Teitl Casgliad: Aberdare Leader

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 8 o 8
Full Screen
23 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
Advertising

EFFICIENCY RESTS ON SOUND FEEt. f .1 THE A OPEDIC BUNION SHIELD Has given relief to hundreds of suffeiers in the district. Let us demonstrate its effi- ciency to you. Price 2/. each. The Opedic Toe- > Right. I Will straighten Crooked Toes and is a certain method of relieving Bunions. Price 1/6 each. Ask for Illustrated Booklet, sent post free anywhere. APPLY— LEWIS, SHOE SPECIALIST, 1, Canon St., ASEROmFiE (Opposite post Office).

Aberdare Police Court

Aberdare Police Court. Wednesday, August 30th. Before Messrs. R. A. Griffith (Stipendiary), D. P. Da vies, L. N. Williams, E. M. Hann and D. W. Jones.

Drunksj

Drunks. Richard Edwards, Cwmbach, in Com- mercial'Street, Aberdare. Adjourned for a week. James Rees, Cwmbach, 13s.

Theft of Coal

Theft of Coal. Elizabeth Verrier, Hirwain, was charged with stealing coal, the pro- perty of the Marquis of Bute.—P.S. Lewis proved the case, mentioning that he saw her coming from the direction of the Tower Colliery. The coal was valued 4d.-Mrs. Verrier now said that she stole coal because the price of it was so dear and her husband's wages so small.—Fined 10s.

Mystery of a Matchi

Mystery of a Match. Hirwain Collier's Defence. Benjamin Lewis, 79 Brecon Road, Hirwain, until recently employed at the Tower Colliery, was summoned for having a match in his possession in the mine. Mr. A. J. Prcsser (Messrs. Kenshole and Prosser) prosecuted for the em- plovers, and Mr. Ivor Parry (Messrs. Morgan, Bruce and Nicholas) defended. Stipendiary It is rather a surprise to see this kind of case defended. Mr. Prosser: Quite so. Mr. Parry: There will be a good many more surprises before we have finished. Daniel Jones said he was the mana- ger of the Tower Colliery. Defendant was employed at that colliery. On June 13th witness was in company of the undermanager and two men, mak- ing periodical searches of the men's clothing to see whether they had any pipes or matches. They met defend- ant and witness told him he was search- ing that day. Witness had searched two previously. Defendant was in his shirt-sleeves, and after witness had searched his waistcoat asked him where his coat was. Defendant replied "On top of No. 3 drift." Witness pro- ceeded to the point where the coat was, and searched it. Defendant and the other men were there, and witness found a match in one of the pockets. Witness said: "Look here, you have a match in your pocket," and defend- ant replied: "I don't know Anything about it, but it must have been there a lqng time." Witness said he would' be reported. By Mr. Parry: The shift began at 7 o'clock, and it was three hours later that defendant was searched. They searched about 10 per cent. of the men every day. He did not usually con- duct the search, but he did it that day. The fireman was the official searcher, and he had been appointed as j such. Mr. Parry Why did you make the search that day?—Three" men came to me and said that Benjamin Lewis was smoking in the mine. Mr. Parry: Why did you not search the man before he went down at 7 o'clock?—I was at the Aberdare and Merthyr Colliery until 9 o'clock. Answering other questions witness said that he had examined two men before they came to defendant, and about 40 or 50 afterwards. The men who were with witness were Evan Bry- ant, under-manager, and Alec Reès and Thomas White, assistant repairer. Mr. Parry Have you and Lewis ever had a quarrel?—Yes, about 7 years ago, and I gave him 14 days' notice. Do you remember a conversation with him last April or May?—Yes. And did he make a charge regarding colliery examination?—Yes. Do you know the Minimum Wage Agent and are you on good terms with him?—We are all right sometimes-we: agree occasionally and disagree other times. I What is the present position of this I Box and Cox arrangement? Witness: It has nothing to do with i this case. ) Mr. Parry: Others have to decide that. You answer my question. And did you tell the defendant, Why are you so much with Gwilym Richards (minimum wage agent) ?—No. | Mr. Parry: Will you give us the name of the man whom you say told you that defendant was smoking in the mine?—No. j Mr. Parry: I invite you to give it privately to the Bench. I don't want to see it and no one else will see it. Defendant: I decline. I Mr. Parry: Then I suggest to you it is a lie that anyone told you. Witness: It is not a lie. I can tell the truth as well as you. Mr. Parry: I am testing your capaci- ty for it. Re-examined by Mr. Parry, witness said that the day after the alleged offence defendant gave 14 days' notice. Defendant had not denied the offence to him during those 14 days. Evan Bryant, under-manager, corro- borated the evidence of the manager. He heard Lewis say, while the manager was searching the coat, However much you will search you will never find anything there." He did not hear the defendant say, after the match had been found, You did not get that in my pocket." Stipendiary (to Mr. Parry) What is your defence—that no match was found in the pocket? Mr. Parry Not exactly that. I shall indicate it as I go on. I have already made some indication. I also wish to submit this regulation in the Mines Act, that persons employed in the mine must be ex&mined before going down the colliery, or before thev commence work. This man's coat had been hang- ing for three hours in a place where defendant could not keep an observa- tion on it. Alec Rees, timberman, and Thomas •White, assistant timberman, who were members of the searching party, gave further evidence. They mentioned that they had searched the manager, in accordance with the regulations. Several men would pass the place where Lewis' coat was hanging.

