2 Liver, Broken Wind, Influenza, {3 Z.2 of Appetite, etc, etc. For Hide-bound, Staring rj" S f*\ ii, 1 Coat, Hove or Blown —Si I irl.TILI I ft Diotemper, Epidemic, 5n=) ?! UUUUAV; Surfeit, Conditioting. a> 3 — = For Rot or jFl'uke, and § S 3.2 CIVirtA-rv ke-ping in Health, aS dI166D £ 88i5tiDg iD*° pq > x Condition, Scouring in '5"o Lambs, etc. j Prepared upwards of 50 year? by the late ] FRANCIS CUPISS, M.R C.V.S.. DISS. NORFOLK: Sold in packets 1/9 and 3/6 each, 7 small packets 10/6, or 7 large 21/ by Chemists and Medicine Vendors, or from FRANCIS Cupiss, Ltd., The Wilderness, Diss cn receipt of amount. d395 James Morgan, FRUITERER AND FLORIST, I FISHMONGER AND POULTERER, II Tier Street, Abcrystwyth, EGGS. EGGS. EGGS. Bought in any quantity for Cash, — Latest Designs in £ t j\ Monuments and Headstones jfr-r-l in Granite, Marble and Slate. Good Stock always on hand. Write or Call. Low Prices J DAVIES AND JONES Monumental Works, d349 Chapel Street, Tregaron THE FURNISHING WAREHOUSE, Great Darkgate St reet, BEST VALUE IN FURNITURE J T.H;-Wl:s :M-V&Iqs, OABIVET MANUFACTURER. UPHOLSTERER, AND UNDERTAKER Begs to inform the public th it he has always a large Stock of Furciture, &c,, made on the premJHS. nr"yk||r«|> "LINCOLNSHIRE" ULFINI3 J PIG POWDERS SEND FOR FREE SAMPLE of the best MEDICINE FOR, PIGS. From DENNIS'S PIG POWDERS, LOUTH Sold everywhere lOd. per doz., by post lB. 2d mm- mm F; SEEDS. J917. -¥- Reliable Garden R AND Agricultural SEED CATALOGUE POST FREE on application. G. WILKINSON And 50N, North Parade, Aberystwyth. Telephone 88. J. VEAREY, 17, Northgate Street, ABERYSTWYTH, Have now in Stock a large variety of Garden Seeds Of a reliable quality also a variety o Early Seed Potatoes AGENTS Fon CARTER'S TESTED Garden & Agricultural SEEDS. T. Powell & Co., MARKET STREET, ABERYSTWYTH, AND COMMERCIAL HOUSE, LLANGWYRYFON. e22 ELLIS'S PHARMACY DISPENSING of English and Foreign Prescriptions. Medical and Surgical Requisites. Robert Ellis, Pharmaceutical Chemist, ¡ 53, Terrace Road, I ABERYSTWYTH. I 1 Tel. 71. I Scientific Sight-Testing and Frame Fitting Qualified Sight-Testing Optician. I W. MIALL JONES. M.P.S I Pharmaoeutioal Chemist Fellow of the Worshipful Company of I [ Spectacle Makers, and of the Institute of Ophthalmic Opticians. [ 33, TERRACE RD., ABERYSTWYTH j

