Teitl Casgliad: Aberdare Leader

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 5 o 8 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
23 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
Advertising

64wvioes for Sunday Next. HIGHLAND PLACE UNITARIAN CHURCH.—11 and 6. Evening, teacher, Mr. John Lewis, Pontypridd. TRINITY CHURCH, ABERDARE. NEXT SUNDAY, SEPT. 3, 1916. Preacher: W. WATKIN w ILLIAMS, SWANSEA. CREEN ST. WESLEYAN CHURCH, ABERDARE. Treacher Next Sunday, Sept. 3rd, 11 and 6: Rev. STEPHEN HARPER, DUNSTABLE, The Newly Appointed Minister. Hearty Invitation. Hymn Books Provided. "—

Aberdare Ministers Valedictoryi

Aberdare Minister's Valedictory. On Sunday evening a large congre- j Eat ion gathered at Green Street Yves- %van Church, Aberdare, on the ocea- on of I farewell sermon by the Rev. Henry Barraclough. The rev. gentle- delivered a powerful discourse horn the words, How long halt ye he- tween two opinions ? If the Lord be God, follow Him." He remarked that hWhen he came to the Aberdare Circuit he found many in his congregation who were halting between iwo opinions, but he was also glad to be able to say that Some had made the great decision, and had joined the church. Commenting On the attractions of the world and the Uncertainty of life he concluded with a very ernest appeal to all who had not already decided for Christ to do so, and to become active workers in the cause. During the service the Roll of Hon- our containing the names of those who «ad gone from the church to His Majesty's Forces was read. At the close the Sacrament of the Lord's Supper was administered, the Whole service being a very impressive one. Mr. Barraclough was a preacher of the evangelical type, and his work iat > the circuit had been marked with toiuch success. Mrs. Barraclough, by her cheerful disposition and many kind actions, had endeared herself to the Members and friends at Green Street, and her -departure is sincerely re- gretted. They left Aberdare on Mon- day morning for their new circuit— Stanley, Durham, and a large number of friends were at the station to wish them God-speed. | The pulpit at Green Street will be Occupied morning and evening next Sunday by the Rev. Stephen Harper, who succeeds Mr. Barraclough as Superintendent minister.

BOUGHT A COLLIERY FOR ALAW COCHI

BOUGHT A COLLIERY FOR ALAW COCH. Mr. Eustace Richards, sales agent for Messrs. D. Davis and Sons. Ltd., at Cardiff, is retiring at the end of this 1 Oionth after having been in the ser- ^ice of the firm for nearly 43 years. Mr. Richards, who is a native of Aber- dare, has been engaged in the coal trade the whole of his business life, His father was one of the pioneers of the coal trade, and, in the fifties, in Partnership with the late Mr. R. H. J^hys, of Llwydcoed, purchased the Merthyr Dare Colliery for the late M1 David Williams (Alàw Goch), Ynys- Cynon, father of the late Judge Gwilym Williams, Miskin. Mr. Richards is on.; of the best known figures on 'Change, where he is mush esteemed.

