Teitl Casgliad: Cambrian news and Merionethshire standard

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Mae hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn eiddo i Cambrian News Ltd.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 3 o 8 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
14 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
Advertising

D I I A D ? The Soap of NATIONAL SERVICE PURITAN SOAP

Cardiganshire Appeal Tribunal

Cardiganshire Appeal Tribunal. TWO DAYS SITTING. SCHOOL CASES. On Friday and Saturday two sittings of Car- diganshire Appeal Tribunal were held at Aber- ystwyth, there being present Mr. Jenes, Cwm- ere, chairman; Sir Lawrence Jenkins, Mr. Herbert Vaughan, Mr. Lima Jones, Mr Evans, Llaniofawr; Mr R. S. Rowland, Mr. R. J. R. Loxdale, and Mr. D. C. Roberts; Mr. Evan Evans, clerk; Major Williams, Mr. D. H. Davies, and Mr. T. H. Edwards, military rspre- aontativea; Mr D. Lloyd Lewis and Mr T. Mor- gan, Pontrhydygroes, agricultural representa- tives: Tregaron Cases. Joseph Henry Hopkins, farm labourer, 18, single, Tycoch, Pontrhydygroes, appeal by Mr. Win. Hopkins, father; 35 acres, two ploughed; father carpenter on Hafod Estate in advanced age; one son killed at Kut last April, farm worked by wife and children but wife getting into age and son required at bome; other sons away from home; Joseph working part time at mine.—Not to be called up until April 30th. Morgan Roberts, farm hand, Halodrhydd, Fontrhydfendigaid, Class A, Mr Stephen Roberts, father of 72 (represented by Mr. W. P. Owen); 80 acres, 15 cultivated; military ap- peal against conditional exemption; only son left at home; before son was at home had to engage a servant and before the war had a lad in addition to Morgan; Williams was shepherd at Fannog and John was at Brynglas in Brecon- ehire; no sons in army.—Substitute to be pro- vided. Daniel Jones, Class A, Ystafellwen, Lledrod (represented by Mr. Wm. Davies), joint occupier with John, 45 years of age; 44 acres, 16 ploughed; conscientious objection to military service; military appeal against conditional ex- emption also cultivated Neuadd of 16 acres, &ve to six ploughed; father lives at Cwmbyr where two brothers also lived; not a yard of waate land, at YstafeIIven T/hich he had gr(-atiy improved during his occupation; no crops yet town; maid who had been in London for 24 years, but could not milk; sister died and maid engaged as housekeeper.—15th May. Dd. John Griffiths, horseman, 18, and John Charles Thomas, 29, Bl, horseman. Old Abbey, Pontrhydfendigaid; Mr. Lloyd, employer; mili- tary appeal against conditional exemption for Grimths and employer's appeal against exemp- tion of Thomas until March; 374 acres, 170 aheepwalk, 42 ploughed, 21 horses, 69 cattle, and 500 sheep; only other man employed aged; the cowman's son (Evan R. Jones), rejected, a mason by trade, said he would not help on the farm unless obliged to. E. R. Jones could plough-24th May for GruRths, conditional ex- emption for Thomas. Thomas Davies Jones, farm servant, Llwyn- colfa Coed, Tregaron, 18, employed by Mrs. Pugh whose husband died last March, leaving Jones only man on 63 acres, 23 ploughed; mili- tary appeal against conditional exemption; mother represented by her son, the Rev. Mr. Pugh.—Conditional exemption. Geo. Rowland Parry, 18, cowman, Mynachty, Ystrad Meurig; Mr. John Parry employer; 165 acres, 35 ploughed, another son, David William of 29 holding conditional exemption; military appeal against three months exemption; three other sons, one in the army who had been in a milk business in London, and a boy of 16 who to help his uncle had gone there. One son of 33 was a chemist in China. Four daughters, two in London.—24th May. Ebenezer Hugh Morris, 19, horseman, Bwlch- ydwyallt, Talybont; Mr. Rd. Jones employer (represented by Mr A. J. Hughes); 140 acres, 38 ploughed; 40 cattle and 500 sheep in winter also occupying 25 acres at Gogerddan; Morris and lad of 16 on farm and maid; military appeal against conditional exemption; had from 1,000 to 1,200 sheep on Plynlimon, which the employer looked after; Morris engaged in ploughing and doing work on the farm.—Order for substitution. David Lloyd, general farm hand, Roiarth, Nantcwnlle, 24, military appeal against condi- tional; 36 acres, 18 ploughed; mother-in-law waa the landlady who with the sister-in-law in- tended leaving for another place in September; eelf and wife would then only be left on the farm.—Exempted for two months. Roderick Lloyd, horseman, Penybont, 28 (Mr W. P. Owen), David and Catherine Lloyd em- ployers; 300 acres, 70 under plough; three on farm.—Applicant, David of 37, Powell of 31, mother and two sisters; one brother in the army in France; brothers joint tenants with mother; on death of father in 1907, one brother came home and there were then three male servants in addition to brothers; now the three brothers only.—Substitution order. John Owen Jones, horseman, Tynddraenen, Swyddffynon; Mr. Chas. Owen employer; 159 acres, 30 ploughed, employer engaged in feed- ing cattle and sheep; maid of 19; Jones, a re- lative, came home from London in 1915.