I IHINTS FOR ALLOTMENT HOLDERS

HINTS FOR ALLOTMENT HOLDERS. By SPADE-WORKER. WHAT TO SOW NOW. Carrots are among the most important of all root crops, and it is well worth while taking pains to ensure success. The cultiva- tion of this vegetable is a hobby with many people, of whom I am one, and a very pro- fitable hobby it is. The present week is considered to be the best of all times for sowing the main crop. You cannot grow fine carrots unless the soil has been dug deeply and is free from fresh manure, large stones, or clods of earth, for upon meeting with any of these obstructions the roots will become forked. If I am not satisfied that my soil is sufficiently good for carrot grow- ing, I bore holes ISin. deep, and 3in. wide at the top, and fill them with sifted soil with which soot and sand have been mixed freely. The compost is pressed moderately firm and three seeds are sown on top, near the middle of the hole. The seeds are covered with half an inch or so of soil. The holes taper to a point at the bottom, and are bored at 6in. apart. It does not take long to prepare the holes, and this method ensures the finest produce. I am growing the, arieties Red Elephant (the largest of carrots), James' Intermediate, Long Surrey, and New Red Intermediate. Readers whose soil is not in good condition, and who do not care to go to the trouble of preparing holes in the way described, should grow one of the stump rooted carrots, such, for ex- ample, as the variety Standard. The carrot fly is often troublesome, but its attacks can usually be prevented by using soot freely both before sowing and as soon as the seed- lings are through. Before sowing the seeds I scatter soot thickly all over the bed and fork it in. I make the surface as fine and level as possible by means of the hoe and rake, and sow in drills lOin. to 12in. apart. The seeds are sufficiently covered by raking the soil level. KOHL RABI. Kohl rabi, although belonging to the cab- bage family, is grown as a substitute for the turnip. The accompanying illustration gives a good idea of its appearance. Every gar- dener known that in a hot, dry summer it is a difficult matter to produce nice crisp turnips, unless they are on rich ground and copiously watered, or in partial shade; even then, sometimes the piante do not grow freely, ,and the roots become "stringy." Now kohl rabi is not affected by drought in this Kohl Rabi, an easily grown and useful vegetable. way; therefore it is especially to be recom- mended to these having fresh ground to deal with. I shall continue to sow turnips for another week or two, but if a hot, dry period then sets in, I shall sow kohl rabi in- stead. The seed is sown just as for turnip, in rows 12in. apart, the seedlings being thinned so that they are clear of each other in the row. THE PROFITABLE LEKK. Every allotment holder ought to grow the lek; it is one of the hardiest and most ac- ceptable of winter vegetables, and is often valuable when winter greens have been dam- aged by frost. Seeds should be sown at once on rich soil in the seed bed; the seed- lings are thinned out before they become crowded, and in June they are planted out on rich, deeply dug ground. Many gar- deners give their leeks a lot more room tnan they really need, and the belief that the plants take up a great deal of space is re- sponsible for the fact that so few amateurs grow them. I put them in rows 12in. apart and allow Gin. between the plants in the row. There are many methods of cultivation, but the two simplest I know of are to put the seedlings in a V-shaped trench or to plant them in holes made with a enrked bottle. In the former case the seedling is. of course, planted at the bottom of the Y-trench, which is lOin. deep, and in the second case it is put in the hole made by the neck of the bottle. As the plants progress the soil is placed round them. In this way quite serviceable leeks are obtained at little trouble. While the seedlings are developing in the seed bod, I sow a row or two of turnips or lettuce on the ground where they are to be planted these will be off in time to allow of the leeks being put out. Another good plan is to plant the leeks on the ground occupied by the first peas, which will be off early in July. VEGETABLE MARROWS. These are among the most useful of the by-products of the allotment. The plants thrive excellently on a heap of turf made from that which has been taken off the top of the allotment, especially if holes 2ft. to 3ft. apart are made and filled with manure. If any readers possess a frame or green- house they should sow seeds singly in small pots of soil now; if they can give no such protection seeds should be sown on the bed out of doors about the end of April. I think one of the small varieties of marrow is to be preferred to a large one, such for example as Pen-y-byd. There is no real ad- vantage in allowing a few marrows to grow to a large size, for the effect is to prevent the development of the remaining fruits; you cannot have size and quality at the same time, and for myself I prefer the quality even if the marrows are rather small. They are far more tender than the big ones. 01 ANSWERS TO CORRESPONDENTS. R. E. B.—To prepare an onion bed dig the soil well, mixing partly decayed stable manure in about 12in. deep. Scatter a sprinkling of powdered lime on the surface and fork it in. Do the same with super- phosphate of lime, using at the rate of 2oz. per r-quare yard. Then give a good dressing of soot in a fortnight, make the bed firm by treading, and sow the seeds thinly in drills lOin. apart. Sow b-cet the second week in May, in drills 12in. apart. Thin the seed- lings, to Gin. apart. IGNORAMUS.—Nothing is simpler than the cultivation of the Jerusalem artichoke. There are "eyes on the tubers, and growth springs from these. You may, if you wish, cut large roots iu two pieces, taking care that each one has "eyes." Plant the tubers at once, putting them 5in. or 6in. deep and a foot apart. If you plant more than one row, let the rows be from two to three feet apart. "This vegetable will grow in almost any soil (though the better the soil the finer the crop), and it will thrive in jjartial shade.

