Teitl Casgliad: Carmarthen weekly reporter

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 4 o 4
Full Screen
10 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
run PASSING WEEK

run PASSING WEEK "LÐt tbcwe be tuisMos, thfra are grapes it oi £ thin.as, there are no?; Ten thousand broken lights and shape** Yet glimpses of tho true."—TKNNTBOK. Sonic who have an ambition to figure as great, fic,tionists must feel a pang of envy when t-hey read the '"wireless" news from Berlin. The ordinary second rate liar must fee! inclined to bow his head in the presence of a master mind of the same craft. But even the author of the German wire'ess has to play second fiddle to the compiler of the news sup- plied to, the people of Constantinople. Ordin- ary Western mendacity grows dim before the brilliance of Oriental imagination—as the electric light grows dim in noonday glare. **• The Turksh papers are full of the doings of their great hero the Hadji Goulloum. This is the way in which they refer to the Kaiser Wilhelm. One need not be surprised art William being spelled with a "G." In Welsh he would be- "Gwilym," in French "Guillame" and in Latin "Gulieimus." The English and the Germans however always had an animosity against the letter "G" at the beginning of a word. That is how we manage to get the Norman "guardian" for instance softened down to "warden,' and the British word "gwlan" softened down to the English "wool." **# "Goulloum" therefore is only the Turkish for "Bill." The title "Hadji" which is given him by the Turkish journalsts is perhaps not P-o easily explicable to all Westerns. Te begin with, the "Hadji" is a picus Mohammedan. He is not one of your ordinary careless Moham medans who only says his prayers five times a day at the appointed hours and who goes to the mosque once every Friday. Mere indiffer- entients of that stamp are not entitled to the pious title or Hadji. A Mussulman has to do many things before he attains to that hon- ourable degree. He has to make the pilgrim- age to Mecca for one thing and to perform certain religious exercises at the tomb of the Prophet. A pilglimage to Mecca is no light matter. It cannot be arranged by Cook, and there are ni> motor buses on the road. **• Xo Western European has ever been to Mecca with the exception of a few adven- turous spirits like Sir Richard Burton, who were able to palm themselves off as Arabs. It is .related of one of these that he was suspected when he got to the Holy City and was accused of being an infidel. He protested his ortho- doxy so vigorously that the doubters were routed, and he quoted the Koran so copiously and spoke such excellent classic Arabic that he was accepted as a learned son of the faith. It is a long way to Mecca, and there are no refreshment houses on the road-at least none which would commend themselves to Western ideas. By the time the pilgrim gets there and comes back, he is fully entitled to his degree of "Hadji." «*« Like everything else, there is a good deal of fraud about the "Hadji" business. We have heard something in the West of persons who buy University degrees. There is also said to be a method of becoming a. "Hadji" without going to all the trouble of making the pil- grimage. One method is for wealthy men to purchase from poor devotes the; proofs of their having made the pilgrimage. There are even cruder methods of assuming the degree than this. In some parts of America a man who gives himself airs comes to be known as "Colonel" although he never served in the Army. One celebrated character who was asked what was his claim to the title said that he had "married" it. His first wife's husband was a colonel, and when she became a ividow he married her and took the title In Oriental countries men who have the Mohammedan equivalent for "swank" assume the title of Hadji on similarly flimsy grounds. It is much to be feared that our friend Goulloum is not really entitled to be called "Hadji." It seems to have been conferred upon him "honoris causa" as they say at the English Universities when they make dis- tinguished personages Doctors of Law. The law is exposed to a goed deal of quack-doctor- ing when it is desired to do honour to some- body or other. But when the accounts of the doings of "Goulloum" are read in the Con- stantinople press it will be admitted that they deserve some recognition. His Islamic Ma- jesty we a-re told has completely conquered the Belgians. It appears that the Belgians were until lately very fierce and bigoted Christians, but that under the beneficent rule of that good Mussulman, the Hadji Goulloum they have seen the error of their ways and are turning their churches into mosques. ••• This, however, is nothing to the great doings in France. The Turks never heard of Belgium before; but every Oriental has heard of France. In fact in Eastern countries, all the Christians are called "Franks," and a Turk or an Arab who is well educated usually en- deavours to learn a little French which he is led to understand is the principal language of the Western infidel, just as Arabic is the chief language of the true believers. When a Pole talks French to a Turk the negotiations are apt to be a bit cloudy. The news that Hadji Goulloum has occupied Paris, the capital of France, has come to the Turks as something definite which they can understand. We learn that the Hadji held his court in the Chamber of Deputies and that all the chiefs of the Franks knelt before him and acknowledged him as their Sultan. 