Teitl Casgliad: Aberdare Leader

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 2 o 8 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
31 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
Advertising

Magnificent Record. School of Commerce ABERDARE. In connection with the London Association of Accountants and Institute of Commerce Exams., the following students have been successful in passing their Exams and procuring Diplomas, the result of a Thorough, Practical and Up-to-Date Training received at the School. i i i- -t Resulting from such distinctions, they are entitled to use the initials attached to their names John Richards, F.C.I., A.L.A.A., 54 Swansea Road, Merthyr. Windsor Coslett, A.C.I., Brynonen Villa, Aberdare Road, Mountain Ash. Hopkin J. Morgan, A.C.I., 20 Radyr Road, Llandaff North. Charles Dudley, A.C.I., 35 Philip Streeet, Caegarw, Mountain Ash. Thomas Furlong, F.C.I., 94 Woodland Street, Mountain Ash. Maldwyn Hughes, A.C.I., 99 Woodfield Terrace Penrhiwceiber. A further heavy list of recent successes giving names and addresses may be procured^on^app an(j effective methods of teaching are utilised for the training of youths and young ladies for Business, Secretarial and Civil Service Posts. DAY, EVENING and POSTAL COURSES. Parents and intending students are invited to call and see the Principal, 19 Whit- combe Street, Aberdare, and to write for Prospectus and full particulars.

Herthyr Board of Guardians

Herthyr Board of Guardians. On Saturday, Mr. J. Prowle in the chair.

Increases of Salaries

Increases of Salaries. In the minutes of the House Com- mittee it was stated that applications had been made by cleaners, washers, ironers and dressmakers for a war bonus and that same had been re- ferred to the Finance Committee. Evan Davies, the Master's acting junior clerk, had also made an appeal for an increase of wages.—Referred to the Finance Committee. The Chairman (Mr. Prowle) asked whether the time had not arrived when the wages of all officers should be considered as a whole. Appeals were coming in constantly at some committee or other, and he thought it would be much better to deal with them en bloc. Mr Rees Rees said they should be deferred till after the war. Chairman: They will not want any war bonuses then. No action was taken.

Aberdare Relief Districts

Aberdare Relief Districts. Mr. Meth Davies said that the Board should consider the advisabili- ty of re-arranging the Aberdare Re- lieving Officers' Districts. No. 1, Aberdare Lower District, comprising Aberaman. C'wmaman, Vetc., had about' double the work No. 2, Aberdare Upper District. 1 Part of No. 1 should be taken away and placed in the area of No. 2. It would be seen in the minutes this week that Y,102 was paid in a week in No. 1 District, and 162 in No. 2. And yet the Relieving Officer for No. 2 ob- tained zCl50 salarv and the officer in No. 1 9130. Chairman: We cannot deal with salaries. It is true the amount of money paid out is nearly double each week. The area is about the same, but the population is much more. The Clerk said that No. 2 district was a more scattered area. When the chairman was about to proceed with the next business Mr. David Jones. Hirwain, went on to say that No. 2 had a larger area than No. 1, and it comprised such places as Rhigos, Pontwalby. and Hirwain. The amount of money was only one thing. Perhaps there were more paupers in No. 1 District. Chairman You are out of order, Mr. Jones. Come to the Relief Com- I mittee and we will listen there to all your eloquence. (Laughter.)

Cannot Accept Appointment j

Cannot Accept Appointment. Miss Martha Davies, 50 Brook St., Aberaman. who was appointed Relief Foster Mother at the last meeting, wrote that she could not accept the appointment, inasmuch as she had accepted a position elsewhere. Mrs. Richards: If you had accept- ed Mr. Meth Davies' and my report last time this would not have hap- pened.. Chairman If she could not wait for a week she was not worth having.