—Sub- stitution order. Lampeter Rural. The father of Watkin Davies, 38, roadman, Blaencruser, Llanwen, in a written statement said his son was married with three children; was one of four brothers, three of whom volun- tarily joined the forces, two in France and one sergeant instructor R.F.A. His son Walter vol- unteered for road construction in France but was medically rejected. He was then called up and went to Brecon where he was classed B2 and sent to Oswestry and thence to France where he was placed in a labour corps. He thought that the military had acted exceedingly harshly toward his son and asked that he should be recalled from France. He said that because at Aberystwyth his son was threatened with the police if he did not go to Brecon. Major Williams strongly protested against the statement which was absolutely without founda- tion with regard to threats. The army to-day was a democratic army and if the man put his case before the company commander it would be fully investigated. No doubt the man was employed on roads, but would have to be attached to a unit.—Further consideration ad- journed. Aberayron Rural. James James, Class A, carpenter, Greenwood, Cilie Aeron two brothers in army came home from Canada where he was earning good money in order to help his widowed mother of sixty.— End of Mav. Wm. H. Cuthbert, weaver, Penwern Mills, Cribyn, 19, C3. In reply to Sir Lawrence Jen- Mns, Major Williams said that at present C3 were not being called up unless a man who could do clerical work was wanted.—Conditional. Thos. Thomas. Class A, Blaenclettwr, 29, em- ployer, Mr. J. Garneld Thomas (represented by Mr. D. Pennant James); 375 acres, 63 ploughed, I upland farm away from roads, employer of 30 not in good health and Thomas taking charge of the farm; staff, self, Thomas and John Davies j of 16; Thomas married and took BIaenclettwr in September, 1915, succeeding his father-in-law of over 60, who lives privately at Mydroilyn two brothers with father at Gafrhiw; about 8 acres at BIaenclettwr not cultivatible.—Substi- tution order. Johnny J. Jones, Hafod, Ffostrasol, Llan- dyssul, 19, Mr. James Jones, carpenter, em- ployer (Mr. Pennant James); 360 acres, 900 to 1,000 feet above sea, 78 ploughed, 12 acres re- cently brought into cultivation; self, Johnny, Griffith John, wife and daughter; four teams; military appeal against conditional.—Substitu- tion order. David Evans, tailor, Cl, Alltwen Cottage, Cilie Aeron, 29, married, sole proprietor of business and if closed some of his customers would have to go 18 miles. The Military Repre- sentative said there were 10 tailors within two miles.—May 31st. James Lloyd Jones, Class A, farm servant, 18,-Fronwenisaf, LIanarth; Mr. John Lloyd Jones, not a relative, employer, 110 acres of heavy land, 36 arable; employer, wife, and servant.—Substitution order. Jenkin Morgan Jones, Tryal, Cribyn, 24, Mrs. Morgan Jones employer, Jones and Evan Jones Davies of 22 on the farm; military appeal against conditional; Morgan Jones holds licence as driver of motor car which he occasionally hired when not busy; employer's brother who lived at Blaenllain never helped on the farm.- In reply to Mr. Pennant James, Mrs Jones said that Morgan came into a tle money after his grandfather when he became twenty-one and got the motor car. Her son had been sowing the farm since he was sixteen.—The son said he did not get the motor car to make a living by hiring it. He did the work on the farm, sowing, har- rowing, and ploughing at 14. Hired the car in emergencies, but had refused applications for hire. Made from B19 to JS20 in hiring. Was allowed 50 gallons of petrol a month. In Novem- ber went to Cardiff for three months for the benefit of his health and when he returned di<. the sowing.—Substitution order. David James Davies, ploughman, 21, Class A, Penrhiw Farm, Cilie Aeron; Mr Evan Davies employer; 81 acres; self, only son, wife and daughter on farm; had been granted four con- ditional exemptions.—Substitution order. Thomas Lloyd, farm servant, Cwmllydan, Cribyn, 20, Mr. D. Jones employer; 101 acres, 25 under corn; servant granted conditional exemp- ol tion but joined the colours, and Thomas Lloyd has taken his place.—Substitution order. Aberystwyth Rural. John DL Morgan, 18, horseman, Blaencarrog, LIanddeinol; Mr. W. D. Evans employer; ? acres, 33 ploughed; was willing to take a sub- stitute; lad of 14 also employed.—Substitution order. Hugh James Davies, 18, Cwmbwa, Penrhyn- coch; Mr. Richard Evans employer; 117 acres, 26 to 30 ploughed; other servant in charge of cattle; had himself to attend to mill grinding corn for farmers; did ploughing for small- holders.