Teitl Casgliad: Carmarthen weekly reporter

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 4 o 4
Full Screen
9 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
THE PASSING WEEK

THE PASSING WEEK "Let there be thistles; there are grapes, If old things, there are new Ten thousand broken lights and ghapea Yet glimpses of the true."—Tinntbcx. It is satisfactory to leairn that American humour is net a thi,ng of the past. Poor eld Mark Twain is gonf- and we feared we should never have another author who could turn out anything so funny as the "Jumping Frog." Artemus Ward and Bret Harte have gone over to the great majority, and Josh Billings is a mere memory of the past. But the high traditrons of American humour are well main- tained by the President and the Secretary of State in their note to Germany over the sink- ing of merchant ships and the drowning of women and babies by German pirates. ••• The Note contains the following passages: Recalling the humane and enlightened attitude hitherto assumed by the German Government in matters of international right. Having learned to recognise German views and German influence in the field cf inter- national obligations as always ranged on the side of justice and humanity. long acquainted as this Government has been with the character of the Imperial Government- and the high principles cf equity with which in the past it has been actuated and guided. statements are to be taken as anything bnt ironical. There is a grim story told in West- em America of a tribe of Indians which was defeated and had most of its belongings cap tared by the United States troops. Amongst the other trophies which fell into the hands I defeated and had most of its belongings cap- of the soldiers was a hair rope about a hundred yards long. It was not made of the hair of aboriginal American Indians. There were lengths made of the long red hair of European women there were sections made of the hair of blonde ladies; and there were yards and yards twisted out of the tresses of golden- haired little European children. It is not on record that the United States Colonel who captured the trophy talked to the chief of the tribe about the well known principles of humanity which had always animated that triue t •He might just as well have done so. The j poor benighted Indian with his tomahawk and his scalping knife was a mere dabbler | compared to the German Emperor. The Kaiser is the head of a- gang of savages a million times more murderous and a million 1 times more degraded than any which ever •i infested the Western Prairies. The poor 1 benighted Indian was only able to work by j hand. The Chief of the Potsdam savages 1 carries on the same business by machinery. 'J ,i Of course Germany poses as "humane, i That is part of tke doctrine of Nietzche. That ] philosopher teaches that there are two sys- i terns of morality—one for the strong and one for the weak. In one delicious chapter he deals w ith the points of view of the eagle and the lamb. He says that the eagle's view is that it is a very good thing to eat tfee lamb. On the other hand the attitude of the lamb is that this is a 'highly improper action on the part of the eagle. The eagle however would cease to exist if he accepted the lamb's idea, and his own attitude is perfectly justifiable from his own s-tandpoint. This is German policy in a nutshell. The German recognises the tw o points of view, and he is quite enough of a humbug to pretend that he regards things from the standpoint of others. The German Eagle continually holds him- self out as a mild turtle dove. He does not go screaming all over the landscape that he is very fond of lamb. If he did that he would defeat bis. proposal, because the flockmasters would go in for guns and bulldogs. He says '-e. v.iv w uiim 1/uwi- aJ'1 JJ- uej,1 e:; IS to promote friendship with the lamhs. He preaches mercy at f the game. The Eagle only wants the men with the guns and the bull- dogs to clear off and to leave him to deal with the lambs in his own way. ••• This idea of a Double Morality explains many things. Germany believes in Peace. She wants other Nations to reduce theis Armies and their Navies. There is little doubt that some people in this country and in Franco who have preached Anti-Militarism have been in the pay of Germany. She is verv much in favour of Anti-Militarism—on the part of other Nations*. It is not a- good thing for other Nations to go in for Militarism Other Nations ought to devote all their energies to cultivating the soil and to the manufacture of ploughs and harrows. Mih- tarism is only for Germans! I Germany is an Apostle of Humanity. She Iras always advocated Hwmanrfcy—on the part of other people. For her own part she believes in the most utter ruthlessness and she acts up to her principles. But this is quite a different thing f rom advocating fero- city on the part of other people. She con- tinually teaches other nations that they ought to l>e very gentle. This is not humbug. It is a fine thing to practise two hours with the gloves every morning and to spend the rest of your time striving to get everybody else in the street to give up athletics and to take