Teitl Casgliad: Carmarthen weekly reporter

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 2 o 4 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
13 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
Advertising

PEARL ASSURANCE COMPANY, LTD. I HIGH HOLBOI^, W.O. Summary of ANNUAL REPORT for the Year ending December 31st, 1914. In presenting the Accounts for the past year, the Directors have to report that the pro- gress of the Company during the first seven months of the year was more favourable than that of the corresponding period of the previous year, which was a record one. The con- ditions, however, which have since prevailed, are unprecedented in the history of the Com- pany. The sudden call to arms had been cheei fully responded to by 1,908 members of the Company's Staff, who have joined His Majesty's Forces. During the first five months of the war, claims on the lives of one thousand and twenty of the Company's Policy holders who have become victims of the war have been paid in full, although by the conditions of their policies the Company was not liable for any pay- ment. The heavy burden of this gratuitous and self-imposed strain, has been greatly augmented by the provisions of the Courts (Emergency Powers) Act, 1914: to meet the liabilities under which it has been found necessary to reserve £ 52,000. A valuation of the Company's business has been made by E. J. Bull, Esq., F.I.A., and the Company's Consulting Actuary, R. M. Moore, Esq, who report a surplus of L247,779, after providing for all liabilities. INCOME..—The Total Income for the year amounted to £ 3,466,896 14s 3d, being an in- crease of tl261,206 5s 2d over that of the previous year. In the Ordinary Branch, the income amounted to L735,540 12s lOd, which is £ 42,314/12/6 greater than that of the previous year. The number of Policies issued during the year in this Branch was 22,663, assuring the sum of zCl,891,318 10s Od, and producing a New Annual Premium Income of £ 85,076 4s 9d. Five thousand one hundred and seventy-nine Personal Accident and Employers' liability Policies were granted during the year, representing tlO,478 9s lid New Annual Premium Income. The total Premiums received in this Branch amounted to £31,860 16s lOd, being an increase of £ 2,246 9s 7d over the previous year. CLAI-NIS.-Tlle Life Claims, Grants, Matured Endowments. Accident a,nd Employers' Liability Claims numbered 164,013 during the year, amounting with Bonuses and outstand- ing Claims, to CI,348,484 17s lOd, which, added to the sums previously paid, make a total of £ 16,386,739 18s 6d. The Assurance Funds now amount to t9,110,630 6s 9d, which show an increase of £ 776,455 12s 4d for the year, making the total funds, with Capital paid up, ZE9,808,538 9s lOd. By Order, JAMES ROLL, Chairman. Wanted, additional representatives in all districts. To good business men liberad terms and certain success.—Apply to the District Superintendent, T. Price, 13, Guildhall Sq., Carmarthen. A. ZEE. STOODLEY, ELECTRICAL ENGINEER & CONTRACTOR GARFORTH, BARN ROAD, CARMARTHEN. Electric Lighting and Power, Private Plant, Bells and Telephones a Speciality. CW All Business will receive my Personal Attention. MISSES LEWIS & CLARE are now making a I SPECIAL SHOW OF HIGH-CLASS SPRING MILLINERY A Visit of Inspection will be esteemed. CAVENDISH HOUSE, 41 KING STREET, CARMARTHEN. n«™nm> ESTABLISHED 1854. K DAVID TITUS WILLIAMS Hn NN ZBOOZECZBHSTIDIEIIR,, Etc., ■ ■ I CHAPEL ST., CARMARTHEN. Magazines, Periodicals and all kinds of Publications Bound to suit the owner's taste. Hymn Books, Bibles, etc., repaired and re-covered. Books Bound in Publishers' Cases at Publishers' Prices. BOOKBINDING TO THE TRADE. WATCHES & CLOCKS REPAIRED. JEWELLERY REPAIRED LIKE NEW. GILDING AND ELECTRO PLATING. HIGH-CLASS WORKMANSHIP. ESTIMATES GIVEN ALL WORK GUARANTEED AT JOHN WILLIAMS Watchmaker, Jeweller, & Silversmith, 9 & 10 Lammas Street, Established 1836. i Galvanized Corrugated Sheets. :For Excellence of Quality and Durability Buy the Brand, and for Good Value in GALVANIZED AGRICULTURAL FEEDING REQUISITES AND WIRE NETTING, ask for LYSAGHPS MAKE. Catalogues and Articles are supplied by any Iron- monger or Agricultural Implement Dealer. Penn'orths of coal are being sold in Lon- j don. The quantity sold for a penny ie 4Jlbs. W. S. MORiilS, Wholesale Grocer, Corn, Flour and Seed Merchant, OA Nat. Telephone, 50. Telegrams, Morris, Merchant Carmarthen." SEND FOR PRICE LIST The Welshman's Favourite. IMAB0N Sauce I MABON Sauceio 3 r As good as its Name. I DON'T FAIL TO GET IT. V S Mtinufacturers—BLANCH'S, St. Peter St., Cardiff. 6 8.a: iff iff I My Moil's Sauce I I Large Bottle 2d. I ■ Delightful Sauce and lots of it fop a the money. Of all Grocers and Stores. 