MOUNTAIN ASH FLOWER SHOW

MOUNTAIN ASH FLOWER SHOW. The Mountain Ash Constitutional Club Flower Show was held at the Club premises on Tuesday. Judges Mr. D. J. Lewis, Mr. Stone, Troedv- rhiw House; Mr. Lawrence, Mr. G. Mears, and Mrs. Stevens. Secretary, Mr. J. G. Groves. Awards :— Special Prizes: W. Phillips, J. Mor- ris, H. Bowers, E. Eagles. J. Morris, Miskin, staged two stands of greenhouse plants and outdoor hlooms. W. Treseder, Cardiff, staged one stand of blooms and pot plants. Three Plants in Pot: 1, J. Smith; 2, J. Morris. Vase of Garden Flowers: 1, J. Morris; 2, E. Evles. Four Vases of Sweet Peas: 1, J. Morris; 2, Ernest Eyles. Six Pansies: 1, G. Holier. Six Carnations: 1..J. Morris. Six Dahlias: 1, W. Walsh; 2, J. Cresswell. Six Asters: 1, G. Horler; 2, E. Eyles. Six Stocks: 1, E. Eyles. Basket of Wild Flowers: 1, J. Howells; 2, G. Horler. CollectiolV of Vegetables: 1, W. Phillips; 2, E. Eyles; 3, T. W. Phillips. Spring Onions: 1, E. Eyles; 2, T. Howells. Leeks: 1, E. Evles; 2, R. Watkms. Eschallots: 1, G. Mears; 2, E. Eyles. Carrots: 1, E. Eyles; 2, T. Howells. Parsnips: 1, J. Morris; 2, W. Phil- lips. Turnips: 1, W. Hawkins; 2, J. ■ Morris. Beetroots: 1, E. Eyles; 2, Thomas! Phillips. Potatoes, Round: 1, H. Bowers; 2, j G. Horler. Potatoes, Kidney: 1, H. Bowers; 2, G. Mears. Tr Collection of Potatoes 1, H. Bowers; 2. E. Eyles. Cabbage, White: 1, W. Phillips; 2, H. Bowers.. Cabbage, Bed: 1, W. Hawkins; 2, W. Phillips. Cauliflower: 1, W. Phillips; 2, T. Howells. Runner Beans: 1, H. Bowers; 2, W. Walsh. Dwarf Beans: 1, J. Cresswell; 2, T. Howells. Peas: I, E. Weston; 2, J. Morns. Celery: 1, T. Phillips; 2, E. Eyles. Rhubarb: 1, G. Horler; 2, H. Bowers. Marrows: 1, W. Phillips; 2, E. 1 Weston. Lettuce: 1, W. Phillips; 2, W. Hawkins. Dish of Hen Eggs: Alfred Morgan. Cottage Loaf 1, T. Griffiths; 2, E. Evles. Cooked Potatoes: 1, E. Eyles; 2, T. Griffiths.

Local Mems

■■ Local Mems. BY MEMO. The lady postman has arrived in Aberdare at last. In the Rhondda and several other busy places her ser- vices have been requisitioned long ago. In country places the lady post- men is no innovation. I know of one place where a young woman carried the letters 25 years ago, and another young woman has charge of the round to-day, while the telegraph "boy" is an old man of 79 summers—and winters. If country districts can he covered by young women, it should be an easy matter for representatives of the fair sex to manage the towns. The rough farm roads and hilly slopes for miles around form the beat of the country postwoman, while in the town, once the letters are sorted, the delivery Is plain sailing. A false rumour had a good run in Aberdare last Sunday, until the morn- ilip papers of Monday scotched it. The rumour in question was that a great naval battle had taken place; that Britain had lost any thing from 1(3 to 24 ships, but that Germany's Navy had been entirely wiped out. How these rumours first see the light is a mystery, but once they see the light they travel like lightning. News almost equal in importance to the sinking of the German Navy ar- rived, however, on Monday afternoon. It formed a new Act in the great war tragedy. Enter Rumania! The dra- matis personae continue to increase as the pl&y proceeds. When shall we see Greece, the land of the ancient dra- matic art, enter upon the stage? The sooner she joins the Allies the better, if she wishes to partake of the spoils of victory.

Haggars AberdareI

Haggars', Aberdare. I

NEXT WEEK THE WAR IN PICTURE AND STORY

NEXT WEEK: "THE WAR IN PICTURE AND STORY." Everyone owes a debt of gratitude to our old friend, Councillor Haggar, for bringing this great picture of "The War" to Aberdare. We seek for happiness, although the war is with us. We seek our own pleasures and achievements, yet the war goes on. Mr. Haggar brings us something to show us what is going on, what counts, and the trifles that we pass by unheedingly. For Monday and all the week he has engaged the great war correspondent, Dr. Baron, the learned and intrepid representative of the "London Daily Mail and "The Times," to lecture on the War, as he and his camera "have seen it. Mr. Baron has not been the man at-a-distance, but right there, close up, in the midst of it, and has brought back a portion of German magnanimity—a bullet in hie shoulder. The extraordinary agility combined with British bravery is clearly displayed. As one may easily expect Dr. Baron in his close searching for picturesque news did not escape unscathed. Four of his elaborately equipped cameras were potted and also the contents. The films that Dr. Baron produces and ex- plains are right there, even so close that the men are easily recognisable, and possibly you may be able to see your relatives, friends and companions doing their bit. The lecture and films will be continued all the week, but an entire change will be given on Thursday, Friday, and Saturday. Of course, this entertainment will be supported by a rich programme of star dramas, comedies and comics every performance.