to intellectual and religious pursuits. You will soon be able to fight everybody in the street if you keep on in that way, and the "Day" will soon arrive. But it is quite as necessary to hoodwink your neighbours into becoming peaceful citizens as it is to get yourself into training. The one thing is as much a part of the scheme as the other. We have had some curious exhibitions of "patriotism" during the last few days. The shops of German residents have been looted, their houses have been broken upen, and the Germans themselves have been badly mauled. It is wonderful how patriotic the hooligans and corner-boys are. If thay 'want to fight the Germans why on earth don't they enlist? If they murdered every German baker in London and burned down the premises of every Ger- man sausage-maker in Liverpool, they would not drive the German Army an inch further hack in Belgium. The Government is appeal- ing for more men to enlist, and our country to be very gentle. This is not humbug. It is a fine thing to practise two hours with the gloves every morning and to spend the rest of your time striving to get everybody else in the street to give up athletics and to take to intellectual and religious pursuits. You will soon be able to fight everybody in the street if you keep on in that way, and the "Day" will soon arrive. But it is quite as necessary to hoodwink your neighbours into becoming peaceful citizens as it is to get yourself into training. The one thing is as much a part of the scheme as the other. We have had some curious exhibitions of "patriotism" during the last few days. The shops of German residents have been looted, their houses have been broken upen, and the Germans themselves have been badly mauled. It is wonderful how patriotic the hooligans and corner-boys are. If they "want to fight the Germans why on earth don't they nlist 11 If they murdered every German baker in London and burned down the premises of every Ger- man sausage-maker in Liverpool, they would not drive the German Army an inch further hack in Belgium. The Government is appeal- ing for more men to enlist, and our country gory mire os Belgium has been by the German soldiery. There are thousands of able-bodied men in this country who ought to be out in Belgium fighting the German soldiers. They I stands in daifger of who ought to be out in won't do that. They however feel wonder- fully virtuous and tremendously patriotic when a hundred or two of them mob a decrepit old German jeweller or clocu-cleaner! 0*9 We don't want healthy able-bodied men to let off their superfluous energy in this way. But we do want them to go out to the trenches and to kill as many German soldiers as they can. -if they do that, they will do some- thing practical. If the heads of all the Ger- mans in London were carried on pikes by the mob to-morrow morning, this would not keep back the German Army one hour on t,he march t1 Calais. There is no need to go into the question of the morality of the mobbing of Germans. The great objection to it is that it a w aste of energy. What we want is to hare that energy directed into a more useful channel. If all the men who are bldwtng bJf steam against alien enemies at home were prepared to go out and fight the German soldiers at the front, the Kaiser's Army would soon be driven back to the Rhine, and the present national peril would be averted. I It is perfectly true that the mobbing of j Germans in this country is quite as justifiable as the winking of the Lusitanio.. There is no j denying that fact. This has ceased to be a war between two armies. In the good old days. the two armies used to do the fighting and the civilians were left untouched so long as they did not interfere. But the Germans have now changed all that. It is now a war cf peoplies. The pro-Germans have done their best to explain away all the cold blooded mur- ders committed by the German soldiers in Belgium. But the sinking of the Lusitania cannot be explained away. Here was a passen- ger ship fitted with non-comhatants-nien. womtn and children. They had nothing to j do with the war. Yet the Germans sunk the ship and drowned about 1,400 helpless people. out of sheer murderous mania. The act was infamous from a moral standpoint. Moreover it was useless from a military standpoint. If the German Navy could sink the British battleships and cruisers which have closed up the German ports they would help their cause a great deal. But if they sank every liner which crosses the Atlantic they would not help themselves in the least. The sinking of the Lusitania was not only savage; it was I useless. For practical ettect it is on a pit-i with the anti-German riots in London—al- though of course it is a thousand times m-ov heinous. However both have one feature in common. They were acts of wanton savagery which served no purpose whatever. 