The Defence

The Defence. The defendant gave evidence and said he had been employed at the Tower Colliery for 21 years, and this was the first charge of any kind plade against him. On the morning in question, June 13th, he searched himself as he always did before going underground. A man named Rogers saw him search himself. He was a smoker, and he in- variably left his pipe in the locking- station. About three hours after he had started working the manager and the other men came on to him. The manager said: "I have come in pur- posely for you to-day." Witness re- plied: "What have I done?" Mr. Jones asked him to hold his hands up, and Mr. Jones then proceeded to ex- amine his pockets. Afterwards lit asked for his coat, and witness took him to where the coat was hanging. Only Jones and he went towards the coat. Witness emptied his coat pocket of his box and jack and the manager then searched. In a short time the manager called to Rees and White said: I've caught him." He told th( two men: "None of you saw the manager pull that match from my pocket." Mr. Parry You are not here to make a charge against the manager or any- body else, but were you perfectly cer- tain that there was no match in your pocket ? By Mr. Prosser: He had not been on good terms with the manager. They quarrelled about four months ago, and the manager accused him of following the minimum wage man too much. Answering further questions put by Mr. Prosser, witness admitted that he generally smoked on his way from home to the colliery. Mr. Prosser: Do you suggest that someone put this match in your pocket? Witness: That is the mystery. Mr. Prosser: You say someone put it there ? Witness: Must be. Stipendiary: He is not bound to suggest anything of the kind. Mr. Prosser: Well, sir, the manager has been rather severely criticised and certain insinuations have been made. Mr. Parry then addressed the Bench and submitted that the searchers had contravened the regulations by examin- ing the men after work had com- menced. The Act expressly stated that the search must be made before work started. He further. contended that the authorised person tp conduct the search was the fireman. Mr. Prosser said that the manager had power to select the person to con- duct the search, and if he had that power he had the power to conduct a search himself. The greater included the lesser. Mr. Parry disputed the right of the manager to such work. The Stipendiary in giving judgment said "I hold that the manager did not conform with the regulations of the Coal Mines Act, 1911. First of all he did not cause the defendant to be searched before he commenced work, for the purpose of ascertaining whether he had a match in his possession. Secondly, the search was not made by The fireman, the person authorised in writing to make the search. I hold that tWne defendant cannot be properly convicted on the evidence before the Court." Mr. Prosser asked the Bench to state n case and to express an opinion as to whether the match was found in the pocket. Stipendiary: We all agree that the match was found in defendant's pocket.