9*0 The only unfortunate thing appears to be that the Hadji has not yet occupied London. According to the latest advices from Constan- tinople, the armies of Goulloum have landed in England and have defeated the British forces. They are marching on London, which rthey are determined to level to the ground. As a peace offering, George, the King of the English, has sent the Hadji 2,000 asses laden with gold. There is a truly realistic touch about this. King George evidently knew how to appeal to the fraternal feelings of the German General Staff. They would be quite unable to resent such an appeal from 2,000 of their own species. After all, the ransom was not a particularly big one. An ass could not .,oa.rry much more than 300 Ibs in a sack on his back-say £ 20,000. This would only bring the ransom up to forty millions. Of course there are donkeys who could carry a. good deal more. The Crown Prince for instance would make an effort to stagger under even a bigger load of loot, but we are not dealing with phenomenal asses. In the case of 2,000 we are only entitled to calculate the capacity of the average ass. It appears that Goulloum Has captured the entire British Navy and in the early summer he is coming to Constantinople escorted by 20 British Dreadnoughts to pay his respects to his brother the Sultan of Turkey. All this seems very funny, but is it a bit more ridicu- lous than the way in which the Kaiser has played with the various Christian Churches. Twelve months ago, it was continually being brought before the French Catholics how friendly the Kaiser was to the Church, and .how much more favourable he was to them than their own "atheistic" Government. At the same moment some of the Ulster Leaders were expressing a hope that if Home Rule did come, that good Protestant the Kaiser would rescue the Orangement from Popish domina- tion. If a man can clutch the sleeve of the Pope with one hand, and he-at the Protestant drum in Ulster with the other, there is no reason why he should not at the same time dance like a Dervish in Constantinople. And the extraordinary part of it is that he has really succeeded in fooling the lot. Most ruffians know how to utilise religious cant for their own purposes, but Goulloum has passed the limit! ••• The' Zeppelin myth is pretty well exploded. We have been hearing since the beginning of the war a.bout the terrific Zerpelins, They were going to sink the British Fleet and thus open a way for the German invasion of Eng- land. The Germans and their friends all over the world sounded the fame of the Zeppelin, so as to reduce poor old John Bull to a proper state of nervous collapse. Whenever the British or their Allies scored any success, the pro-Germans would shake their ha.nds know- ingly and say "Oh yes; but we haven't seen their Zeppelins yet." We haven't. And we never will see the Zeppelins which have been created in the vivid imaginations of the Ger- mans. The real Zeppelin is a very poor "con- traption" as the Americans would say. It was built chiefly to keep up the spirits of the poor deluded Germans, and it is beginning to be a failure even in that respect. j • *« The fame of the German air-service has been loudly trumpetted, and we were told that our own aviators were wretchedly behind the times. Yet it is an undeniable fact that so far all the honours of war lie with the British aviators Early in the war they dropped bombs on the Zeppelin works in Germany. They afterwards raided a German depot on the Lake Constance. In the attack on Cux- haven. the British aeroplanes put the Zeppe- lins to flight. In the raid on the Belgian coast last Friday, 34 British areoplanes damaged military and naval bases and re- ) turned safely every man of them. And what are the achievements of the Ger- man airmen? On Christmas Day they dropped a bomb in a Dover garden, and smashed a greenhouse. Since then they made a raid on Yarmouth and killed a couple of civilians. As for doing damage of any military significance they failed utterly. The attack on Sheerness on Christmas Day was a miserable failure. The airship was fired at and retreated