990 It is as weill to face the fact that we are in for a long war. The War Office is making arrangements for a winter campaign. Mr Lloyd George has made provision in the Budget for the carrying on of the war until the 31st March, 1916. Some unexpected event might terminate the war suddenJy. On the other hand, it is quite possible that the war will not be finished even by the 31st March next. It is more than likely that the war will have to be fought out to the bitter end. The Germans must either conquer Europe, or else Germany must be crushed. It is literally a case of "All or Nothing." It is utterly impossible to propose peace terms to the Germans. They would agree to the terms all right—and break them when the opportunity suited. The doctrine of the "scrap of paper" WAS no mere passing phrase of Von Hollweg. It is "a deliberate principle of German statecraft. Bismarck in his re- miniscences says quite plainly that no nation can be expected to keep treaties when the treaties Clash with their self-interests. It might be possible to get the Germans to agree now to a. treaty by which they would evacu- ate Belgium. It is net at all certain that they would do so; but what if theydid ? They wouild only accept the peace as a truce to enable them to get ready for the "second round" in a year cr two, and then they would not make the mistakes they made this time. One cannot make peace with a snake. The only thing to do is to draw his fangs. The German fangs must be drawn. The Allies must push back the German boundary per- manently so that the great. Rhine fortresses shall be taken out of German hands. As a result of the war of 1870, the Germans got the boundary so fixed that they would be able to strike at France at a moment's notice—and so that nobody could strike at them. They had things so arranged for forty years that the German Army could reach Paris in a week or ten days after the outbreak of war. Europe has lived for forty years with the German axe suspended over its neck. A few little things happened to disarrange the machinery, and -aft-r ten months they are as far off Paris as ever. Still we can't run any more risks of the kind. We can't Por-PA to a l.w..n'" mien mey choose. The Germans have to learn to turn their attention to some useful occupation like feeding pigs or making cheap clocks. Their day as the Robber Band of Europe must lie ended1. There is as much talk about the "battle for Calais" as if it were quite a. new idea. It is usually referred to as if the Kaiser having failed to get to Paris had made up his mind to hack through to Calais as a kind of "con- sola ton" prize. Ths is exactly the reverse of the actual fact. The Kaiser of course wanted to get hold of Paris. Why did he want to get hold of Paris P Because Paris is the brain of France. To have got hold of Parios in time would have disorganised the French arrangements as much M the capture of Crewe by an enemy would disorganise the L. and N. W.R. Co. But why did the Germans want France? Principally because they want con- trol of the English Channel. As they could not get to Paris in time they are now trying to cut their way to the Channel by a direct route. MM. A Why do they want the Channel? A glance at the map of Europe will explain that in a second. Ships from Germany cannot reach the outer ocean except through the English Channel or else by the long journey round the North of Scotland. The journey round the North of Scotland is one which may be left out of account. It is so long and so dan- gerous that no master who could avoid it would think of undertaking it. The Channel between England and France is the only out- let which can be considered practical. And the Channel has been a nightmare to Ger- many for the last twenty years. ••• Germany for the last generation has been endeavouring to build up a foreign trade, and has been endeavouring to acquire colonies. Her foreign trade and her communications with the Colonies must pass through the Eng- lish C'halnnet. The idea is to her intolerable. What should we think of a factory which 1_1 tr- 1.6. '1" wtuu onIV gex- its supplies m and which could only send its consignments out through a side door in the back-yard of a rival firm? The owner of the factory—if he were ambitious— would never feel very happy. He could not help feeling that he was at the merey of a rival who could at any time destroy his buei- ness by shutting up the side door! • *« This is exactly how the Germans look at it. They could not send a ton of goods to America or a. company of soldiers to one of their colonies without running them under the guns of the British Fleet. Naturally they have felt for years that the first step towards making Germany a world power is to dominate the Channel. Germany must have a clear undisputed "right of w ay" out to the Atlantic before she can really feel safe. This is what the Kaiser meant by that mysteriQUs phrase "a place in the sun." The ideal situation from a German point of view would lie that they should occupy both sides of the Channel. But at the very least they must ocupy oiie,-or else resign all their ideas of Colonial power. If the Germans pos- sessed Durikirk, Calais, Boulogne and Cher- bourg, they would make these naval bases. Each of these bases would be converted into a Gibraltar. From any of these places shells could lie dropped so far that there would be a "safety zone" within which the British Fleet dare not venture, From Calais and Boulogne, it would by possible to drop bhelfe