Advertising

NO TBA LIKE dank%. a k rTeMy-%z SOLD BY ALL QROGIR9 I I

Money Owing to the Guardians

Money Owing to the Guardians. Thomas Williams, Foundry View, Godreaman, was sued for Ell 14s., money owing to the Guardians. LIew. Richards, warrant officer, said that Mrs. Williams was sent to prison in July, 1912, and the children were sent to the Workhouse and an order of 9s. a week was made against the father. The Bench made an order to pay forthwith.

Sent Back

Sent Back. Evan Rosser, an old offender," whose case was partly heard la,st week, was summoned for being drunk and dis- orderly. P.O. Evans proved the case. The Clerk read a letter from an Ine- briates Home, where defendant had been confined for n years, stating that they would receive him back. An order to this effect was made. Rosser: Send me back to-day and let me have the few turns that are due to me at the colliery. (Laughter.)

Soldiers Alleged Theft

Soldier's Alleged Theft. Morgan Davies, Broncynon Terrace, Cwmdare, a soldier, was charged at the last Court for stealing clothing, the property of the War Office. Super. Rees now stated that defend- ant had been handed over to the mili- tary authorities to be dealt with. The case was therefore, withdrawn.

Dispute About a Side Door

Dispute About a Side Door. Mrs. Elizabeth A. Owen, 29 Lewis Street, summoned her next door neigh- bour, Mrs. Lucy Landry, for indecent language. There was a cross-summons by Mrs. Landry against Wm. Owen. Mr. T. W. Griffiths represented the Owens and Mr. T. Marchant Harris de- fended Mrs. Landry. Mr. T. W. Griffiths said that the had feeling had been caused owing to a dispute concerning a side door in Park Road. Wm. Owen said he had a bakery at the rear of his premises and defendant, who lived at the back of No. 29b Lewis Street, was constantly using bad language towards him. On Wednes- day, August 16, he was at work when defendant came to the door of the bakery and used filthy language. She challenged him to fight, and called him. a coward. She also used bad language towards his wife. Mr. Harris questioned witness with regard to the side door, and witness said the door was his, but defendant had a righ" of way through it. Mrs. Owen, Richard Swales, Mer- chant Street, Aberdare, cab driver, and Chas. Summerhayes, a boy, gave evi- dence of having heard Mrs. Landry use the bad language. Mrs. Landry then gave evidence, stating that Wm. Owen used abusive language against her. The Bench fined Mrs. Landry 20s. and costs, and dismissed the summons against Owen.

Separation Case

Separation Case. Margaret J. Williams, 78 Regent Street, Aberaman, applied for a separ- ation order. Mr. T. Ma reliant Harris, for Mrs. Williams, said that her hus- band had left her some time ago. The parties had been married 10 years, but there were no children. The husband had paid various amounts towards her from time to time. He was an iron moulder at Abert-man. The defendant was not present in Court and the Bench made an order of 15s. a week.

I John Lake Wants an Ejectment Order

John Lake Wants an Ejectment Order. John Lake, Aberaman, appeared in the witness box to ask for an ejectment order against Henry SmitlY, 22 Gwawr Street, Aberaman. Clerk: Where are the copies of the notices served on defendant? Lake: I haven't got any. I have given the tenant three notices. I want to get back to my house. Clerk: Did you summon them to ap- pear here to-day?—No, sir. Excuse me, gentlemen, but I don't know the law. Clerk: Then I am afraid you must go to a lawyer. Lake I am not having any rent, and I can't pay £1 Is. here. He1 was told by the Stipendiary that he must give the tenant notice to ap- pear in Court. Lake: Can I take the windows and the locks out, as the Lord Chief Jus- tice said the other day? (Laughter.) There was no reply, and the Stipen- diary smiled, while Lake left the Court in the company of his daughter.