with- out dropping a bomb. The body of a man recently picked up out of the Thames is said to have been that of a member of the crew. The German air-craft seem to be very easily brought down. The Itussians have captured many of them, and the Allies on the West have brought down a few. The Zeppelin in fact is a swindle. «*« Why then do the Germans boast so much about the Zeppelins? The explanation is childishly simple. The Germans believe in "terrifying" their enemies. When the great Tartar conqueror, Kubla Khan, went to war with the Chinese, the latter actually made use of shields on which were painted the faces of demons. The Chinese really believed that the hideous pictures on the shields would terirfy their enemies! This silly tomfoolery is still an asset of German generalship. Count Zeppelin is eighty years of age, and is bound to admit that the air-ship is not all that his youthful fancy painted! **• The great "German spy" myth is another of the instances in which the Teutons were foooled. There is no longer any secret about the matter. Great Britain and Ireland was filled with German spies Wre all know that. But what was not so well known to the general public until lately was that the British Gov- ernmen had its own Secret Service. Every German spy in this county was known. When he set about finding certain, information he always found somebody ready to give him "in- formation." It would be too crude for any- body to approach a British officer and to ask him for certain information. The process is usually more elaborate. The spy tries to en- list the services of a "mutual friend" who will get the information from the officer and pass it oif to the individual who requires it. The German spy never had any difficulty in fmding "mutual friends." Sometimes they were people who were in debt and who could not afford to be particular as to the means by which they raised the wind. In other cases they were Socialists who would be only too glad to see the Kaiser come over and smash up the British aristocracy. In several in- stances, the mutual friends were persons of Irish extraction who longed to see the "wings of the British Lion clipped" Lions have no wings, but that is a detail. These mutual friends gave the German spies piles of "infor- mation." It has dawned at last even on the dull wits of the German Government that they have been had. The "mutual friends" were members of the British Secret Service, whose business it was to hoodwink the spies! It must be admitted that the German spies did get some genuine information. They could purchase Kelly's county dictionaries, Whittaker's almanac, and Bradshaw's time- tables. There is a good deal of excellent in- formation to be got out of these excellent manuals. By remaining in Berlin and sub- scribing a few pounds a year for a supply of these reliable books the Chief of the Spy De- partment would have got as much information as he did by all his/ elaborate schemes. The French and the Russians in peace time used to make a great outcry against German tipi-es who were arrested when they were caught doing anything which they ought not to have done. The Germans congratulated themselves that the British Government was too stupid to note the presence of spies here. On the whole, the British Public found it the best policy to "pull the leg" of the German spy. It is easier to fool a German than to fool any- body else in this world A German is so wrapped up in his own serene self-conceit that he never entertains the possibility of being fooled. We have had a little further light on that other piece of German bluff the submarine. Without waiting for the appointed day, a German submarine in the North Sea attacked a British merchant ship the "Laertes." The Captain did not "heave to" as ordered, and the German pirate sent a torpedo at him. The ship dodged the torpedo and then ran away. The submarine was perfectly helpless! **# It is to be feared that a good many of us derive our ideas of submarines from that ex- citing work of Jules Verne "Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea." It was a curious prophecy. It was quite a popular prize book for boys thirty years ago, and it all turns on the adventures of Captain Nemo and his sub- marine boat the Nautilus. In those primitive days, the story was regarded as a, wild flight of imagination. Within the last seven years, bhe submarine has become an accomplished tact. But the actual submarine is not nearly mch a perfect vessel as the imaginary "Xautiilus." And we are beginning to "ealise the limitations of the actual submarine The imaginary submarine was able to wan- der all over the globe-from Pole to Pole. The actual submarine is tied to its base. Its motive power is petrol. The very highest capacity alleged for the latest submarine is