—Order for substitution. Wm. Jenkins, Class A, coal merchant and general carter. Bridge End, Llanbadarn, married, 38 (represented by Mr. W. P. Owen); supplies the neighbourhood with coal and oil and milk to the village; had a nephew to help; had tried unsuccessfully to dispose of his business; had two cows and a horse, his wife looking after the cows; carted hay for neighbours; 210 people I had petitioned for his retention; would try to give every half-day to assist his neighbours. Conditional exemption on assisting neighbours wholly on Wednesdays and each half-day with the exception of Saturday. the exception of Saturday. Alexander Lloyd, Class A, 25, Frongog Farm, Aberystwyth, Mr. Joseph Hopkins, employer; 70 acres, 25 ploughed, ftteep farm; self and Lloyd only men on farm; adopted son, one killed in action; did carting for Frongog mansion with eight acres and for Nantceirio; Lloyd took milk into town and did ploughing; had ploughed one neld this year which had not been ploughed since the opening of the Cambrian Railway; maid could not take milk into town to sixty or seventy customers as she was not strong.—Substitution order. Aberystwyth Borough. John Fred Chamberlain, married, 25, baker, Bridge-street, Mr Richard Chamberlain, father (Mr. A. J. Hughes); son doing the baking and the father's brother doing the carrying out to 300 customers. On outbreak of war Frederick and Albert said that one of them would have to go; and it was agreed that Albert should go and that Frederick should remain to help his father; and a fourth son turned 14; a second son went last January; business had increased, not because of increased consumption but because many bakers had been called up.—Two months exemption during which other arrangements to be made for carrying on the business. D. J. G. Beynon, 24, Class A, GIanrafon- terrace, was applied for extension by Mr. McIIquham to manage his general dealer's busi- ness, Mr. Mcllquham's state of health being certified as not permitting him to carry on the business.—Adjourned for inspection of nature of business done.—The Tribunal eventually granted two months, in the meanwhile other arrangements to be made for carrying on the business. Arthur James Bliss, boot and shoe maker, 28, Chalybeate-street (represented by Mr. W. P. Owen); invested capital in machinery, doing re- pairs for over 1,000 customers; apprentice of 16 gone to war; wife and two children, mother-in- law partially dependent on him; in 1916 3,794 cases of repairs wer made; on receiving condi- tional exemption had purchased stock; before the war there were 24 repairers in Aberystwyth and now 11 only.—Exempted for two months during which other arrangements to be made for carrying on the business. Wm. David Jones, 19, agricultural shoeing smith. Mill-street; Mr. E. B. Lewis employer (Mr. Emrys Williams); two qualified smiths joined, leaving Jones who had been an appren- tice and now an improver, as his only qualined man; exempted on three occasions against the last of which the military appealed two smithies only now left in the town.—Mr. Lloyd Lewis said the Board of Agriculture attached great importance to the retention of agricul- tural smiths.—Substitution. Thomas Llewelyn Thomaz. head teacher, Pen- parke, 31 married with one child, granted con- ditional exemption on two occasions, appealed for by Dr. Jones PoweII and the Managers of Penparke Church School on the ground that Mr. Thomas was doing work of the greatest national importance and that the school could not be carried on by a woman; one supplement- ary teacher of 43 and two uncertified assistants of 18 who would be leaving for college in Sep- tember Mr. Thomas superintending cultivation by the pupils of 680 square yards plot and managing war savings association with JS289 sav- ings; average attendance 92; attested in 1915 and was quite prepared to go with the consent! of managers.—In reply to Mr. Lima Jones, Dr. Powell said it would be easier to consider the matter of a substitute when teachers came out of the training colleges.—Exemption to 21st July with liberty to apply again, but Tribunal inti- mated that if the Managers again apply for renewal of cxemp:.ion the Tribunal would con- sider what efforts had been made in the mean- while to secure a substitute. Harry James Lewis, baker, Queen-street, Mr Teviotdale employer, before the war had ten skilled men eight of whom hw.O gone into the armv: three men now in the bakehouse and the rest boys. one woman, but it was impossible to give a woman flour and water and tell her to make bread.—15th May. David P. H. Ashton, senior teacher of physics and mathematics atAberystwythCounty School, 30, married with one child, almost impossible to obtain a qualified woman; conditional exemption on two occasions against which the military ap- pealed; male staff of four and five women: school last year had one more teacher than now for 179 pupils as compared with 222 pupils at the present time.