Colliery Assault Case

Colliery Assault Case. Arthur Williams, Jubilee Road, Godreaman, summoned David Thomas, 24 Mount Hill Street, for assault. Mr. Griffith T. Davies appeared for Williams, and Mr. T. Marchant Harries for defendant. Dr. Finney was called and said that on Thursday, Aug. 17th, the complain- ant came to him and made a complaint. Witness examined him and found bruises on the right arm, middle of back, ribs and left shoulder. Defend- ant said he had been assaulted by a man. The bruises could have been caused by violent blows. Arthur Williams said that David Thomas came to his stall in the Aber- aman Colliery one day and said, Your wife was bad with other men when you married her." Later Thomas came to witness and struck him several times. Thomas Wilson arrived on the scene and told Thomas that he had made a mistake in taking the law in his own hands. Thomas threatened to treat him similarly. On Tuesday Thomas came to witness and offered to settk- the case. Witness referred him to his (witness) solicitor. He had lost five days' work in consequence of the at- tack. By Mr. Marchant Harries: He had not taunted Thomas that he was afraid of his wife to go for a holiday. He had been on friendly terms with Thomas until recently when the latter wanted him to attend a school of science to leam boxing, which witness indignant- ly refused. Emrys Jones, assistant to Arthur Williams, said that on Aug. 17th Thomas came to Williams and accused his wife of immorality. Williams re- plied that he "married his wife hon- ourably." Then Thomas assaulted Williams. Aneurin Evans, another boy in the employ of Williams, corroborated the last witness. On Tuesday Thomas came to Williams' stall and wished to settle the case. He had heard Arthur Williams shout in derision, Danny shant go away this week." They had arranged to go away together. Thomas Wilson said that on the 17th Emrys Jones came to fetch him. He saw Thomas assaulting Williams. Wit- ness told Thomas that he was a coward to keep striking a man on the ground. Williams then threatened witness. The story related by David Thomas, the defendant, was that after some chaffing between them witness made a certain remark about Williams' wife. Williams struck witness first. Then witness retaliated with one blow. The Bench were quite satisfied that defendant had committed a most brutal and cowardly assault, aggravated by the blackguardly assertions he made concerning the character of complain- ant's wife. The Bench did not believe a word of defendant's evidence. He would be fined t2 and £3 costs, or :2S days.

Damaging Timber

Damaging Timber. Ebenezer Ebenezer, Spencer Street, Cwmaman; Wm. B. Davies, Ynyshvyd Street, Aberdare, and Dd. L. Jones, Railway Terrace, Cwmaman, were sum- moned for damaging timber, the pro- perty of the Cwmaman Coal Co. Mr. perty of the Cwmaman Coal Co. Mr. Prosser (Messrs Kenshole and Prosser) was for the Company. The defendants admitted the offence and were lined 10s. each.

Abercynon Soldiers Death in Action

Abercynon Soldier's Death in Action. Private T. J. Mason, only son of Mr. and Mrs. David Mason, Bassett Street, Abercynon, has been killed in action in Prance. Previous to the war he worked at the Abercynon Colliery as engine- man. Private Mason was very well known in the locality, and was a leading athlete. He was captain of the Aberaman Football Team for years, and was a brilliant centre-forward, but shortly after the war was declared decided to give up the football field for the battle field. His death is greatly regretted by all.

