Teitl Casgliad: Carmarthen weekly reporter

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 4 o 4
Full Screen
14 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
THE PASSING WEEK

THE PASSING WEEK "Let there be thistles, there are grapes It old things, there are Ten thousand broken lights and shapes Yet glimpses of the true."—TBNNYSON* The Germans have been telling us what terrible things they are going to do. The Germans are so notorious for their hatred of truth that it is pretty safe to assume if they say they are going to do a certain thing, that they won't do it but something else. This is the only way in which it is passible to get any information from persons who are experts in that particular branch of "kulture" which is called by other people lying. **# A story which Mark Twain tells of a cele- brated character aptly illustrates the attitude which it is advisable to take up in regard to the Germans. There was a man who was well known in the district for his persistent a falsehood. The person to whom the state- take told the truth. One day he was found dead having apparently committed suicide. By his side was a note in which he asked the public not to blame anybody, because he was tired of life and had determined to end it. The jury came to the conclusion that this statement was false. The deceased (they declared) always told lies. He said that he had committed suicide; therefore it was clear that he had not done anything of the kind. So the jury returned a verdict of "Wilful murder against some person or persons un- known." There is however a danger to be guarded against in such cases. A person who tells a lie—who speaks the exact opposite of the truth—is practising the first degree of lying. The first degree1 can really only be practised successfully by people who have some reputa- tion for truthfulness1. Really accomplishel liars resort to the second degree of lying. This is 'a more involved process. The expert tells the truth to a person, who expects him to tell a falsehood. The pesson to whom the state- ment is made, knowing the character of the individual who makes it at once concludes that a lie is being told. Therefore he is deceived by the truth. For instance a person who is known to be untruthful is asked "Where are you going" Knowing that his questioner expects him to tell a falsehood, he answers "To London." The questioner at once concludes that wher- ever this untruthful person is going it cer- tainly can't be to London—because if he were really going to London he would say that he was off to Edinburgh, or Birmingham. But the untruthful person is really going to Lon- don and has told the truth knowing that it will be taken for a lie and has put the ques- tioner off his track! There are really higher and more compli- cated branches of falsehood than these two preliminary degrees, but these two are quite sufficient for, good practical everyday liars like the Kaiser, Von Hollweg and the rest of the Potsdam set. The question is—which degree jof lying were they practising when they threaten to use submarines to blockade our ports The chances are that they were making use of the second degree. They know- by this time that we regard them as experts at falsehood. Therefore they have possibly decided to tell the truth in the hope that it will be taken for falsehood. Still one can't be quite sure. The Germans have a serene and childlike confidence in themselves which it is difficult to upset. There is no imbecile so shallow as the man who thinks that he is a tremendously "deep" character. So it may be that the Germans not being able to see themselves as others see them are really only practising the first degree. *#» The threat to sink all ships flying the Brit- ish flag is quite theatrical. All waters within 50 miles of the coast of Great Britain and Ireland are declared a "war area." It is the intention of the German submarines to sink all British merchant ships, and it may not always be possible to make any arrangements for the safety of the crews. As "accidents may occur," neutrals are advised to keep away from British waters as the neutral flag may not always be respected. Thia terrible programme is to come into force on the 16th February. Nobody doubts that the Germans will do these things—if they can. Moreover they would have done these hings long ago had they had the power to do so. In August last a German submarine destroyed two British ships on their way to Norway. There was so much other news of an exciting character from Liege at the time that the fact passed almost unnoticed. On Saturday, the 30th of January, a German submarine sunk three cargo vessels in the Irish Sea. Why then should they make a bombastic proclamation as to what they are going to do after the 16th February? They would have more long ago, had they been able to do so. They have been all the time doing their worst, and that is all they can do after the 16th February. It looks very much as if the proclamation were made to keep up the spirits of the poor deluded people in Germany who are now on a. Government allowance of ten ounces of bread per day, • The performances of German submarines have not at all borne out the great threats which were held out regarding their capacity for mischief. We all know what they have done. But the striking characteristic of the war is the things which the submarines have not done. Transports have carried hundreds of thousands of soldiers from England to France, and the submarines have not even damaged a troopship. Now the bombastic comic-opera proclamation states that the Ger- man Navy is going to attack British transports crossing the Crannel, and neutral shipping is advised to keep away from the scene as there is going to be trouble. The whole thing is like a negro plantation song in which warning I is given that 'the razors will be flying in the air." | Can it be seriously suggested by friend or foe that the Germans did not sink troopships before because their better feelings would not allow them do so ? Why did they sink a ship full of Belgian refugees and why did they attack an hospital ship? Is the explanation not obvious? The troopships were guarded; the Belgian refugee ship and the hospital ship were not. This is why German submarines have such a poor record. They get mauled when they attack fair game, so they try to get satisfaction out of some poor unprotected vessel which nobody except a. German or a Hottentot would think of attacking. • *« Then in the Irish Sea raid is it not curious