—The Rev. R. J. Rees, chairman of Governors, said it was impossible to obtain a substitute of Mr. Ashton's qualincations, very few women taking the subject. If Mr. Ashton went it would injure the scientific department of the school. If it was a teacher of classics or mathematics the filling of vacancies would be easier than to nil the position of teacher of phvsics. Women had been engaged to fil vacancies in other subjects wherever possible. Mr. Lima Jones referred to a similar case in his district, but the Rev. R. J. Rees said that Mr. Ashton occupied a different position. Same order as in the case of the Headmaster of Pen- parke School. Walter Osborne Jones, Glyn Tuen, manager of Star branch business at Aberystwyth for ten years, 39, married with four children (repre- sented by Mr W P Owen); no woman could take charge and do the heavy work of the provision department.—Temporary exemption confirmed 30th June. SATURDAY Sir Lawrence Jenkics presiding. Aberayron Urban, Etc. Abel Thomas Davies, City House, Aberayron, draper, adjourned for medical examination after which Davies was referred to Dr. Lloyd for observation for four months.—Adjourned for a month, Davies to obtain a report by Dr. Lloyd for presentation to the military and the Tri- bunal. Thomas John Jones, ploughman, Gorsdalfs. Cross Inn, Llanon; military appeal against con- ditional exemption; 27, Class A, 80 acres of heavy land, 25 ploughed; also ploughed for three small holders; father and mother 61 and 64; self 28, sister 31; house so constructed that a stranger could hardly be admitted a.s a mem- ber of the family.—Local decision connrmed. New Appeals. David John Evans, Pantsod, Cross Inn; 178 acres, 56 under plough; father said he helped his brother very occasionally in cattle dealing.— Substitution order. David G. Jones, collier, Hafan View, Cross Inn, 30, married, experienced in farm work and engine driving, willing to do work of national importance.—To act as whole time substitute at direction of military. John Daniel Jenkins, ploughman, Pantan- arnlwg, Llanon; C2, 22, 74 acres.—Local deci- sion confirmed. Edward Davies, Class A, Pantrodynuchaf, LIanon; Mr. James James employer, Davies step-aon, farmer of 64, holding doctor's certifi- cate and wife suffering from ejects cÆ arm dislocated in May of 1916; 41 acres, 20 cultiva- ted; did without one man on understanding that labour on farms would have to be reduced; had been a general passenger carrier and a butcher and did a fair amount of bacon curing, but had to give up carrying and butchering work because of his health and had to rely on Davies.—Substitution order. Evan Wm. Edwards, Class A, cowman, Pant- wilog, Llanon, 21; Mrs. Jane Maria Evans, widow, employer, 80 acres all capable of being ploughed in rotation, 40 ploughed .this year, ploughing for small holders and growing potatoes for villagers; two sons, one in school and another just left school and looking after sheep; three daughters; small holders did not work for her and the villagers did not give her a day, but paid and did their own sowing and drawing.—Not to be called up till 24th May. Morgan Evans, Class A, farm servant, Fant- yrodvnisaf, Llanon, 29, granted conditional ex- emption; married his employer who has two daughters, on the previous Tuesday; 47! acres, 20 ploughed; boy of 15 employed.—Local deci- sion confirmed. Wm. Daniel Williams, teamsman, Cl, 21, Wernllaeth, Llanon, Mrs Margaretta Williams, widow, employer; 160 acres, 40 cultivated; two sons engaged on farm; conditional granted locally.—Local decision connrmed. Aberystwyth Rural. John Blackwell, Cynonfach, LIanfihangel, dragging timber by horse from a wood (repre- sented by Mr. A. J. Hughes), engaged in home- grown timber trade. Mr. Evr'i Williams said his firm were contractors for '-he supply of 7,000 tons of pitwood; had surged 3,500 tons; and had taken local woods: Blackwell only depend- able haulier, the wocd bemg steep and the work difncult; only six men out of thirty engaged of military age; up to June Blackwell was on a farm and came to his present work of his own accord.-30th April. Somewhat similar facts applied to Evan Wm. Evans, 24, cowman and haulier, Wenall', Farm, engaged by father who is contractor to Messrs. Williams's firm for the haulage of timber young man engaged in hauling during the day and attending to cattle at night; father holding Hendrerees of 106 acres and WenaIIt 105 and ten acres grazing land; 57 acres ploughed; father mason by trade and never did a day's t-loug'i-ng: one son at WenaIIt and one at Henlr3.-3.;s; rn& policeman in Monmouthshire; one in France.; one joint tenant of Wenallt; Evan .f 24. son of 18 at Hendrerees, and son of 15 helping h's brother in hauling; three daughters, one married in Abertillery; not yet sowed a hand- ful- four sons on the two farms, tv'o orlv work- ing regularly on the farm; twelve working horses.—31st May. Wm. Davies, 18, Class A, horseman, Aber- (Trwdisaf Goginan, engaged with uncle at Aber ffrwdisaf of 45 acres and attending to Tyarn Crug for tenant who is ill, 22sacres;9tol0 and 7 acres ploughed—Civil appeal dismissed. John James Jones, horseman, PantraIIad, Llanfarian, 18, 96 acres, 30 ploughed, only male above 16 on farm; conditional exemption locally; two teams; another son of farmer, 16, working at Llettygegin with his uncle; three daughters of 14 and under; farmer able to plough but now certified to be suffering from bad toe which might necessitate amputation.—Adjourned.

