Teitl Casgliad: Carmarthen weekly reporter

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Llun 1 o 4 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
8 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
Advertising

f THE BLACKSTONE OIL ENGINE ) THE GREATEST LABOUR SAVER on the FARM. SIMPLE RELIABLE ECONOMICAL. ever Beaten in w cmpetition. I j = ¡' li I. V: #' r"o. I 1 f ..C -K S Several Sizes can be seen actually at work at our Market Depot. 1, I I WE SUPPLY A 5 h.p. P:MTTEn,s,, OIL ENGINE FOR A32. ALL SIZES OF PETROL ENGINES IN STOCE. j We are Sole Agents for theflCelebratedtf "INTERNATIONAL" PETROL ENGINES. EXPERT ENGINEERS sent to all parts of the country. ESTIMATES FREE. 8 THBISI SOU AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERS, CARMARTHEN. Bedstead Showrooms-5, St Mary Street. Furniture Showrooms-I, St Mary Street, 33 Quay Street. Branch—9, Priory Street. Farm Implements—Market Place, Carmarthen, Llknelly, Llandyssul, and Llanybyther. ¡ i "1. EORGE PILLS A MARVELLOUS REMEDY. For upwards of Forty Years these Pills have held the first place in the World as a Remedy for PILES and GRAVEL, and all the common disorders of the Bowels, Stomach, Liver, and Kidneys; and there is no civilized Nation under the Sun that has not experienced their Healing Virtues. THE THREE URMS OF THIS REMEDY: No. I-GeQrge's Pile and Gravel Pills. No. 2—George's Gravel Pills. No. 3—George's Pilis for the Piles, ihld everywhere in Boxee, la. lid. and 2s. 9d. each. By Post, In. 2d. and 2s. lOd 2 PIROPRIEfoa-j. E. GEORGE, II.B.P.S" HIP WAIN, ABEBDARE. PRINTING! PRINTING! GOOD CHEAP AND EXPEDITIOUS PRINTING EXECUTED AT THE ["REPORTER" PRINTING & PUBLISHING OFFICES, BLUE-STREET O^I^Mr-A-IR/I-HEXsT ORDERS BY POST receive prompt and careful attention. JpRICES ON A P P L I OA T ION. The Carmarthen Weekly. Reporter PUBLISHED EVKBT THURSDAY BVKNINO, Circulates throughout South Wales generally, and has the LARGEST CIRCULATION IN THE COUNTY OF CARMARTHEN Pitiom ONie PitiNir; POST Fitzz 119 PBB QUABISB THE BEST ADVERTISING MEDIUM FOR aLL OfA3S:G"S OF ADVERTISEMENTS. NOTICES TO QUIT FROM LANDLORD TO TENANT AND TENANT TO LANDLORD, May be obtained at the "REPORTER OFFICE," Blue-street,iCarmarthen. i TRUE ONE PENNY., ■ i X STOP ONE MOMENT Y Oh Dear Doctor MUST My Darling die? There is very little hope, But try TUDOR WILLIAMS PATENT BALSAM OF HONEY. WHAT IT IS I Tudor Williams' Patent Balsam of Money Is an essence of the purest and most effica- cious herbs, gathered on the Welsh Hills and Valleys in their proper season, when "their virtues are in full perfection, and combined with the purest Welsh Honey. Ail the in- gredients are perfectly pure. WHAT IT DOES! Tudor Williams' Patent Balsam of Honey Cures Coughs, Colds, Bronchitis, Asthma, Whooping Cough, Croup, and all disorders of the Throat, Chest and Lungs. Wonderful Cure for Children's Coughs after Measles. It is invaluable to weak-chested men, delicate women and children. It succeeds where all other remedies-fail. Sold by all Chemists Ii and Stores in Is., 2s. 6d., and 4s 6d. bottles. Great saving in purchasing larger size Bottles. WHAT IT HAS DONE FOR OTHERS. What the Editor of the "Gentlewoman's Court Journal" says:- Sir,—The result of the bottle of your splendid Tudor Williams' Balsam of Honey is simply marvellous. My mother, who is over seventy, although very active, every winter has a bronchial cough which is not only distressing, but pulls her down a lot. Its gone now. With best wishes for your extraordinary preparation. W. Browning Hearden. YOU NEED NOT SUFFER! Disease is a sin, inasmuch that if you act rightly, at the right time, it can, to a, great extent, be avoided. Here is the preventative The first moment you start with Sore Throat tae a dose of TUDOR WILLIAMS' -P-&rz-MMTMI BALSAM OF HONEY. It has saved thousands 1 It will save youl It is prepared by a fully qualified chemist, and is, by virtue of its composition, eminent- ly adapted for all cases of Coughs, Golds, Bronchitis, Esthma, etc., it exercises a dis- dinct influence upon the mucous lining of the throat, windpipe, and small air vessels, so that nothing but warmed pure air passes into the lungs. It' the product of the Honeycomb, chemically treated to get the best results. The Children like it. THEY ASK FOR IT So different from most medicines. Nice to Take Cures Quickly For vocalists and pablic speakers it has no equal, it I makes the voicc as clear as a bell. Manufacturer r Tudor Williams, MEDICAL HALL, ABERDARE. TO POOR RATE COLLECTORS, ASSISTANT OVERSEERS, &c. FORMS of NotiOe of Audit, Collector s Monthly Statement, &c., Poor RateReoeipt Books, with Name of Parish, Particulars of Rate.&c., printed in, can be obtained at the REPORTER Orrios at Oheap Rates. Send for Prices. THE CARMARTHEN BILLPOSTING COMPANY, NOTT SQUARE, CARMARTHEN. OILLPOSTINGand ADVERTISINGS all its JL# Branches, throughout the Counties of Cam then, Pembroke, and Cardigan R. M JAMES. Manager. Carmarthen County Schools, I THE GRAMMAR SCHOOL. HIADMASTKR E. S. ALLEN, M.A. (CANTAB). COUNTY GIRLRS- SCHOOL HEADMISTRESS Miss B. A. HOLME, M.A., Late Open Scholar of Girtou College, Cambridge. Ficxs:-El 9s. per Term (inclusive). Reduction when there are more than one from the same family. The Term began on Thursday, April 22nd 3915. Boarders can be received at the Grammer School. l/l J WE CLAIM THAT 2/9 DR- TYE7S DROPSY, LIVER, AND WIND FILLS ova. Constipation, Backache, In digestion, Heart Weak- ness, Headache, and Nervous Complaints. Mr. John Parkin, 8, Eden Crescent, West Auckland, writes, dated March 12th, 1912 "I must say that they are all that you represent them to be, they are splendid, indeed I wish 1 rad known about them sooner. I shall make their wortn known to all who suffer from Dropsy." — Sole S. J. COLEY & CO. 57 HIGH ST, STROUD,OLOS. WEDDING CARDS, NEW SPECIMEN BOOK CONTAINING LATEST & EXQUISITE DESIGNS Sent to intending Patrons at any address on reoe pt of an intimation to that effect. PRICES TO SUIT ALL CLASSES. REPORTER" OFFICE 3, BLUEST.