3 Sale Makers—BLANCH'S, St. Peter St., CARDIFF, JG niHT lilllii li II1"QIIIIIiBiI8. Mm ii if i m CLARKE'S B41 PILLS can be relied upon to cure, In either aex, all acquired or constitutional Discharges from the Urinary Organs, Gravel an* Pains in the back. Free from Mercury, Established up- wards of 50 years. In boxes 41 6d each, of all Chemists and Patent Medicine Vendors throughout the World, or sent for sixty stamps by the maker*, The Lixawa and Midlaad Counties Drug Company, Lincoln. TIMBER FOR SALE. TO BE SOLD in 3 Lots about 12 ACRES of fine Grown LARCH and few SCOTCH TREES, suitsble for Pitwood, grown on Cwmgwyn Farm, in the Parish of Llanegwad, about n miles from Nant- garedig Station close to the Main Road. Further particulars to be had at Brynglas, Nant- garedig. Tenders should be sent in on or before March 12th, 1915, to T. Lewis, Brynglas, Nantgaredig. CARMARTHEN BOROUGII POLICE. WANTED for position as POLICE CONSTABLE a healthy man of good character and physique. Age, 21 to 25 height, without bcots, 5ft. lOinches chest, 36 inches. Wages commence 27s., and rise to maximum of 34s. Applications to be made to Head Constable, Carmarthen Borough. CARMARTHENSHIRE COUNTY COUNCIL, EDUCATION COMMITTEE. TO BUILDERS AINI) CONTRACTORS. TENDERS are invited for !tbe erection of a new Council School at PENYGROES (Accommod- ation 250 Infants). Copies of the Plans and Specification may be obtained on application to the Architect, on payment of a deposit of One guinea, remitted by cheque, made payable to the Carmarthenshire Education Committee, which will be returned on receipt of a bona fide tender. Sealed and endorsed Tenders are to be delivered to J. W. Nicholas, Esq., County Education Offices, Carmarthen, on or before 31st March, 1915. The lowest or any Tender will not necessarily be accepted. W. VINCENT MORGAN, A.R.I.B.A., County Architect. County Education Offices, Carmarthen. RURAL DISTRICT COUNCIL OF WIIITLAXD. AUDIT OF ACCOUNTS. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a Copy of the Accounts duly made up and balanced to- gether with all Account Books, Deeds, Contracts, Accocnts, Vouchers aud Receipts mentioned or re- ferred to in such Accounts of the above named Rural District Council, will, on the 17th day of March, 1915, be deposited in the office of the said Rural District Council at 3 St. James Street, Narberth, and will be open, between the hours of 10 a.m. and 4 p.m., to the inspection of all persons interested until the 26th day of March, 1915, and that J. E. Pugho Jones, Esquire, the District Auditor, will attend on the 26th day of March, 1915, at the hour of 11 in the forenoon, at the Court House, Narberth, to Audit the Accounts for the half-year ended at 30th September, 1914, of the said Rural District Council. Dated the 2nd day of Mirch, 1915. HENRY LEWIS, Clerk to the said Council. CARMARTHEN UNION CONTRACTS FOR PROVISIONS, DRAPERY, IRONMONGERY, &c. TENDERS are incited for supplying the Workhouse and Cottage Home for 3 or 6 months with Meat, Bacon, Flour, and other Provisions and Groceries, and Coal and for 6 or 12 months with Milk, Flannel, Drapery, Clothing, Ironmongery, Boots and Shoes, Coffins, Timber for Firewood, and for Printing, and for Carpenters', Masons', Painters', and Plumbers' Work; and Hire of Hearse and Carriages. The Guardians reserve the power of contracting separately for each article, and do not bind them- selves to accept the lowest or any tender, The quality of the articles will be most rigidly enforced. The estimated quantity of each article is stated on the Printed Tender Form, which miy be had on application to the Clerk. The Guardians, however, do not bind themselves to any specific quantity, but only such as may be ordered from time to time. All Tenders must be delivered to the Clerk in separate sealed envelopes (marked Tender for "), not later than 1 p.m. on Tuesday, 16th March next. All samples must be delivered with the Tender, but PACKED SEPARATELY IN PLAIN WHITE PAPER WITHOUT HAVING THE TRADESMEN'S NAME OR ANY WRITING OR DISTINCTIVE MARK WHATEVER THEREON. The Tenders will be opened on the 20th March next. By order of the Board, JOHN SAER, Clerk to the Guardians. 7, Hall-street, Carmarthen, 1st March, 1915. TO ADVERTISERS. PREPAID SCALE OF CHARGES FOR ADVERTISING IN THE REPORTER. No. of One three Six Words. Insertion. Insertions. Insertions, s d s d s d 20 1 0 2 3 3 6 28 1 6 3 6 4 6 36 2 0 4 0 5 6 44 2 6 4 6 6 6 The above scale only applies to the Situations, To Lets," and To be Sold by Private Treaty" clases of Advertisements, and must be paid for in advance, or the ordinary credit rate will be charged HALFPENNY STAMPS, or Postal or Post Office Orders, payable to M. LAWRENCE, at Carmarthen. Replies may be made addressed to the Reportei Office, and will be forwarded to advertisers when stamped envelopes are sent. JAMES JONES, Billposter and Advertising Agent for Kidwelly and neighbouring Villages. All work duly executed. Address :—Station Road, Kidwelly. TO LET, SHOP & HOUSE, 17 Kins-street, Carmarthen, Apply—J. A. Hughes, Solicitor, Barry.