THE PASSING WEEK

in England and to blow British defence works to pieces. Germany has no choice in the matter. She must either give wud _fllil. li £ C is no getting away from the alternative. There are a few people in this country either ignorant enough or widked enough to pretend that. Germany and Britain can Jive side by side in pe-ace in Europe-. They may-when one is content to be a subordinate state as insignificant as Switzerland. There is no room for the British Empire and the German Empire in the world. One or other must go. It is aU nonsense to talk of Anglo-German friendship. There cannot be any such thing. i It is -o. clear issue—Destroy or be destroyed. »** The unrest caused by the war is being felt in all quarters. Portugal has seized the opportunity of going in for another revolu- tion. Portugal had an utterly corrupt Gov- ernment, and it decided to get rid of King Manoel and his following. It suoceded in that object. But it only got into It worse plight. If they had gone in for a Republic on democratic lines, they would have made a step forward. But they did nothing of the kind. A gang of corner boys and other riff- raff recruited from the lowest scum of Lisbon seized the reins of power and set up a tyranny a thousand times worse than the first. The Portuguese people did not care very much for being exploited by their "betters" (so-called), but when it came to being exploited by a gang of professional politicians "on the make" it was rather too much. As a Republic. the whole thing was a Slham. (The gang took good care tihat nobody who was known to be opposed to them was allowed to vote. Opponents of the gang were warned away from the poll Only 48 per cent. of the "total possible" voted at the last election. It is easy therefore to get a rattling good majo- rity by means of 30 per cent. of the electorate. When allowance is made for all the small fry of officia.,Is-dorwn to sub-postmasters and road labourers, railway porters and rural postmen —whose living depended on 'me Government, i,t is easy to underhand that the gang were practically kept in power y voting for each other. Portugal was, bad enough under its King, 11 but it has actually retrogressed under its "Republic" (so mlted). ;Nten who had com- mitted no crime except to advocate an im- proved form of Government were thrown into filthy prisons and lodged under conditions in which nobody in this country dare keep a dog. Men. who had murdered King Manoel's father and brother were so insistent on "loyalty' to themselves that it was a criminal offence for any Portuguese to criticise them as any of us criticise Mr Lloyd George or Mr Asquith. *« Under the Monarchy, Republican news- papers attacked Royalty freely and openly. It was then as common a thing for a Republican journalist to assail the Royal Family as it is in this country for a Conser- vative journalist to attack the LilRra-I Govern ment. This of course is perfectly legitimate. But what ha opened when the Mrmnrrliv n-as overthrown? A rigid censorship of the Press was established. Nobody dare print a word of news except such as an ignorant and illiterate Republican official thought proper, and many of these were 60 wooden headed that they thought there was some treason in classic and literary references which were beyond their limited powers of comprehension. W hen the Republic was established, the colleges- belonging to the religious orders were 1 lootcxl and the scientific apparatus reduced to fragments. Instead of improving. they < destroyed. The leaders of the revolt did not know the use of theodolites, microscopes, or k,A' eA, as rubbish! In a ooHe in which over a hundred students resided, the Repub- reported quite, seriously that they had discovered an instrument of torture by means of which jets of name could be applied to any person stretched across it. Those instru- ments of torture can be found in most big institutions in this country too. But the lower grades of Portuguese had never before seen a gas stove! 'ibis delicious piece of humour was printed quite seriously by three or four of the leading papers in London. *«• All this is no argument against Republican- ism. In the abstract, Republicanism is per- haps the best possible form of Government. But the term P,,epttblican" is often applied to the most tyrannical cli-ques which get into power and which white talking loudly of liberty deny liberty to everybody except them- selves. We use the word "Republican" when we mean "Non-Monarchial"—which is quite a different thing. We are apt to assume that if a man is not a Liberal he must be a Con- servative, that if he is not a Roman Catholic that lie must be a Protestant, and that if ft Government is not Moniaxchist it must be Republican. One might as well say that if a horse is net black he is bound to be white. This is really a common logical fallacy. There the many alternatives to Monarchy besides Republicanism. The commonest is what is called "Oligarchy." This is the rule of the political "boss." In home Amerie,an States, a couple of bosses on each side arrange matters, and the people at large hare no voice at all-so perfect is the machine. Attempts have been made to iiit-roduce the "Boss' sys- tem into this country, but constituencies and voters will not accept wire-pulling from head- quarters, and it has been proved that the sys- tem won't root here. Still we have to keep our eyes open and to take care not to be de- ceived by mere words. Under the guise of Democracy, it is possible to set up a tyranny more odious even than Kaiserism. The o-nly safeguard is for every voter to exercise his vote, and to vote exactly as he pleases with- out dictation from any quarter. We hare had a revival of the talk about I Conscription. It is no use pretending thufc it is a. hogey. Another million men must be got. If they come willingly well and good. If not they must be forced. At Swansea on Satur- day, reference was made to oases in which four or five young: men of military age were to be found in one family; and they had no intention of enlisting. This is very disheart- ening. It is not the mere loss of the men which count's. It is the bad example. Others think "Why should we sacrifice our sons and let these shirkers/ toast their slippers at home?" So others follow the bad example. An impaiftiaJt conscription is the only method of raising an Army. ..————.