Deputising Relieving Officers

Deputising Relieving Officers. Mr. T. T. Jenkins Defends the Teachers. A discussion arose on the question of Relieving Officers holidays, and the Chairman remarked that some teachers acted as deputy relieving officers.. These teachers, added Mr. Prowle, wanted holidays and yet they were prepared to take the place of relieving officers and accept double • pay- Mr. Sam Morgan I protest against that system. They should not re- ceive double pay. Mr T. T. Jenkins I rise to ask a auction. Who are those teachers ? Mr. Prowle There was one by the name of Davies who used to be teach- ing at Cwmaman, and there is an at- » tendance officer now acting. Mr. T. T. Jenkins: You made an attack on teachers. I have nothing to do with attendance officers. Mr Sam Morgan It amounts to the same thing. they get holidays and are paid during holidays. Mr. Prowle There was a teacher who deputised Mr. J. Al-. Young for several years. Mr. T. T. Jenkins: Let us have the names of the teachers who are acting now. Mr Prowle I don't want to be per- sonal, but I think it a wrong thing for a man who is drawing his salary during holidays, to be paid by another public body for doing other work. Mr. Sam Morgan: What power have we over these persons who act as deputies ? The Clerk said that some years ago the responsibility of finding per- sons was placed on his shoulders. Any person would not do to under- take the duty of handling and paying out large sums of money. It was very difficult to obtain competent people. Mr T. T. Jenkins: You can't get men who are out of a job to accept this for about three weeks. Mr Sam Morgan: There is no diffi- culty in our district, and I am not prepared to agree that men paid dur- ing holidays by one public body should receive a separate pay from another public body. Mr Meth Davies said it was diffi- cult to make any other arrangement. A collier deputised a relieving officer in Aberaman some time ago, and at the end of the three weeks, when the collier went back to his ordinary work, he was told by the colliery manager to go elsewhere. Mr. Evan Davies: Managers are not so independent as that now. Chairman: It is too late to do any- thing now. Cheques have been drawn. Mr. Sam Morgan: I give notice to bring this matter forward a fortnight or a month hence.

Mess Room Maid

Mess Room Maid. Three applications were made for the above position. The applicants were: Catherine Griffiths, 48 Ynys- lwyd Street, Aberdare Margaret J. Evans, Troedyrhiw, and Margaret Morrissey, Penydarren. Miss Evans was appointed.

Farm Committee

Farm Committee. The following items appeared in the report of the Farm Committee Accident to Four-Wheeler.—The Superintendent reported that the Foster Father, in driving to the Abercwmboi Homes with the four- wheeler, had met with an accident I by the horse slipping in crossing the tram-line, and the shaft was cracked. The Superintendent further reported I that the shaft had since been re- paired.—We recommend that the Superintendent be directed to ask the Foster Father to exercise greater care in handling the horse in future, as this is the second adverse report the committee has received of his driving. Illness of Cow.—The Bailiff report- ed that one of the cows that had calved was now seriously ill, and he had come to the conclusion that it would be better to slaughter her.- We recommend that the veterinary surgeon be called in, and if he ad- vises that the cow be slaughtered it be done.

Arrearsj

Arrears. A member asked the Clerk to state whether the various parishes had paid the "calls" to the Union. The Clerk replied that Aberdare at present owed £6,000 on the call; Merthyr had paid all that was due Gelligaer owed 17,900 (Shame) Vaynor owed 1842 Penderyn, 2373, and Rhigos C688.

