Teitl Casgliad: Aberdare Leader

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 2 o 8 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
21 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
Merthyr Board of Guardians

Merthyr Board of Guardians. On Saturday, Aug. 28th, Mr. J. Prowle in the chair. The other members present were Messrs. Dd. Jones (Hirwain), T. D. Williams, Morgan Williams, Meth Davies, Evan Davies, Samuel Davies, W. LI. Jones, John Davies, Henry Evans, Patrick Mansfield, Samuel Thomas, A. J. Howfield, T. T. Jen- kins, Wm. Jones, Edwin Thomas, Samuel Morgan, Joseph Price, Mor- gan Thomas, Revs. A. E. Sutherland, Wm. Thomas, D. L. Jones, Mrs. Lydia Price. Miss Hettie Jones, Mrs. H. E. Wills, Mrs. M. T. Wil- liams, Mrs. M. A. Edmunds, with Mr Frank T. James (clerk) and Mr G. A. Cook (assistant clerk).

Joining the Army

Joining the Army. At the No. 5 Relief Committee a letter was read from Philip T. Lewis, Aberaman. clerk to the Superintend- ent of the Training School, applying for permission to join the Army, and asking that his position be kept open for him. It was resolved that permission be granted, and that his position be kept open for him, and that he be paid half salary while he is serving in the Armv. It was further re- solved that' Oliver Williams, junior clerk in the collector's office, be transferred to the superintendent's office temporarily. Mr. Llewelyn Richards, warrant officer and collector, now wrote stating that he could not spare his clerk (Oliver Williams), or the work and collections would suffer. The Chairman remarked that he was still convinced that the com- mittee had done the proper thing in recommending that Oliver Williams be transferred. Every other depart- men was working at top speed, and he could not see why Mr. Llewelyn Richards could not manage without this clerk. The Board were always told that the collections would suffer if they proposed a reduction of staff. That was the pistol held at the heads of the members, and some officers could fire straighter than others. (Laughter.) It was clear that Mr Owen, superintendent, Trecynon, must have a clerk instead of Lewis. The Clerk said that Mr Llewelyn Richards was away from his office a good deal. At present he was in Newcastle re a question of settle- mChairman: It is all mechanical work at the office. Mr. Harry Evans asked whether the Board could not devise some more economical means than send- ing their warrant officer all over the country. The Clerk: I am afraid not. Mr Meth Davies stated that if Mr Richards must get a clerk, he would move that Oliver Williams be pro- moted to the place of Lewis at Tre- cynon, and that the Board appoint a new clerk for the Warrant Officer. It was stated that Lewis' salary was 28s. a week. Williams was transferred to Trecynon, salary to be determined later, and it was resolved to advertise for a successor to Wil- liams.

Trecynon Military Hospital

Trecynon Military Hospital. There was a letter from the Major, R.A.M.C., Western Command, stat- ing that he believed 60 beds would be sufficient for the time being at the Trecynon Military Hospital. It was desirable that an officer should inspect the building as soon as zn ready. The Clerk observed that the Hos- pital was not quite ready, and the appointment with the officer in question should be deferred for a while. The electric lighting and the stove were not completed. The mortar mill was still on the premises, and that should be removed. It should be stated that Messrs. W P. Powell and Son, Ltd., had agreed to supply the limestone which was necessary. The Chairman said that the mortar mill would be removed in a few days. Mr T. T. Jenkins referred to the slowness of the progress made with the Trecynon building, which is being adapted as a military hospital. He was utterly astonished that now, at the end of August, this building was not yet completed. The parties who were to blame ought to be told, and the public should know of it. In Whit-week a promise was made that the building would be ready An a fortnight, and here we were in August. It was a disgrace to Mer- thyr and Aberdare. There were hundreds of people willing to help all they can, but someone was lag- ging behind. He felt quite ashamed of himself. They talked about re- moving a mortar mill, as if it meant the removal of a mountain. Mr J. Prowle It would be inter- esting if you could lay your finger on the responsible party. I think there are a host of people to blame, lhe war is responsible for the delay. The X-Ray apparatus has been ordered long ago and has been put on the rails, but it is not to hand yet. And there are surgical instruments wanted. Mrs. Edith Williams, secretary of the Aberdare Red Cross Society, sent a list of utensils required at the Mili- tary Hospital, and on the motion of Mr. David Jones (Hirwain) it was re- solved to purchase them.