A Pub Transformed

A Pub Transformed. LADY RHONDDA OPENS PUBLIC KITCHEN IN LONDON. The conversion of the Crown,' a public-house in Whitecross-street, London, has been very radically effected by The Salvation Army. When Lady Rhondda arrived to conduct the opening of it as a Public Kitchen she found a transformed building, bright with new paint and generously beflagged, and the large room, achieved by the removal of secrecy-providing partitions, filled with women and children waiting to sample the dinner. Commissioner Adelaide Cox opened the pro- ceedings, and called upon Colonel Laurie to ex- plain the development of the scheme for provid- ing hot cooked meals to families, thus effecting economy in fire, gas, and food, and the pro- viding of wholesome dishes at cost price. During five weeks, the Colonel said, the Men's Social had been able to arrange for thirty-two such centres which could cater for 17,000 families daily. There was to be no profiteering and no I pauperizing. Lady Rhondda in a most hearty manner talked to the women and children gathered there, expressing her delight at the opportunity afforded her in opening that Kitchen, and hop- ing that there would soon be many more places. "It seems to me," her ladyship added, "that when we are without something that is especi- ally necessary we always come to The Salvation Army." Mrs. C. S. Peel, from the Ministry of Food, also spoke "as a working woman to working women," and then Lady Rhondda served the first portions of food to the hungry customers.

THE SHORTAGE OF FEEDINC STUFFS

THE SHORTAGE OF FEEDINC STUFFS The President of the Board of Agriculture has issued a grave warning to farmers, and taken them fully into the confidence of the Government, on the subject of the serious short- age of feeding stuffs for live stock. There will be a reduction of no fewer than lg million tons-about one-sixth part of the whole of concentrated feeding stuffs on which farmers could rely. Restriction on imports accounts for a million tons while the milling regulations will put another half million into bread for man instead of food for beast. Farmers must face the situation, and lay their plans accordingly. The President does not wish to enforce compulsory rations for animals; but they can only be avoided if the good-will of all concerned make them unnecessary. Save in the one instance of milch cows, the food of all classes of live stock must be cut down, and the greatest use made of all home-grown supplies. There will be no fat stock shows, and no fa1 Christmas beef this year. At present the num- ber of live stock is large, and, as the year goes on, a reduction must be made. In the interest of our future flocks and herds, young breeding stock must be saved, but other animals must ba got ready for market.

LLANON

LLANON. SUDDEN DEATiri.—News reached the villag. early last week that Phoebe Jane Griffiths, th. six-year-old daughter of Mrs. Griffiths, formerh of Brodawel, and of the late Mr. John Lewi Griffiths, had died of croup at Pontlottyn, in South Wales. Interment took place on Saturday at Llansantffraid Churchyard. The Rev. T. Aneurin Davies, B.A., officiated at the Church and graveside. The children of the village, who were trained by Mrs. Thomas James," Maes- llyn, and the Rev. D. Moses Davies, C.M. min- ister, sang at the graveside "Bugail lesu" and "Tu draw i swn'r ystorm." The chief mourners were Mrs Griffiths, mother, M-iss Griffiths, sister, and a number of near relatives from Pontlottyn and Llanon. Great sympathy is felt for th mother at this second unexpected bereavement during the past six months or so. WRECKS.—Among the wreckage cast upon the shore during the south-west winds of last week is a ship's lifeboat some fifteen feet long. It was pulled ashore and was found to be b° slightly damaged. It contained nothing but few biscuits and there was nothing to identif it. It drifted on to the stony beach south of t! Graig Las.

LLANGEITHO

LLANGEITHO. PULPIT.—On Sunday, April 15th, Alderman John M. Howell, J.P., of Aberayron, preached twice at Llangeitho Chapel and at Pandy at two o'clock. PERSONAL.—Mrs. Davies, Cwrtmawr. Miss Mary Davies, Mr. J. K. Davies, M.A., and Mrs Peter Hughes Griffiths of are in resi- dence at Cwrtmawr.