Trecynon Military Hospital

Trecynon Military Hospital. Getting Ready for Wounded Soldiers. A special committee appointed to deal with matters relative to the ac- commodation of wounded combatants at Aberdare, was held at the Train- ing School, Aberdare, on Tuesday, the 20th July. Present: Mr. John Prowle (chairman), Mrs. Maria Rich- ards. Mrs H. E. Wills, Mrs A. N. Jenkins. Messrs Morgan Williams and Rees Rees, together with repre- sentatives of the Merthyr and Aber- dare Detachments of the Red Cross Society. The following applications were received, and considered, from the representatives of the Red Cross Society, viz. Will the Guardians allow a self- supporting partition to be put up in one of the rooms of the new building, so as to divide it into two—one to be used by the trained Nurses and the other by the Red Cross V.A.D. mem- bers-or to divide the room into two by means of a curtain and rod ?—Re- commended that the Society be al- lowed to put up a curtain or screens. As the building is lit by electricity, will the Guardians allow a switch to be fixed to enable the night nurses to boil water or put a saucepan on for heating milk, etc., as the distance is great to the kitchen 1—Recommended 11 that a gas-ring be provided in the basement at the expense of the Guardians; the Gas Company to carry out the work. Will the Guardians allow the Society to place perforated zinc over the windows of the larder for pur- poses of ventilation ?—Recommended that this be done at the expense of the Guardians, the Architect to have the work carried out. Do the Guardians intend providing the new building with a fire-hose ?— Recommended that the Architect be instructed to purchase same. Will the Guardians allow the floors of the bedrooms in the Administra- tive Block to be stained? Recom- mended that the Society be allowed to do so. Will the Guardians allow the floors of the day-rooms to be varnished.— Recommended that the floors be left as they are. Will the Guardians allow the new wood-work in the administrative block to be painted ?-Recommended that this work be done, and that the architect be directed to have the same carried out. Will the Guardians fix grates and mantelpieces in the new rooms in the administrative block ?—Recommend- ed that the architect be directed to have these fixed. Will the Guardians allow some of the windows of the Hospital to be frosted 1 Recommended that the architect be directed to have the work done. Will the Guardians allow the Society to place names and numbers on the doors of the building ?—Re- commended that the Guardians place the numbers and the Society to paint the names on cards. The architect to be directed to supply the society with something to hang the cards on. Will the Guardians allow a tele- phone extension to be fixed on the outside of the Commandant's room? Recommended that this be agreed to, the same to be carried out at the ex- pense of the Board. The committee having received an application from Dr. Banks for a stand and two urns for the oper- ating room, recommend that the architect be directed to purchase same.

Llwydcoed Wedding

Llwydcoed Wedding. DAVIES—EVANS. On Sunday morning a fashionable wedding was solemnized at Horeb, Llwydcoed. The officiating ministers were Rev. W. S. Davies (pastor) and Rev. J. Sulgwyn Davies (Siloh). The contracting parties were Miss Amy Davies, elder daughter of Mr and Mrs W. P. Davies, Kingsbury Place, and Mr Rees Evans, eldest son of Mr and Mrs D. Evans, Capel Iwan, New Castle Emlyn. The bride was formerly teacher at Llwydcoed School, whilst the bridegroom is manager of the Cwmdare Co-oper- ative Stores. The bride, who was given away by her father, was attired in a gown of white silk voile, with white picture hat to match. The bridesmaids were Miss Sallie Evans (bridegroom's sister), who wore a grey silk dress, with hat to match Miss Eirwen Davies, bride's sister, and Miss M. E. Buxton, Cwmdare, both of whom looked very pretty in white silk dresses, with tunics of white ninon. Mr Tom Evans, bride- groom's brother, acted as best man. As the bridal party left the chapel Mr W. B. James (organist) played the Wedding March. After the cere- mony, breakfast was partaken of at the bride's home. Later, the happy couple left for Mumbles. The bride's travelling dress was a navy blue costume with cream velour hat.

No title

Fair Artist: "I hope you don't mind my sketching in your field." Farmer: Oh, dear, no, missie. You keep the birds off the peas better'n an ordinary scarecrow." "Ye", Parker invented the safest air- ship ever heard of." "But it refused to fly. You couldn't go up in it." That's, of course, why I say it was the safest."

Advertising

■ J VICTOR FREED, Mountain Ash, has PIANOS in stock by I COLLARD & COLLARD, SPENCER and other famous makers. A liberal Cash Disoount allowed. ASK FOR CATALOGUE. ————— 1

Abercynon Police Court

Abercynon Police Court. Thursday July 29.-Before Messrs. R. A. Griffith (Stipendiary), Wm. Fenwick and Wm. Williams.