run PASSING WEEK

2,000 miles—which is probably an exaggera- tion. At any rate this means that when the vessel has travelled 1,000 miles "outwards" she is only able to get home in time to be re- charged. Practically it would be an impossi- bility for any commander to "cut the thing too fine." Any incident which threw him out of his course and made him do an extra hundred miles would mean that he would be in command of a holipless log a hundred miles from home! And in fact the "submarine" is not really a submarine at all—paradoxical as the state- ment appears! Under water it is "hlind." When the coast is clear, the submarine sails on the surface. It only submerges when con- cealment is desirable. Then the course can only be steered by the compass, and the posi- tion ascertained by "dead reckoning." This old-fashioned method of taking a ship's posi- tion was a great favourite with the unedu- cated sailors of the past, but is now quite out of date. The captain mak-es a dot on the chart at the last position which is certainly known draws a line showing the direction of the ship's course, and calculates the distance by multiplying the number of hours during which they have travelled by the rate at which they are going. This is better than no reckoning at all, but it is obviously very in- exact. In the narrower seas such a method would mean disaster as a mile might make all the difference in the world. The submarine therefore can only travel under water in case of necessity—not as a nor- mal state of affairs. When under wiater it is possible to take observations by means of the "periscope." This is an optical instrument which is pushed up to the surface. The ob- server in the cabin can see in a mirror aU that is in view of the periscope onthe surface. But the periscope is visible to everybody in the neighbourhood! When the look-out on a big ship sees a periscope pop up, he gives the alarm and there is a chance of getting away. The submarine must show witself before it can do anything. **# Moreover the submarine is wretchedly slow. The bigger liners can simply run away from it. Its armament consists of a couple of torpedo tubes. Torpedoes are the easiest of all pro- jectiles to dodge. They can be seen coming sailing through the water. A British destroyer of the fastest type has to slacken speed when it. discharges a torpedo otherwise it might overtake the torpedo and be blown up by its own projecticle. During the present war many cruisers have "put about" rapidly and have watched an enemy's torpedo go skimming past them. The look-out man re- ports "Torpedo passed, Sir," and that parti- cular incident is closed. If a submarine is "caught in the act" by a destroyer or cruiser it is perfectly helpless. It cannot sink in a flash-Ias most people ima- g,ne. There is a slow process of filling certain compartments with water and other preparations which have to be gone through. A submarine could be smashed like an egg by one shot from a 4in. gun; a destroyer or a light cruiser would blow it to scrap iron before it could submerge. **• The attempt to blockade the English coasts by submarines may therefore he viewed with complacency. Nobody outside Colney Hatch or Berlin would thing seriously of "blockad- ing" two islands which have about 7,000 miles of coast line-or more. Germany has only about 300 miles of coast line to the North Sea. and the Baltic can only be entered by the Skager Rack, a bay about a hundred miles wide at its broadest. Any Navy which can close up 400 miles of coast can effectually blockade Germany. Even if the two Navies were equal, the effectiveness of the German to the British blockade would be in the pro- portion of 1 to 18—more or less. Von Tirpitn's yarns will go down well with the peasants from the Black Forest who never saw the sea until they rode into Ostend in the uniforms of Uhlans. This canal-boat Admiral has threatened to sink all ships of any nation- ality approaching Great Britain and to let the crews drown. An attempt has afterwards been made to explain this away; but nobody doubts that the Germans would do this if they dared. But their own doctrine regarding the possi- bility of "reprisals" deters them. No silly sentiment would prevent our Government dealing with piracy in a proper manner. We are at present giving honourable treatment to German prisoners who ought to be publicly gibbetted.