No title

FOOTBALL.—A Rugby football match was played at the Carmarthen Grammar School field, Carmarthen, on Saturday last, between teams representing Llanelly and the 4th Welsh (Reserve) Battalion now stationed at Car- marthen. The Hanelly team included two old Carmarthen Harlequin players—Henry Thomas and Samuels. After a most uninte- resting game the 4th Welsh proved victorious by one penalty goal and two, tries to nil. Next Siaftiurday (to-morrow) the 4th Welsh entertain the 1st Brecknock lXlttailion of the South Wales Borderers at the Morgan Arms field, Water st., Carmarthen, the kick-off being timed for 2.30. The 4th Welsh have not yet suffered defeat. THE next practice of the Carmarthen Male Choir will be held at the English Congrega- tional Schoolroom on Sunday afternoon next at 3.45, and not on Sunday night as usual. It is hoped that all members will make a special effort to attend. A hearty welcome is ex- tended to a,11 local gangers.

CARMARTHEN SHIRE INFIRMARY

CARMARTHEN SHIRE INFIRMARY. The Secretary begs respectfully to acknow- ledge the receipt of the following: £10, dona- tion from Mr James Woodrow, Llandilo; £3 3s, Lammas street Chapel, Carmarthen; peri- odicals, Mi-s Gwynne Hughes, Glancothi; Mr R. H. James.