Leg a Mass of Scab

Leg a Mass of Scab. Terribte Dischargtng Sores Heated by Zam Buk Another remarkable cure by Zam-Buk has been recorded at Honiton, East Devon. When interviewed by a representative of the Western Times at her home, Claylands, Mrs. Hatherley readily gave particulars of the cure of her bad leg by Zam-Buk. "I had a very bad leg," she said; "in fact, such was my condition that I began to fear that I should be a permanent. invalid. My trouble started with a spot, about the size of a half- penny, which spread entirely over my right leg. The skin scabbed and scaled, and at times there I was a terrible discharge. I' "My leg was one mass of scab, and the irrita- tion was so intense that sleep was out of the question. I felt I could tear my leg to pieces. ) I went to the chemist, and later to the doctor, but neither of them did me a particle of good. They gave me lotions and ointments, with which I persevered for some time, but without getting any benefit. "Then I saw Zam-Buk advertised, and decided to try it, as a last resource. I felt relieved after the first application. I could feel the scabs lifting under the influence of Zam-Buk, which I applied liberally on a clean bandage twice a day. After each application I felt better, until after a week or two's treatment I was perfectly cured. All the bad matter was drawn out of the inflamed sores, which then nlled up with healthy new Sesh. Tt is now nearly twelve months since Zam-Buk cured me, and my leg is still perfect, there being no sign of a further outbreak. My cure is wholly attributable to the wonder- working Zam-Buk." It is always the wisest and cheapest plan to depend solely upon Zam-Buk to heal your wounds and skin sores. Zam-Buk's reputation is world wide, and results show there is nothing to equal it for eczema, ringworm, piles, poisoned 1 sores, gatherings, cuts, bruises, etc.

GUESTS OF THE KAISER

GUESTS OF THE KAISER. Towyn Man's Thrilling Story. EXCLUSIVE TO THE CAMBRtAM NEWS." PASSED BY CENSOR. [Copyright.] Being further experiences of an in- ternment with the Hun in German" East Africa. By the Rev. John T. Williams, U.M.C.A. August 3rd.—A candle factory started in Amp. August 4th.-Every prisoner who has money in Government hands will be in future allowed to draw R14-18s. 8d.-per month to buy extra food. August 8th.—0mcially told that King George V. was captured in France by the Germans. August 16th.—Football match between the "Civilians" and the "Army and Navy"—the former won 2 goals tc 1. A sailor who refused to climb the wireless-pole, was acquitted at his trial, as he was & stcker. August 20th.—Told that half of London was in ruins and na.m%s, M the result of a big Zeppelin raid. August 24th.—Gieat rejoicings displayed by the Huns at the ticking of the "Lusitania" and "Arabic"—papti says a great naval victory. August 30th.—Wt saw a copy of a German report of the treatJ114nt of German prisoners in South Africa, and the Hun was enthusiastic over the splendid treatment accorded to them by the English. On the strength of this we drafted a petition to' better treatment here, but our petition was refused. September 3rd.—R<-trial of the Belgian lieu- tenant for whistling -he Marseillaise—sentenced to one year's imprisonment, including the time already done. September 4th.—Petition against cleaning of the latrines by Europeans allowed. The Editor of the "Prison Times," whose offer of R50 as an 'amende honorable' was refused some time ago has heard from private sources that th offer has been published 8.$ "the grateful ack- nowledgment by an English prisoner of his splendid treatment in the camp is supplemented by a gift to the Red Cross of R200-£13 2s 6d." This is another Hun be. September 13th.—General Botha and 250 men captured in German West Africa is the latest oSciaI. September 21st.—First prisoner captured on the border brought iB. He says all is well. October 6th.—Told that when the English took the town anc fort of Bukoba on Lake Victoria they found cannon in position behind a Church'6y ing the Red Cross! October 21st.—Her) is a specimen story as told to us very freqtt'ntly. A sea fight took place between RuBSttn and German cruisers. The Russians had to nee, and took refuge in a port of Sweden, wh