Mr Asquith to Liberals

Mr Asquith to Liberals. "RELY ON MY JUDGMENT." Mr Asquith has addressed the following letter to Mr J. W. Gulland, M.P., the Chief Whip under the Liberal Government:- 10, Downing street, Whitehall, S.W., 28th May. Dear Mr Gulland,—The Government of which I have been the head for more than seven years has been reconstructed on a new basis. It has hitherto been recruited entirelv from among members of our own party. It its altered form it contains representatives of the regular Opposition and of the Labour party. It was my wish, which, for reasons I fully understand has not been realised, that our Irish bt friends also should have particpated in it. The transformation implies a temporary abandonment of the system of party Govern- ment which has ever since 1832 dominated our political arrangements, and which I hold to be. under normal conditions, the best adapted to our IlIational requirements. It is natural that such a sudden and fundamental upheaval of our traditional praotice should create aston- ishment, and even arouse misgiving, among a large number of those upon whose loyal devo- tion and strenuous efforts 1, like my prede- cessors in the leadership of the Liberal party for generations past, have lailways relied. There is one reason and one reason only which could justify or explain such a new de- parture, a clear and urgent case' of national necessity. It was only because the conviction was forced upon me that a non-party Government would prove the most efficient instrument for the successful prosecution of the war that [ have taken a step which has caused me infinite personal pain. I cannot, in the public interest, enter at present into any details, and I must ask my friends to rely for the j moment upon my judgment. Meanwhile, the pursuit of our special aims in the sphere of domestic politics is not abandoned, but sus- pended, and when the national cause has been vindicated against the enemy we shall take up again the unfinished tasks to which the Liberal party has set its hand. Yours very faithfully. H. H. aSQCITH.

i The Question of Health

-———————————— The Question of Health The question of health is a matter which to tore to concern us at one time or another when Influenza is so prevalent as it if just now, so it is well to know what to ta.4e to ward off an attack of this mist weakening disease, this epidemic catarrh or cold of an aggravating kind, to combat it whilst under its baneful influence, and particularly after nn attack, for then the system is so lowered as to be liable to the most dangerous of com- j plaints. Gwilym Evana* Quinine Bitters is acknowledged by all who have given it a fair trial to be the best. specific remedy dealing with Influenza in All its various stages, beiiifl a Preparation skilfully prepared with Quinine I and accompanied with other blood purifying and enriching agents, suitable for the liver, digestion, and all those ailments requiring tonic strengthening and nerve increasing properties It is invaluable for those suffer- ing from cot.Is. pneumonia, or any serious ill ueas, or prostration caused by sleeplessness, or worry of any kind, when the body has a general feeling of weakness or lassitude Send for a copy of the pamphlet of testi- monials. which carefully read and consider well, then buy a bottle (sold in two sizes, 2s 9d and 4s 6d) at yout nearest Chemist or Stores, but when purchasing see that the name "Gwilym Evans" is on the label, stamp and bottle, for without which none are genuine. Sole Proprietors Quinine Bittore Manufacturing Company, Limited, Llanellj, South Wales.