Advertising

THE EVENINGBAM, f low ca If it were better known that Backache, Dropsy, Rheumatism, Sediment, Gravel and Stone point to Kidney Disease, there would be fewer fatal cases than there are. Backache in the evening and backache la the morning. The same pains, the same worry, the same cause. How many people suffer constantly from lame, aching backs, and don't know why ? Backache is kidney-ache in most cases. The kidneys (located in the small of the back) ache and throb with dull pain, because there is a congestion or inflammation within. You can't get rid of that ache until you cure the cause-the kidneys. Doa&'s Backache Kidney Pills cure kidney ills, and thus drive away backache for good. If it hurts yonr back to stoop or lift- if you suffer sudden, darting pains through the hips, loins and sides, suspect the kidneys. There will be other signs too: headaches, dizziness, scanty or painful urination, too frequent urination, rheumatism, sediment, biliousness, or a constant tired feeling. Thousands have found quick relief and lasting cures by the use of Doan's Backache Kidney Pills. Doan's Pills have a quiek and direct action on the kidneys and bladder. They promote a free flow from the urinary system, washing out clogging impurities from the passages, and draining out the collected water through the natural channels. They gently lead the kidneys back to health and activity, and thus reach the CAUSE of most cases of dropsy. Doan's Backache Kidney Pills have no action on the heart, nor on the liver, stomach or boweb; they are solely for the kidneys and urinary system, and are, there. fore, of the highest value in dropsy, gravel, stone, rheumatism, and all diseases arising from kidney and Madder trouble. In fl9 toset wttty, tie boxtt ISI9. Newor Hid Nose. Of all ekemie" and <<< or from fetter-MtCltllam Co., 8, WtlU-ttrMts OrftrditreH, Undm, JIr. J tubitifubt. .0. I Backache Kidney Pills

FAIRS FOR MAY

FAIRS FOR MAY. G. Lampeter, Cayo, Fishguard, Laugharne 7. Lampeter, Pencader. 19. Rhayader. 21-22. Llanboidy, Treciastle. 24. lil-anddarog. 25. Tregaron, Pontardulais. 26. Lampeter, Llansadwrn. 27-28. Llangiadock. 13. Cross Hands, Llanelly. 14. Llandilo, Llansawel, Pontyates, St. Clears. 15. St. Clears, Llandilo, Llandovery. 17. Letterston, Llanybyther, Llanarthney, Llandilo Bridge. 18. Kidwelly, Tregaron, Llangudockj Maen- elochog. W'hitlond. Ha: Brecon.

