Teitl Casgliad: Aberdare Leader

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 3 o 8 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
22 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
lip and Down the Valley

lip and Down the Valley, LLWYDCOED. JAY'S furniture is worth placing in your best rooms. SHALL our traveller call for orders? Satisfaction guaranteed. — Fletcher's, Commercial Street, Aberdare. MORIAH C.M. — On Sunday last the Rev. Thomas Davies, Taffs Well, was the Preacher.

TRECYNON

TRECYNON. YOU will be pleased after calling at JAY'S. WHY suffer the torments of indi- Estion and liver troubles, when a single ttle of Emrys Evans' Digestive Juice "ill relieve you. THE PULPIT of Siloh Congregational j'hurch was occupied on Sunday last by *tr. T. Teifi Evans, one of the deacons of the above church. MINISTERIAL. The preacher at Ebenezer Congregational Church on Sunday last was the Rev. J. Bowen Davies, Abercwmboi.—At Bryn Seion (C.M.) the Rev. Daniel Davies, Cardiff, officiated.

ASERUARE

ASERUARE. JAY'S furniture is worth placing in your beet rooms. THE "CUP always cheers" when the tea is bought at Fletcher's. BUY JONES' Sewing Machines. They toe the talk of the Valley. ST. ELVAN'S. On Sunday morning fielmore's Te Deum was sung. The Benedictus was chanted. The Rev. C. Q. Wright was the preacher. At the evening service the Canticles were chanted. The Rev. D. J. Wills officiated. ST. MAIR, Preceding his sermon at St. Mary's Welsh Church on Sunday Evening the Rev. Victor Hughes, B.A., said it was the last time he would have 'the privilege of preaching to the congre- gation as their curate. He thanked them for their many kindnesses, and Prayed that God would abundantly bless them. The rev. gentleman has accepted the curacy of Dewi Sant, Cardiff. c TABERNACLE. On Sunday the Preacher at Tabernacle Congregational 'Church was the Rev. D. P. Roberts, B.A., B.D., Llandilo, who is well known In Aberdare, being the son of Mr. W. T. Roberts, Park Schools, and a native of Llwydcoed. At the morning service he addressed the children, and then Preached from Hosea 14. 4, "I will heal their backsliding; I will love them freely; for mine anger is turned away from him." He dwelt on sin and its Consequences and also on the readine of the Saviour to forgive the sinner and reuee.m iiis errors. INTERMENT. On Thursday last the remains of the late Mrs. Dallimore, 72 itonk Street, were interred at the Aber- dare Cemetery. The mourners were: Husband; Nellie, Idris, Clifford and Harry, children; Mr. and Mrs. Fullard, daughter; Mr. and Mrs. J. Davies, daughter; Mrs. Davies, Nantymoel; Jtr. and Mrs. D. Evans, Mr. and Mrs. J. Evans, Grovesend; Mr. and Mrs. R. Thomas. Mr. and Mrs. D. Eynon, sisters; JlLrs. Clark, Mrs. Howells, Caroline and Sarah Ann, cousins; Mrs. Picton, 1drs. Swales and Mrs. G. Thomas. The deceased's son, Private T. G. Dallimore, 8th Welsh Regiment, is on foreign ser- vice in India. The Rev. D. Silvn Evans officiated. The late Mrs. Dallimore leaves eight children to mourn her de- parture. She was a faithful member of Siloa (Cong.) Chapel. Messrs. John Howard Morgan and Co., 34 Clifton Street, were the undertakers,