Advertising

The Old Folk's Best Friend BACKACHE KIDNEYPILLS. In the Evening of our Days Old Friends are Bile." Rutty Celli (I ,torr. tt Doan's Backache Kidney Pills have proved a great blessing to many old folk, because they banish backache, regulate the action of the kidneys and help the kidneys to keep the blood pure. The greaiest discomforts of old age are poor syesight, lame back, stiff, achy joints and urinary ills. Most often these troubles come from a weakening of the kidneys. The kidneys have a heavy task daring a long life, of filtering the blood and keeping the body free from the irritating effects of uric acid. Kidney weakness usually gets little attention, and it is no wonder if the kidneys break down. And when the kidneys are sluggish and weak, there is little comfort. Backache is likely to become a constant trouble; lameness in the morning, pains when stooping or lifting, restlessness at night, too frequent and painful passages of the kidney secretions, and persistent languor. Bheumntis pains, stiff joints, dizzy spel!e and weakness of sight and hearing are often due to the excess of urio acid in the blood. So are gravel and stone, dropsical swellings of the limbs ana extremities, heart weakness. These symptoms are causeb dy weakness or diseases of the kidneys and bladder. Urinary waste is being left too long in the system, and is setting up disease in different parts of the body. Doan's Backache Kidney Pills relieve inflammation of the kidneys and bladder, and make the urinary system actives so that it can flush out this poisonous kidney waste. This remedy contains no injurious ingredients whatever, and is safe for All-men and women, old and young. Elderly people will therefore find Doan's Backache Kidney Pills a valuable remedy; they keep the kidneys active, and prevent waste water and uric acid staying too long in the body. Many bad casel of stone, dropsy, rheu. matism, lumbago, and distressing urinary weaknesses have been completely eared by Doan's Pills, even in patients between 70 and 80 years of age. ) In Sj9 boxtt only, six boxet 1319. Neversoldloom. 01 all stores and ehemUts, or from jFoiltr-MeCURmit Co., S, WelU-Btreet, Oxford-Street, London, Wt substuutes.