WEST WALES SHERIFFS

WEST WALES SHERIFFS. The following were appointed new sheriffs by His MaeSsty-»in Council at Buckingham Palace, and will serve for the ensuing year:- Cardiganshire: Mr Wm Lewis, Llysnewydd Henillan. Carfarthenshire: Mr John Henry Thomas, of 2, Wedderbutrn House, Mampstead, London Pembrokeshire: Mr William Bird Allen, of 158, Portadown road, Maida Vale, London.

Stitch in Time

Stitch in Time. Tliore is an old saying "A stlitch in time saves nine" and if upon the first gmptow of anything being wrong with our health we were to resort to some simple but proper means of correcting tb4 mischief, nine-tenth* of the suffering tha-t invades our homes would be avoided. A doae of G vil.y m Evans' Quinine Bitters taken wkn 1 n feel the least bit out of sorts is jiSt tin t "stitch iu time. You can -et Gwii^ra E ana' Qiunine Bittei-a at any Chemists or Stoi in bottles, 2s 9d and 4s 6d each, but imen,ber that the only guarantee ofgenuine is the name "Gwilym Evans" ou the la-D], stamp ant" bottle, without which none ('08 genuine. Sole Proprietors: Quinine Bitteis Manufacturing Company, Limited, lilAnelly* South Wale.

St Davids Day at Carmarthen

St. David's Day at Carmarthen. GRAND SERIES OF CELEBRATIONS. St. David's Day was celebrated at Carmar- then this year on a moire ample scale than at any time during living memory. 0*0 The National Celebration may be said to have commenced on Saturday, 27th February. This was Welsh Flag Day. At every point of vantage in the Ancient Borough, young ladies had taken up positions with a view of induc- ing passe.rs-by to purchase flags at t,he price of Id, 3d, or 6d, for the benefit of the Fund which provides comborts for the Welsh troops. They did a very brisk trade. Many young ladies who were of an enterprising nature made a house-to-house visitation, and quickly disposed of a large portion of their stock. • ft* On St. David's Day daffodils were rather scarce. This has been a very late season, and home grown daffodils were not to be had in any quantity for the 1st March. Most of the "daffodils" worn were either artificial flowers made of paper, or else Trumpet Narcissi im- ported from the Channel Islands. The leek was worn to a very large extent—for there is a decided revulsion in its favour, and there is a feeling that it has been too lightly se-t aside without its case being heard. Most people in Carmarthen however evaded the controversy by wearing in their buttonholes the little Red Dragon flags: which they had purchased the previous Saturday. The school children of course had a holiday. The festival partook largely of a military character. Laurel wreaths were hung on the four military monuments of the town-those of Picton, Nott, the Welsh Fusiliers, and the South Wales heroes. The soldiers present assembled in Guildhall Square at 11 a.m.; the band played, the children sang, and a patriotic programme was very pleasingly rendered. ••• In the evening the soldiers had dinner at the Assembly Rooms, and at the Pentrepoeth School. No one room in the town was big enough to hold the lot. The whole of the dinner arrangements were in the hands of Scoutmaster Humphreys, and the arrange- ments were admirable. Mr D. H. Thomas, Starling Park, was the special treasurer for the Dinner Fund. Col. Lort Phillips, of the P.I.Y., presided at the Assembly Rooms, and after the dinner the toast of his health was enthusiastically received, as also that of Capt. Long Price, Mr Griffith Owen (hon. secretary of the Soldiers Club) and others. At Pentre- poeth, the men were necessarily broken up into small parties; but here too everything went off like clockwork. *»• In the evening Lieut.-Gen. Sir James Hills- Johnes, V.C., G.C.B., presided at a concert given to the soldiers at the Picturedrome. The National Anthems of France and Belgium were sung by Mr Victor Annisseau, a vocalist from Liege, who was wounded at the battle of Mons. Songs and recitations of a patriotic character weire rendered by Miss Enid Whel- don, Mr Arthur Lloyd, Mr W. H. Burt, Madame Thomas, Mr Jack Auckland, Mr Lewis Jones, Miss H. J. Jones, Mr Oliver Evans. Mr Harold Malkin, Mr W. F. Watts and Mr Hew. Edwards acted as accompanists. The concert concluded with the singing of "Hen Wlad fy Nhadau" and "God save the King." The Cymmrodorion Society had a meeting at the Guildhall in the evening. The Rev Griffith Thomas presided. Choruses were ren- dered iby the Choir, led by Mr Wm. Jones. Vocal selections were given by Miss Hannah Jones, Messrs T. Davies and B. Jones, Miss B. Richards, Messrs John Thomas and Willie Davies, and Miss Gwendia Evans. Short addresses were delivered on "Welsh Art" by Professor Stephens, on "Welsh Poetry" by Dyfnaillt, and "The Soldiers of Wales" by Mr P. J. Wheldon. Recitations were given by Hywel Myrddin, and a reading from the works of Daniel Owen by Mr Henry Howell. Mrs Glyndwr Richards and Mr Stanley Isaac acted as accompanists. Llinos Cwmamman sang penillion, whilst Mr J. Lewis, Clydach, acted as harpist, and her topical penillion were very keenly appreciated by the large audience