Drunk and Disorderly

Drunk and Disorderly. Henry Smith, in Station Road, Abercynon, 13s.; Dd. John Hatton, in Pentwyn Avenue, Matthewstown, 13s. Thomas Meredith and Elvira. his wife, in Haswell St., Matthews- town, 9s. and 6s.

Drunk Disorderly and Damage

Drunk, Disorderly, and Damage. The above charges were preferred against Edwin Petherick, Abercynon. P.C. Osborne proved the charge of drunkenness. Police Inspector Toye stated that the prisoner was brought in to the Police Station on July 17th at 7.30 p.m. He was drunk and disorderly. He was put in a cell and given two rugs. Some time after witness heard a peculiar noise. Accompanied by P.C. Williams he went into prisoner's cell. He. was lying on tne bench and one of the rugs, value 5s., was torn into three strips, and one end tied to the ventilator. Witness asked him if he intended to commit suicide. He answered that he was all right. Prisoner was fined 13s. for being drunk and disorderly, 10s. for the damage, and ordered to pay the damage, 5s.

No Dog Licence

No Dog Licence. Rose Price, the wife of a soldier, was summoned for keeping a dog without a licence. Defendant stated that her husband was in the Army. She received 23s. Army allowance and 10s. from the colliery per week. Fined 5s.

Smoke and Sparks

Smoke and Sparks. Joseph Hetherrington, 7 Main Road, Mathewstown, was fined 5s. for allowing his chimney to emit smoke and sparks.

A Cyclonic Cyclist

A Cyclonic Cyclist. Robert Davies, Abercynon, was summoned for furiously riding a bicyle in Abercynon Road, Aber- cynon. P.C. Osborne stated that on July 10th he saw Davies coming down the hill at a terrific rate, about 25 miles an hour. He called on him to stop, but he refused. Later witness went to his house, but defendant had fled upstairs. Fined 15s.

Three Toms

Three Toms. Thomas Davies, Thomas Williams and Thomas Deloy were fined 6s. each for gaming with cards in Gelli Road, Ynysybwl.

Stop His Cards

Stop His Cards." Stichia Davies, answering a charge of drunk and disorderly in Main Road, Matthewstown, said that she was not in the Main Road. She was in the Jug and Bottle. The police- man (P.C. Osborne) told her he would stop her beer and she told him that she'd stop his cards. (Laugh- ter.)—Fined 9s.

A Row Amongst the Rileys

A Row Amongst the Rileys. Thomas Riley, Matthewstown, was charged with assaulting Kate Riley, his next door neighbour. Complainant stated that her hus- band was the son of defendant, and on the night of July 17th she was re- turning from posting a letter and called at Riley's house for her hus- band. Riley came out and punched her, and knocked her down, cut her head and stamped on her. He also stabbed her with a knife in the wrist. Two women picked her up and carried her unconscious into the house. Cross-examined by Riley Aren't you living tally with my son, shame to him ? Stipendiary: Keep yourself to the assault. Riley She's no class, and my son's disgraced himself with her. They are not married. Ellen Jones stated that she saw Riley stamp on Mrs. Riley and also stab her. Harriet Pugh heard shouts of murder and came out and saw Riley jumping on Mrs. Riley. Lily James and Margaret Ann Davies also saw the assault and stab- bing. Jeremiah Riley, called for the de- fence, stated that he was the son (f defendant. His father only pushed her away from the window. Con came out and struck his father and then a fight commenced. Witness denied that his father stamped on the woman. She cut her wrist by breaking the window. Emily Bailey, living in defendant's house, denied the assault, and stated that she saw no knife. Defendant pleaded that his son Con had disgraced himself by his conduct with the complainant. None of his brothers would speak to him on that account. He ought to be in the Army, where his other brothers were. He didn't strike her; she was a bad woman and low class. Fined 30s. and 10s. costs.