ABERAMAN

ABERAMAN. DON't delay, but call on Jay. J. BUGLER & SON sell Jones' Sewing Machines. All repairs done. QUALITY best; prices lowest.— Fletcher's, Commercial Street, Aber- ,dare. J FOR Indigestion, Constipation, and other stomach troubles, try Emrys Evans' Digestive Juice. HOME FROM THE FRONT. Chapel 'Street was gaily decorated with flags, tc.. on the occasion of the home-coming of Sapper William James Evans, of the Ttoyal Engineers, from the firing line In France on a ten days' leave. He arrived at Aberaman late on Sunday evening. He has been in the "Big Push." He joined in April, 1915, and ■Was drafted to France in October, 1915. lIe is the eldest son of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Evans, Jubilee Road, and son- in-law to Mr. and the late Mrs. Frank Harris, 6 Chapel Street. OBITUARY. Early on Monday "tttorning Mrs. Esther Jones, wife of "Mr. Rhys Jones, 29 Brynheulog Terrace, passed away suddenly. Deceased was 29 years of age. She had been married only 14 months. She was the grand-daughter of Mrs. Joyce Edwards, Bute Arms, Aberdare. She was of a quiet dis- position, and much liked by all with whom she came in contact. Gen- eral sympathy is extended the bereaved family. WAR NEWS. Driver David John Smith, A.S.C.. a brother-in-law to the late Mrs. Frank Harris, 6 Chapel Street, is in France on active service, and is quite well. He is a native of Tredegar, and enlisted in 1914 at Senghenydd, and was sent out to France in July, 1915. His wife and three children reside at Chapel Street. RECRUITS. Archie Price, son of Mr. and Mrs. W. Price, 6 Tanybryn Street, Aberdare, who was employed by the Cwmbach Co-op. Society at Aber- aman, has joined the Cyclist' Batt. of the 7th Welsh Regiment. G. G. Hancock, son of Mr. and Mrs. Hancock, 5 Ynys- lwvd Road, Aberaman, has joined the 2nd Batt., 8th Manchester. He was em- ployed on the Aberdare Tramways. WAR NEWS. Corporal Ben Scorey, S.W.B., son of Mr. and Mrs. James Scorey, 362a Cardiff Road, was given a rousing welcome home on Saturday last. Cardiff Road had been profusely decora- ted with flags, etc. He was slightly wounded in the "Big Push in France, and arrived now from a military hospital in Taplow on a ten days' sick leave. 'Corporal Scorey has been through some severe fighting. He joined on August 10th, 1914, and was drafted to France in January, 1915. Corporal Ben Scorey is very popular in the district. His numerous pals wish him God-speed and a safe return. INTERMENT. The mortal remains of Mrs. Elizabeth Harris, 6 Chapel Street, were interred at the Aberdare Cemetery on Thursday last. The Rev. 'David Smith, Bethany, performed the obsequies. The chief mourners were: First coach, Husband; Willie Harris, son; Messrs. Gomer Rees, brother; Tom Bailey, Merthyr, brother-in-law; Gwilym Rees, nephew; 2nd coach, Mr. Evan Evans and Mr. Evans, Cwmaman, friends; Evan Morris, Fred Morris, and William Morris, Ebbw Vale, cousins; 3rd coach, Walter Bruning, nephew; George Williams, Merthyr, cousin; Henry Morris, friend. The bearers were Messrs. Gough Lloyd, Ben Morgan, Evan Samuel, Jack Parry, John Smith, and George Hobbs, representatives of the Gasworks' employees. Floral tributes were received from: (1) Husband and family; (2) Mr. and Mrs. David Smith, sister; (3) Mr. and Mrs. Gomer Rees, brother; (4) Mrs. Wilson, Merthyr, cousin; (5) Miss Maggie May Thomas; (6) Mrs. James Jones; (7) Mrs. Alice Jones; (8) Mr. and Mrs. Samuel, Malpas; (9) Gasworks' Employees. INTE,RMENT.-On Wednesday, Aug. 23rd, the funeral of Mr. John Miles, 432 Cardiff Road, took place at the Aberdare Cemetery. The Rev. T. Lloyd Rees, Gwawr, officiated. The following were the mourners: First coach, Mrs. Miles, mother; Mrs. Phillips, sister; Mrs. Pax- ford, Mrs. Harris, Mrs. Martin, Aber- dare; Mrs. Pugh, Pontlottyn, aunts; Mrs. Williams, Penrhiwceiber, great- aunt; 2nd coach, Mrs. Andrews, Cwm- dare; Mrs. Davies, Cardiff Mrs. Davies, Mountain Ash; Mrs. David Harris, Tre- cynon; Mrs. Williams, Ferndale, aunts; Miss Bessie Davies, Mountain Ash, cousin; 3rd coach, Mrs. Parry, Llwyd- coed; Mrs. Owen, Clydach; Mrs. Harris, Clydach; Mrs. Edwards, Clydach; Mrs. Miles, Aberdare, aunts; 4th coach, Misses Ellen Paxford and Florrie Paxford, Mrs. James Paxford, cousins; Mrs. Tom Turner, Clydach, and Mrs. Ben Turner, Morriston, aunts; 5th coach, Miss Mary Harris, cousin; Mrs. William Henry Jones, aunt; Mrs. Williams, friend; 6th coach, Mr. William Jones, Penrhiwceiber, friend. Follow- ing the hearse: Messrs. John Miles, father; James Phillips, brother-in-law; William Thomas Williams, brother; David Miles, Samuel Miles, and John Martin, Aberdare; Samuel Wells, Ferndale; William Henry Jones, Wil- liam Williams, David Harris, Ben- jamin Harris, William Davies, Tom Andrews, Aberdare; Benjamin Turner, Morriston; Thomas Turner, Clydach; Henry Parry, John Lee, uncles; James Paxford. Willie Paxford, John Parry, Charles Phillips, Private Brinley Davies, cousins. The bearers were: Messrs. Wm. Jones, John Walter Jones, George ,,e Lock, George Butter, Thomas Oliver, and David Samuel. Several wreaths were given. Mr. J. Zachariah was the undertaker.