2nd BATTALION GLAMORGANI VOLUNTEER REGIMENT

2nd BATTALION GLAMORGAN VOLUNTEER REGIMENT. "B" COMPANY. Orders for Week Ending Sept. 9, 1916. Monday.—Firing Practice, Llwynhelyg Range, 5.30 p.m. Tuesday.—Platoon Drill, 7.45, p.m. Wednesday .-Firing Practice (Drill Hall), 7 p.m. Thursday.—Firing Practice, Llwynhelyg I Range, 5.30 p.m. Friday.—Firing Practice (Drill Hall), 7 p.m. Saturday.—Firing Practice, Llwynhelyg I Range, 5.30 p.m. For Duty.—Platoon Commander W. C. Cox; Platoon Sergeant H. H. Col- I lette; Section Commander T. 0. Os- mond. | A. L. GREGOR, Company Commander

Empire Mountain Ash

Empire, Mountain Ash. NEXT WEEK: "A WOMAN'S HONOUR AND "THE SECRET SIN." The charming musical comedy that Mr. Victor Rowe is staging this week is a rarity. It combines patriotism with real class songs and splendidly equipped orchestra. "The Prince and the Beggar Maid" is a delicious bit of musical comedy, and deserves what it is getting —crowded houses. Miss Lottie Holland is a hostess, and an entertainment in herself. Next week, Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday, will be presented Mr. Stephen Crossley's well-known London Co., in "A Woman's Honour,' including Miss Florence Hatton. On Thursday, Friday and Saturday there will be a complete change of programme, when a new and original play, "The Secret Sin," will be produced. Both these plays are from the pen of Miss Florence H. Crossley, the well-known novelist and dramatist. The official war film will be shown during the week, de- picting special pictures of mining activity on the British front.

ip and Down thy Valley

ip and Down thy Valley ABERDARE. LET JAY supply you on their easy payment system. OBITUARY. — We regret to record the death of Mrs. Davies, 67 Bute St., wife of Mr. William Davies, hay merchant, which occurred on Tuesday evening. G.W.R. TEMPERANCE UNION. — The monthly meeting was held on Sun- day, the chair being taken by Mr. J etlries. A Bible reading was given by Mr. Wilkins. Instrumental trios were given by Mr. Symonds, Mountain Ash, and friends. A solo was rendered by Mr. H. Campbell, and a recitation by Mr. Watts. Several new members were enrolled. The meeting was very well attended. GOOD TEMPLARY. The new officials of the Pride of Aberdare Lodge were duly installed on Friday night at Carmel Hall. Bro. Leonard Cooke, D.C.T., as the Installing Officer, did his work in his inimitable style, and Bro. Thomas Davies as C.T. received the emblem of office. The other officers are: V.T., Sister Miss Henry; secretary, Bro. Tom James; chaplain, Sister Couldrey; P.C.T., Bro. W. Arnold. Bro. Morgan Parr was elected P.G.C.T., Sister Alice Jones, S.J.W.; Bro. W. Arnold as E.Super., and Miss Henry as pianist. The programme included solos by Bros. Tom James and W. Arnold, and addresses by the C.T. and Bro. Cooke. YOUNG PEOPLE'S RAMBLE. On Thursday last some of the members of Tabernacle Congregational Church went for a ramble to Penderyn. Owing to the inclemency of the weather only eleven ladies turned up at the station. They entrained to Hirwain, walking from there along the tramroad to Pen- deryn, en route for Cilhepste Falls. Those present were: Misses E. Thomas, A. Collier, B. Culliford, P. Lloyd, C. Durrant, Mrs. Harry Davies, Miss Grubb, Miss Keeling, Misses B. and J. Richards and M. Howells. The walk along the moors was invigorating. Reaching the Falls they set to making a camp fire, round which they sat for a delightful tea, cakes, etc., having been made by some of the members. After tea the party strolled for some length along the river banks, and proceeded home to Aberdare, via Llwydcoed. SEND-OFF. On Friday evening, at the Conway Hotel, a send-off concert was given to Private George Davies, of the Welsh Regiment. Private Davies was well known in football circles, having one time played for Aberdare A.F.C. The chairman was Mr. A. Ryan. Songs were given by Messrs. E. Vater, E. Morgan, M. Donelly, and John Lewis. Private Davies was presented on behalf of his friends by Mr. R. H. Scorey with a shaving set. Mr. E. Snow on behalf of himself and family presented Private Davies with a shaving bowl. Private Davies responded, and thanked all for their kind gifts, which he would always appreciate. A hearty vote of thanks was given to the host and hostess for their kindness towards Private Davies when at the front. The secretaries were Mr. R. H. Scorey and Mr. Morgan J. Davies.