Up and Down the Vallej S

Up and Down the Vallej S' HIRWAIN. FINEST quality butter at Fletcher's, Commercial Street, Aberdare. A.. J. PADDOCK wishes to announce that he has now opened a branch shop u Cross Street with a fine selection of ,iaths, Lavatories, Gasfittings, and a 11 Sanitary Goods, and where all orders tor repairs, etc., may be sent. ACCIDENT. A serious accident be- fel Mr. Tom Powell, of Pant GIas Farm, on Tuesday last at the Tower Colliery. He was severely crushed by a fall ,t debris, sustaining internal injuries. TO MUNITION WORKS. Two local young ladies departed for Coventry Munition Works on Tuesday morning, viz., Misses Olive Powell and Laura Crony. They were given a hearty send-off at the station. SHOOTING MATCH. On Thursday last members of the Aberdare Volunteer Training Corps met some of the Hir- wain members in a shooting match on Crawshay's Estate. The scores were: Aberdare, 934; Hirwain, 675. WOUNDED. Private Charles Davies, of Cynon Terrace, has been wounded in France. Whilst serving as a stretcher- bearer with the King's Shropshire Light Infantry he was shot in the arm. He is now in Boulogne Hospital. PUBLIC MEETING. A most successful meeting was held at the Victoria Hall on Wednesday evening, when Mr. R. C. Wallhead, the prospec- tive Labour Candidate for Coventry, addressed a large audience. He dealt mainly with the issues of the present crisis. He desired the Government to make an immediate move in the direc- tion of solving the food problem. The price of foodstuffs was to-day 62 per cent. more than pre-war cost. Numerous questions were asked and answered. Mr. Gwilym Richards, Minimum Wage Agent, presided. DEATH AND INTERMENT. — An esteemed resident passed away on Saturday last in the person of Mr. David Matthias, of 46 High Street. Deceased, who was 60 years of age, suc- cumbed to a brief illness. Thirty-three years ago he met with a severe accident at the Aberdare and Merthyr Colliery, which rendered him unable to use his legs. Although taken about in an invalid carriage he was always cheerful. He was a faithful member of Nebo Church, at which place pathetic refer- ences were made to his death on Sunday evening last. The interment took place at Bryngar Cemetery on Tuesday, the Rev. E. Wern Williams, assisted by the Rev. M. P. Moses officiating. Several of deceased's favourite hymns were sung by Nebo Choir, led by Mr. William .James. The deacons of the church acted as bearers, namely: Messrs. William Powell, Penderyn Road; William Lewis, David Jenkins, Richard Morgan, Wil- liam Powell, Station Road, and Arthur Owen Perkins. The chief mourners were: Mrs. Matthias, wife; Mr. and Mrs. Richards, Llanishen, sister; Mr. and Mrs. James Griffiths, sister-in-law; Mr. Evan Bevan, brother-in-law; Mrs. Llewelyn, Llanishen; Mrs. Gibby, Car- diff; Mr. Edward Richards, Llanishen; Mr. and Mrs. Phillip Lansey, Porth; Mr. and Mrs. William Lansey, Mrs. Jane Matthias, Mr. Thomas Harris, Porth; Mr. and Mrs. James Harris, Mr. David Harris, Blaenllechau; Miss Martha Harris, Porth; Mrs. Rees Jones, Mr. Evan Bevan, Tylorstown; Misses Lizzie Catherine and May Bevan; Mr. and Mrs. David, Llanishen; Mrs. Wil- liams, Dinas; Howell James Jones, Lance-Corporal Morgan Bevan, Haver- fordwest, nephews and nieces; Numer- ous floral tributes were sent. We sym- pathise with the relatives in their ber- eavement.