CODREAMAN

CODREAMAN. ALL trams and buses lead you to JAY'S. JONES' Sewing Machines are British- made. FLETCHER'S, 9-10 Commercial Street, is becoming the centre of attraction for smart up-to-date housewives. FUNERAL. The interment of the remains of David Jones, 56 Cwmaman Road, took place on Wednesday at the Aberdare Cemetery. The Rev. Joseph Morgan, B.A., officiated. Deceased was well known in the district, having worked a long time at the Lletty Shenkin Colliery.' The following were noticed amongst the general public: -Councillor T. Lloyd, Cwmbach; Messrs. J. Perrott and E. Woods, Aberaman Colliery; T. Howells, Aberaman Hotel; Edward Howells, Griffin Inn; John Jones, builder; S. Jones, Aberaman; Thomas Thomas, manager, Aberaman Co-op.; H. J. Venables; W. G. Lewis, David Davies, Aberaman Co-op.; Guardian D. J. Phillips, Messrs. J. Thomas, D. W. Jones, F. Motley, Directors Cwm- bach Co-op. Society, and Private G. Stephens. Also a large number of em- ployees of the Cwmbach Co-op. Society, of which deceased's two sons and daughter are employes. The following were the bearers:—Messrs. D. Jones, Watkin Jones, Thomas Jones, D. G. Pugslev, S. J. Rusbatch, and Martin Isaac. Mourners following the hearse: Messrs. John Henry Jones and Ben- jamin Jones, sons; Phillip Rees, Troedyrhiw, uncle; Joshua Davies, Cwmbach, brother-in-law; John Henry James, David James and Martin James, Cwmbach, nephews; Thomas James, Mardy; James Davies, Ferndale; Thomas Williams and William Wil- liams, Cwmbach; John Williams, Mountain Ash; James Parker, Abernant, cousins. First coach, Mrs. Miriam Jones, wife; Misses Miriam Jones, Maggie Ann Jones, Beatrice Jones, Emily Jones, Winnie Jones, daughters; Mrs. Joshua Davies, sister-in-law; 2nd coach, Mrs. J. H. Jones and Mrs. Ben- jamin Jones, daughters-in-law; Miss Annie Mary Jones, daughter; Mrs. (Police-sergeant) Evans and Miss Katie Lewis, Pontycymmer, and Mrs. S. Hughes, Troedyrhiw, cousins; 3rd coach, Miss M. J. Davies, Cwmbach; Mrs. T. James, Mardy, Mrs. J. Davies, Fern- dale, nieces; Mrs. Jenkins and Mrs. Thomas, Swansea, cousins; 4th coach, Mrs. B. James, Cwmbach, cousin; Miss Mary James, Ferndale, niece; Mr. Thomas Williams, Cwmbach, cousin; Mrs. R. Hughes, Aberaman; 5th coach, Mrs. J. Williams, Aberaman; Mrs. W. Williams, Abercwmboi; Mrs. Jones, Aberaman; Miss Maggie Perkins; 6th coach, Mrs. Rees Harries, Mrs. Perrott, Miss Williams, Mrs. Owen, and Mrs. W. P. Jones, Abercwmboi. Floral tributes were received from: (1) Wife and children; (2) John Henry, Gwen and Eirlys; (3) Ben and Annie Mary; (4) spray, Eirlys Jones. grandchild; (5) spray, Winnie and Emily, daughters; (6) Employes, Cwmbach Branch Co-op. Society; (7) Vena Horton; (8) Mr. and Mrs. Levi Harries; (9) Mr. and Mrs. H. J. Venables; (10) Mr. and Mrs. Owen and Mr. Golightly; (11) Mr. W. Perking and family; (12) Messrs. John and Henry Williams, Mountain Ash, cousins; (13) Mr. and Mrs. Davies and family, Pen- rhiwngau Farm; (14) Annie Mary Davies; (15) Lletty Shenkin Surface Colliery Workmen; (16) Mr. and Mrs. W. G. Lewis and Nancy, Cwmaman Road; (17) Mrs. Perrott and family; (18) Lily May Jones.