that only three small cargo boats were attacked. There are swift liners running between Holyhead and Dublin, Liverpool and Dublin, Fleetwood and Green ore, Greenock and Belfast, Glasgow and Londonderry, and Fishguard and Rossi are. There are even Atlantic lines running into the Mersey and Clyde. How then did the submarine only attack three little cargo boats which were very slow "goers." There is only one answer. The submarine did its best. Von Tirpitz spears a herring with his fotik and tells the Kaiser "Another whale, your Majesty." The limitations of the submarine are be- I coming evident. It is significant that all the warships which have been submarined in this war were old and slow vessels wheh were out of date. The "Formidable" was the last of the line of a long flottila and seems to have been left unguarded. The three cruisers—the Hogue, the Aboukir, and the Cressy-which were submarined together were taken un- awares—the loss of two was directly due to an attempt to save the first. Warships which are on the, look-out for submarines seem quite able to tackle them. In the action of Zeebrugge, the submarines not only failed, but were Slunk by the British Fleet. In the recent North Eea fight, the destroyers and light cruisers were more than a match for the submarines. The worst that can possibly happen is that a certain percentage of our merchant ships will be sunk—but this is a question merely of insurance. The real purpose of the threat may be to induce the Armiralty to move a large pa.rt of the Fleet to the Atlantic and so leave the East Coast open to raids! The British blockade of Germany is a fact—it is no theory. If the Germans could do anything practical, they would torpedo the warships which blockade their own coasts. It is suggested that the proclamation of a German blockade may have the effect of putt- ing up the price of foodstuffs. It will have no effect that way. The prices may go up whether the blockade is effective or not. It is perfectly evident that the British public is ;in the hands of a ring, and that the ring will do its utmost to starve the British public- whatever Von Tirpitz may succeed in doing. **» It very often happens that burglars and pickpockets have a difficulty in "passing off" stolen bank-notes. When the Germans occu- pied Brussells they seized a large number of notes of the Belgian National Bank. Natur- ally the bank which had removed all its valu- ables refuses to cash these stolen notes. On the other hand there are in London numerous Belgian refugees who had some bank-notes with them when they fled. The Belgian Bank in such cases is quite willing to cash the notes. But now a difficulty arises. The German Government has agents in London who are palming themselves off as Belgian refugees and who are endeavouring to cash the stolen notes, a few at a time. The German Imperial Government has actually fallen so low that it is utilising the methods of Fagin, Bill Sikes and Co. in order to "raise the wind" on stolen property. tilt. The sooner the better we realise that we are not at war with a civilised nation. What has really happened is there is a gang of pirates in the heart of Central Europe and that it has set out to rob and murder all who get in its way. It is becoming more and more evident that this so-called war was simply got up for "swag." The German commercial "boom" had failed. Even our Tariff Reformers had ceased to quote German trade figures after the year 1910. German finance was getting very rotten, and the whole country was on the verge of commercial disaster. So they arranged an expedition to start out in the summer and to loot a few hundred millions from their more prosperous neighbours. The details of the German plot to assassinate King Albert of Belgium have at length been published. When the Germans entered Brussels they got hold of a number of Bel- gian uniforms. A number of German soldiers were dressed in these uniforms and sent to join the Belgian Army. The plot was that these Germans were to take a suitable, oppor- tunity to murder the King of the Belgians. Then it would be said that the Belgians had murdered their own king and that they were quite reconciled to German rule. Distrust having thus being created amongst the, Bel- gians, they would suspect each other. They would no longer have a King or a Country to fight for, and Belgium would become a Ger- man province. If one were to search through the Newgate calendar for the last century, one would not amongst all the criminals find one so utterly depraved as the ruffians who rule Germany. These are not "enemies" in the old honourable sense of the term. They are enemies of the human race like tigers and cobras. The question has been raised how far indi- vidual Germans should be held responsible for the actions which they commit under the orders of their superiors. A few weeks ago, the German cruiser, the Bluoher, came to Scarborough and murdered little English chil- dren on their way to school in the, morning. Shortly afterm-ards the Blucher was sunk by a British warship, and a large number of her crew are now prisoners in Scotland. The question now arises-what is the status of these prisoners? If they had fought an engagement with an English fortress on the East Coast, and killed a thousand soldiers it would have been all in the game. If civilians had been in the neigh- bourhood and had got killed, thai would have been a regrettable incident. Civilians have no right to live in the neghboburhood of the fortresses, and if they do so it is at their own risk. It is seldom that a regular action takes place without causing the death of some civilians who get in the way of the military operations. But the; Scarborough case is en- tirely different. The expedition set out for the express purpose of murdering civilians. It is part of the deliberate policy of "fright- fulness." • It has been argued that the survivors of the Blucher ought to be dealt with as murderers and not as prisoners of war. There is only one possible argument against this. It may be said that the men acted under orders and are not responsible. This is a most atrocious doctrine. No man has a right to committ crimes and to shelter himself behind the orders of another man. Each man has a separate individual conscience and has to face the penalty of his own actions. The custom of sheltering one's conscience behind orders given by somebody else is one of the most degrading effects of all forms of autocracy—whether in the case of militarism, trades unionism, or I'