CWMBACH

CWMBACH. WHY do the majority of Cwmbach people buy at Fletcher's? Because they get best value. JAY'S furniture is worth placing in your bert roomr. THE PULPIT of Bryn Seion (Cong.) Chapel was on Sunday last occupied by the Rev. J. Sulgwyn Davies, Siloh, Tre- cynon. 'r:- '< DEATH. We regret to record the death of Mr. Daniel Davies, of Lletty- shenkin Houses, who passed away on Monday morning last at the age of 66 years. The deepest sympathy is felt towards the family. ON FURLOUGH. Private Jenkin Lewis Jones, of Pond Place, R.A.M.C., is home on sick leave from hospital. During recent fighting in France he re- ceived a severe shock and sustained in- juries to his leg. Driver Daniel Davies. R.F.A., stationed at Portsmouth, and Privates John Phillips, of Cross Row, and Thomas Gough, of Powells Row, both of the Welsh Regiment, are home on furlough. Private William Davies, of Tirbach, is also home on sick leave, having undergone an operation, a bullet having been extracted from his wrist. Driver Fred Ward, R.F.A., of Pleasant Grove, is also home. PRESENTATION MEETING. At Carmel Vestry on Friday evening last a presentation was made to Private John Nicholls, who. was home on leave from hospital. Private Nicholls was wounded during the "Big Push" in France. The chair was occupied by Guardian John Hughes, who gave an inspiring address. Songs were fiven by Messrs. Thomas E. Williams, William Gentle, John Griffiths, Trecynon; Misses Mary Williams, B. Jones, E. M. Hughes. Recitation, Mr. John Griffiths, Tre- cynon. Addresses were given by Messrs. David Bufton, W. Lewis, Timothy Palmer, David Davies, and Urwin Davies, Trecynon. On behalf of the members of Carmel Mr. William Lewis presented Private Nicholls with a purse of gold. Private Nicholls suitably responded, and thanked the friends for their kind wishes. The accompanist was Mr. David Daniel. Private Nicholls returned to his depot on Monday. INTERMENT. On Saturday last the interment of Mr. William John Edwards, of 3 Powells Row, took place at the Aberdare Cemetery. The Rev. Joseph James officiated. The chief mourners were: Mrs. E. M. Edwards, widow; Emlvn and Lewis Thomas Edwards, sons'; Phyllis Edwards, daughter; Mr. and Mrs. John Edwards, father and mother; Mrs. Llewelyn, sister; Mr. and Mrs. Collins, Aberaman, sister; Miss Bronwen Edwards, sister; Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Edwards, brother and sister-in- law; Clifford and William John Collins, nephews; Mrs. Jones and Mrs. Pritchard, Troedrhiwfuwch; Mrs. Gough, sister- in-law; Mr. and Mrs. William Williams, Miss Myfanwy Williams. Mrs. G. Polly, Mr. T. Powell., Mr. Levi Edwards. uncle; Messrs. John Jones, Daniel Jones, Evan Edwin Jones, cousins; Mrs. R. Davies, Mr. Thomas Polly, Messrs. Richard and Thomas Langford, Morgan Lewis, Aberaman W. Llewelyn, and Mrs. M. J. Lewis. The bearers were: Messrs. W. Miles. William Jenkins, W. Johnson; Bert Jackson, James Rees, and Mark Roar'h. A large number of floral tributes were received. The under- taker was Mr. J. Zachariah, Aberdare.

CWMAMAN

CWMAMAN. ALL trams and buses lead you to JAY'S. PULPIT. The pulpit of Soar (C.M.) Chapel was occupied on Sunday last by the Rev. W. Llewelyn Davies, Llan- gadock, Carmarthenshire. OUTING. A large number of the members of the Holiday Club, in con- nection with the R.A.O.B. Lodge, went for an outing on Wednesday to Gloucester in a charabanc, supplied by Gough's Garage Co., Mountain Ash. DEATH. — On Friday evening last at her residence. 101 Fforchaman Road, the death took place of Mrs. Jane Powell who had suffered a prolonged illness. She was an old resident and held in high'esteem by all. She was 67 years of age. DEATH. On Thursday morning last Mr. James Davies-Powell, residing at 23 Spencer Street, passed peacefully away after four months' illness. He had been to the Cardiff Hospital on several occasions. He was 27 years of age, and a native of Miskin, where his parents and family now reside. He leaves a widow and two children. General sympathy is expressed towards the bereaved family. CALLED-UP. Among the youths of 18 years of age called up for service on Friday last were Oswald T. Davies, son of Mr. and Mrs. Rhys Davies, 11 Spencer Street, and an assistant teacher at Aman School, and Johnny L. Evans, son of Mrs. Jane Evans, Milton Street, pay clerk at the Cwmaman Colliery Offices. The former was drafted to the Welsh Guards, while the latter joined the R.F.A. They are stationed at London and Preston respectively. OUR SOLDIERS. — Lance-Corporal Isaac T. Evans, Glanaman Road, re- turned on Thursday evening last on leave from hospital, where he has lain wounded for many weeks. We are glad to note that he is improving.—Another wounded soldier, in the person of Private Tommy Morgan, is on a visit home from hospital. He is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Ben Morgan, Brynhyfryd, and has been treated for months at Sheffield Hospital. He is now at a Con- valescent Home at Hardwicke. He is also improving.—Private Evan James Rees, son of Mr. Evan Rees, 22 Bryn- hyfryd, is home on leave from hospital, having been wounded at the front.— Private W. Hughes, 5 Railway Terrace, is home on leave. He had only gone to Guernsey a week, when it became necessary for him to return owing to illness in the family.—Private Morgan Lewis, son of Mr. and Mrs. David Lewis Morris, was home on leave for the week- end. He is attached to the 3rd Welsh, and is stationed at Cardiff.