Advertising

VENO'S LIGHTNING COUGH CURE The Ideal family remedy. Contains no opium, morphine, paregoric, or other harmful drug. Cures at all ages. COUGHS.COLDS & INFLUENZA Veno's is the surest and speediest cure for these winter ills, the best pro- tection against more serious dangers. CHILDREN'S COUGHS Soon yield to Veno's—even Whooping cough. And there Is no trouble in giving it, children simply lore Veno's. Other tiies 1/1\ and 2/9, I ariSp I «S from chemists and. storts T-trJl I Q everywhere. Ktfnst sub- Iriai A m ttitv tis they are not Bottle w « "just as good as Vtno's." I

Chancellor Reviews Welsh Troops

Chancellor Reviews Welsh Troops. MAGNIFIOENT SPECTAOLES. On Tuesday evening the following telegram from the Chancellor of the Exchequer was re- ceived by General Ivor Philipps, D.S.O., M.P., commanding the 1st Division Welsh Army:- "Please convey to the tro-ops under your command, whioh I have had the pleasure of seeing at Llandudno, Colwyn Bay, and Rhyl, my personal thaniks and the thanks of his Majesty's Government for their patriotic efforts. Only the united action of officers, non-commissioned officers, and men, ably directed las they have been by you could in the short time in which the Welsh Division has boon in existence have produced such remark- able and satisfactory results. Wales has reason to be proud of this, her latest contribution to the Imperial Forces, which, judged by the evidence of grit and enthusiasm I have witnessed, will worthily maintain the name and traditions of Welsh regiments and add a glorious page to the his- tory of a glorious race.—(Signed) D. LLOYD GEORGE. In a telegram of acknowledgment General Philipps -otarbed:- "On behalf of the officers and men of the Welsh Diviison I tha.nk you for your encour- aging and inspiring words. We have all much appreciated your visits, and assure you that no effort will be spared on our part to make the Welsh Army Corps, and his aide-de-camp, force. I fully believe th a. my our presence and sympathetic approval of our work will induce many more of our young men to join the Army of Wales." The Chancellor of the Exchequer visited Oolwyn Bay and witnessed an inspection by General Sir Henry Mackinnon, Commander- in.Chief of the Western Command, of the four battalions of the South Wales troops, nearly 5,000 strong, forming the 2nd Brigade of the Welsh Army Corps. Accompanying the Chancellor were Mr Her- bert Lewis, M.P. (Parliamentary Secretary of the Local Government Boarrd), Major General I Sir Ivor Herbert, Bart, 1\L., Mr Timothy Davies, M.P., and Mr William Brace, M.P. "ifth the Commander-in-Chief were members olf his staff, anclalso, General Ivor Philipps, D.S.O., M.P., commanding the 1st Division of the Welsh rmy Corps, and his aide-de-camp, Lieut. Gwilym Lloyd George. The inspection which was favoured with lovely weather, took place on the West Promenade, and afforded a brilliant spectacle for an enormous crowd of spectators, who assernble-d on a green bank knolwn as Caley Slope, which forms a natural platform. It was at one end of the embankment that General MacKinnon took the salute, as the brigade, headed by Brigadier-General Hora- tius Evans, swung past. The Chancellor on several occasions observed to the inspecting General, "What a fine sight!" The troops first marched past in column of platoons and returned in columns of fours. They were ac- cClompaniûd by the bands of the Cardiff City and 10th Gwent Battalions, and all four battalions had their regimental goats, that of the Glamorgan Gurkas (the antams) wear- ing a, handsome new silk-lined coat which bore on one side the effigy of a bantam crow- ing. After the inspection a civic reception was extended to the Chancellor. In replying, Mr Lloyd George said: Mr Chairman and Gentlemen of the Colwyn Bay Urban District Council. I thank you very cordially for your very kind welcome to me on this occasion to your beautiful health resort. Colwyn Bay is one of the most beautiful health resorts, not merely in Wales—and that is putting it very high—but in the whole of the United Kingdom, and it is always a plea- sure to me to visit this part of the country (cheers). Your chairman has reminded you one or two instances in Welsh history which are ,associated with this part of the world. There has been many a