A Corporals Courtship

A Corporal's Courtship. Harriet Ann Pulsford, 7 Aberdare Road, Abercynon, summoned Corpl. Edward Pearce to show cause, etc. Complainant stated that her child was born on September 30th last. They had courted for about 18 months. Misconduct first took place on Dec. 31, 1913. In January she discovered her condition, but did not tell him until April. Jane Pulsford, mother of com- plainant, stated that her daughter had been courted by Pearce tor a long time. He had visited the house and stayed Christmas, 1913, with them. When she spoke to him about her daughter's condition and isked him if he was going to marry aer, he replied, Yes, I suppose." Thomas Eames, brother-in-law to complainant, testified that he was courting Miss Pulsford's sister at the same time as defendant was courting complainant. They had all been together to Pontypridd. At Christmas he told witness that he was going to ask the mother for the girl. Witness was now married to complainant's sister. Mrs. Gwen Jones testified that she had seen the parties in Carne- town Wood on sevaral occasions. Defendant on oath stated that a young man from the 3rd Hussars came to the house. Mrs. Pulsford said if Jack knew there would be trouble. He had never known till the summons that she was in trouble. The Bench made an order of 3s. 6d. a week.

Scene in Court

Scene in. Court. Henry Haynes was summoned by Sarah Jane Haynes, 18 Harris Terrace, Penrhiwceiber, his wife, for arrears of a maintenance order made against him on October 16, 1913. Complainant stated that the order was for 12s. a week. Defendant offered to pay on con- ditions. His condition was that his wife should send the man who was living with her away from her house. Complainant denied the allega- tion. She had a lodger who had lived there for 13 years. As complainant left the witness- box she called out, You old scamp." Defendant made no offer to pay and was sent to gaol for three months.