Representation on the Red Cross Committee

Representation on the Red Cross Committee. Mr. Harrv Evans said he under- stood that the management commit- tee had been formed, and he would like to know whether the Board were going to have representation on that committee. The Clerk replied that it was the Red Cross Society who were the committee responsible, and the chair- man of the Board (Mr Prowle), Mavor of Merthyr and High Con- stable of Miskin Higher had been appointed on the committee. They had power to add to their number. Mr Morgan Williams: It will be like the Sanatorium Committee. They have not added to their number yet.

Military Hospital and Electric Light

Military Hospital and Electric Light. There had been complaints that the Aberdare Electrical Co., Ltd., had been dilatory in completing the electric light contract, and the fol- lowing letter had been received from Mr A. J. E. Belsten, the managing director:— We have received from Mr. Roderick, architect, several letters complaining about the slowness in completing the electrical contract at the above premises. We beg to point out that this is through no fault of ours, as owing to the war there is a great demand for our labour, and we are unable to get men at any price for this work, and at the pres- ent moment we are very short hand- ed, and the Guardians took our first hand some few weeks ago to take over the work at this place, and we respectfully suggest to them that they release this man temporarily so that we may finish this contract off If they could see their way clear to do this we shall be extremely obliged as the need is very great. Hoping you will put this letter before the Guardians as soon as possible and let us know the result, and thanking you in anticipation." The Building Committee having been given plenary powers to deal with the subject, they decided to re- lease Mr. Hughes, Aberdare (the working engineer recently appointed by the Board), for a period, so thai he might help the Electrical Co. above referred to to complete their contract.

Dispensable and Indispensable

Dispensable and Indispensable. There was a proposal to carry out alterations to a yard at the Bargoed Cottage Homes. The Chairman suggested that this work be deferred till after the war. Mr Evan Davies, a Bargoed mem- ber, acquiesced in this proposal, but wished to remind Aberdare members that the Cottage Homes in the Aber- dare District were palatial buildings compared to the Bargoed Home. Mr A. J. Howfield moved that the work be deferred, and this course was agreed to. There were tenders in for a supply of flour, and Mr Morgan Williams jocularly suggested that they do without it till after the war. (Laugh- ter.) The tender of D. Jones, Dickenson and Co., Ltd., Dowlais and Cardiff, was adopted.

Jam

Jam. The Board decided to advertise as usual for 6 months' provisions, and Mr A. J. Howfield suggested that in future, instead of asking contractors to supply a specific brand of goods, they be given liberty to tender goods of equal quality. For instance a contractor could supply jam made by Crosse and Blackwell, or of equal- quality." Mr T. T. Jenkins But who is go- ing to decide the quality? Chairman: The Master of the Workhouse. Mr Meth Davies: Does the Master taste every pot of jam that comes in ? Clerk: No, or he would probably not be alive, if he did. (Laughter.) Mr Howfield's suggestion was adopted. -=

Letters to the Editor

Letters to the Editor. ABERDARE AUXILIARY FUND. gir _i shall be glad if you will allow me a word of explanation m regard to the statement of accounts of the Aberdare Auxiliary Fund, which appears in your advertisement columns m this week's issue. From that statement it will be seen that the expenses are gradually in- creasing each week, and while the amount expended for the week ended June 28th, the last account shewn, was Y,78 18s. 6d., the amount spent in the week ended last Saturday, the 28th August, was over £ 94. The Fund to date has received ad- mirable support from people of every class and denomination, and on behalf of the committee I should like to express their deep indebted- ness to those who have, and are con- tributing so handsomely by regular weekly or monthly subscriptions to this Fund, and yet it is still neces- sary to emphasise the fact that if the weekly grants to each dependent (not receiving other assistance) is to continue, the present amount of sub- scriptions must on no account be al- lowed to fall in arrear, but rather, if possible, every effort should be made to increase same. I am sure it is not necessary for me, at this stage, to emphasise the material necessity of such a Fund as this, but I would like to point out that the administration of same is carried out, thanks to the generous assistance rendered me by the Coun- cil's staff, free of any salaried ex- penses, while the administration costs can, I think, be justly claimed to be very small indeed. Again, on behalf of the committee, expressing our sincerest thanks to those so kindly contributing.—I am, etc., D. LLEWELLYN GRIFFITHS, Hon. Secretary.