struggle for liberty altong this coast. Here the Welsh princes have made some of their greatest struggles for freedom (cheers). Near the headland to the east of your bay they used to cut off the convoys of the Normans and take them up to the hills laughter). Now we are engaged again m a struggle for liberty (cheers) and it has thrilled me to witness the way in which Wales has responded to the old call that al- ways stirred her blood. It was one of the most magnificenit spectacles I have seen-the march past of these young fellows who are offering their lives to the country in its great hour of need (cheers). I cordially re-echo the sentiments expressed by the chairman in hoping that the efforts made here and else- where to organise the forces of this powerful Empire will end, as I feel confident they mil, in the triumph, the complete triumph, of human liberty, of human justice, and of fair pllay throughout Europe and the world. On reaching Rhyl, where the 2nd Brigade is quartered under Brigadier-General Dunn, the front was thronged with people. The Chancellor after passing the massed battalions returned to the saluting base, and the march past began. They first went by in half pla- toons and came back in column of route forma- tion. The Carmarthen Battalion of the Welsh Regiment had with them their majestic look- ing mascot, the champion lie-goat Copthorne Ghost, presented by the British Goat Society. It is said to be the largest of its type ever bred in Great Britain, and has a long list of prizes to its credit. Each of the Rhomdda Battalions also had its goat mascot, and the Swansea Battalion's mascot was the bulldog presented by the Cor- poration. The line was admirably kept, the alertness and intelligence of the men, over 5,000 strong evoking general comment. The parade ended, the members of the Urban District Council were presented and the group photographed. The Chairman (Mr Phillips) alluded to the pride with which the district looked on this brigade, in the formation of which they had done their level best. He added a word on behalf of thousands in this country, that was, to thank the Chancellor for his splendid speech at Bangor on Sunday. The right hon. gentleman said in that great utterance what almost all of them were thinking in their heart of hearts (cheers). Mr Lloyd George said: It is a great plea- sure to me to visit your famous town, and it is a privilege to visit it on this occasion to witness a spectacle which has thrilled us all —the appearance on parade of these young men, who have tendered their lives to their country in its greatest hour of emergency. In so far as a mere civilian may compliment ex- perts, I should be very happy to give my meed of praise to the admirable work rendered by Brigadier Dunn, by the brigade officers, and by the commanding officers of the various bat- talions, and the way in which the Army has been trained and disciplined. I have now seen about 15,000 Welsh infantry; I never thought I should live to see the day when there would be 15,000 Welshmen once more ready to meet the foes of liberty; but there, they are always ready to the call, as they wore in the past. They are only part of an army of 80,000 turned out by Wales in this crisis, and I am certain that the 80,000 is only a beginning to the much larger force that our country is going to contribute to the greatest struggle that has ever taken place for human progress (cheers). I congratulate the officers on the appearance of the men. I am sure the chairman is right in attributing it in some degree to the salubrity and invigorating conditions of Rhyl. Lord Kitchener and those responsible for the creation of these great armies will, I have no doubt, be duly grateful for the elements which have so, much contri- buted to the efficiency of this fine force. 1 am sorry I must return to town—the whole of us are very hardworked as Ministers (hear, hean ), and I shall have to resume work as soon as I get back. I am extremely obliged to you for your kind welcome (cheers). Mr Lloyd George joined the London express in which Mrs Lloyd Georgie had travelled from Llandudno unction. Before the train left Rhyl Mrs Lloyd George was presented with a bouquet of daffodils by Miss Phyllips, daugh- ter of the chairman of the Urban District Council.

