Teitl Casgliad: goleuad

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 7 o 16 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
2 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
COFFA GWRAIG RINWEDDOL

COFFA GWRAIG RINWEDDOL. PREGETH NEILLDUOL MEWN CYFAR- FOD NEILLBUOL Ddydd Mereher, Rhagfyr 6. daeth ynghyd dyrfa lawr a pharel-las i Lanreath, Pembroke Dock, i ddangos eu parch i un o anwyliaid y ncfocdd. Mae 52 o flynyddoedd- wedi myned heibio er y sefydlodd y Parch. William Evans, M.A., yn ydrel bwysig uchod. Llwyddodd yr a-chos yn fawr dan ei ofal- aeth, fel y prawf capel mawr a hardd St. Andrews'. Tair neu bedair blynedd yn ol rhoddodd i fyny fu- geiliaeth St. Andrews', a chanlynwyd ef gan y gweinidog ieuanc galiuog, y Parch. Oscar Symonds, B.A. Ond cariodd Mr. Evans ymlaen ei arolygiaeth ar eglwys Llanreath, rhyw chwarter milltir o'r dref, a, n.awr ei ofal ef a l ddiweddar briod am dani. Flvvj ddyn yr, ol bu farw Mrs. Evans, a phenderfyn- wyd rhoddi ifenestr goffadwriaethol yn y capel bych- au. hardd. Ddydd Mercher oedd diwrnod pwysig y dadorchuddiad. Daeth cynulleidfa fawr a pharchus ynghyd erbyn tri o'r gloch,—rhoddwyd yr oedfa yn Haw v Parch- Ddr. Cynddylan Jones, fel hen gyfaill anwyi Mr. Evans. Wedi gweddi fer ddechreuol, a chanu, galwodd y Dr. ar Faer Penfro i ddadorchudd- io y ff ei-iest r, yr hyn a wna-eth gyda symledd gmejd- us Yna, wedi darllen a gweddio gan y Dr., tra- ddododd bregeth bwrpasol ar yr achlysur, yr hon a ddilyn yn yr iaith y traddodwyd hi ynddi: ■ Y BREGETH. Gen. xlviii., 3, 7. "And Jacob said unto Joseph, God Almighty appeared unto me at Luz in the land of Canaan, and blessed me. And as ■ for me when I came from Padun, Rachel died by me in the land of Canaan in the way, when yet there was but a little way to come unto Ephrath; and I buried here there in the way of Ephrath; the same is Bethlehem." In old age, confronting the eternities, it is won- derful how few are the memorable things in our. past lives. If you asked an aged1 Israelite; at the end of the forty years' sojourn in the wilderness, to name you the places in which he and the children of Israel had encamped, I am tolerably sure he would not be able to give you a decent and orderly ac- count. He could tell you of Marah and Sinai, Reph- idim and Meribah, the places where wonderful events took place-he could never forget them but as to the small stations, he would be hardly able to call them to mind. The sojourning of Israel in the wilder- ness between Egypt and Canaan is correctly viewed as a picture of the sojourning of each one of us on our pilgrimage through life to the heavenly land. When we draw near the unknown country and review our past history, it is marvellous how few are the occurences on which we care to dwell, how few in- deed are the events which have made a deep mark on our lives. Events, which, at one time, seemed to us important, when we stand on the brink of eternity, dwindle into insignificancy, but there are two or three things which loom larg in the dim past, large and important even in the light of eternity. Thus it was in the case of the patriarch, Jacob. He was now on his bed, sick unto death. The news of the old gentleman's ilhiess in Goshen in the Land of Egypt reached Joseph; the Prime Minister of the Egyptian Empire; and however urgent the claims of statesmanship on Joseph's time and attention, he did not allow them to gj between him and his duty to his father. He left the cares of government behind and hurried to the bedside of his dying parent. The old man was glad to sea his fivourite boy. and told him a few things which he had never revealed to, him before. He reviews his life on his deathbed, and there are only two or thre things which he remembers with any vividness, and on these things his whole life hinged- Those things. constitute my text. His life is .summed up in those. Theyre these, his vis:on of God in Luz, his union with Rachel in Padan, and her death on the roadside within a mile of two of Ephrath. Those are the three memorable events of his life-seeing. God, marrying Rachel, and burying her whilst on a journ- ey on the wavside. Believing, marrying, burying; re- ligion, home, death. Let us devote a. few minutes' consideration to otich 1. The vision of God, the vision he had at Bethel, on his departure from home as a young man of twenty or twenty-five. This marked a crisis in his life. for really that vision effected his conversion. He slept that night in the open air, his conscience ill at ease because of the unworthy trick he had played