MOUNTAIN ASH

MOUNTAIN ASH. DON'T delay, but call on JAY. ON LEAVE. Private W. F. Phillips, R.F.A., stationed in Scotland, has been paying, a welcome visit to his parents, Mr. and Mrs. William Phillips, 18 Beadon Street. VOLUNTEER CORPS. There was a good muster for parade of the above corps on Tuesday evening in the Pavilion. Platoon. drill was conducted by Sergeants J. Blueitt, Antill, and White. DEEP DUFFRYN. A meeting of the workmen of the above colliery was held in the Institute on Wednesday evening to consider the advisability of working extra time to 'enable them to attend the forthcoming fete. It was decided to approach the management with an offer to work a quarter turn, either before or after the event. PRISONER IN GERMANY.—Private H. Soper, Somerset Light Infantry, a prisoner in Germany, writes to Mr. and Mrs. Tatem, Conservations Club. He is quite well, and sends his regards to both of them and all the members of the Club. A lot of things have happened since Soper started on his journey to Berlin. Warrant Officer Tatem has left the Consti., has been all through Gallipoli, and is now tickling the Turks on the banks of the Suez.

MISKIN

MISKIN. JAY'S easy payment system is easy for you. SEND-OFF. On Monday last a fine send-off was given by the residents of Glancynon Street to Private Hugh James, of the Welsh Guards, who has returned te his depot at Tadworth, Surrey. The gallant hero was badly wounded at Ypres. He was admitted to Sheffield Hospital, and from there went to Doncaster Hospital. He was suffering from shrapnel wounds in the legs. He is 24 years of age. He joined in May, 1915, and was drafted out in September last. He has the best wishes of his Miskin friends. His home is at 18 Glancynon Street.