THE PASSING WEEK

political partisanship. It is the device of moral and spiritual cowards to combine toge- ther to do mean actions which they would be ashamed to do individually. It means in effect "I don't care what I do, so long as 1 can get a clap on the back from a few others as bad as myself." # In any event the possibility of German mur- derers being properly dealt with, is a matter to be borne in mind. The "Handbook of Land Warfare" used in the German Army s'taltes that the soldier must not be effected by sentimental considerations but that he must only be affected by the "possibility of reprisals." The fact that there is a possi- bility of reprisanls may have a deterrent effect on German terrorism.

Advertising

pm irtBkm T3r lui HAYMMTCl BALSAM 1 CURES EI COUGHS&COLDS Invaluable in the Nursery, Bottles and 2.6 ii| OF ALL CHEMISTS AND STORES. E LL

CARMARTHEN UNDER THE SEARCHLIGHT

CARMARTHEN UNDER THE SEARCHLIGHT. Come, come, and alt you down; you shall not budge, fÓoA shall not go, till I set you up a glass Where you may see the inmost part of you. SliOBFUU. Some little mystification has been caused by the fact that there were nearly twice as many convicvtions for drunkenness in the Car- marthen division in the year 1914 as in the year 1913. This does not necessarily mean that there is more drunkenness. It probably only means increased vigilance on the part of the police. At the meeting of the Chamber of Agricul- ture last week attention was drawn to the ad- visability of farmers uniting together. One of the speakers quoted a saying that he had heard-that if the farmers all stuck together and poured all their milk down the drains for two days they would get any price they wanted! «ft* This is doubtless true. But if all labourers were to combine together loyally and refuse to "plough or sow or reap or mow" the "far- mers' boys" would be getting El a day before a month was up. The principle laid down is an excellent one. People in all trades say much the same thing. What nobody seems to realise is that the principle is capable of uni- versal application. Where would farmers be w-thmut the railway men? How could they possibly deal in milk except there were trains to take it to the populous centres? And it may be said just as truly that if the railwaymen stuck together for a fortnight, 'and farmers could neither sell their produce nor buy manures nor feeding stuffs for their stfock they could bankrupt the whole farming industry in the Kingdom. The railwaymen ooul(I absolutely paralyse the farming industry in a fortnight. ititit Suppose the blacksmiths were to stand loyally together for a month and refuse to shoe a .farm horse or to mend an agricultural implement ? The farms would be at a stand- still in a very short time. Suppose the colliers stuck loyally together in frosty weather and I the coal owners joined them and refused to let the farmers have as much as a bucket of coal ? In a few days they would be reduced to eating a paste of flour and water because they would not be able to bake bread—much less cook bacon or boil "cawl." Suppose the gas workers and the electric workers pu their heads together and got the distributors of petroleum to join them ? Where should we be then ? Suppose the people who control the petrol were to throw it down the drains so that everything from a motor car to the little engine which drives the chaff cutter in the farm yard had to stop. Suppose all the tanners, curriers, and shoemakers stopped work for a season, the farmers would be ready to pay any price for a pair of boots. Is there any need to pursue this line of thought fur- ther? The principle is a sound one. The anly objection is that it has a wider application than anybody thnks. *«* All these suggestions savour of Syndicalism in its worst form. Farmers as a body are acredited with being a very conservative class But at the present time you will hear farmers giving utterance to Syndicalist principles of a vigour which would stagger Keir Hardie or Tom Mann, or Ben Tillett. All the accredited Labour leaders in this country repudiate the advanced type of Socialism which teaches that every industry should be controlled entirely by those engaged in it, that they should get the last possible penny out of it irrespective of other people's rights. The principle of Socialism in plain English is this: "Never mnd about other people; stand up for your own class, and drain the last drop of blood out of the rest of the com- munity." This is an atrocious principle viewed from the moral standpoint. But even from a. utilitarian standpoint it is sheer folly. No war can be carried on from one side. If any class—whether farmers, colliers, or rail- waymen, farm labourers, shippers, or mer- chants— declares) war on the Nation, it need not be surprised if the Nation declares war on them. A couple of years ago everybody was denouncing the doctors. They had been offered 6s a head (I think) for attending "in- sured persons" and they wanted a good deal more. The dootors said that if they did not got their terms they would not work the Act at all. Surely this was reasonable. If any man is offered wages which he, thinks too low, he is entitled to refuse to do the work. The very workmen who had themselves com- bined to raise their wages tha.t very year denounced the doctors in a, most atrocious style. Medical men who stood apart from the British Medical Association were lauded to the skies by British workmen who would have maimed a non-Unionist workman who dared to put a foot inside a workshop. Trade Unionists did all they could to smash up a rradea Union—because they thought Unionism i1. most immoral principle when it turned against them! Wherever you turn you find the same incon- sistency, and when you point it out to the offenders they can't see it. They always told you "Ohl that is quite a different thing." It is. Every class in the country thinks it is tie "hub" and that all the others are only spokes in the wheel. The farmer will tell you that he is the backbone of the country; the collier will tell you that he is the only man that counts and that farmers are not worth speaking of; and the traction workers assert that they are absolute masters of the situation. The whole lot are deluded. Alil classes are interdepen- dent. It is more true in the Twentieth (Jen- tury than it was in the days of the Apostle that "No man liveth unto himself." No authority, whether it happens to be the Ger- man Kaiser or a Trades Union, is above the moral law, simply because it has the power to do an injustice. The principles of right and wrong are as unalterabie as the laws of mathematics. It is in a sense satisfactory to find that a certain grant has been refused to the County Council because "there is no unemployment in Carmarthenshire." The difficulty just now is not for men to find work, but for the work to find men! »*» About half the people in Carmarthen are at present laid up with influenza. A sufferer who is of an enquiring turn of mind has been recommended the following cures:—1, Onions, 2 quinine, 3 whiskey, 4 oranges, 5 rum, 6 Eu- calyptus, 7 a complete rest. I should think if anybody took the first six, No 7 would follow as a matter of course. ALETHEIA.