ABERCWMBOI

ABERCWMBOI. OUTING. The Wesleyan Sunday School held their annual outing on Mon- day, when they visited the Wye Valley and Chepstow in three charabancs, supplied by Gough's Garage Co., Mountain Ash.

ABERCWMBOI

WINNING NUMBERS of John Owen's Prize Drawing, Abercwmboi: 2526, 3349, 3362, 4678, 2355, 2153, 1882, 1645, 1907, 4156, 2895, 2657, 1747, 4731, 689, 2126, 1977, 1716, 1723, 1011, 2272. 700, 4825.-James Thomas, Secretary. JAY'S easy payment system is easy for you. FLETCHER'S, Commercial Street, Aberdare, is the shop for best value. Send post card, and traveller will calL Deliveries daily. DO YOU ever feel down in the mouth? Depend upon it, it surely arises from stomach troubles. Try Emrys Evans' Digestive Juice—a certain cure. DOING WELL. Private D. J. Mor- gan, 2 Jenkin Street, who was wounded three weeks ago, and as reported in the "Leader" had his leg amputated, has now been drafted to a military hospital at Bournemouth, and is doing well. PULPIT. Mr. Evan Llewelyn Lewis, North View Terrace, occupied the pulpit at Bethlehem on Sunday, and preached two English sermons. Mr. Lewis is a very successful student in London. MILITARY. Mrs. Davies, 87 Park View Terrace, has been notified that her son, Lance-Corporal Bugler D. J. Davies, S.W.B., is laid up at St. Patrick's Hospital, Malta, suffering from the effect of the heat in Egypt. SOLDIER TWICE WOUNDED. Mr. Evan James, Jenkin Street, was on Thursday morning last notified from the War Office that his son, Private James James, Royal Scots Fusiliers, has been wounded, and lies at No. 5 General Hospital, Rouen, France, suffering from a gunshot wound and a compound fracture of the left arm, received on Feb. 2nd. Private James had been wounded before. I.L.P. MEETING. On Friday night last the Lesser Hall was packed, when a meeting was held under the auspices of the Aberdare I.L.P. Branch. Mr. W. Yeoman, Abercwmboi, presided. Ad- dresses were delivered by the Rev. G. Neighbour, Mountain Ash, and Mr. R. C. Wallhead, Labour Candidate for Coventry. Guardian Noah Tromans also gave a short address, urging upon the workers of Abercwmboi to form a branch by the winter months. Mr. D. J. Jones, 21 Bronallt Terrace, was ap- pointed secretary. ANNIVERSARY. The Sunday School anniversary of Bryn Seion English Wesleyan was held on Sunday, when the following programme was gone through: — Morning: Psalm, Willie Swain. Recitations, Eunice Flook, Ethel Jones, Alice Lock, Maud Jones, .Annie Belcher, M. Floyd, Ifor Jones, and Mr. Fred J. Rudd. Dialogue, Messrs. W. J. Phillips and James J. Walker. Recita- tion, Hilda Swain. Afternoon: Chapter, Alice Lock. Recitations, Lily Clark, Ethel Jones, Willie Swain, Gwladys Lock, Mr. W. J. Phillips, Miss Rigby, Violet Hood, Ada Richardson, and Stuart Dolbel. In the evening Psalm by Lily Clarke. Recitations, Misses Nellie Stoneman, Maria Floyd, Miss Rigby, Misses Annie Belcher, Alice Lock, E. Dolbel, Edith Jones; Ivor Jones, Mr. Fred J. Rudd. Duett, Blanche and Lizzie Dolbel. Dialogue, Messrs. J. J. Walker and W. J. Phillips. Recitations, Hilda Swain and Fred Stoneman. Solo, Hilda Swain. PRESENTATION. — Another in- formal presentation meeting was held on Monday afternoon, this time at the local newsagent's shop. The recipient was Private Tom Davies, R.W.F., son of Mr. and Mrs. Sam Davies, Park View Terrace. Private Davies was called up as a Reservist at the outbreak of hostilities, and was in France in the first week of August, 1914, where he re- mained for 17 months, at which time he was discharged as a time-expired man. Tom came home, and had a right royal reception. He worked in the colliery for a while, but eight weeks ago he re- enlisted, and is to be drafted to France this week. Mrs. Davies, 87 Park View Terrace, sister to Councillor J. Evans, in presenting Private Davies on behalf of the Heroes' Fund with a wrist watch, said that she greatly admired his pluck in rejoining, and wished him every luck. Others who took part were Mr. John Evans, the energetic secretary, and Mr. W. R. Griffiths. Private Davies suitably acknowledged. PRESENTATION. A concert was held under the auspices of the Heroes' Fund Committee on Thursday night last, over which Mr. William Williams, checkweigher, presided. Solos were given by Messrs. Abraham Morris (Ap Morris), George Jones, Walter Hobbs (comic), Bryn Morton, Miss Gwladys Thomas, and Mr. W. Williams, Mostyn Street. The chairman explained that there were two soldiers to be presented that evening, viz., Private Frank Winnan, who has been wounded twice, and Private William Parry, Jenkin St. Private Parry, who is the son of Mr. W. Parry, Jenkin Street, lost his mother while he was out in France. He enlisted at the outbreak of war when only 16 years, of age. He was in the firing line in France when he celebrated his 17th birthday. Now his age has been dis- covered, and although he had enlisted for 14 years, Private Parry has been sent home for eight months. The pre- sentation took the form of a glow wrist watch. Mrs. Lewis, Park View, pre- sented Private Parry, and Mrs. Speck presented Private Winnan. Both suit- ably acknowledged. The National Anthem was sung, Mr. P. Rees, A.C., taking the solo. A vote of thanks to the chairman and artistes was moved by Mr. John Evans, the secretary, and seconded by Mr. John Davies, Tanybryn.