PENRHIWCEIBER

PENRHIWCEIBER. JAY'S furniture is worth placing in your best rooms. INTERMENT. Little Emlyn, the eleven-weeks-eld child of Mr. and Mrs. Richard Erasmus, of 5 Glamorgan Terrace, passed away on Saturday last. His remains were interred at Abercynon Cemetery on Tuesday. The Rev. D. Lloyd officiated. Much sympathy is ex- tended to the sorrowing parents. HOME FROM THE FRONT. — On Sunday last Park Street was gaily de- corated with flags and bunting to wel- come home from a military hospital in Scotland Private George 1 eague, of the R.F.A. He was badly wounded at I Mametz Woods. He joined at the out- break of war, and has been on active service since. He has taken part in several engagements. He returned on I Wednesday to his depot. His home is at 34 Park Street, Penrhiwceiber. SOLDIER'S RETURN. On Tuesday last Rheola Street was prettily decorated in honour of Gunner Percy Roach, of the R.G.A., elder son of Mr. and Mrs. Henry Roach, of Rheola Street, who has been discharged from Orchard Military Hospital, having been wounded in the foot whilst in France. He was engaged in bringing up ammunition when one of his horses reared at the sound of the guns, and brought his hoof down on Roach's foot. He was sent to Bristol Hospital, thence to the above hospital, and is now fully recovered. He left for his depot on Thursday, prior to taking up duties at the front again. His brother, Private Harry Roach, attached to the A.S.C., is now expected home from Perham Downs. SOLDIER'S WEDDING. On Satur- day last at the Register Office, Ponty- pridd, a pretty wedding was solemnised. The contracting parties were Mrs. Rosa Pawles, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Sandry, of Swansea, and Private George Ellis, of 2nd Coldstream Guards, son of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Ellis, of Coleford, Somersetshire. The bride was charmingly attired in a light blue dress, with blue hat.. She was given away by Mr. Ed. Whitcombe, step-brother of the bridegroom. The best man was Mr. E. Whitcombe. The bridesmaid was Miss Whitcombe. After the ceremony the bridal pair repaired to the bridegroom's brother's home, where a sumptuous wedding breakfast was partaken of. A host of friends and relatives were present. The wedding took place from 1 Glamorgan Terrace, the home of Mr. and Mrs. Whitcombe. The bride- groom has just been discharged from North Everton Military Hospital, where I he was a patient suffering from shattered nerves through shell shock. He joined-on the outbreak of war, and took part in the retreat of Mons. He has been in action at the Marne, also at La Bassee, Givenchy, Loos, Ypres, and other engagements.

MATTHEWSTOWN

MATTHEWSTOWN. DON'T delay, but call on JAY. OBITUARY. We regret to record the death of Mr. William Davies, of 11 Homerton Street, who passed away on Wednesday at the age of 52. Deceased had been ill only nine days. He was a native of Aberdare, and was highly re- spected. He leaves a wife and children. Much sympathy is felt for the family. His remains were interred on Tuesday last at Abercynon Cemetery. The Rev. D. Howells, Bethesda, officiated. The mourners were-. Mrs. Davies, wife; Mr. Daniel Evans, Tre- forest, brother-in-law; Mr. and Mrs. Richard Jones, Llanharry, sister; Mr. John Jones, Llanharry, brother-in-law; Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Thomas, Penrhiw- ceiber, cousins. Floral tributes were re- ceived from relatives and friends. HOME ON LEAVE. On Monday last Private Dan Evans, of the Cycling Corps, came home on a few days' leave from Swindon. Recently he won two beautiful cups at a singing competition held for soldiers at Swindon.—Also Lance-Corporal Tom Evans, of the 11th Devons, a brother to the above, is home from Wareham (Dorset) on sick leave. He has done his bit at Salonica, and was sent back to England last March suffering from shattered nervee and enteric fever. They are the sons of Nurse E. Evans, of 6 Homerton Street.

ABERCYNON

ABERCYNON. LET JAY supply you on their easy payment system. QUARTERLY MEETINGS. The Sunday School quarterly meetings of the English Wesleyan Church were held on Sunday last. Mr. Rosser, Cilfynydd, presided in the afternoon, and Mr. Badham, Aberaman, in the morning and evening. Programme: Chorus by the Choir, under the oonductorship of Mr. J. Titley. Recitation, Lily Foster. Solo, Ada Taylor. Recitation, Dora Wil- liams. Duett, Mary Davies and Rosy Daniels. Recitation, Winnie Lester. Chorus by Church Choir. Recitation, Rosy Daniels. Solo, Mrs. Dwyer. Recitation, Freddy Villis. Recitation, Arthur Harry. Duett, Mrs. Dwyer and Miss Taylor. Recitation, Louie Villis. Solo, Hilda Taylor. Recitations, Blod- wen Titley, Ruby Barwick, Maud Berry. Mr. W. Davies presided at the organ.