CARMARTHEN UNDER THE SEARCHLIGHT

CARMARTHEN UNDER THE SEARCHLIGHT. Come, come, and aft you down; you shall no* budge, ft. shall not go, till I sot you op a glaM Where you may see the inmost part of yon. BILAKRAPRARS. It is rather curious that it should be sug- gested that collections be taken up "in the churches, chapels and cinemas" on the IVelsh Flag Day. But the individual responsible for the idea had a pretty good notion as to where the masses congregate. »*• It should be seated that the reference to the increased number of convictions in the "Car- marthen Division" has no reference whatever to Carmarthen Borough. The "Carmarthen Division" means the division of the county surrounding Carmarthen. The Cyr» nirodorion Society has decided to dispense with refreshments at the St. Davids Day re-union. A good many other societies will doubtless adopt a similar policy in regard to their meetings. And it is highly probable that we shall never revert to our old customs even when the war is over. There are many customs which once they are dropped can never be revived. .1' The custom of combining festivities with business is gradually disappearing. War or no war, it would have disappeared in ten more years. Fifty years ago, men met frankly to drink and proceed to business afterwards. Many of us remember the typical public ban- quet with its long toast-list, and somebody or other would introduce two or three extra events. Every society had its annual dinner at the least, and many had their monthly or even weekly reunions. It was nothing at all unusual for a man who; belonged to several societies to have three or four dinners to attend every week regularly. **• This attitude of societies has fallen out of date very rapidly. Half a century ago, no society could exist without its dinners- Twenty years ago, the members barely tolerated the dining aspect, aqd to-day they are not even inclined to tolerate it. If some- body proposes that a new organisation should have a dinner, he is very promptly told that "this is a buiiiness meeting, not a convivial gatheri,ng"-or words to that effect. And this is not due to any particular aver- sion to dinners. Go to any town you like and youl'll find three catering establishments where you would have found one a quarter of j a century ago. Dining out is evidently on the increase-and yet there are fewer public dinners. The real explanation is, I fancy, th ;,t people are banning to find that dining a'1-1 business do not go together. There is a time ard a place for all things, and present day sentiment is against taking the agenda of a bus'nees meeting as a supplement to a banquet. ### The remarks 'Pp!y in a lesser degree to toa-partivs. The ten-party is fl survival from the day cf our grandmotheis when tea was a shilling an ounce. And that was not the best. I have been led to believe that sp:<-a! brands like "Orange Pekoe" and "Gun- powder" cost more. In the. e days her could h, had for a shilling a, gallon. To offer any- body tea was to offer them a rare treat. Children in the early Victorian epoch never tasted tea except at school treats or some such functions. This aspect of the matter bns long since pased away; but custom has almost sanctified the tea. party as a national institu- tion. **« I am told that good tea is as dear as ever but that the- British Public don't want it. The depraved taste which even wealthy people have in tea is astonishing. You'll find families who have large houses and several motor cars. They'll pay high prices for the best wines for their table; but they'll offer their guests tea at Is 6d per lb. One will even tell the other of a place where they can get tea. at Is 4d per lb. They actually boast of the cheap prices they pay for their tea— and the high prices they pay for everything *«• It is much to be regretted that the Carmar- then Guardians did not on Saturday decide to raise the sca!e of outdoor relief. Swansea and Pontypridd have already done so A person chargeaVe to Swansea, and living in Carmarthen now gets 6s where formerly he (or she) got 58..A person living in Swansea and chargeable te Swansea pets the game privilege. A person living in Carmarthen and chargeable to Carmarthen gets the same I don't know why there should he a penalty placed on people for living in their own parish There was a time when people were punished for leaving their own parishes. The Carmar- then Board has reversed that historic policy. They punish people for remaining in their own parishes. .11. It was stated in the discussion that the price of living had gone up 20 per cent. It is very difficult to state exactly to what extent the cost of living has gone up, for no two people live on exactly the same scale. Some articles have gone up 10 per cent. and some nearly 50 per cent.. and the total effect on any particular individual depends on t,he articles which he uses. In any case, it does not follow that anybody pays the exact in- crease shown by the figures. Some fortunate people possibly buy as much as ever. There however are exceptional cases. *« What happens in most oases is that people retrench. Those who used to have cake to their tea every day now only have it on Sundays and content themselves with bread and butter. Those who used to have it on Sundays only now go without cake altogether. It is not so very hard on the people who can drop something. The trouble arises: when we get, down to the people who in the most pros- perous times only got bread and butter. What are they to drop? There have been periods in history when the masses could not get bread. In the years preceding the Frenph Revolution, the peasantry were often obliged for months to live on turnips. The brutal indifference of the ruling classes to the misery of the people was appalling. When the Abbe Foulon was told that the people had no bread he replied "Then let the people eat grass." The mob treasured up the saying, and in the days of the Revolution they hung him to a lamp post, and stuffed grass into his mouth. There is no so wild as a people without bread, and for their own sake rulers should be care- ful not to raise any such wild beast. **• The figures which are published in numerous journals regarding increased prices do not fully represent the extent of t'he rise. In most cases, the figures are obtained from the sellers. The only way in which correct figures can bo obtained is by gathering information from the purchasers. There is a particular grade of flour which is practically neTer sold in eome towns. What earthly usa is it quot- illg fyhe prices of a How which Ï8 not sold in the locality? We read that butter has gone up from Is to Is 4d. This is utter nonsense. There is butter doubtless to be had at Is 4d, tut the price of fresh farm butter is Is 7d to Is 8<1. Then in regard to beef, there is a very wide margin. Beef steak costs Is 2d a lb. 'there are all sorts of grades from that price down- wards. I am told that a cow-heel can be had for lid and that with the addition of a few vegetables and a little seasoning, it is possible to make a dinner for a fa.mily of eight persons for 5d. I don't guarantee the accuracy of these figures; but as public men often say "1 believe they are substantially correct." Of course the family might kick against cow- heels if they came too often. Anyhow the quantity of such luxuries must be very limited. A cow has only four heeds. w The paupers however are not nearly so badly off as the Old Age Pensioners. In a bad case the pauper can appeal for more, and if lie can show a, claim the Guardians will possibly allow .an extra shilling.. The Old Age Pen- sioner however cannot appeal to the Pension Officer to allow him more. In the case of those solely dependent on the pensions, it would be better for them to give up the 5s and to apply for relief. The proposal to build a culvert at Felin- gelli, Abergwili, kept the District Council in roars of laughter for half an hour on Satur- day. No doubt there is something very humorous about building a culvert at a place called Felingelli; but I never had a sense of humour myself, so. possibly there is some joke about the business which escapes me. The Vicar of LlanMtawddog remarked that it was no laughing matter; but he was clearly in n minority. Now the building of a bridge at Owmfelin-mynach W08 discussed very solemn- ly. What is there so funny about the place called Felingelli? ALKTHJEIA.