Penparke Notes

¡ Penparke Notes. The following appeared in the Rochdale I Times'' of April 7th ;The official news was received in Rochdale on Thursday of the death in action on March 10th of Private Joseph Ash- worth, of the Lancashire Fusiliers, who was, ing staff of the Rochdale Times. The in- formation was conveyed to his parents, who now live in Edinburgh, and formerly resided in Aberystwyth, and was forwarded by them to I this office. It was a coincidence that on ti same morning another member of the "Times" sta.S received a letter from his brother, who is also in the Lancashire Fusiliers, stating tha t Private Ashworth, whom he knew personally, had met his death. Private Ashworth was 25 years of age. He was trained as a reporter on the "Cambrian News, Aberystwyth. and joined the "Times" staff in December of 1912. He joined the colours in November of last year, and after receiving his training at Southport and Ripon he wa.6 sent out to France in th<: early part of February. The letter already re- ferred to states that he met his death the nrst time he went into the trenches. He was a courteous and genial young man, and was highly popular with all who knew him. He was particularly well-known in the Littleborough district, which he worked for a considerable period on behalf of this paper. Private Ashworth lodged in Exeter-street and was connected with St. Luke's Church, Deeplish. Another brother is serving with the forces in Mesopotamia. A JOURNALIST'S TRIBUTE. His work is done. At duty's call he laid His pen aside and, heeding not the cost, Facing the foe his all he freely gave, Counting for freedom's sake his life well lost. His work is done. His work is done. Full soon his tale of years Is ended. Mother Earth reclaims her own, And in heroic guise his spirit soars To reap the fruit of freedom bravely sown. His work isdone. His work is done. And we who knew him best, His genial spirit, smile that ever shone, Can only mourn and hope that he may rest In peace secure, and meanwhile look upon His work well done. A.J.M.

LAMPETER

LAMPETER. The supply of store cattle at the Mart on Thursday was rather small, the trade being slower on account of the weather. Yearlings averaged jB14 to JE19, and two-year-old, JS18 to S23. In accordance with arrangements made by the local branch of Free Church Council pulpits were exchanged. The Rev. D. Jones, Noddfa, preached at Soar. and the Rev. E. Evans, Soar, preached at Noddfa. The Rev. T. Niro!as, Uangybi, occupied the pulpit at Wesley Chape!. Lieut. E. Waiter Davie", son of Mr and Mrs Thomas Davies, Teify Forge, has been sent home from France to Bristol Hnspital, suffer- ing from injury to his knee. Lieut. Davies has been out for some time and has seen nerce nghting Private Tom Rogers, son of the late Mr. and Mrs. Roe'ers, St. Thomas-street, has been wounded at Gaza.

WELSH FARM COLONY

WELSH FARM COLONY. When the Welsh party meet a report may be obtained from the Board of Agriculture regard- ing the choice of site for the Welsh Farm Colony for ex-service men. Sir Richard Winfrey has now completed his inspections, but there has been some delay owing to the question of what has to be paid for the Carmarthenshire site. The Welsh sub-committee hope eventually to utilise both sites, and that it is quite likely Board of Agriculture sanction will be obtained for this course.