Y CARDOTYN

Y CARDOTYN. Os yw y gwlaw Yn disgyn draw Ar ben rhyw dlawd gardotyn, Paid byw'n rhy hy' Er yn dy dy Rhag i ti ddod i newyn. Os daw y tlws I guro'th ddrws Paid myn'd yn ddrwg dy ysbryd; Ond rho i'r tlawd Ychydig ffawd, Brawd ydyw ef mewn adfyd. Mae ganddo ef Wrth ddrws y net" 'Run hawl i'w lef a thithau; Paid gwrthod bwyd Fr truan llwyd Rhag i Dduw 'th wrthod dithau. J. D. JONES. Abercynon.

Letters to the Editor i

Letters to the Editor. —— ALCOHOL AND HEALTH. ) Sir,-It is calculated that 169 millions J sterling is spent annually on alcoholic I drinks. It is supposed that every person over 20 years of age spends on an aver- age X6 17s. 2d. per annum on drink, Consider what this sum would do if wisely spent. It would mean for the husband at the age of 55 that he would have .£422, or invested in an annuity a yearly income of Æ82 10s., or 12s. 6d. a week. This would not exhaust the saving, The improved health of the parent would imply saving of money and in- crease of efficiency, and the standard of family life would be raised.—Yours, M.S.L.

NONUNIONISM IN SOUTH WALES

NON-UNIONISM IN SOUTH WALES. A meeting of the executive council of the South Wales Miners' Federation was held at Cardiff on Wednesday, when Mr. James Winstone presided, and the treasurer (Mr. Alfred Onions) and the general secretary (Mr. Thomas Richards, M.P.) were also present. The latter issued the following official report:— A deputation from the Penallta Col- liery workmen attended respecting some difficulty that had arisen under the agreement for dealing with non-, Unionists. A report having been re- s ceived that similar difficulties had arisen in various parts of the coalfield, it was' resolved that the general secre- tary should call Sir George Askwith's: attention to the unsatisfactory manner in which this agreement had been ob- served by the coalowners. A deputation attended from the Risca Colliery regarding a dispute that had arisen between the workmen and one of the overmen at the colliery. It was resolved that the chairman and the general secretary should endeavour to effect a settlement of the dispute, failing which the matter should be raised at the Conciliation Board meet- ing on the 29th inst. Correspondence with Sir George Askwith respecting the non-payment of the last wages advance of 15 per cent. to the workmen employed at the Pem- I brokeshire Collieries was read. Sir George intimated that he had appoint- ed Mr. Charles Doughty to make a local inquiry, and desired the general secretary to make the necessary ar- rangements. Messrs. Walter Lewis and Charles i e Edwards reported having arranged a settlement of the dispute between the Undeb Mewn Cariad Lodge and the Dowlais District, which had been the subject of legal proceedings. A resolution was passed instructing the general secretary to call the atten- tion of the President of the Board of Education to the large number of school teachers who had been called up to the colours and the detrimental effect it was having upon the education of the children. The remainder of the meeting was oc- cupied in making arrangements for the presentation of the workmen's claim for an advance of 12-t per cent. in wages which is to come before Lord Justice Pickford as independent chair- man at the meeting of the Conciliation. Board to-day (Thursday). =======