ECONOMY IN TH USE OF GARDEN SEEDS

(Continued from previous column.; ECONOMY IN TH' USE OF GARDEN. SEEDS. It is important in the national interest thai everyone who is sowing vegetable seeds should exercise economy in order that no more seed should be sown than is necessary. In ordinary times seed, whether plentiful or scarce, is often used with a free hand, but at present the seeds of many vegetables are neither plentiful nor cheap, and it is not only a wise economy but also a duty to make them go as far as possible. The following hints may be of use in this connection:— 1-—The seeds of many vegetables, especially if they are of a good harvest, retain their ger- minating power almost unimpaired for several years. This is true, for example, in the case of leguminous plants-peas, beans, sqarlet runners, French beans; etc. Therefore, before opening this year's seed packets, seeds of these vege- tables left over from last year should be tested in order to find out whether they will germ- inate well or not. This is very easily done. All that is necessary is to line two saucers with pieces of wet flannel or blotting paper. A known number of seeds, 20 or 30, are placed, well separated from one another, in one of the saucers. The other saucer is taeii inverted on the one containing the seeds, and the saucers are stood in a moderately warm place and covered with a bowl or iar or with newspapers, to prevent drying up. The seeds will germinate quicker if, before they are placed in the saucer, they are soaked overnight in water. The saucers should be examined daily, and after an appro- priate time the seeds which have begun to sprout are counted and'removed. The rate of each seed's germinating varies very much ac- cording to the kind, so that the test must run on for a time varying from a few days to ten days or a fortnight. If a fair proportion of last year's seeds germinate, they should be sown, and this year's seeds kept in their unopened packets for use next year. 2.-S3eds should be sown as thinly as possible, but at the same time it must be remembered that, if sown too thinly, there may be gaps when the seedlings come up. 3.-Some seedlings transplant quite well, so that with them thinnings can be used to in- crease the number of rows. 4.-Take care that no waste is allowed in such seeds as those of cauliflower, as the supply will probably be short next year. But large garden- ers might remember that a few dozen seedlings (good varieties) of cabbages and savoys are often a welcome gift to the smaller gardeners in their neighbourhood. 5.—In an ordinary year the seeds of scarlet runners, broad beans and peas. ripen perfectly well in this country, and growers of these plants should save a fair amount of seed from their own gardens. Anyone who has parsnips, beet, carrots, leeks, celery or cabbages sown last year should let some of them go to seed, and if successful the seed. should be saved. Home-saved seed should be protected from birds, should be allowed to ripen thoroughly, should be liar- vested when ripe, all the bad seed picked out and burnt and the rest kept away from the air in a cool dry place. The risk of disappointment in some cases owing to a wet autumn is well worth risking. 6.—Another thing which amateurs would do well to remember is that mice are very fond of certain kinds of seeds—certain peas for instance; the seed therefore should be slightly moistened and mixed with a little red lead; it is then left alone by vermin. Remember also that birds are very apt to pick and destroy seedlings, particu- larly on Sundays when nobody is about. Where netting is not available three or four strands of black cotton spread over the rows will often serve to keep the birds away.

SUT I LAOD TYRCHOD

SUT I LAOD TYRCHOD. Ysgrifena John Pryce, Mqesymeirch:- "Blinid ni acw gan dyrchod, cynyddent bob blwyddyn, fel yr oedd y tir a golwg ddifrifol arno, ac yr oedd arnaf gywilydd j ohono; ond clywais fod Mr Hugh Davies, Chemist, Machynlleth, wedi dyfeisio peth i'w lladd yn ddi-drafferth iawn. Ei enw ydyw "Molrat," mewn packets 13. 6c. yr un. Prynais backet a rhoddais ef yn ol y cyfarwyddyd am ben pryfaid genwair, a rhoddais y rhai hynv yn llwybr y twrch. Ni chododd y twrcn mwy. Druggist. d951

1 IY Golofn Gymraeg

1 Y Golofn Gymraeg. BLODYN Y GWANWYN. Cennad dihalog y wynfa bell A'i fflurddaill yn llawn o dynerwch, Clws yw ei wedd yn esmwythdra'm gardd A chlws yn nyrysni'r diffaethweh; Cuddied ei hun yng ngwyleidd-dra'i fron Dan wrychoedd caredig encilion, Ni cheidw ef fyth ei arogl per Rhag cyffwrdd a min yr awelon. Hoffaf ei wylio'm mhersawr y maes A phopeth mor llawn o atgofion, Cesglais bwysiau i'w dwylo hi, A blodyn oedd hoffter Rhiannon. Cilia ei ysbryd i'w wynfa yn ol Yng nghwynfan di-orffwys corwyntoedd,* Rhy lawn yw ei fron o deimlad mwyn I oedi'11 rhyferthwy gaeafoedd; Erys ei sercli er-liynny i gyd, Ac erys yr haf yn ei galon, Daw yntau dracliefn i ddolydd y fro, Ond aros o hyd mae Rhiannon. Unig wyf finnau bob gwanwyn glas Yn disgwyl yn n

Advertising

"Atora" is the best of the Beef. It makes delicious digestible puddings, which enable you to eat less meat and yet be well nourished. "ATORA" Beef Suet puddings are 'also strongly recommended for children, fortifying them against cold and damp. Buv" ATOHA" from your grocer in lib. boxes, price Is. 4d. lbs..d. Each box contains leaflet of recipes for! delicious puddings-eless and meatless, yet very nourishing.