Carmartheo County Court

Carmartheo County Court. This court was held Aft the Guildhall. Car- marthen, on Friday, before His Honour Judge Lloyd Morgan, K.C. ALLEGED EXCESSIVE CHARGES. Miss Margaret Parry, of Oldhom, claimed a sum of L75 from Mrs Selina Carver. Mr Buckley (of Messrs Batty, Ford and Buckley, Manchester) appeared for plaintiff; and Mr J. W. Jones, Llanrwst, for defen- dant. In his opening statement, Mr Buckley said that, the plaintiff is the sister of a draper in Oldham. She went to Llanrwst to visit her sister who is married to a music teaher also named Parry. Miss Parry when she went on a visit to Llanrwst took with her a quantity of ladies wearing apparel new from stock given her by her brother. Mrs Carver called to arrange about some music lessons for her child. She saw some of the goods and after seeing them purchased those set out in the particulars. Miss M. E. Parry said that she lived with her brother in Oldham her brother is a draper She frequently visited her sister, Mrs Parry at Llanrwst. In November, 1913, Mrs Carver came to Mrs Parry's house to see about music lessons for her children. When she called she saw a helio hat there and tried it on. Next day she called and said that she had been dreaming of the hat. Plaintiff told her that the price was three guineas. Defendant said that that was not more than she could afford to pay. She bought the hat and also a lot of other goods to the value of £31 16s. This included a pair .of helio shoes at 18s 6d. She took away the goods in her carriage and had a bill for £31 16s. Defendant said that she had a good deal of property and that the deeds were in the tin boxes in Mr Jones, solicitor's office. Next day she called and bought the other articles. The dresses were somewhat short and they were lengthened to suit the defendant. No suggestion was made by Mra Carver that the prices were wrong. She had a bill for the second lot at the time. An application was made for the money in August 1914. The answer to that was an application to return the ring which Mrs Carver had given her as a keepsake. The ring was returned. Cross-examined by Mr J. W. Jones, plaintiff denied that it was she who first called on the defendant. Some of the letters had been written by Mrs Parry. Mrs Parry was not acting as plaintiff's agent. Plaintiff became very friendlly with Mrs Carver, who told her many things. which one would only teU a very intimate friend. Mr Jones: I put it to you that you are tak- ing advantage of that to force her to pay this extortionate sum Plaintiff: Yes. Mr Jones Yes. The Judge: She cannot understand the question. She surely cannot mean that. iliiip Jones: WTere these goods quite new? Plaintiff They were quite new. M)1 Jones: I put it to you that these were your own second hand clothes. Plaintiff said that they were quite new. Mr Jones suggested, that the plaintiff had worn the helio hat and the lancer feather her- self. Plaintiff sad that she had not; she charged 11 guineas for a squirrel sable stole and six guineas for a muff. 12s 6d was the price for a pair of kid gloves up to the elbow. She thought the price very moderate. She charged six guineas for a cream crepe de chine dress which she thought very moderate as also tne L27 charged for a fur ooat. Mr Jones suggested that one of the dresses way "Empire" style of the fashion of 1900. Plaintiff: Mrs Carver liked it very well when she bought it. Mr Jones asked if the plaintiff lived with her sister at Deganwy in 1899. Mr Buckley: This is ancient history. You might as well go back to the flood. Mr Jones: I am not going back to the flood. I am going back to the fire. Mr Jones then referred to a case which occurred some years ago at Deganwy when an Assurance Co. defended a claim for a fire in a shop on the ground that the laim was frau- dulent. Miss Parry said that she was not a party to the case; she was a witness. The Judge said that there must be some limit to this. Mrs Catherine Jones, Blaenau Festiniog, dressmaker, said that she altered the dresses according to the sikirt which Mrs Carver sent. She considered the prices charged reasonable. Mr Jones: Dou you value them its new or second hand? Witness: As new. The Judge: Were the dresses you altered new or second hand ? Witness: They were new. Mrs Selina Carver said that Miss Parry called on her and asked her to call on her the next day. Miss Parry had on a stole and a miuff which the defendant said were very nice. When she called Mrs and Miss Parry showed her these goods and forced them on her. No price was. agreed upon. Mrs Parry said that could have the goods at a reasonable price. Som of the things had previously been worn by Miss Parry. She bought them as second- hand goods. Cross-examined by Mr Buckley, defendant said that in October, 1914, she returned a, lot of the goods saying that she had not worn them. She had not at this time had a bill for them. You had bought these goods from a perfect stranger and left it entirely to her that the I