CARMARTHEN UNDEtt THE nn SEARCHLIGHT

CARMARTHEN UNDEtt THE "nn SEARCHLIGHT. Jonae, come, and sit you down; you shall DOt budge, ft* shall not Ko. till I set yon ep a glass Where yon may see the inmost part of yoib. BBAKuriuai. The controversy as to the whiske-y tax has in Carmarthen altogether faded into insig- nificance beside the question whether 17s 6d or 23s 4ld a week is the proper charge for billeting a soldier. The early potatoes were badly swept by the frost on Friday. Loud were the lamentatiois on Saturday morning, and many pathetic ex- periences were exchanged at the market. Even within a five mile radius of Carmarthen that little touch of frost cost thousands of pounds. fttt* At the County Education Authority a dis- cussion took place over a proposal to exclu le children frbm the coal tips at a certt-.ti village. It appears that the children car t attend school because their mothers send them to gather coal from the rubbish tips- a practice allowed in all colliery districts. There is no rubbish tip which does not contain a good deal of valuable material which is allowed to go to waste because the time re- quired for extracting it is usually more valuable than the material itself. That is why the Carmarthen refuse tips have latterly become rather a problem. Far- mars actually paid for them at one time, and an auction used to be held for the purpose, As time went on,, the farmers found that the manurial value of part of the rubbish—such as road sweepings—was not worth the labour required in picking out the salmon tins, old boots, broken saucers and other stuff which possessed no elements of fertility. The rubbish was not less valuable than formerly; j but the labour as the years went on became much more costly. Hence the difficulty to- day is not to get a price for the rubbish, but to get people to take it away for nothing. The colliery tip appears to be a similar problem. Therefore it is a happy hunting ground for children whose time is of no value otherwise. But it would be a great mistake to suppose that the children look upon it as a labour. Children like wallowing in dirt and rubbish. What is the use of denying it? We have all been through that stage. There is many a boy who grumbles if his mother asks him to go to the well to fetch a can of water, cr to go to the grocers to fetch home ten pouruls of flour. But no boy objects if his mother asks hftn to dig up the garden or fetch something from a rubbish tip. That is not woifc that is fun. What is the explanation of the craving which children—boys especially—have for digging and waHowing in rubbish. There are several dust bins provided by the Carmarthen Corporation at Various corners, and if you pass one on a holiday you will generally find one or two healthy boys up to the neck in it. It is no use saying this is unhealthy. The children who wallow in dirt look the healthiest. This realy is the attraction of the seaside. The children dom't care twopence for the bounding main and the briny breezes. What they like is to wallow in the sand. It is no use the Education Committee or the colliery owners or anybody else trying to keep the children from the tips. They'll go anyhow. Even if their mothers forbid them to go, they'd go and take their chances. So it is iust ns well to let the excavations be carried on legally. shortly for wasting water. It is strictly for- bidden to use the town water supply for the watering of gardens cr lawns. The word "garden" of course has to be used in its widest sense. A plant in a pot is a, garden within the. meaning of the Act. It would be perfectly absurd to prosecute one man for watering half a dozen geraniums in an out- side bed, and to allow amother man to water two dozen geraniums which he kept in pots in a conservatory. ••• This principle of course must be extended. One man keeps a few dozen tame Sweet Peas or Canterbury Bells which are very thirsty. Another main keeps a dozen cage birds and a third keeps a couple of dogs. Is it likely that the man who goes in for flowers is going to stand by quietly and and see his pets die of thirst whilst the bird fancier and the dog fancier are aUowed to give their pets all the water they require ? No; such a course would be manifestly unjust. It is quite clear that the inhabitants of Carmarthen must be for- bidden to give the water to dogs, cats, parrots or other cage birds. It is clearest pf all that the water ought not to be given to horses. What business has one man to keep a couple of horses which use up Jarge quantities of water, whilst another man who pays quite as much to the Borough TreaSlUryis not allowed a can of water to moisten a bed of petunias. It is an outrageous piece of clasis legislation, and it will be inte- resting to know if some effort is not made to test its legality. ww'" The only fair method is to put a water meter to every .house and to charge according to the quantity used. There are houses which use a thousand gallons of water a day, and there are others paying exactly the same rate which do not use more than -a hundred although there is a little bit of a garden. The rank injustice of the suggestion that it is iile- gal to water gardens is obvious, The Chairrman at the Dairy Farmers meet- ing on Saturday said that they were not there to declare war on the consumer. This is perfectly t,ruc 'rile priw paid 6y the con- sumer bas very little reliation in any case to the price which the producer gets. If every penny extra paid by the consumer meant an extra penny paid to the producer that would be -at any rate fairly reasonable. But it "eg not mean anything of the kind. Somoti 