Poultry

Poultry. CROSSBRED POULTRY. There are many various ways for crossing poultry and all of them more or less are suc- cessful. One must naturally be governed by the market at hand and suit the fowl to meet local requirements. If the demand is for a big chicken then you would not use an Old English Game, but if on the other hand a nice private trade where quality comes first then the use.of an old English Cockerel would prove of great value. This cross will turn out a fine boned bird, and smaller offal than any other fowl, while the breast is very full and a nice clean cut right through from front to back of a short sweat meat. The hen for using with the Old English may be Faverolles, Light Sussex or of a somewhat lighter build, the Houdan or the Black Hamburgh. The Hamburgh has a black leg which does not meet with general favour, but when crossed with the Game as described the letfs come a better colour and some are almost white. The Houdan has a long breast, with white flesh and skin, and they make a very fine chicken when crossed as described. The object of these crosses are of course to make a useful table fowl and the laying quali- ties are left out of consideration, though when using the Old English and Hamburgh some good layers may be produced. Where a much larger bird is wanted, and where weight counts most then recourse must be had to other varieties, a great improvement could be made by using an Indian Cock with almost any of the we; known heavy varieties. The Indian has a yellow leg and skin, but most of them run pale in body colour, so that when used with a white fleshed fowl they lose nearly the whole of the yellow shade. In spite of this colour it cannot be ignored when wanting a big fowl for table for the Indian carries a broad body with legs well apart, so that this helps in making frame in the chicken and its bone and frame which counts in weighing. Few birds carry the amount of breast as does an Indian and this quality is passed on to its progeny in a marked degree. A typical Indian for the show pen must be short in back though of course it must have the width, yet when sketching a cockerel for crossing the width is essential, but also take the longest back you can find. Such a bird is no use to the fancy breeder and they can be bought at a much lower price than the fancy rate. When selecting the hens, no matter what the breed have them deep in front and long in back, then you must have those with a long breast. Nearly every breeder has his own ideas of breeding and what hens give the best result, but there is great importance in selecting the right kind of hen. If you want to breed stuff for table shows you will find it quite as necessary to be careful in the selection of the parents as if you were mating up to produce show points. These high class chickens are not raised hap- hazard nor yet taken at random from the pen, but very carefully handled and sorted out, to see that the old stock is right and then the chicks can be sorted later. If the idea of crossing is to get a bird for market at an early age, then there is nothing better than the Indian and Faverolle, for if pushed along nicely they should be ready for killing at sixteen weeks and for some customers at. fourteen. The Sussex will make a good cross, but they want another week or two to make up, then they are grand. Other fine crosses are with the Buff Orpington and Dorking hens, but they take longer to grow but when ready you get size and weight. The Orpington and Sussex can be kept on almost any ground, but the Dorking is inclined to go wrong on damp, coki soils, so if not well drained be careful. Some people will leave out the Game alto- gether and use a Faverolle and Plymouth Rock, which produces a very big framed bird with weight, and these sell well at Christmas, making good prices, which compensates for the long time required for feeding. The Faverolle and Sussex will make a good fowl, or use the Sussex or the Orpington, but in every case see that the hens are the correct shape and straight- breasted.