Mountain Ash Jottings

Mountain Ash Jottings. BY LUCIFER. Parliament has risen for six weeks and the Mountain Ash District Council and Education Committee have suspended their meetings for four weeks. There will be work to do, however, in the meantime, for the Clerk of the Council will have to see to the carrying out of the National Registration Act locally. It is gratifying to learn that in Mountain Ash and district, as at Aberdare, volunteers for the work of distributing and collecting the papers have been more than suffi- cient. Mr. A. Pincombe, the Clerk, remarked last week that he had more names than what he required, but that he was retaining the whole list in case of a few persons with- drawing at the last moment. The performance of this work en- tails a vast amount of labour, be- cause it is not a matter merely of leaving one paper in each house, but papers must be left for every person between the ages of 15 and 65. Some of the questions, again, are somewhat difficult to answer, and the enumerators will have to help and explain to the people how to fill the papers. A joint movement is on foot by the Aberdare and Mountain Ash Councils for the acquisition of the Canal which runs (?) through this valley. If the two Councils come to a satisfactory arrangement the people of this district would be eternally indebted to them. The canal, or what was once a canal, has been an eyesore to the inhabit- ants living on and near its banks for many years, and it is unquestion- able that the health of the district has suffered owing to the stagnant waters, and the evil smells arising therefrom. Worse than all, refuse, including dead cats, rats, etc., are thrown into the bed of the Canal, and these things spread sickness and death all round. A couple of years ago, when Aberdare "boasted" the highest rate of infantile mortality in the kingdom, the medical officer of the district attributed many of the children's deaths to the influence of the canal, because a very large number of cases came from Blaen- gwawr Ward, which includes Cwm- bach, where the canal is most objec- tionable. There was a proposal at one time to acquire the canal for the purpose of making a new road from Aber- dare to Cwmbach, and on to Moun- tain Ash. I don't know what the scheme of the Councils is at pres- ent, but the canal can be turned to some good use if the negotiations for its purchase go through all right. Good luck to them, and good riddance of a horrid and horrible nuisance. Mountain Ash Councillors have firmly made up their minds that they will not have a system of motor buses in their district. Applica- tions were made some months ago by two firms for permission'to insti- tute a service of motor buses to run from Mountain Ash to Abercynon. The project was looked upon with favour at that time, because these parts have absolutely no facilities, with the exception of the trains, for conveying people from one spot to another. While the Motor Bus firms were getting ready the Council changed their mind, and are now resolutely refusing licences for such buses, on the ground that they would break up the roads. The members of the Council base their objection on what they have seen in other districts, es- pecially those portions of Aberdare district where the trackless motors run. The road from Aberaman to Abercwmboi was mentioned by Councillor W. Millar as a sample of what to expect if a service of heavy motor buses were inaugur- ated at Mountain Ash. Besides, the Mountain Ash Coun- cil have now committed themselves to promote a Parliamentary Bill for the construction of traways in the district. The Bill will come on next year in Parliament, and it is hoped the Council will be successful, for some such system is urgently re- quired The only choice at present is Shank's ponies and taxis, and most people prefer something better and easier. than the former and less expensive and luxurious than the latter. New acquisitions bring on new duties and the Council are already experiencing some trouble with the new Abercynon Park. In the first place, Ynysboeth and Abercynon Road people are making a short cut to the Park by trespassing over the Taff Vale Railway, and the T.V.R. Co. are objecting to this. In the second place the rough element among the population are making things uncomfortable for the softer and more refined element at the Park. And so as the 7/6, plus tips, is only the beginning of trouble and expense in a marriage career, the laying out of a Park is but an initial cost in the maintenance thereof. Now we hear of an appointment of a park-keeper. Of course the Park is all right and dtfes not require any looking after, but it appears that the people who frequent it have got to be policed. It is a Park Inspec- tor that is required and not a Park Keeper. The Surveyor wants a wounded soldier to take on the job. Very good, let the soldier bring his rifle with him. also a few hand gren- ades to cope with those recalcitrants referred to by two or three Coun- cillors last week. A favourite saying among British people was that in order to ensure peace we should be prepared for war. But a big hole has been knocked through that theory, be- cause Germany was prepared for war, and being prepared for war she made war. Can the same be applied to Fire Brigades and fires ? Can we say, In order to ensure immuni- ty from fires we must be prepared for fires?" This might appear very silly, but methinks there is a deal of truth in it. In the pre-Fire Brigade days there used to be more conflagrations than we see nowadays. It does not suit people whose businesses do not pay to set their houses on fire now, be- cause slap bang the Brigade is on top of it and puts it out at once and the Insurance Company will only pay for what is destroyed. Provid- ed that there is no loss of life a big conflagration is a fine sight, and I feel sorry that the chances of see- ing a few are getting more remote. I suppose it is because there are no real fires to cope with that some- thing in the nature of a Fire Brigade demonstration was organised at Mountain Ash. It came off last Thursday unless the rain interfered and made the hose unnecessary. The men who drill and practise con- stantly are liable to lose interest in the work if they do not have oppor- tunities of showing their prowess. Boxing is called the noble art of self-defence," but I have yet to meet a man fond of boxing and fighting who, if he does not get opportuni- ties at self-defence will not venture into the realm of defiance in order to test the jaw-breaking capacities of his muscles and knuckles.

YR ADRAN GYMREIG

YR ADRAN GYMREIG. Gwahoddir cyfraniadau i'r Adran hon yn y ffurf o ohebiaeth bwrpasol, adroddiadau lleol, a barddoniaeth deilwng. Nis gellir cyhoeddi cyn- yrchion meithion.