Carmartheo County Court

price would be reasonable?—Yes. In answer to another question, witness said that she had worn the clothes at Chepstow. Mr Jones said that this was not a transac- tion between a tradesman and a customer it was a transaction between two intimate friends. The Judge said that it could not be put as high as that. They were not intimate irriends then, although they became so afterwards. John Rowlands, draper. Carnarvon, said that lie had 14 years experience. He had been in business on his own account for three years He thought the charge of three guineas for the hat and lancer feather exorbitant. The stole Was Canadian squirrel and worth six guineas; the muff was worth R2 5s. The blue dress produced was worth E3 5s. The helio gloves were worth 6s lid. He had sold such gloves for less. The orepe de chine dress was a home-made affair on the foundation of an evening dress and worth three guineas at the most. The helio dress was made of material worth 2s lid a yard. It was worth £2 10s or £2 15s. The Empire dress was worth JE3 5s at most. The coat produced was not marmot but dog-skin worth tl2 to £14. Mrs M. Thomas, Emporium, Carmarthen, was the next witness. Mr Jones: What experience have you had. The Judge.: You need not ask that. I have lived all my life at Carmarthen, and I know Mrs Thomas. Mrs Thomas gave valuations of several articles, the priam-s being much below those charged. The fur coat was worth 12 guineas. In answer to Mr Buckley, Mrs Thomas said ladies usually asked the price of articles which they bought. If they did not they were told. Mr Jones: That would not apply to a tran- saction between two intimate friends? The Judge said that he could not hold that they were intimate friends at that time. After reviewing the evidence he came to the con- clusion that the defendant had agreed to buy the goods at the prices stated. The contract could not be repudiated because the prices which she had agreed to pay were too high. He gave judgment for the plaintiff. Mr Buckley asked that immediate execu- tion be issued notwithstanding the Courts Emergency Powers Act. His Honour agreed but pointed out that as the defendant was a married woman they must And out what separate estate defendant had. MYSTERIOUS DEATH OF A HORSE. Mr Samuel Jones, Tirgorse farm, near Car- way, Llangendeirne, sued the Carmarthen Rural District Council for £25 10s for the loss of a horse. Mr J. Lewis Phillips, solicitor, Llanelly, iapivared for the plaintiff, and Mr T. R. Ludford for the Council. Mr Phillips stated in his opening that the Council cut a trench through a field in con- nection with the Carway waterworks. The case for the plaintiff was that in consequence of the neglect of the defendants, a horse be- longing to the plaintiff fell into the trench and was killed. Mr Samuel Jones, Tirgorse farm, Pont- yates, said that he owned the horse which was killed. He found it dead in a trench on his mother's farm on Sunday morning. He paid R21 10s for it. He had the right to graze his horse on the farm. The District Council had been working on the field for two years. They had been trying for some, time to get the water He showed them where the water ought to be found. When he found the horse dead he went up to Carway and told Mr Gilbert, the local District Councillor. Cross-examined by Mr Ludford: The gutter was 2ft. wide and 2ft. deep. Mr Ludford How do you say the horse was killed there? Plaintiff: I found him dead there in the morning. Are you serious when you say that you found this big horse in this gutter—packed in a gutter about 18in. deep and 18in. wide? -Yes. Mr Ludford suggested that the horse had previously been the subject of an action in the Swansea County Court and that plaintiff bought it for L3 10s. Plaintiff denied this. Mr Ludford asked if this were not a black horse with some white hairs? Plaintiff said that it was 0.11 black. Mr Ludford: Didn't this horse die of old age, and aren't you trying to make a profit out of the District Council on the back of this old horse. Afr J. Lewis Phillips: This is the first we have heard of this; we have all the corres- pondence here. Mr John Davies, fruiterer, Water et., Llan- elly said that he saw R21 10s paid for the horse. It was a very handsome horse Y cs, a very good horse. Plenty of good points?