MEMS FROM THE MOUNT

MEMS FROM THE MOUNT. There is a certain element of danger in the lady clerk. One just new to the office was given a half-crown to fetch a dozen postcards. She had picked the prettiest she could find, she said, as she handed the boss a bob change. A bluff Buff was leaving his lodge; the other evening, when he noticed a very bright star. Juniper is very bright to-night," he observed to his brother Buff. All good Buffs will ap- preciate this joke, because "No man is wise at all times." A merry party, out for a charabanc trip, were just starting away when the brakes were applied so suddenly as to give everyone the jerks. A lady had forgotten the gold plate with molars attached that didn't grow out of her gums. She didn't chews to go without them. The non-unionist is a perpetual pest in this district. One old collier, who did his bit on Bank Holiday, told me that the majority of the absentees on that day were the non-unionists. i Just at this time the local clubs hold their annual flower shows and just at this time the garden thieves flourish. | Cannot something be done to stop these petty robberies? A secretary of one of the shows had one of his best cabbages cut to ribbons .just for sheer spite. Mr. Wm. Pardoe is presenting a grand musical comedy at the Empire next week. He little thinks that he has a great rival in the histrionic line in the person of our genial townsman, Mr. Alfred Pardoe, especially in tragedy. Who of us can ever forget 1 "The Tinshop Tragedy" or "As Pants the rifle for the old Ivy wall," I in which he took the leading part. A lady visitor to a house in Caegarw not just catching what her hostess called the baby, said, "I thought you were going to name the baby George l Edward." "Well, you see, we pre- ferred to call it Marv Victoria." The visitor was offended. 1 The Mount Volunteer Corps is full of generous schemes, the latest being an offer of a goat as a mascot. On Tuesday evening two arrived, and one ¡I being of the Billy clan and the other of the Nanny clan there was trouble in the camp. Corpl. Harry Bolton I backed. General Sir Doublyou Gee introduced the happy pair. Billv butted and Kernel Bill Bala of Brecon retreated. Sergt. White in angry and stentorian tones called out, Shun, this is no laughing matter." The goats, not being military yet, dis- obeyed the word of command. They are now in chokee. What made Jim- my Wilde was when ten more laughs were served out by the Sergt. Sec. and he got none.

I YNYSBOETH SOLDIERS DEATHI

YNYSBOETH SOLDIER'S DEATH. On Saturday Mr. and Mrs. rvans, parents of Private Sidney Evans, of the 18th Welsh Battalion Regiment, and who reside at 5 Hebron Villas, received officially the news from the Chaplain of their son's death. He was killed in action on the 13th of August. Private Evans was highly esteemed by all who knew him. He joined on June 3rd, 1915. at the age of 26. Previous to enlisting he was employed by the Pearl Assur- ance Co. The Chaplain stated that he took the service at Private Evans' funeral. He was laid to rest in a beautiful cemetery neat the firing line.

1 IYOUR EXEMPTION CARD PLEASE

"YOUR EXEMPTION CARD, > | PLEASE." Last (Wednesday) evening there ( were exciting scenes in the streets of Aberdare when a large body of police I officer's, posted in various quarters of the town, demanded from pedestrians whose ages ranged from 18 to 41 their military exemption cards. In a few instances only were the cards pro- duced, while in a large number of cases men had either no cards or had for- gotten to place same in their pockets. In such cases the men were asked to accompany the officers to the Police Station, where their names and ad- dresses were taken. Those who had left their cards at home were afterwards allowed to go. How many additional soldiers to the Army will be procured by this sudden "raid" is not yet known. The holding up of various per- sons in the streets attracted large crowds in Cardiff Street, Market St., and Commercial Street.

HACCARS MOUNTAIN ASH

HACCAR'S, MOUNTAIN ASH. TO-DAY: "THE ROSARY." How cleverly Mr. Richards seems to touch the pulse of the people is exempli- fied this week-end by his acceding to the popular request for a re-visit of "The Rosary." This beautiful picturization of Mr. Edward E. Rose's champion drama has scored an enormous success. The original actors and actresses will appear, including Miss Kathleen Wil- liams as Vera Wallace and Charles Clary as Brian Kelly. This welcome re- appearance, by special request, is for three days only—to-day, Friday, and Saturday. Those who remember its pro- duction here a few short months ago will be pleased to renew an acquaintance with a picture of simple sweetness and characteristic charm. One word of ad- vice-don't be too late. There are hundreds who wished but did not see it last time, and intend to do so on this occasion. 1

Advertising

READ THE ADVERTISE MENTS IN THIS PAPER. « THE MAN WHO ADVERTISES Is generally a goof business man, and reoognlses the necessity of giving honest VALUE FOR MONEY His reputation is at stake on every purohase you make. WHEN YOU FANCY BUYINC THE GOODS ADVERTISED, THEN INSIST ON HAVING WHAT YOU ORDESI. ——————————————————— | THAT'S WHY IT PAYS I TO DEAL WITH ADVERTIBERIL