Barddoniaeth

Barddoniaeth. LLONGYFARCHIAD I Mr. Rees Jones a Miss Esther Edwards, Bute Hotel, Aberdar, ar ei huniad mewn glan briodas. Wyres ydyw y briodasferch i'r diweddar Josiah a Mrs. Edwards, Bute Hotel. Nis gallaf beidio canu Wrth wel'd fy nghyfaill Rees Yn gadael chlwb hen lanciau, A hyny gyda brys; Ond gydag un edrvehiad Ei siriol Esther wnaeth Ei enill mewn amrantiad, A serch a'i daliai'n gaeth. Wei, Rees as Esther, dymtinaf i chwi Oes heulog ddigwmwl, gyforiog o i'ri, Dechreuweh eich gyrfa dan deg wenau li'awd, Ac felly parhaed hyd derfyn eich rhawd Na ddeled un afiwydd i'eh aelwyd na chroes, Ond beunydd deg fwyniant hyd derfyn eich hoes, A phandyr y cwlwm priodasol boed hedd Diderfvn i'ch rhan uwchlaw aneau a'r bedd. HEN FFRYND.

SUDDIAD Y LUSITANIA

SUDDIAD Y LUSITANIA. A Mai yn gwasgar ei belydrau ter, A'i des yn nawsu min yr awel ber, Y Lusitania hudai'r teithwyr mad I forio'n ddewrfryd draw hyd draethau'n gwlad. Cychwynai'r Cadben hwylio'n s$n y Ilu Bygythion erch grogasai'r Almaen ddu. Ar furiau llydain porthladd Efrog lan Am lwfrdra cudd ac ystryw'r llongau tan I suddo'r llestr-coron celf a'i bri, A'i chladdu'n ddwfn ym medd y dyfrol li. Bleserus fordaith o'r Gorllewin draw, A'r orwel bell yn asur glir bob llaw Y Werydd fawr yn llyfn fel gwydr gwyrdd, Heb ewyn broch ar frig ei wenyg ffyrdd, Na chalon erch ar fwrdd yn llunio brad, Na breuddwyd wan yn disgwyl oer- llyd nad; Fel cwch yn esmwyth hwylio dros y llyn Ar nawn-ddydd haf wrth droed anghysbell fryn Bu mordaith ola'r Dywysoges ban Hyd fan ei beddrod llaith yng. ngwydd y lan. Pellebrau roed ar wifrau'r ewyl iacli Gan wibio'r newydd draw i Dref- draeth Fach Fod ei Brenhines—bri y Werydd For. A Meibion Gwent, ei chynghaneddol gor, Yn hwylus ddod a'u can yn chwyddo'u bron Wrth wel'd Gwyllt Walia Wen o frig y don, A Lerpwl Fawr yn chwifio'i benyr thvs Fod ei Mawrhydi'n dod ar drothwy'i drws, A'i theithwyr lion yn fyw ar lawnt ei phlas Fel tylwyth teg o bendefigol dras. Ond Och! pa beth yw'r waedd sy'n disgyn draw ar draeth Kinsale fel dolef groch ac ofnadwyol aeth Pa beth yw'r fyglyd dorch esgynna'n syth i'r nef, A'r swn sy'n rhwygo'r awyr megis taran gref? Ai'r erch dan-suddol long o ddyfais Prwsia Fawr A'i gorffwyll ethern ddu sydd wedi suddo i lawr Orchestwaith celf, a'i chwalu'n ddellt ar draws yr Aig, A'i 'sgyrion fel mewn ymehwil wyllt am gysgod craig ? O! frawychus lewyg barlysai'r teith- wyr blin Pan welwyd suddol-long yn chwim gyfeirio'i min, Gan luchio ei dinystriol arf dan warr y Hi, A gweld angeuol nod yn llywio'i. hosgo hi. t Trom atsain fel taranfollt sy'n gwefru. dros yr aig, A'r newydd drist yn disgyn ar draws clogwynni'r graig Fod eilun Mor y Werydd yn anrhaith dan y don, A llawer mam mewn cynni a'i baban ar ei bron Yn nofio dros yr eigion ac angeu yn eu gwedd, Tra'r weilgi'n prysur agor ei ddwfn ddyfrllyd fedd. Yn awr mae clych Berlin yn galw'r ddinas dlos I ddathlu y gyflafan yn oriau trwm y nos; Yr Almaen geiaw wyl i gofio'r anfad waith A erys am ganrifoedd yn ddwfn lofruddiol graith. 0! Almaen erch lofruddiog, pa ddeunydd yw dy graidd? Barbariaeth noeth yw'th foes, a thwyll sydd wrth ei gwraidd, Dy had am byth erlynnir am dywallt gwirion waed A sathru'r cysegredig o dan dy halog. draed. PARCWYSON.