Pearl Assurance Company

Pearl Assurance Company. A GOOD YEAR DESPITE THE WAR. The annual report of the Pearl Assurance Co. shows that for the first seven months of 1914, the amount of business done was greater than in the first seven months of 1913—which was a record year. The war of course affected the oompany largely. 1,908 members of the Staff responded to the call to arms. 1,020 policies on the lives of persons killed in the war were paid in full, although the Company- is not liable for anything on them. The Courts Emergency Powers Act also required a reserve of £ 52,000. Nevertheless the income for the year ( £ 3,466,8969 14s 3d) shows an increase-of L126,206 5s 2d over the previous year. In the ordinary branch the additional income was £ 42,314 more than in 1913. Mr T. Price, 13, Guildhall-squaxe., Carmarthen is the local superintendent.

No title

FOR THE BLOOD IS THE LIFE.-Clarkes Blood Mixture is warranted to cleanse the blood of all impurities, from whatever cause arising For Scrofula, Scurvy, Eczema, Bad Legs, Abscesses, Ulcers, Glandular Swellings. Skin and Blood diseases Pimples and Sores of all kinds, its effects are marvellous. Over 50 years success. Thousands of testimonials. In bottles, 28 9d, each of all chemists & stores Ask for Clarke's Blood Mixture and do not be persuaded to take an imitation