MOUNTAIN ASH

MOUNTAIN ASH. Don't delay, but call on JAY. JUST THAT FINISHING TOUCH is what Ted Mac gives the gents who call at his establishment. Hats and ties. G.W.R. Mr. T. Gwatkin left Mountain Ash on Monday to take up his new position at Pontypool. DIED FROM WOUNDS. News has been received by Mr. and Mrs. Evan Davies, 41 Consort Street, Miskin, that their son, Private Evan David Davies, Welsh London Batt., R.F.A., has died from wounds at Abbeyville Hospital, France. PARISH CHURCH. Holy Com- munion was celebrated in St. Mar- garet's Church on Sunday morning at 8 o'clock. Morning prayer was intoned by the Rev. T. J. Morgan. Evensong was conducted by Rev. I. Westhead. The Magnificat was sung to Garrett, and the Nunc Dimittis to Foster. GREAT WESTERN T.U. The monthly meeting of the branch of the above was held on Sunday evening in thp waiting room. A splendid address was given by Mr. W. Jenkins. Solos were given by Miss Jones and Mr. B. Davies, and recitations by Master A. Manifield and Maggie Manifield. There was a large and attentive audience. I » ON THE ROLLING WAVE. A.B. Seaman Ernest James Nicholls, R M.S. Moon, has been home for a little tiulo- He has had some lively experience Bince his last visit. I was in that little affair off Jutland," says Nicholls, "and all o*1 board swear that they sank a sub- marine." This gallant little seaman as modest as it is possible to be. wife lives at 20 Cliff Street, with hi# uncle and aunt, Mr. and Mrs. Fred Stokes. MOUNT SOLDIER HONOURED. We announce with pleasure the honour accorded to Sergeant J. T. Clarke, Rifle Brigade. He has received following "Card of Honour, -your Brigadier has reported that on 10th, 1916, at Pozieres, you re-organised your men whilst in the enemy's line$ under heavy fire, and I hereby award you a Card of Honour.—Signed, MaJor- General Nicholson, Commanding 34tb Division." Clarke in private life lived at 9 Dover Street, Mountain Ash, was employed in the shop of Mr. Harry W. Long.

MISKIN

MISKIN, JAY'S furniture is worth placing iO your best rooms. OBITUARY. William, the teu- weeks-old child of Mr. and Mrs. Williai* Barwell, of 2 Victoria Street, passed away on Wednesday week. His mortal remains were on Saturday last at Caegarw Cemetery. Mr. W. G. Bowles officiated. We extend our sympathy to the bereaved parents. MILITARY. Private Luther Davie6- of the 3rd 5th Welsh, son of Mr. and Mrs. William Davies, of 27 Arthur Street, returned last week to Fort Scoveston after spending a few days leave at home. He has just been dig- charged from Lichfield Hospital, where he underwent treatment to rupture, sustained whilst doing some heavy lifting. The operation was quite sue cessful. H(-joine(i as a Reservist on the outbreak of war.

PENRHI WCEIBER

PENRHI WCEIBER. JAY'S easy payment system is easy for you. SOLDIER WOUNDED. Private Rees L. Thomas, of the R.A.M.C., son of Mr. Evan Thomas, of 9 Belle Vue Street, was wounded by a shell 011 Friday last. In a letter to his father from a hospital in France, he statei that he is getting on well, and wishes to be remembered to the Penrhiweeibef boys. Prior to enlisting on October 30th, 1915, he was on the clerical ctaff at the Penrikyber Colliery offices. He was drafted out on August 8th last, and les wounded on August 18th, his first day in action.