No title

(Continued from previous column.) the border arrived to-day, and he gave us not ing but good news from all parts. February 25th.-A Belgian soldier put in cells on suspicion. He was caught making a map. February 26th.-Great search made for maps and found, too safely hidden. March lst.-Two men given three days cells each for not reporting themselves as unwell' March 8th.-Three men made a daring escape by pushing out a sheet of corrugated iron. Another failed to get away, and was found in bed fully dressed and promptly put in cells The officers had their town walk stopped to- day, because they refused to promise to re- port any news they might get of the escaped men! The nurses were also refused permission to go out. March 9th.—Increased precautions taken to prevent escapes. All suspects to sleep in cells at night; thorn bushes piled round the camp as a fence; all to sleep in one room. March llth.—The three runaways brougl" back, they were tied together with ropes, with both hands behind their backs, put into a cell as they were, and refused food or drink. They had to remain tied thus, absolutely helpless, in a standmg position for forty-eight hours. This is the most barbarous crime yet com- mitted by the Germans here and the camp is in a state of revolt, and the guards have been doubled. March 12th.—A missionary put in cells, be- cause a map of his was found on one of the recaptured prisoners. The missionary was utter- ly ignorant of the fact, as the map had been taken, without permission out of one of his books. He was released later. March 13th.-Between 80-90 of us are herded at night in one long room. The space allowed is nve inches between every two beds. Light is kept on all night, and native soldiers walk up and down, being changed every two hours. These soldiers are cheeky and insulting, and at times dangerous. It is beastly! March 14th.-Renewed search for maps. March 22nd.-Our concession of being able to buy extra food stopped. March 24th.-The first South Africans cap- tured prisoners-twelve, in number-arrived. March 25th.-Arrested for having a neld- glass in my possession, and also the famous copy of the "Bystander." March 27th.-Archdeacon Woodward of the U.M.C.A., a man of some sixty and more years, and who has served in "German" East Africa since 1875, in the work of educating the natives, etc., was sworn at and threatened with seven days cells for venturing to ask the officer in charge of the camp for the return of one of our nurses from the German hospital to assist the nurse in camp. He was told that the per- sons of the nurses, like the persons of other prisoners, were at the beck and call and dis- posal of the Germans! March 28th.-Put on my trial and acquitted of all charges, as I had not been specifically told I had to give up neldglasses, etc. But it was considered a grave matter, and I should have to consider myself as being considered a suspect! How the bram of a Hun works is a mystery to me! March 29th.-A British major and a D.S.O. given seven days cells for objecting to his French notes being taken from him! April 4th.-Recent captured prisoners report the retreat of the Germans everywhere before the advancing British. April 8th.—A Boer boy in camp put in cells for three days for sharpening his mother's scissors without permission! And later another extra four days for having a piece of leather in his pocket!! April 22nd.—Orders for all soldiers and sailors to leave for the south to-morrow. Five civilians and myself are to go with them-we are sus- pects, and the English are advancing. (To be continued.)

Advertising

I FP FORTYC HIGH STRE.ET, CRRDIFF. S,tnd for Catalogues. TEL.,L 103. "0

LLANGEfTHO

LLANGEfTHO. Up to March 3rd. the Association at the Coun- cil School had invested £7.543 16s. in War Sav- ings Certificates, thus establishing the record for school associations in Cardiganshire. The Rev. T. G. Jones, one of the Church of England chaplains attached to the 38th Welsh Division, died at the Empire HosnitaL London, Mr. Jones, who was thirty-three years of age. had held curacies at Mostyn and L.fangeitho. anf' accepted a chaplaincy with the Welsh Division in preference to the offer of a living by the Bishop of Dandafi. Three of his uncles are the vicars of Brynamman, and

CWRTNEWYDD

?"CWRTNEWYDD. The pupils of the BIaenau Council School have collected a sum of S2 15s. towards the funds of the British and Foreign Sailors Society. Some time ago a local bard forwarded the fol- lowing stanza to a friend, then in training at Beccles:— Bwcio am ferch o Beccles—yn ynfyd 'Wy'n on6 yw'th hanes; Ie, mynd gyda Srynd nres, Neis ei swyn, 0 Saesones. On Monday at LIanwenog Churchyard were interred the remains of Mr Thos. Thomas, brother of Mr. David Thomas (Dewi Barcer), Blaenhirbant. The service at the house was conducted by the Revs. E. Glyn Edwards and L. Williams, AIltyblacca, and at the church by the Rev. J. Morris, vicar. For the lengthy period of forty seven years there ha.6 been no death in the BIaenhirbant family. The annual meeting of Llanweno Parish Council was held at New Court Council School on Saturday, when there were present Mr. T. Bowen, Maesyfelin: Mr. D. Jones. Derlwyn; Mr. D.Davies, Beilibedw: Mr. J. Jones. Bedlwyn; Mr E. Jones, Rhydlewis and Mr G Jenkins.Tan- rallt.—Mr. D. Davies, Beilibedw, was re-elected chairman and Mr. Griffith Jenkins vice-chair- man. Mr. James Jones, Caerau, and Mr rhos. Davies, BIaencwrt, were appointed overs-. The application of the Clerk (Mr. R. Davies) for an increase of salary was adjourned "or months.