Carmarthenshire Education Committee

Carmarthenshire Education Committee. A meeting of the Carmarthenshire County Education Committee was held at the County Offices on the 13th inst. Mr W. N. Jones pre- ,A sided. PICKING COAL AT LLANGENNECH. A letter was read from the head teachers at Llangenncch stating that the attendance at school was seriously interfered with because children went to pick coal off the "tips" at Llangennec h. When the children came in the afternoon they were. too tired to do any work. They suggested that a letter be sent to the proprietors asking them to exclude children from the rubbish tips. Latterly caps and umbi-ellas were stolen in school. This was due to the lower tone of the morals caused by the children learning to pick up everything handy on the tips. r The Attendance Officer reported that there was general illness prevalent, and much poverty i,n the village. The Rev R. H. Jones said that they should not try to get children excluded. There was a good deal of valuable material on the tips which would go to waste were it not that the children got permission to collect it. He re- membered as a boy collecting a good deal for his mother, who had many children to bring up. He knew it helped her greatly. Rev A. F. Mills: What we have to realise is that the price of coal is so high that the poor people can't obtain it. The Chairman: They can get it at 6s a ton. Mr W. J. Thomas said that lie did not think they ought to do this during scihool hours. The Chairman 'We have no authority over these tips. Our business is to get the children into school. Rev A. F. Mills foilia that the teachers ought to use their influence and appeal to the parents. It was decided to enforce the attendance of the school children. APPOINTMENTS. The following appointments were made or confirmed:- Pontyates (Llanelly) Council School (aver- age loo), certificated head master, salary, £124 10s per annum, and dwelling house valued at £10 10s: William David Lewis, Bankffofifelen Council School. Llangunnor Ch. of England School, certi- ficated headmistress, £75: Mrs Selina Allen, Beulah, Garth, S.O. Certificated Assist ants. Brynamman Council School: Arthur Henry Davies, Borough Read College, Isleworth, London; and Mary Hannah Morgan, Arwclfa, Cowelll road, Garnant. Blaenau Council School: Hannah Mildred Williams. Oa-kfield, Glanamman. LLangadock Council Sfohocl: Dan Phillips, Blaenhiraeth, HenlTan Amgoed, Whitland. Llangennech Council School: Thomas P. Evans, Maesyeoed, Bynea, Llanelly. Felinfcel Council School: Caroline Bowen, 24, Ivor street. Pontyeymmer, Bridgend. Ponthenry Council School: Llewelyn Jen- kins. 22. Vere road, Brighton. 11rimsalran Council School: Mrs Henrietta C. Francis, Noddfa, Greenway st., Llanelly. Uncert. assist.. Trimsaran Council School: Annie Hughes, Cwmbrane, Mothvey, Llan- dovery. Supple. teacher, Whitland Council School: Alice Elsie Davies. Manchester House, Whit- land.