Advertising

N° DEAD CHICKS.-To make your Poultry Pay, yor. must rear every Chick, and the only sure way to do this is to feed them for the first three weeks exclusively on ARMITAGE'S No 1 ORIGINAL DRY CHICK FOOD, and follow on with ARMITAGE'S No 2 GROW-ON CHICKEN MIXTURE, and ARMITAGE'S No. 3 SMALL CHICKEN CORN, manufactured by Armitage Brothers, Limited Poultry Food Specialists, Nottingham. Sold by all grocers and corn dealers. p6150

THE iftlGl f1qttt

THE iftlGl\ œf1.qttt April 20, 1917 CATTLE. Usk.—The fortnightly market was held on Monday at Usk. Under the hammer of Mr. J. H. Rennie there was rather a short supply. The sheep trade was good, fat sheep making up to E5 10s, Radnor double couples to 92s., small weight porkers 25s a score (and up to JE5), a couple of small baconers up to £14, fat cows to £31, cows and calves to £32. There was also a short supply under the hammer of Messrs New- land, Hunt, and Williams, which met with a fair trade. Rearing calves made up to 65s each, porker pigs 24s to 25s, bacon pigs 22s 6d per score, weaners to 40s each, mutton Is 3d to Is 4d, beef Is 3d per lb. Carmarthen Live Stock Fair.—'John Brown's' fair usually the largest of the year, held at Carmarthen on Monday, was small in compari- son with the fairs of previous years. There was only a limited supply of horses, mostly heavy carters, and prices ruled very firm, the best animals making from JB90 to £100 apiece, the average being E80 to £90. Light horses and colts were very scarce, the former realising £ 30 to £45, and the latter JS15 to E35. Few cattle made up to £ 38. Carmarthen, Saturday.—The supply and make have not increased in cask butter this week the demand continues zood, and prices still firm. We quote for cuk Is lid to 2s.; fresh pats, 2s to 2s Id. Eggs with better demand— price paid 15s per 120. No potatoes on offer.

LORD RHONDDA S SUCCECS

LORD RHONDDA S SUCCECS. FIRST PRIZE AT HEREFORD BULL SAFCE. Lord Rhondda's yearling bull, "Snowdrift," first in his class at the second spring show and sale of Hereford pedigree bulls at Hereford, realised the highest figure of the day. Sir Frederick Cawley, Bart., paying 200 guineas for it. The rest of the winners included:—January two years old and over, 3rd, Lord Rhondda's "Admiral Beatty" two years old, h.e., Major David Davies, M.P., Llandinam Hall, "Dinain's Crusader"; and January yearlings, Major Dd. Davies, M.P. Among the sales, in guineas, were:—Lord Rhondda's "Admiral Beatty." 61; Major David Davies, M.P.'s, "Dinam Crusader," 60 (Mr. Morris, Pembroke); Lord Rhondda's "Double," 52 (Mr. Jenkins, Pontypool). —— ~4

Advertising

H THE HOST — p [ PERFECT PAINT f] ft Experience can make or jm jH money can buy, is the H| CAMBRIAN M BRAND y IB (of Guaranteed Materials) IRA y IN 64 BICH STRONG COLOURS. Ask your Ironmonger, or « J Decorator to show you | I the Cambrian Paint j J Tint Card. m See that ths naijrj HE! ■ CAMBRIAN BRAND is H OT on the tin, and ensure pi |1 absolute satisfaction. J j j J ■AMCFACTUBED BY ■ MI ■ I I g JAMES RUDMAN, BRISTOL-' | i /5|I War-time PI CHICKS are %^waluaBle W The rearing of young Chicks into UiflM strong, healthy stock suitable for r r increasing the supply of eggs and WTwd table poultry in Great Britain, is VjT tiff "t greatest im- ^jfi-portance at the present period, and can be under- taken by owners of 9^^ suburban gardens, small holdings and pasture land with moderate outlay. A vital question is that of FOOD for the young chicks, but no difficulty need be experienced if Spratt's Middle Course be adopted, viz.:— SPRATT9 Chicken Meal I "CHIKKO" as the the dry feed for early morning: soft the afternoon and feed. I evening feed. FREE.—We will gladly send GRATIS and POST FREE our interesting book "Chicken and Poultry Culture" (published at 6d.), also brochure "The Middle Cour e," containing expert advice and many valuable hints. Spratt's Patent Ltd., 24-25, Fen church St, London. F.C. Have YOU tried the Only Reliable Remedy for all DISEASES IN FOWLS P Prepared 4 p only by William Jones MPS., THE A ERON pHARMACY, A BERAYRON. d404 MAKES HENS -ST LAY "IP Sold in 7 lb. bagfo by all Corn Dealers. All Corn Dealers are requested to send for list LIVERINE, Ltd., GRIMSBY. I THE GKEAk V&ILSKI Kt/HtDY | RELIEF FROM COUGH IN 5 MINUTES TIq For Coughs, for Colds, for | \J