—Yes. Mr D. T. Gilbert, the local District Coun- cillor, was- called as the next witness. Before giving evidence he asked leave to make a per- sonal statement. He had received the sub- poena and 2s 6d at p.m. the night before the Court. He is the headmaster of a Council School. If he closed the school without tak- ing the proper steps-which there was no time to take—he would be subject to a penalty. As it was he had left the school for the day in charge of uncertificated teachers. His-Honour said that Mr Gilbert had been badly treated having such short notice and such a small amount of conduct money. He would have been justified in refusing to come. 2s 6d for a man in his position for that dis- tance was, quite inadequate. Mr Gilberttlien gave evidence as to seeing the horse dead. Thomas Rowlands, who. lives half a mile away, said that he saw the horse after it had been pulled out of the trench. This concluded the case, for the plaintiff. Mr W. E. Jones, surveyor to the District Council, said that the gutter was about 2ft. wlide by 18in. to 2ft. deep. The soil was very soft. He saw the horse after its death and he saw i-talive in the field. It appeared to 00 in good condition. A horse with a fair amount of energy could easily have got out ot the gutter. Mr J. F. Rees, M.R.C.V.S., said on the 9th I he saw the horse. It was a black stallion with a few white hairs. It was 15 to 20 years old apparanetly. He could say nothing as to the activity of the horse, as it was then dead. If the horse had had any vitality there would have been signs of a, struggle in the gutter. Horses which fall usually struggle to rise. He could not say what the cause of death was. He might have fallen down dead of heart disease. Mr J. Lewis Phillips: Do you suggest that the horse felt faint and lay down in the ditch and died. Witness: I have said that I cannot say what the cause of death was. Mr Ludford The horse passed away peace- fully on Sunday morning-a most suitable morning. Mr Joseph Davies, formerly a horse dealer, now employed at the Pembroke Dockyard, said that he sold a, ul-acik- staUion to the plaintiff's brother for R3 10s. Mr Phillips: You have heard the witness say that L21 10s passed ? Witness: It did not pass my way. Mr Lldford said thait the man who told such a story of the value of the 'horse was quite capable of pushing the horse into the gutter when lie found it dead of old age. Mr J. L. Phillips said that he did not think that the word of a horse-dealer was of more va,lue than the word of a fruiterer from Llan- olly. There was negligence in that the defen- dants had not done what any reasonable man would have done. His Honour -said that there might be slight negligence on the part of the defendant; but there was no evidence that such negligence caused the death of the horse. Judgment for defendants with costs. COMPENSATION INVESTMENT. Mr W. W. T. Pressor made an application to vary the order of the Court in the case of Elizabeth Bowen v. the Tredega-r Coal and Iron Co. An order had been made on the | 17th March, 1914, that the proceeds of the in- vestment in the P.O. Savings Bank should be paid out to the mother of the children. The mother is now dead, and the application was that the money should be paid to the eldest daughter, Mary Anne Bowen, who is looking after the younger children. Miss Bowen is 22 years of age. The Judge made the order asked for.