Advertising

Indigestion 1610 199 and "Nerves" Extremely Severe C- e -4 by Dr. Cassell's Tablets. Mrs. Holmes, of 87, Bolton Brow. Hovrerby Bridtre. says: I had got into a low. run. down state, with no 'life' in tne, and thoucrh I bad medical treatment I only got more depressed and neurasthenic. No food agreed with me; what- ever I ate caused wind and palpitation, and the Fplitfii'fr headaches I endured were really acronisinc A,(r at times. I grot no si-eed it night. and I wi. so neryoue that I dreaded to be left alone. I had ajiffered for ovef a year when I got Dr. Caasells Tablets, goon after I began to feel brighter. I could sieep at nisht. and I grew etronper and better diily. All the bead aches a.nd indirection left me, and presently I found myself well and strong." Dr.Cassells Tablets Dr. Caseell's Ta.bleta ar. a genuine and letted raraedf for all (oTtai of nerve or todily weaknem in old or yoting. Compounded of ncrve-nutrienti and tonics of indisputably proved efficacy, they are the reeog-nued modern home treatment for NERVOUS BREAKDOWN NERVE PARALYSH IPINAL PARALYSIS INFANTILE PARALYSIS NEURASTHENIA NERVOUS DEBILITY SLEEPLESSNESS ANÆMIA KIDNEY DISEASE INDISESTION STOMACH DISORDER MAL-NUTRITION WASTINfi DISEASES PALPITATION VITAL EXHAUSTION PREMATURE DECAY Specially Taluable for Nursin* Mothcm, and daring the Critical Periods of Life. Chemijts and etorea in all parta of the world sell Dr. CMeell's Tablets. Pricea JO1, £ d., I/lVjd-, and 2{9-th 2/9 sire being the moet economical. A Free Trial Supply will be mt to yon on recoipt of name and address and two penny tttmpe for T".tage and packing. Addresa: Dr. o..e).I', Co.. Ltd.. 418, CherbteT-road. Manchester.

WEATHER AXD THE CROPS

WEATHER AXD THE CROPS. Weather very cold and tan inch-and-lvalf of rain fallen. The cold has kept back the growth of vegetation. ftain has supplied re- serve of moisture. Meanwhile there is the fact that the promise of the new crop is for- ward and that spring-sown barley and oats are behindhand. The country must be pre- pared to face harrest nearly a fortnight later than usual. The run on dry feeding stuffs will be increased if the hay crop should be a short one. Good progre^ has been made with planting potatoes and with earlier sprint sowings of seeds. The waste caused by the waif" is beginning to be noticed in the wheat trade. From Monday's "Mark Lane Express"

MAN0RDIL0

MAN0RDIL0. The annual singing festival in connection with the Baptists of Llandilo and district was held at Owmifor on the 13th inst. Though the weather was unfortunate, the services were well attended and the singing as usual was of a high standard. The conductor was Mr W. T. Samuel, Cardiff, and he filled his place admirably. It may hI; addtd lierc- that he has been conducting at this festival for 21 yeai-fi-ziot a bad record. The accompanists were Mr T. C. Hurlefj-, Mr E. Morgan, and Miss Bowen. and the String Band was under the conductorship of Mr Frank A. Jones. The presidents were the Rev D. J. Davies, the pastor, in the morning, Mr W. Thomas, Bank, in the afternoon, and Mr Dan CJwynne, Llan- gadock, in the evening. Papers were read by Mr J. Gravdle, C.M., and Mr T. Davies, whilst Mr T. Davies catechised the children in the morning. Plenty of excellent food was supplied by the lady members of Cwmifor Baptist Chapel. Cabmarthcn Printed and Published by the Proprietress, M. Lawbskob, at her Offiges, a Blue Street, Fbjdat, May ;?ht, 1115,