Nodion a Newyddion

Nodion a Newyddion. Tri mhen ycnydig wythnosau bydd y Parch. R. J. Jones, M.A., Broniestyn. Aberdar, yn 80 mlwydd oed. Deil ei feddwl yn glir ^'i ysgrifbin yn ystwytk o hyd, iel y pravvf ei nodiadau hunan- gofiawl yn y Geninen." Unwaith bu "Ffeiriad Coch y Rhon- dda," fel y'i hadnabyddid, mewn ym- drechfa a lleidr pen ffordd, yr hwn a hawliai oddiwrtho ei arian neu ei fywyd. Yn yr ornest lladdwvd y lleidr. Wrth son am yr amgylchiad meddai yr offeir- iad, "Fe'i tarewais o'm modd ond fe'i lleddais o'm hanfodd." Collodd y bardd a'r eisteddfodwr Mynyddog y rhan helaethaf o'i wallt, pan yn ieuanc. Ami o Iwyfan yr eis- teddfod y gwnai gyfeiriad chwareus at ei benglog moel. Fel hyn yr englynodd un tro: Galar hallt am wallt fy mhen—a. 'mlina, Moel iawn yw fy nhalcen, Dirywia gweithdy'r awen, Coron y bardd yw croen ei ben.

Yn Min yr Hwyr

Yn Min yr Hwyr. Melus rhodio yn y glesni tawel Pan y gwyra'r blodyn bach ei ben- Gyda'i fron yn friw wrth roddi. ffarwel Ar yr huan gwridgoch sy'n y nen. Hyfryd gennyf wrando ar yr osber Roddir ar allorau temlau gwyrdd, Atswn o'u hanthemau sydd yn sein- ber I dramwywyr trist y deiliog ffyrdd.. Mae yr afon lyfndeg yn arafu Wrth gusanu godre'r gefnen ir, A fy enaid innau sydd yn mynnu Holi'n ddwys am hwyr y ffarwel hir. Wedi dal ergydion y tymhorau, A fydd hedd ar ddiwedd f'einioes i ? Gaf fi glywed sain y per ganiadau Yn yr hwyr, wrth groesi'r olaf Ii' 1- —Orchwy Bowen.

Trecynon Wedding

Trecynon Wedding. JONES—EVANS. On Monday, August 2nd, at Taber- nacle, Aberdare, by the Rev. J. Sul- gwyn Davies, Siloh, Mr Abraham. Evans, 31 Ynyswen Road, Treorchy. and Miss Elizabeth Jones, 10 Harriet Street, Trecynon, eldest daughter of Mr Rd. Daniel Jones, were wed. The best man was Mr Wm. Rd. Evans. brother of the bridegroom. The bridesmaids were Miss Olwen Jones. sister of the bride Miss Catherine- Alice James, Miss Rachel Mary Davies and Miss Maggie Jane Evans. There were also present: Mr. Evan S. Jones 20 Hirwain Rd., grandfather of the bride Mr. Wm. John Davies, Mr John Davies, and Mr. Wm. Rd. Jones, father of the bride, who gave her away. The wedding breakfast was pre- pared at 10 Harriet Street, by Mrs. Elizabeth Jones, mother of the bride, assisted by Mrs. Hannah Davies, 91 Bryn Terrace, Cwmdare, aunt of the bride. There was also present Mr Wm. D. Davies, her uncle. The happy pair left for Swansea for their honeymoon.