Advertising

NO TBA LIMa 'Quaker' Tea OF ALL GROQIRS. I

MISKIN

MISKIN. JAY'S furniture is worth placing in your best rooms. DEATH AND INTERMENT. Mr. Henry J. Cobley, of 74 'Clarence Street, passed away on Sunday last. Deceased was 56 years of age. He was born in India, and came to Mountain Ash 45 years ago. He was a faithful member of the Allen Street Brethren's Church. He leaves a sorrowing wife, two sons, and one daughter. The funeral took place on Thursday last at Maesyrarian Cemetery, and the burial was conducted according to the Brethren's rites. Bro. Morgan officiated. Bro. Dix conducte I the service at the house. The mourners were: Mrs. Cobley, wife; Mr. Albert J. Cobley, son; Mr. and Mrs. William H. Cobley, son; Willie, Bertie, and Leyshon Cobley, grandchildren; Miss Annie Cobley, daughter; Misses Kath- leen, Winnie and Nancy Cobley, grand- children; Mrs. Davies and Miss Davies, of New Tredegar, aunt and niece; Miss Polly Williams, Treharris; Mrs. Darby, Mrs. Williams, Mrs. Brown, of Mer- thyr Vale, friends; Mrs. Nelson and Mrs. Tucker, of Mountain Ash. Floral tributes were sent by relatives and friends. .y

MISKIN

I Next week is to be a great week for I Mountain Ash-,i time which thous- ands of townsfolk will remember with gratitude all their lives. Mr. Worrell, the London eyesight specialist, is com- ing to help them. All his great skill and lifelong experience, all the re- markable talent and accumulated knowledge that twenty-five years' close study of the science of sight has taught him is to be placed freely and gladly at the service of every man, woman, or child who seeks his aid. What an opportunity! What a boon to the thousands of workers upon whose sight depends their daily existence, and who, hitherto, obliged to rely upon rough and ready methods, which are seldom without danger, will now be able to avail themselves of the expert advice, professional skill, and exper- ienced guidance that have been within reach of the rich only. Every sufferer from defective vision in Mountain Ash, every victim to head- ache, neuralgia, staring, squinting, and the host of other distressing dis- comforts resulting from defective eye- sight is to be helped to see clearly by this famous man. The great burden of their lives is tb be lifted, and instead of groping their way from day to day— losing half the pleasure of life and running the risk of serious eye trouble —they will be made to see once-again with all the vigour and distinctness of their youth.