Advertising

t 1 FREE TO EVERY PURCHASER, I LESSONS, STOOL, TUTOR, IN- SULATORS and 10 YEARS WARRANTY I by purchaaifig your PIANO at I I I VICTOR FREED, Mountain Ash, ASK FOR CATALOGUE. Footpad (3 a.m.): "Wot time is it, mister?" Belated Citizen: "Eh—er—my watch doesn't run." Footpad (producing a revolver): "Well, you just hand it over ter me an' watch me and it run fur a few seibonds.-

Inquest at Trecynon

Inquest at Trecynon. Robertstown Collier Crushed by a Stone. Mr R. J. Rhys, Coroner, held an inquest at the Trecynon Police Station on Monday, touching the death of James Clement Forey (36), residing at 8 Philip Street, Roberts- town, and who was killed by a fall at the Gorllwyn Level of the Bwllfa Colliery Company at Cwmdare on Friday morning last. Samuel Forey, a brother of the de- ceased, who worked with the de- ceased as a collier, gave evidence of identification and said that his de- ceased brother was survived by a wife and four children. About 4.15 in the morning he heard his brother call out for help. He found him pinned between a big stone and a piece of coal. Witness was working about 10 yards away and heard the ground moving. He obtained assist- ance to liberate his brother, who was by this time dead. By Mr McBride (H.M. Inspector of Mines) He believed his deceased brother was making place for another prop when the fall occurred. David Williams, a pumpsman 'at the colliery, stated that he saw the fall. Deceased was in a bending position at the time and pricking under the coal when the top gave way suddenly. Wm. Davies, a collier, working in a level close by, said he was called to the scene of the accident, and helped to extricate deceased. The stone that fell weighed about two tons. There was a smooth above it, and there was a break with the coal that could only be seen after the fall. Evan David Evans, acting fireman, said he examined the place at the commencement of the shift, and found it quite safe. Bv the Coroner: Witness was ? years of age, and held a fireman's certificate. Coroner I don't suppose you could teach the Foreys anything as work- men?—No, sir. Thomas John Evans, day fireman, said that the deceased man was en- gaged on emergency work making a water-way. Witness got to the working place shortly after the acci- dent. The stone that fell measured 6 feet 9 inches in length by 3 feet 6 in. deep, and 3 feet 1 in. in the widest part. The ground was of a damp nature in that place. There was an unseen break in one side of the roof, which was also an unnatur- al one. Replying to the Coroner witness said that the Foreys were good work- men, and were engaged on special work. E. Pugh, M.E., manager, who ex- plained the plan of the workings, said that he did not think any measures for the safety of the place were not taken which could have been taken. In summing up the Coroner sair, they all knew the Foreys to be reli- able workmen and "top sawyers" at their job. A verdict of Accidental death was returned.

Carmel Aberdare

Carmel, Aberdare. Pastor on Secular and Spiritual Occupations. On Sunday morning the Rev. T. Edmunds, B.A., pastor of Carmel English Baptist Church, Aberdare, preached from the words in Matt. vi., 33, And all these things shall be added unto you." He remarked that to many of the sayings of Jesus a literal meaning must not be ap- plied. To many of them a poetic in- terpretation should be given. The purpose of several passages could not be got at in a prosaic, matter-of- fact manner. We required sanctified imagination and common sense when reading the Gospel. Jesus assumed that we possessed both. The author- ised version, Take no thought for the morrow," was not correct, for the Apostle Paul said that the man who was guilty of domestic improvi- dence was worse than an infidel. The meaning of the words of the text was that first things could not be put second. When business matters and financial interests demanded the enthusiasm and energy of our nature we were bound to give a secondary place to spiritual things. He knew a man of a keen spiritual in- stinct who had made a lot of money in South Wales, but to-day his soul was as cold a steel. Huxley used to say that he had to read the Sermon on the Mount once every three weeks in order to rectify his conscience. Let us seek first the kingdom of God and let every-other interest take its place in relation to the central in- terest. The text did not imply that the church as an institution was to have the first claim on our time and attention. That was giving one's religious outlook and activities too narrow a scope. No man could be a Christian unless he made religion the dominating and determining factor of his life. We should ask <■ everything we did, W ill this help the kingdom of God 7" That was the true test of a Christian. No life was consistently Christian unless lived for the realisation of the king- dom of God on earth. Did cut coal, or manage a colliery or run a busi- ness justify existence ? Did we live for something which made life worth while? Earning one's living was a necessity and a duty. But could a man afford spirtually to give all his time to what we called making a living"? He did not think it pos- sible. We must choose a profession, the pursuit of which gave us an op- portunity for spiritual service, or we should outside our daily task find something to do which helped the kingdom of God. A missioner or a teacher's work afforded a great scope for spirituality, but making bread or building houses none what- ever. _———-

No title

Was it not disgraceful the way in which Smi^s snored in church to-day. "I should think it was. Why, he wofce us all up."