Stitch in Time

Stitch in Time. an ,ol.J "A st/.tch iu tima upon tLo first «ymptome oS anything being wrong with our health we weie to resort to aom« simple but proDer meana of correcting th* miscbiV, rine-tenfiu of the differing that invades oar homes would be avoided A doao of G 

Tragic Death of a Carmarthen Mac

Tragic Death of a Carmarthen Mac. FATAL ACCIDENT ON THE RAILWAY., Mr Thos. Walters. Borough Coroner, held an inquo; t at the Guildhall, Carmarthen, oil Saturday concerning the death cf Evan Jones, a mason. J. Jones. Abergwili, a yards-man on the G. \V.R., said: Deceased was my father. He was a mason in the employ of the G.W.R. Co. He was G6 years of afe. He had been 27 years in the service of the Company. I paw him this morning in the offict- at the Old Station. This was about 7.;jO a.m. He was all right then. 1 only said "Gcod morning." He was giving in his time-sheets. He was then going back to his work at the new station. I saw him leave the office. He said nothing to me more about anything. John Jones, 6a, Pricry utr-,et, Carmarthen, a clerk in the employ of the G.W.R. Co., said: Deceased was at my office about 8 a.m. this morning. I did not see which way he went. I know nothing cf the accident. The deceased was in his usual health. John Evans, Parade road, Carmarthen, an inspector of permanent way on the G.W.R., said: This morning J. Jones, son of deceased, told me that sometfne had been knocked down (m the line. I went down at once, and a couple of men went as well. I eent two men for the stretcher and one man for the Borough Police. The body was lying between the rails his feet towards Carmarthen and the head towards Lkingunnor. The head had been smashed. He was lying in the four-foot way. He was on the end of the bridge next Aber- gwili, close to the points. I had the body conveyed to the carpenter's shop. P.C. J. Wil iams came quickly. I sent a man to in- form them at the house, and afbr consulting with the constable I sent the body home. He was knocked down by the L. and N.W.R. train which was going to Carmarthen station. No other train had passed. It was taking empty carriages from the goods yard to the station. In answer to a juror, the witness said that two lines ran into one at the end of the bridge Thomas George Thomas said that he was a lad porter on the G.W.R. The Coroner: If you had said you were a porter we should have concluded the rest. Witness said that he was going over the bridge and passed the train. He looked brick and saw the unmbreYa under the coaches. He saw nothing more then. He went down to the station and when he came back he saw the dead body on the stretcher. He saw the umbrella about 200 yards from the p'ace where the body was found. There is a footpath in which one can walk when a train is passing. J. Jones, the son of the deceased. re-called sa-id that hs father was carrying an umbrella. Evan Evans, 37. Richmond terrace, said that he lived next door to the deceased. lie was an extra engine driver. He was a fire- man, but took the place of an engine driver. He shunted these coaches. The first he heard of this was when he arrived at the station. He did not feel the train going over anything. The Coroner: It was difficult for you to see with the coaches in front. Witness: I was looking out at one time and my mate at the other. You coud not see anyone in the four-foot nay ?—No. David Owen, Seymour terrace, Carmarthen fireman on the engine, gave similar evidence. He said that he was 20 years of age. He had passed the test last year, but he had had longer experience. When he reached the station he was told of the man being knocked down. Being an ambulance man he went back, but found that the deceased was beyond all ibuman aid. He did not see the deceased on the line. He was first told by the driver on arrival at the station. The driver re-called sa,id that he was told by Foreman Powell when he arrived at the station. The Coroner: How did he know? Witness: I don't know. PerHaps somebody telephoned down. Inspector Jones suggested that somebody in the yard had from a distance seen something unusual. The Coroner: Deceased was an employee of the Company? Inspector Jones He was. The Coroner: He was therefore not a tres- passer on the premises ? Inspector Jones: He came down with his time eheet. In answer to another observation, the In- spector pointed out that there was a strong gale blowing at the time. Death returned a verdict "Accident/al Inspector Jones expressed the sympathy of the Company with the relatives. The Coroner said that he was sure the Jury would also express their sympathv with the family.