Advertising

FOR OLD AND YOUNG. MORTIMER'S COUGH MIXTURE FOR COUGHS, COLDS, WHOOPING COUGH, ETC., ETC. OYER — 70 YEARS REPUTATION IN THIS DISTRICT. THIS CELEBRATED WELSH REMEDY Is now put up in cartons securely packed for transmission to all parts of the world and contains a Pamphlet, written by an eminent Medical Authority, dealing with he various beneficial uses of this specific Price Is lid and 2s 9d per bottle. Th* larger bottle is by far the cheapest.

Assault on the Police at Carmarthen

Assault on the Police at Carmarthen. CHARGE AGAINST A FARMER, John Williams, who was stated to be a far- mer, was brought up at the Borough Police Court at the Guildhall on Monday, charged with being drunk and disorderly and assault- ing the police. P.G. Morgan said that at 3 p.m. on the 6th inst. he was called to the Red Cow to eject the defendant. Defendant was drunk. He was very violent. The constable received a couple of kicks from him. Defendant had to be handcuffed and carried to the police station The Bench fined the defendant 15s and costs

The Question of Health i

The Question of Health i Tbio question of health is a matter which if tore to concern us at one time or another when Influenza is so provalent as it if jurt now, so it is well to know what to taxe to ward off an attack of this mist weakening disease, this epidemic catarrh or cold of an aggravating kind, to combat it whilst under its baneful influence, and particularly after nn attack, for then the system is so lowered as to be liable to the most dangerous of com- pHaints. Gwilym Evans' Quinine Bitters iii acknowledged by all who have given it a fair trial to be the best specific remedy dealine Send for a copy of the pamphlet of testi. monials, which carefully read and consider well, then buy a bottle (sold in two sizes, 2s 9d and 4s 6d) at your nearest Chemist or Stores, but when purchasing see that the name "Gwilym Evans" is on the label, stamp and bottle, for without which none are Manufacturing Company, Limited, Llanellj; genuine. Sole Proprieton: Quinine Bittert South Wales. with InUuenea in all its various stages, being a Preparation skilfully prepared with Quinine and accompanied with other blood purifying and enriching agents, suitable for the liver, digestion, and all those ailments requiring tonic strengthening and nerve increasing ing from colds, pneumonia, or any serious ill neas, or prostration caused by sleeplessness, or worry of any kind, when the body has a general feeling of weakness or lassitude. propei ties. It is invaluable for those suffer*