his brother. In his broken sleep he dreamt a dream; he saw a ladder with its foot on the earth and its top in heaven, with the angels of God de- cending and ascending on it, i.nd at the top God himself. Jacob never forgot that dream, he could iiever obliterate tp" 'mpression made upon his mind bv that vision of God. It. was the turning point in his history—-it marked his conversion. Before that memorable events he was a scheming-, cunning char- actiar--ho. lacked straight-forwardness, honesty, frankness. Th.er- w-ss a serious twict in his char- acter, God met h' m face to face in his hurried flight from home. Jacob never forgot the vision, it made p new man of him. The twist was not un- ravelled nt once; he continued, manv a long year a crafty, wily creature: a wily saint, but no longer a; wily sinner. After this hfs behaviour lacked trans- parency, but ever since the vision of God at Bethel, he was gradually improving, he was being straight- ened out, till the last twist was removed in his wrestling with God in PenieT. He was then made lame of body, but straight of character. Is not the history of Jacob a faithful portraiture of the life of many of us ? Did not God meet us in our young days? Did He not speak to each one of us in the depths of our conscience ? Ah, yes; we also had .a vision of God, and we entered into a. covenant with God, and that changed the whole aim and tenor of our life. We have not attained perfection in the moral life, the twists still remain, but they are gradually getting fewer, and we hope that some day the last twist will be smoothed out. We are not perfect, but that does not prove that we are not sincere. When it was told an aged deacon in our Connexion concerning an old lady who made profess- ion of Christ late in life, that she still continued 10 tell lies, the old man wisely answered, Yes, she still tells lies; but she tells fewer than formerly; let her alone, and the time will come when she will tell none." Sanctification was gradual in Jacob, and it is gradual in us, but holiness will prove triumphant at last. 2.—The second important event in his history was the establishing of a home for himself in Padan- Aram. He married Rachel out of pure love. That is emphasised: again in the story. Love is the saviour and the savour of life-the impress of love is on all God's work. In the floral world it is called capillary attraction; and in the solar system, gravit ation. In irrational creatures it is called instinct, and in men affection. In God it is called love. It is the dominating principle, in the Creator and the creation. In this union of the house of Abraham with the house of Laban was laid the foundation of the patriarch's prosperity. Jacob went down to Padan-Aram (Messopotamia) with only his staff; he came from there with a cavalcade of horses and cattle, camels and asses. And when our venerable brother came down to Pembroke Bock, 52 years ago, with the academic honours of his university upon him, like Jacob he came to pasture sheep; only his was the harder task-it is incomparably easier to manage the sheep of the field than the sheep of the churches. For half a century or more he has obeyed the Master's injunction, "Feed my sheep." And in his arduous work he was loyally helpvi ty his devoted wife. As Jacob united himself to the house of Laban, so he united himself to the house of Dawkins, than whom no family in Pembrokeshire has a cleaner record. Always in sympathy with what is good! and noble and honourable, they have helped liberally every movement, religious and phil- anthropic. I know the ministers of South Wales tolerably well, and venture to say that no one his contributed more readily and more liberally to the funds of our Connexion than our dear friend and his bfloved wife, in whose memory this beautiful window has been placed in this church. Her hand was always open to help every cause that was in distress. Let not thy right hand know what thy left hand doeth," that is Mrs. Evans. Showy—no generous-yes. Ostent-itiou--iio; lib- eral—yes. Had she lived in the days of the blessed Saviour, her name would ha.ve appeared among those women who ministered to Him of their goods. Women occupy an honourable place in the history of the Christian Church. A man of Macedonia ap- pealed unto Paul; sayinCY, Come over and help us." Paul obeyed; he crossed the Aegean Sea and landed in Philippi. Who met him? The man of Macedon- ia? No; but a woman of Macedonia. The man who gave the invite never put in an appearance; it was a certain woman named Lydia- who