ABERCYNON

ABERCYNON. LET JAY supply you on their easY payment system. RECOVERY. Mr. Charlie Willianit3p Ralph Cottage, North Street, who hai been at the Pontypridd Hospital, bsO recovered and returned home last week. MUNITION WORKERS ON FUR- LOUGH. — Miss Mary Jones, eldest daughter of Mrs. Jones, 7 Bradley st., and Miss Price, daughter of Mrs. Price, 8 Bradley Street, have come home 011 leave from Birmingham, where they avO stationed at the Munition Works. SPIRITUALISM. On Sunday evening at the Carnetown Schools Councillor T. W. Jones presided over 3 well-attended meeting of the Abercynoll Christian Spiritualist Society. Mr- Brooks, Penrhiwceiber, spoke oil "Christianity without Theology." A duet was rendered by-Messrs. Evan and Hubert Davies. WAR NEWS. Private Richard Thomas, son of Mr. and Mrs. Jobll Thomas, 2 Gertrude Street, was home last week. He belongs to the Roya] Engineers.—Private John Smith, Cardiff Road, has been reported killed whilst III action in France.—On Thursday after- noon Private Reggie Pyle, R.G.A., soil of Mr. and Mrs. Pyle, Lock Street, came home on furlough from Ireland- Private Pyle was previously employed at the local colliery, and he joined the colours on attaining the age of 19. MILITARY. Private John Emlyn Rees, R.A.M.C., son of Mr. and Mrs. Ben Rees, Mountain Ash Road, has sent a letter home to his parents from Aldershot, stating that he is under orders to leave for foreign service this week.—Mrs. Jackson, 57 Avondale St., has been notified that her husband, Private George H. Jackson, of the Welsh Regiment, who was wounded recently at Mametz, is now in hospital at Read- ing. Private Jackson enlisted at the commencement of the war.—Private W- H. Evans, 10 Salisbury Road, stationed at Salonika with the Devonshire Light Infantry, has sent home stating that they are moving on to the firing line. THE WAR. — On Saturday Lance- Corporal Tom Powell, Royal Engineers. previously employed at the Dowlais-CaJ- diff Colliery Surveying Department, came home on a few days' leave frorO Chatham.—Private Thomas Slade, of the R.A.M.C., has returned safely to his depot, and in a letter home states that it is very likely he will again very shortly be drafted out for active service. —Private Thomas Evans, Mountain Ash Road, arrived home on Monday evening on sick leave from- Ingham' Hospital. He belongs to the Welsh Regiment, and has been out in France for seveJl, months. He was wounded bv shrapnel on January 12th, 1916, and after re- covering was sent out again to the front. He was invalided home again from France on Julv 2nd. CO-OP. QUARTERLY. The quarter- ly meeting of the Abercynon Branch of the Ynysybwl Industrial Co-operative Society was held on the Society's premises on Thursday evening under the presidency of Mr. W. Watkins. The report and balance-sheet for the quarter ended July 18th (14 weeks) was given and accepted. Mr. Edward Jones, Abercynon. and Mr. S. Paget, Aber- cynon, were re-elected on the Committee of Management. The Education Com- mittee's report was given by Mr. A. Morgan, secretary, and accepted, and- Messrs. J. R. Taylor and T. Hughes are the local representatives on the Education Committee for the ensuing quarter. A notice of motion bv the mem- bers of the Committee, "That stock be taken every six months in future," was agreed to, and carried unanimously. The attendances of the Abercvnon members on the Committee of Management for the last quarter was as follows (out of a nossible 11) :S. Paeet. 10; E. Jones, 9; E. Ambrose, 6, and R. Jones, 7. Printed ¡.nd Publishpd at their Printing Works, 19 Cardiff Street, Aberdare, in the County of Glamorgan, bv the Proprietors, W. Pugh and J. L. Rowlands.