PONTRHYDFENDIGAID

PONTRHYDFENDIGAID. On Saturday evening a public meeting was held under the auspices of the National Service Association. The chair was occupied by Dr. Morgan, J.P., Pontrhydygroes, and the Rev. R. J. Rees, M.A., Aberystwyth, was the speaker. In his opening address the Chairman referred to the cruel atrocit;,fs of the enemy. The pre- parations made by the Germans for years greatly handicapped the Allies, but the pro- gress made to combat difficulties was wonder- ful. Much was yet :'0 be done and all should deem it their duty to assist the Government in every possible way. however little. The Rev. R. J. Rees said he always liked to address a Bont audience, and to have Dr. Morgan as chairman. His business that evening was to try and infuse enthusiasm into the people to undertake their duty to assist the Allies in bringing this terrible war to a speedy end. National service meant that all should be patriots not on]y in love for their country but also in serving it. defend it. and help it in the hour of peri! and need. To do that effectively they should submit to some central authority, obey the call for help, and perform it with a will whatever sacrinces it entailed. They should remember the sacrifices made by our brave lads under great disadvan- tages as compared with the perfectly-equipped German armies. Our boys demurred not, grumbled not, but calmly struggled en as soldiers always did. "Their's not to reason why. their's but to do and die." No choice of work, no place to suit their fancy, or power to defer its performance at pleasure, but all had to stand at "attention" and be ready to set off on their task at the word of command. He was sure n ne present considered themselves less brave or greater cowards than those at the front. None of them wished to be dubbed as cowards, and b-, regarded as the refuse of the coærJunity when the war was over because they row re- fused to do their part for their country and help those at the front. All they had to do w&s to enrol for national service and be ready to under- take work selected for them by those in con- trol. The controller knew where help was most needed on farms, in' mines, in munition works, in lumbering, and the hundreds of industries which provided for the needs of the army in all its varied work and for the nation. Be hoped every one would say, Wele fi, anfon n." The address was listened to with rapt attention and greatly appreciated. The meeting was closed with the usual votes of thanks.

FREEMASONRY

FREEMASONRY. Lord Rhondda is to be the new Senior Grand Warden of the United Grand Freemasonry Lodge of England. The appointment will not be officially made until the Grand Festival, which will be held in the Freemasons'-hall next Wed- nesday week. It will bring Lord Rhondda next in raik in Freemasonry to the Duke of Con- naught. the Grand Master. In June there will be celebrated the bicentenary of the first assembly of the Grand Lodge of England, when an especial Grand Lodge will be held in the Albert Hal!, presided over by the Duke of Connaught. Eiglit thousand delegates will be present. Major- General Sir Francis Lloyd is to be this year's Junior Grand Warden. Lord Kensington, now Provincial Grand Master of the South Wales Division, was Senior Grand Warden in 1908, and Lord Harlech in the following year, while Sir Herbert Watkin WilIiams-Wynn, now Pro- vincial Grand Master of North Wales, was Junior Warden in 1908.

Advertising

The Great Skin Cure, BUDDEN'S S.R. SKIN OINTMENT. IT WILL CURE Itching after one appli- cation; destroys every form of Eczema: heals all Wounds and Sores; acts like a charm on Bad Legs; is infallible for Piles; prevents Cuts from festering; will cure Ringworm in a few days, removes the most obstinate Eruptions and Scurvy. Boxes, 9d. and Is. 3d.—Agents: For Aber- ystwyth B. Tayior Hoyd, Chemist; Port- madoc. M E Morris; Blaenau Festiniog. J. Lloyd Jones; Pwllheli, R. 0. Grimth; Machynlleth, Mr Arthur: Dolgelley, R. and G. Williams.d845. LOVEDAY. Registered r!mnbcr and Ccncra! Decorator, 22, Ohalybeate Street, ABERYSTWYTH. Telephone 21 P.O. This Seafoa'8 Pattern Books sent out immediately on application. ESTABLISHED 1881. DAVID WILLIAMS. Builder and Undertaker, 12, Prospect Street, Aberystwyth Experlenoe" Workmen Employed. Estimates given for every description of work ABERYSTWYTH. qjmw MOTOR COMPANY, Queen's Road. THE AUTHORISED AGENTS FOR FORD CARS. COMPLETE STOCK OF SPARE PARTS BUY YOUR FORD from the AUTHORISED AGENTS. ) Touring Car B155- Delivery V&n JB150: Two-Se&ter. ?3125 FOR ALL KINDS OF WINDOW BLINDS. LOOSE COVERS, UPHOLSTERING, caM or write CHAS. WtLUAMS. m. BRIDGE STREET. ABERY8TWYTH. EBtinuttee tpven free. c708 ( MUSK. Mr. J. Chas. McLean, F.RCO. (Formerly pupil of Sir Walter Parratt an Sir Frederick Bridge, etc., at the Royal College of Music, London). ZeMOtM tM