Advertising

o ¡ MOUNTAIN ASH'S OPPORTUNITY. I MR. WORRELL IS COMINC I = j The Famous London Eyesight Expert is Visit- j ing Mountain Ash, Monday to Saturday, September 4-9. I Advice Free. No More High Fees. No More Faulty Glasses. j Nixon's Workmen's Institute.

Who is Mr Worrell

Who is Mr. Worrell? Mr. Worrell, whose chief scientific centre is in the City of London-the axis of the Empire—within the shadow of the Mansion House, the Bank of England, and the Royal Exchange, the veritable hub of mighty London, has for years tested the eyes of members of the aristocracy, world-famous men, city magnates, and countless thousands of other folk. Many medical gentlemen have consulted him, and have acknow- ledged his never failing skill in diagnos- ing and counteracting visual defects.

The Great Crusade

The Great Crusade. Mr. Worrell's services are to cost you nothing! All next week the doors of the Nixon's Workmen's Institute will be thrown open to the public, and Mr Worrell will freely and generously ad- vise and assist all those who seek his aid. His one object is to prove, once and for all, by reason of the enormous business he conducts, that the high fees and inflated charges, which place the expert assistance of the specialist beyond the reach of-the great mass of humanity, can be done away with.

Sight Specialist in Mountain Ash

Sight Specialist in Mountain Ash. It is difficult to over-estimate the boon this remarkable man's visit will confer upon the town. It is a recog; nised fact that over 50 per cent. of the population of our large industrial cen- tres suffer from defective vision in one form or another-and the percentage in Mountain Ash is higher than in many large towns. This is perhaps inevitable. The close work in the factory, workshop and office--the straining of the eyes over the desk or work-table, frequently in a bad light—result sooner or later in an urgent need for glasses. In the majority of cases expert advice is beyond reach. A visit to London to see a specialist whose fees are reckoned in guineas is not to be thought of. There is no other way but the casual choice of what seem to be the glasses required-glasses that really seem to help the vision, but which in nine cases out of ten-are en- tirely unsuited to the particular defect for which they are chosen-and which, instead of helping the eyes, too often ruin the eyesight and impair the health and brain nerves as well. This visit to the London specialist about which many have dreamed is no longer necessary. The specialist is coming to them. All Mountain Ash is invited to meet him and discuss their individual cases with him. It is an opportunity few will miss.

A Great PointI

A Great Point. An outstanding feature of Mr. Wor- rell's crusade is this-he does not want you to wear glasses! He will tell you the plain truth about your eyes. If he finds that glasses are not necessary, he frankly says so. Mr. Worrell is actu- ated by a wish to help those who need his services. Having had the eyes tested scientifically and carefully, ha v- ing received the best counsel and ad- vice, one can, if no glasses are required, walk out of the room without the ex- penditure of a farthing. The glasses are supplied if required; they are scientifically correct, and are ground from a colourless and specially prepared crown crystal. The prices charged are always the lowest possible. For example, the average cost of the lenses is 3s., and the quality and work- manship are guaranteed of the best.

Diseases of the Eyes

Diseases of the Eyes. One thing needs emphasising. Mr. Worrell does not prescribe for diseases of the eye. If your case requires the attention of an ophthalmic surgeon Mr Worrell will tell you so. He occupies himself solely with those cases where a defective vision can be corrected by the use of glasses. If your sight is sound and merely requires a. lotion, a rest or general care, he will tell you exactly the course to follow.