welcomed him and lodged him during h;8 stay in the town. She open- ed her houSe, because the Lord had opened her heart. It was the women in the prayer meeting on the river-side who first accepted the Gospel in Europe, and it is the women of Europe who have kept Christianity alive in E'urooe to this day. Where are the men of Europe? Before the war they were in the theatres and gambling dens, and drink- ing saloons; and since the war thev are on the battlefield. Where are the women? In the church- es. praying God for his protection over their men- folk; and when not on their knees they are piving their needles to provide warm clothing for their brave boys in the trenches, or succouring the wound- ed and the dying, under the banner of the Red Cress. These are people whom Heaven honours. She serveth best who loveth best All things both great and small, For the great God who loveth us— He made and loveth all. When you want a flower to wear on your breast, which flower do you choose? Is it the garish sun- flower, growing in the front garden, the observed of all observers? No. no; but the retiring, modest violet, growing in the shade, un-not.ced by the pass- engers on the highway. It is to the sweet, shy violet that you assign the place of honour. And when Jesus Christ will want a flower to wear on his breast ai-t,d near His heart, whom will He choose? Is it the sunflowers of the churches, whose names appear weekly in the newspapers? O, no; but the modest violets growing the shade-th meek, lowly women who at sundown go out with baskets in thoir hands to visit the widows and fatherless; who help to bind up broken hearts, and cheer the oppressed with words of,,gentleness and deeds of love. These are they who. w,ill be honoured by the Lord Christ in the judgment day. Thank God for the violets, who diffuse their, fragrance on the air and fill the neigh- bourhood with, their sweetness. And we a.re met to-day to honour the memory of one of these violets. Again, I thank God for the violets of the churches. 3. Lastly, we come to the death and burial of Itache,l,inevent which made an indelible impress- ion on the heart and life of the patriarch. See him. an old man, by a great effort lifting himself up on his bed, and sitting, on the side thereof, and telling Joseph in words of tenderness of the death of his mother. As for me when I came from Padan, Rachel, thy mother, died ly me in the land of Canaan in the way, when y

PARCH BOBFBT EVANS Y CENHADWR

PARCH. BOBFBT EVANS, Y CENHADWR. YR ANGLADD. Daeth gyrfa y gwr anwyl, a'r cenhadwr llafurus uchod i ben foie Gwener, Rhagfyr 8, yn ei breswyl- fed yn y Garden City, Llanidloes, ac efe ond 67 mlwydd oed. Gorfu arno ddychwelyd o India—y w1 ad y Ilafura iodd ac a garai mor fawr—oherwydd afiechyd, yng nghanol y flwvddyn, a chyrhaeddodd Llanidloes, He y preswyliai Mrs. Evans, ei briod, er pan ddaethai yma, flwyddyn yn ol i weini ar ei mhab, Mr. Lewis Evans, yr hwn lu farw ddiwedd y flwyddyn. Cynhaliwyd gwasanaeth byr yn y ty, nos Luri. Gwnsanaethwyd gan y Parcliii. J. T. 'Davies, a D. Jones, Lerpwl. Yna dygwyd y corph i gipel China Street, erbyn gwasanacth d m noeth. I. Y GWASANAETH COFFA. Am ddau daeth tcif barchus i gapel China Street, i'r gwasameth.:coffa. Llywyddwyd gan y Parch. J. T. Davies. gweinidog Llanidloes. Darllenodd y Parch. J. Williams, B.A., Carjio, ranau o'r Gail'; ac arweiniwyd mewn gweddi gan y Parch Ed. Parry MA., Drefnewvdd. Siaradwyd gan y Parchn. ft". J. "Williams a David Jones, Lerpwl, dros Gyfeis- teddfod y Genhadaeth, W. Roberts (Gorslwyd), Môn, hen gyfaill a chyd-efrydydd, y Parch. A. Wynne Thomas, a'r Parch. J. M. Harries Rees. Wedi canu "0 Fryniau Caersalem," ffurfiwyd yn orymdaith am y fynwent. Cbdè wyd ym mynwent Dolhafren, ym meddrod ei fa,b. Cymerwyd rhan wrth y. bedel gan y Parchn. J. T. (Davies ac Elias Jones. Ymhlith y gakrwyr yr oedd Mrs. Evans a'r ddwy ferch; Mr. Victor Evans (mab). Yr oedd y ddau fab ami] yn methu bod yn bresenol. Parch. Didr. a Mrs. Griffith, Barry (brawd a chwaer-yng-nghyfraith a chyd-alarwyr); Mx-i.- W. J. Owen, Glanadda, Ban- gor (nai); H. G. Roberts, N. & S. W. Bank, Holy- well, a Mr. R. J. Evans, Menai Bridge (brawd). Danghosodd eglwys China Street, a'r dorf—yn ol eu harfer—bob caredigrwydd i'r teulu trallodus, cyn a thrwy y brofedigaeth. Gwasanaethwyd fel bear- ers gan swyddogion China St., a d'arparwyd !Iun-' iaeth, i'r dieithriaid gan yr eglwys. 11 Anfonwyd 'wreaths' hardd gan y teulu, Mrs. Davies, Trebortb; Misses Partridge, a Morsland. [Ceir yr anerchiadau yn y rhifyn nesafrGol. Goleuap.^ 4