Scraps

Scraps. BY THE SCRIBE. The Hungarian Minister of Public Instruction has issued a circular to all the teachers of the country calling on them to pay special attention to edu- cating the children in the coming term to the respect and honour due to our enemies; that no hatred or contempt should enter the mind of the children against the brave men with whom their fathers are in deadly combat; and that hate or contempt is not to be cultivated in the youthful minds." What a difference between the Huns and the Hungarians! Evidently the latter do not approve of the cult of hate so vigorously promoted by the former. Britain, too, may, without lowering its national prestige, take a leaf from the Hungarian book. Some of us are eager to place a ban on all German music. Very well, but let us be consistent. Let the echoes of the German hymn of hate" also die out in our land of love and liberty and piety. Were it not for the tragic circum- stances surrounding the event I would have been amused by a description given of a valiant young British officer who had given his life for the land he loved. After extolling his many merits an "uncompromising hate of the Ger- mans was mentioned as his crowning virtue. Well I may be old-fashioned in my views, but for the life of me 1 cannot believe that undying hate of a brave foe can be a trait in the character of any true patriot or gallant soldier, be he Briton, Teuton, or Turk. Let us not pray God to strafe England or Germany, but let us learn to respect the valour of our enemies-even if we cannot love them—and learn to hate hatred. „ They come and come again—those angels of Mons-like a recurring deci- mal. I suppose they will continue to visit us until the time when all men will be angels, unless in the meantime all men will exchange credulity for com- mon sense-a, remote probability. I have conversed with several brave —and truthful—men who were present at the retreat from Mons, and each one tells me that he saw no angels, but devils galore. — A message from the eastern theatre of war at the end of the week stated that Brest had been left "clean." It is not always that a communique is so candid. For once it has made. a "clean breast" of it. A hero of a hundred fights was con- gratulated on having got through it all without a scratch." That is not true," said he. "You should have seen my skin after a week in the trenches without a bath." While in some areas the supply of liquor is restricted during the war crisis Aberdare is curtailing its water supply. I do not mean the water that we get from the taps. Economy in this direction is commendable sometimes, even in times of peace. I refer to that nondescript fluid with which our streets are sprinkled—or ought to be— in dry weather. During the recent heat wave of about nine days' duration the local sprinkler did not attempt to moisten the roads more than once, and even then it looked dreadfully dry at us. That would have been a nine days' wonder anywhere except Aberdare. There was sunshine on many a face when the heavens frowned and shed tears on Sunday morning. I am sure the Aberdare civic authority deserves the Government's benediction for carrying out to such an extent the latter's request to economise. I On the ticket of a local prize drawing it is stated that the result "will not be published in any local paper." How- ever, buyers are not informed whether it is the Times" or the "Standard" that is to be honoured with the announce- ment.

Will of Lord Aberdares Aunt

Will of Lord Aberdare's Aunt. Miss Mary Sinclair Bruce, of Bath, who died on the 20th June last, left estate of the gross value of X8,710, of which £8,596 is net personalty. Probate of her will has been granted to her nephews, Lord Aberdare, of Duffryn, Mountain Ash, and the Venerable Wil- liam Conybeare Bruce, rector of Rogiet. The testatrix left £25 each to her god- children, Alma Tyler and Pamela Bruce, J6300 to her grandson, Gerald Bruce, ten guineas each to the executors of her will, J6300 each to the unmarried daughters of her brothers Lewis and Robert, £150 to the married daughters of her brother Robert, C200 to the married daughters of her brother Lewis, and the residue of her estate to the un- married daughters of her said two brothers.