One Week Only

One Week Only. Mr. Worrell can only spend one week in Mountain Ash. Make a point of visiting him early. The opportunity will hardly occur again. To miss it now may mean a life-long regret, and per- haps serious eye trouble. Even if your eyes seem all right, go and consult him. Hundreds of people make a. point of doing this because they know there is no fear of being advised to wear glasses when these are unneces- sary that, if all is well, they will come away satisfied that their eyesight is sound in every respect. And it costs them nothing.

Nixons Workmens Institute

Nixon's Workmen's Institute. HOURS OF ATTENDANCE: 10 to 1; 2 to 7. Don't put down this paper until you have fixed in your mind a time to go and see Mr. Worrell. Let him tell you ex- actly how things are with your eyes. It may cost you nothing; in any case the cost will be much less than is ordinarily charged.

T ICwmdare Notes

————————————— T. I Cwmdare Notes. BY RAFFLES. Don't talk to Will about Nettles; he'll get angry. The best food for a parrot that uses bad language is birdlime. Raffles knows four ladies who spent their holidays at Swansea. They had high times, it seems; also high kicking in the bedroom. Draw the blinds next time, ladies. The couple that spent their honeymoon at—well, never mind where—left an account behind. Who would have thought it? Twm Talcen Slip and the vice-chairman have signed the pledge for an indefinite period. Mary Elizabeth Ann has improved her symmetry. Who fetched the bread from the bake- house the other night, and spent the baking money on strong drink ? Raffles knows. The horse and cart mystery has been solved. Georgie Concertina has turned King's evidence. That was a lively scene up at the Patches last Thursday evening, several scratches on the face. Foul play some- where.

Advertising

X Teeth. X Every care and attention given at Mr. Tudor Williams' Dental Surgery Medical Hall, Aberdare, BY Skilled Operators Xand y Mechanics. NEW 5-SEATER CAR FOR HIRE. Suitable for Parties, Weddings, «u Moderate Charges. AppIY,-WILK'NS, 53 HERBERT STREET, ABERDARE.

THE PAVILION

THE PAVILION, RESOLVEN The Juvenile EISTEDDFOD (VALE OF NEATH) WILL BE HELD ON SATURDAY, OCTOBER 21, 1916. Adjudicators :—Music Dr. D. Evans, Cardiff, and W. Davies, Esq. Glyn Neath. Literature: Alfa and Isfryn, Cwmamman. Drawing and Composi- tion, Mr. James Nicholas, Port Talbot. Chief Items :-Juve.Bile Choir, Own Choice; not under 30 in number, age not over 16. Prize, E5 and gold medal. —Action Song, Own Choice, not under 30 in number, not over 16 years of age. Prize, L2 10s. and gold medal. Champion Solo, Open; Prize, £ 1 10s. and gold medal.—Solos for children, recits, etc.—See Programmes, Ild. each by post, from T. M. Evans, Secretary, 2 Davies Terrace, Resolven. Proceeds towards the Resolven Fund for Dis- abled Soldiers and Sailors.

Advertising

BEVAN & CO., LTD, Wales' Largest Furnishers and Pianoforte Merchants, PONTYPRIDD CARDIFF SWANSEA, &0. -=" SEVEN REASONS WHY You should place your orders in the hands of this well known, old established and reliable *Firm: TTivcf Pdqcnn BEVAN & COMPANY are beyond question the largest Furnishers rirbl XVedbOII in the Principality. PnotjAn Customers get the full benefit of the Firm's experience of sixty-six years OtJCOIIU. iAt'dioUII jn the Furnishing Business, and they know that this experience results in nope but thoroughly reliable goods being supplied ThiTvi The resources of the Company enable them to purchase for Cash in the -Lima xtcaouii ^est markets, and in such quantities that they can often SELL at what other Firms PAY for Goods FTmirfll "Rpfmon Their Stock is so varied, and the selection so large—in fact, it contains iUUitJJ. JAcaDuiJ. everything required for furnishing throughout. Fifth Keason The Stock is clean> briSht' and new—no old stock—no dirty accumulation of years. Qiv+V» PnocAn The Public know full well that BEVAN & COMPANY will not descend OlXill XveafcOn to any sharp practices." Their earnest desire, as their interest, is to give every Purchaser the HIGHEST SATISFACTION q M p All Goods are delivered throughout the Rhondda, Aberdare and Merthyr sevenxn neasoil Valleys by the Firm's own Vans, thus ensuring, tree of charge, safe and perfect delivery!