TEMPERANCE AT LLANGATHEN

TEMPERANCE AT LLANGATHEN. To the Editor Carmarthen Weekly Beporter. Sir,—Sir Stafford Howard's speech at Llan- gathen was marked by a moderation not often to be found in the speeches of temperance advocates. I would point out, though, that there is danger in the fact that the lion, baronet associates himself with a party which has never treated the legitimate claims of the publican to fair treatment with much con- sideration. I realise to the full the danger there is of my being accused of being on the look out for a cheap advertisement in con- tinually sticking up for fair play for the license holder in the press. Speaking from experience I have always felt convinced that if the publican were only treated more con- siderately, and if he were only trusted a little more, and encouraged, he would become a great and useful asset to the temperance party in the fight against excess in nlcoholio drinking. Everywhere one read in the re- ports of the Chiefs of Police of the excellent way in which the publicans are doing their duty, and much of the improvement which Sir Stafford Howard commented upon isdue to this. I again appeal to Sir Stafford Howard to take up the lead in improving the status of the publican, thus adding to his responsi- bilities of course, but at the same time making it worth his while, to fulfil those responsibili- ties to the best advantage.—Yours, etc., A, G. HARRIES.

Mr Thomas Farrow the Eminent IBanker and Commercial Training

Mr Thomas Farrow, the Eminent Banker, and Commercial Training The question "What shall we do with our Boys?" has heen the subject of many news- paper discussions. To-day for many similar reasons the prob- lem may bo better stated thus:—"What shall we do with our boys and girls?" While we have no ready-made solution of an always difficult matter, one fact can hardly be im- pressed too closely upon the minds of anxious parents. It is of paramount importance that the boy or girl has a knowledge of shorthand. This will be attested by all commercial men—the prospective employers of boys and girls. Mr Thomas Farrow, the well-known People's Banker, some years ago, under the non-de-plume of Geoffrey Swift, wrote an im- portant work, entitled, "Shorthand in Twelve Lessons." It is now published in a cheap and concise edition, and is a very easv means of mastering the subject. It should be in the hands of all ambitious boys and girls, and of all parents who have the welfare of their chil- dren at heart. We are sure they will all 00 grateful to Mr Farrow for enabling them to acquire this im- portant commercial asset at such insignificant cost and trouble, Copies can be obtained for Is Id post free, from the Publisher, E. B. Smith, 35, Dock- head, Tooley-sS'treet, London, S.E. Further particulars will be found in our advertisement- oolmuns.

MAYORS WAR RELIEF FUND

MAYOR'S WAR RELIEF FUND. Amounts already acknowledged: Red Cross £ 38 12s Gd; Prince of Wales, £ 220 14s 4d; General Fund, JE78 17s 3d. Joint Counties Asylum Staff, 6th contrib. R2 10s, Prince of Walles; t5 Is 2d General Fund.

I MAYORS BELGIAN REFUGEES FUND

MAYOR'S BELGIAN REFUGEES FUND. Amount already acknowledged: C432 2s. (This amount includes subscriptions that have been paid in advance, in some cases up to one year Parish of St. Peters LS. English Weslevan Church: L5 12s 5d. Priordy Chapel: t5. English Congregational Church: £5. Parish of St. David's: R4. Lammas street Chapel: £ 4. English Baptist Church £3. Elim Chapel: t2 5s. Union st. Cliap-el: t2, Parish of Llanllwch: ti 18s. Asylum Workers' Union, 2nd contrib.: JB1 lis Id. Asylum Staff: t 1.

Advertising

CLARKEGS B41 PILLa can be relied upon to cure, in either IU, aU acquired cm constitutional Discharges from the Urinary Organs, Gravel an4 Pains in the back. Free from Mercury, Established up- wards of 50 years. In boxes 4s 611 each, of aU Chemists nd Patent Medicine Vendors throughout the World. or Hat for sixty stamps by the mateR, The IA and MidlMtt Couniles Drug Company, Lincoln. CARMARTHEN Printed and Published by the Proprietress, M. LAWBENOK, at her OFFIOEA 3 Blue Street, FRIDAY, February ljth, 181o,