Advertising

OWDEI S Rg-4434 AND NEURALGIA YW Thn QUICKEST and MOST CERTAIN CURE V A 2deach. !'6 dov at oil Chemist's & Stores ) #1 SINO *T>OSrAGZ FOQ SAMPLC V/PiWiagfil J.MORGAN JONES t C*. LIANELLV, j/ mmmmmamamammotatamnasaT. Vnii

Tabernacle Aberdare

Tabernacle, Aberdare. ADJOURNED SPORTS. The adjourned sports in connection with Tabernacle English Congregational Sunday School were held on Thursday at Cwm Farm Field, kindly lent by Mr. David Davies. The awards were as follows: Foot Race: 1, Ivor Sanders; 2, Glen Lloyd; 3, Trevor Snow. Foot Race: 1, Ivor Sanders; 2, Horace LIoya; 3, Trevor Snow. Foot Race: 1, Ivor Jones; 2, Glyn Sanders; 3, Ernie Swales. Foot Race: 1, Cyril Bevan; 2, Cyril Baker; 3, Cecil Maidment. Foot Race: 1, Sarah Spiers; 2, Kath- leen Evans; 3, Florrie Snow. Foot Race: 1, Olive Webber; 2, Beatrice Phillips; 3, Rosie Lambert. Foot Race: 1, Merlin Taylor; 2, An- thony Davies; 3, Alfred Spiers. Foot Race: 1, Mary Jane Forey; 2, Annie Stonelake; 3, Lucy Lawrence. Skipping: 1. Mary Jane Challenger; 2, Blodwen Jones; 3, S. A. Davies. Foot Race: 1, Dudley Evans; 3, Glyn Richards; 3, Alfred Thomas. Two-legged Race: 1, Alfred Thomas and Dudley Evans; 2, Glyn Richards and Cyril Thomas. Foot Race: 1, Edith Spiers; 2, Blod- wen Jones; 3, Gwennie Morgan. Two-legged Race: Blodwen Jones and Gwennie Morgan". Foot Race: 1, Merlin Jones; 2, Johnnie Thomas; 3, Guy Runge. Foot Race: 1, Nellie Greening; 2, Violet George; 3, Annie Mary Lloyd. Two-legged Race: 1, Dolly Cummings and Lily James; 2, Nellie Greening and M. L. William^ Foot Race: 1, Austin Morgan; 2, Stanley Lloyd; 3, Alec Williams. Foot Race: 1, Marjorie George; 2, Edith Williams; 3, Alvine Williams. Two-legged Race: 1, Doris Taylor and I Rachel Morgan; 2, Evelyn and Marjorie George. Tug of War: Mr. T. Morgan's team and Mr. Cummings' team contested. The former team won. The arrangements were carried out by Mr. J. A. Lloyd, Superintendent of the Sunday School, and Mr. D. Lawrence, secretary. Mr. Baker acted as starter. Members of the Rev. T. M. Jeffreys' Bible Class assisted.

Former Aberaman Curates Preferment

Former Aberaman Curate's Preferment. The Rev. D. J. Arthur, B.A., curate of Porthcawl, has been offered and accepted the living of Pyle. Mr. Arthur, who is a native of Carmarthen, came to Porthcawl from Aberaman, where he held a curacy. Previously he was curate of Hirwain, of which place Mrs. Arthur is a native. Mr. Arthur is a popular clergyman, and an earnest preacher. He also takes interest in the work of Friendly Societies, and was chaplain of the R.A.O.B. during his stay in Hir- wain. He has also taken a prominent part in Poor Law and civic affairs. He has been a member of the Merthyr Board of Guardians, and is now a member of the Porthcawl District Council.

No title

a No, George, I'll not help you with a solitary shilling. You must paddle your own canoe." "But what with, Uncle?" A skull—just as I did."

Obituary

Obituary. MR. TOM EYNON, NEW TREDEGAR. On Monday week at Bedwellty Ceme- tery the interment of Mr. Tom Eynon, Tredegar Road," New Tredegar, took place. The deceased was a native of Aberaman, and a brother to Mr. D. J. Eynon, Prudential Superintendent at Aberdare. During his life-time he ren- dered yeoman service to the cause of Trades Unionism. He was also a zealous and active exponent of Social De- mocracy, in the persistent advocacy of which he sacrificed and suffered much. He also took a great interest in instru- mental music. Mr. Eynon was a most devoted husband and father. In matters of theology Mr. Eynon was an avowed and pronounced Secular- ist. He delighted in discussions on re- ligious subjects, and more than once had the temerity to cross swords with that champion of Christian Evidence, the late Rev. W. T. Lee. His adherence to scepticism never wavered-not even at the approach of death. By his re- quest the obsequies were of an entirely Secularistic character, there being' no religious service at the house or grave- side. A few words were uttered by a- Secularist comrade. General sympathy is expressed towards the widow and four children.