Carmarthen Board of tiaardians

Carmarthen Board of tiaardians. The fortnightly meeting of the Carmarthen Board of Guardians was held at the Guildhall on Saturday. Mr J. Jones, Plas, Ferryside, presided. OUTDOOR RELIEF. The reports of the relieving officers showed the amount of outdoor relief distributed dur- ing the fortnight ending on the previous Board-day to have been as follows :—First week: 674 paupers, a decrease of-16 as com- pared with the corresponding week last year; expenditure, £98 Is 3d; am increase of 16s 8d. Second week 671 paupers, a decrease of 21s; expenditure, tSS 13s 5d, a decrease of 9s lOd. THE TREASURER'S REPORT. The Treasurer's report showed the balance in hand on the previous Board-day to have i been t2,762 16s 4d. REPAIRS TO OOTi'AGE HOME. Mr J. P. Lewis and Mr T. Thomas reported 1 "The Home was visited by us on the 25th 1 and 26th February, 1915. We found all com- I fortable and clean as could be under the cir- cumstances. The premises are in a bad state of repair both inside and outside. The back I bedrooms are very damp. With a little ex- pense this could be improved by preventing the rain from getting in and the wall papers repaired. The inmates of the workhouse could do much of this at a reduced cost. It is hoped that we shall remove to other pre- mises shortly; therefore no great expense is suggested." Mr T. Thomas in moving the adoption of the report said that it would be well just to ■ spend just enough to keep the house habitable in the meantime. The work could be done i; for £ 5. Mr J. P. Lewis proposed that the work be done at a cost not exceeding t5. Mr Gilbert seconded the proposition which was carried unanimously. )IASiIMH'S REPORT. The Master in his report stated "Divine Service was conducted in the House on Sun- day the 14th February by the Rev E. Ungoed Thomas, Tabernacle Baptist Church, and on Sunday, 21st February, by the Rev D. Roberta of Elim Congregarbional Church. Both minis- ters also visited during the week, and the Rev E. U. Thomas made the following report "Visited the sick wards and other rooms, found them beautifully clean and bright. The patients, bcth males and females, are well attended and seem quite happy although afflicted. The general appearance of the in- j stroution gives pleasure to me as a visitor and reflect.s great credit on the management." j The number of inmates in the house on the last day of the week was 62 against 76 for I the corresponding period last year. The number of casual paupers relieved during the fortnight was 45 against 131 for the same period last year. Periodicals were kindly given I to the inmates by Mr W. Townsend, Brynteg.' f A NEW USE FOR INSURANCE CARDS. F A letter was read from the Merthyr Board of Guardians enclosing a resolution asking the I Insurance Commissioners to give facilities for the tracing by means of their insurance cards of men who had deserted their wives and famili,es.-This resolution was unanimously s adopted by the Carmarthen Board. i THE CONTRACT DIFFICULTY. It was decided to have a special meeting of the Board on the 20th March for the letting of contracts. j Rev A. Fuller Mills suggested that at the present time it would be desiraible possibly only to make contracts for three months. The Chairman: It cuts both ways. Rev A. F. Mills said that at the Sanatorium Committee meeting the previous Thursday they had decided to let some contracts for three months and some for six. It might be 1 suggested in the advertisement that tenders be sent in for either three or six months. Mr T. Thomas: Would not that affect the ¡ prices. Mr J. P. Lewis said that it would be safer to have contracts for six months. Perhaps the prices would be up in three months. Mr J. Lewis (Llangendeim^): Perhaps they the prices would be up in three months. the prices would be up in three months. Mr J. Lewis (Llangendeim^): Perhaps they will be down. J Rev A. Fuller Mills said that the war might ( terminate suddenly. If they accepted con. ( tracts for six months, they might be at a I loss. The Chairman The prices may go up at the end of three months. I do not think they will go down. Rev A. Fuller Mills: Coal Ï8 down this week m Carmarthen. At the Sanatorium meeting we refused to accept a tender for milk as we thought it too high, and we decided to ap- point a committee to look round about Llany- byther in order to see if we could get milk at a reasonable price. The Chairman: What do you call a reason- able price. Rev A. Fuller Lills; I won't tell you hero ¡ now. It was decided to invite contracts for three or six months. MILITARY REVENUE AND RELIEF. ¡ Attention was drawn to one or two cases in S««ng relief w« being paid f i. nJJ' 0 as »>ldi«r's dependents or fod biLlettiing soldiers. Rev A P. Mills said that he did not think ought to go into one or tw out considering the lot. I Her J. Herbert thought that they ought to have a committee to go into this ItS. m-itiL i„ TV1"3 that the matter be deferred. 11,ty did not know how ng the piesent conditions would last It I-as decided to defer action in the mean- time.

Advertising

Preachers next Sunday at Carmarthen Places of Worship. UNION ST. XNWA^TWSNT CHAPEL. ?r,Vs' College. BABiELL, PENSARN. ev Isaac -Davies, Nantgaredig BETHANIA (C.Jf.) Rev J. O. Jones (pastor). ENGLISH BAPTIST CHURCH Rev D. J. Michoal, B A 73.1 •' PRIORDY INDEPENDENT ( -'APEl. Jr  R«r V incent PENUEL BAPTIST CHAPiEr Rev Waldo Lewis, B.A. TABERNACLE BAPTIST PENUEJ BAPTIST CHAPiEr Rev Waldo Lewis, B.A. TABERNACLE BAPTIST. Rev E. U. Thomas (pastor) 1 WATER 8T. C M. CHAPKI Rev J). Rowlands (pastor) BUM. I EBENEZER WELSH WESLEY A JIlt QHAEL. fuw J. Meirion Williams (resident minister).

CARMARTHEN UNION DISTRESS COMMITTEE

CARMARTHEN" UNION DISTRESS COMMITTEE. The Committee desire to acknowledge the the 4d,°U'ing special subscription to the Belgian Refugees Fund:— Proceeds of entertainment given by Mr Tr at the Ferryside Schoolroom on Tuesday, 23rd February, 1915, amounting to £1'1 •s r