The Question of Health

The Question of Health The question of health ia a matter which 11 Sir ^ncern ."s afc one time or another Jnfliienza is so prevalent as it if just now so it is well to know what to tLe Jo w-axd off an attack of this lxmt weakening disease, this epidemic catarrh or cold of an •Js?nl'nf kind, to combat it whilst under 1 mfluenee, and particularly after J? then the system ia so lowered as to be liable to the most dangerous of com- plaints. Gwilym Evans' Quinine Bittiw i. Acknowledged by all who have given it a fair trial to be the best, specific remedv rlmlinn with Influenza in all its various stages, tliSS a Preparation skilfully prepared with Quinine nd accompanied with other blood purifying and enriching agents, suitable for the &er, r,estion, and all thoso ailments requiring tome strengthening and nerve iSSSS propei ties. It is invaluable for those suff5? mg from colds, pneumonia, or any serious ill new, or prostration caused by a!ee3 £ ^e«L or worry of any kind, when the body has^i general feeling of weakness or laasitude. Send for a copy of the pamphlet of teqti" momals, which carefully read and consider well, then bny a bottle (sold in two 2a 9d and 4s 6d) at your nearest Chemist or Wtoras, but when purohasing see that n.al.D "Gwi]ym Evans" is on the label, stamp and bottle, for without which none ai* genuine. Sole Proprieton: Quinine Bittern Manufacturing Company, limited, Llaneiht Booth Wales.

DEATH O DR ABEL EVANS LAMPETMR

DEATH O' DR ABEL EVANS, LAMPET.MR; The death occurred on Saturday night of Dr Abel Evans, Taliesin House, Lampeter. Ihe deceased, who was 82 years of age, was the old^t medical practitioner in the dis- trict and had been coroner for South Cardi- ganshir é and medical officer for the borough and union of Lampeter for many years. He leaves a widow and two daughters.

Advertising

CLARKE98 B41 PILLa Qft be relied upon to cure. In either sex, all acquired or constitutional Discharges from the Urinary Organs, Gravel u4 Pains In the back. Free from Mercury, EstablisW up. wards of so years. In boxes 4s 6d Mich, of an Chemist* and Patent Medicine Vendors throughoat the World, or sent for sixty stamps by the makert, The LImc and IfkOaatf CouoUea Drug Company, UDCOID,

SOLDIERS COlMIMITTED AT PEMBKOKE

SOLDIERS COlMIMITTED AT PEMBKOKE. Michael Scannel and Idris Davies two privates of the 9th King's Shropshire Light Infantry, and stated to be natives of Tre- forest, were at Pembroke on Saturday CQnl, mittcd for trial at t,he next quarter scions for the county upon a charge of stealing £ 34 10s in money from William John, of Monk- ton, on January 28th. CARMARTHEN Printed and Published by tha Proprietress, M. LAWRKNOB, at her OffioeiA Blue Street, Fbiuay, February Wh. 1915,