No title

Mother: "Johnny, remember to al- ways do what is right, and speak the truth at all times." Johnny: "All right, ma; only don't blame me for getting into a lot of rows, then, that'fr j all."

Advertising

lid 11 i ♦ THE COUNTRY is at its best in SEPTEMBER. « vo» can Enjoy the T|ir Superb Scenery only when JiL JKJL Let us take you for one more spin before the cold weather comes-in our Delightful Napier Be Daimler Charabancs. ALL ENQUIRIES ATTENDED TO SAME DAY AS RECEIVED. Telegrams*. GOUGH, t: MOUNTAIN ASH. OL Goughs Garage Co. 5:Ë Mountain Ash Telephone No. 22. a Bevan & Company, Ltd. WALES' LARGEST FURNISHERS, CARDIFF PONTYPRIDD SWANSEA, &c. FOR OVER SIXTY-FIVE YEARS Has this well-known Firm faithfully observed its obligations to every one of their b vast army of customers, with the result that their Business has so increased as to place them to-day in the Front Rank of the Furnishers of the United Kingdom! Largest Selection in the Principality. Everything for Furnishingthroughout. All Goods at Rock-bottom Prices. I Delivery free up to 200 miles. I Pianofortes from 10/6 monthly. Instruments Warranted 10 years. About half Music Warehouse Prices. Catalogues gratis and post free. THE TRAIN FARES OF CASH CUSTOMERS PAID. ——— m—mmmmmmmmmmm, The adoption of Motor Traction at certain Branches has released for sale several Spring Vans & Carts. Now offered very much below their value! IT. SIMMONDS Local Agent for CROSSWELL'S Celebrated. Ely Ales Casks of all sizes-54, 2 36, 18, 9 and 4! gallons always in stock at David Williams, CROWN BOTTLING STORES, CARDIFF ROAD, ABERDARE. WOODS' CHALLENGE REMEDY Is guaranteed under the sum of < £ 100 to cure 25 per cent, more cases than any other advertised remedy. Do not waste time or money experi- menting with unknown remedies. Price, 2s. 9d., extra Btrong, 4s. 6d. Mrs. Wood will be pleased to give Ajdvice Free of Charge. Hours, 10 to 10. Stamp for particulars and copies of Testimonials. Mr. & Mrs. W. WOOD, Ladies' Medical Specialists, 20 LOUIS STREET, LEEDS. CROWN STORES, Cardiff Road, ABERDARE. David Williams, (Proprietor). Wholesale Bottler- BASS'S ALES. GUINNESS' DUBLIN STOUT (The HARP Label). V Orders delivered to all parts. LADIES, READ THIS. ADVICE FREE for stamp.—Mr» M. Stewart's famous Female Remedy never fails. Addres", Guinea St., Bristol. LADIES BLANCHARD'S PILLS are unrivalled for all Irregularities, &c., they speedily afford relief and never fail to alleviate all suffering. They supersede Pen nyroyal, PilCochla, BitterApple, 61" Blanchard's are the best of all Pills for Won,00 Sold in boxes, 1/l, by BOOTS' Branches, and all Chemists, or post free, same price, from LESLIE MARTYN, Ltd,, Chemists, 34 DALSTON LANE, LONDON. Free sample and valuable Booklet post free ld. w Cures in 48 HøJ!.rti derangements of the Organs. Superior to Cop*1 Cubebs and Injee;tions. nauseating effects with Capsules. Of all Chemists. d5 post free for 3/6 from— WILCOX & CO. J 490 Haymarket. Londofli WIt fI EVERY WOMUL Siould send two stamps for our 32 page w Book, containing Valuable Information Irregularities and Obstructions may b# Avoided or removed by simple means. 0li^ mended by eminent Physicians, « Safe, Sure and Genuine Remedy. -Never » Thout tads of Testimonials. Establish*^ MR. PAUL BLANCHARg.^ Olaremont House. Dalston Lane, • i