Sir Edward Grey

Sir Edward Grey. OBLIGED TO TAKE A REST. It is officially announced that Sir Edward Grey has been strongly advised that it is ne- cessary to leave off work for a short time in order to rest his eyesight. During his absence Lord Crewe has been re- quested by the Prime Minister to take charge of the Foreign Office, which lie has agreed to do. Lord Landsdown has consented to assist Lord Orewe during this period as occasion arises. Sir Edward has recently been suffering con- siderably, but his sight seems to be improving and lie pluckiily determined not to be absent from his post at a time of special stress. He has been wearing coloured glasses to soften the glare of the light, but has at last been reluctantly compelled to conclude that noth- ing short of actual rest from reading and writing was likely to be effective, and has now taken his oceulist's advice. When he took his Easter rest it. had been arranged that the Marquess of wrewe should relieve him, but on consideration the Prime Minister agreed to give up his own holiday and take over temporarily the duties of Foreign Secretary. The Marquis of Crewe has actually entered upon his new duties, and was visited at the Foreign Office on Monday afternoon by Sir Edward Carson (the Attorney General) and the French Ambassador. The Marquess of Lansdowne has had long experience of foreign affairs, and as lie holds no portfolio the temporary Secretary of State will have ample facilities for calling in the advice and assistance of his colleagues should lie find himself in need of them. It is highly probable that these considerations weighed with the leaders of the National Government when they undertook the re-arrangement of the Ministerial position.

WEATHER AND THE CROPS

WEATHER AND THE CROPS. The season is marked by very fine weather. Where showers have fallen the aspect is most promising. Most counties, however, would now be glad of a week of warm rain. This hoon. would be especially appreciated in pas- toral counties, as well as where oats are the leading crop. Wheat, with its deep roots, evidently found stores of nifnsture which the wet winter left in the subsoil. It is improv- ing week by week. India's exportable surplus of wheat will be nearly 12,000,000. The French whoatfield has shown marked improve- nient, ind a large yield is expected from the Great Lombardy Plain, in Northern Italy. A large yield of Spanish barley is certain.— From Monday's ''Mark Lane Expre s."

Stupendous Climax

Stupendous Climax. WHEN PROPER MOMENT COMES. Colonel F. X. Maude, C u., writing in the "Sunday Times" says:— To suggest, as some have done, that the Allies in the West have failed in their object is almost childish, for they have never yet put forth even a tenth part of their reaj strength in a combined operation, and to suggest that General Joffre and his British colleague are so utterly ignorant of first prir4. ciples as to fritter away their oroes in object- less and desultory efforts is to be guilty of a presumption that could only emanate from excited and wholly untrained minds, entirely ignorant of the veriest rudiments of military history. Their attacks have in no case been pur- poseless. On the contrary, each of them has been made with so much force, and no more, as was needed to compel the enemy to come to us to be killed under such conditions as is easiest for us to accomplish our purpose most effectively and economically. So long as we continue to provoke the enemy to make such costly efforts, by pres- sure upon points that he cannot afford to abandon, we shall continue to play the same game, but the moment his vitality fails and we are no longer able to stir him into activity in this way the world will witness a climax such as it has never seen since the dawn of history. Four niillioiis-literally millions—will leap forward at the given signal from points which the public little expects, to reap the harvest of their long endurance. When this harvest will be ripe depends largely upon the nature and extent of the preparations which the Austro-Germans have made to repel the dan- ger now advancing upon them from the Italian frontier. Of course, this first success will not be the end, but only the beginning of the end, of the war. Therefore, as prudent men, we cannot aord to relax our- preparations. No one man can foresee the complications that may then arise. But the prospect should be sufficient to restore public confidence and to enable us to undertake our tasks with coolness and de- liberation, without yelding to the outburst of hysteria, which is a natural consequence of the heavy lists that have been appearing. That these are heavy is an inevitable con- sequence of the masses engaged for, when 100,000 men come under fire, even 10 per cent. upon that number makes quite a considerable figure; but they are by no means excessive and come well thin the limits of what we have all expected.

WAR EFFECTS UPON RURAL ENGLAND

WAR EFFECTS UPON RURAL ENGLAND. The effects of the War upon the life of Rural England are discussed in an interesting paper by Air S. L, Bensusan in the June "Windsor Magazine" which is lavishly illus- trated from interesting photographs. In the couse of his theme Mr Bensusan says:- "If there is little knowledge of the causes, incidents, and progress of the war in the heart of the country, there is no lack of pa- triotic feeling. Men have gone willingly enough to face 'Ie grand peut-etre,' and the response to the demand for special constables has brought hundreds of hard-working elderly men into the muddy, rain-sodden, and wind- swept roads between eight o' lock at night and four o'clock in the morning. In towns lire is stirring, however faintly. In the country there is, through a considerable part of each winter month, a darkness that may be felt, a silence and a solitude that oppresses. If there were a few criminals to pursue, there would be a little excitement; it is the law- abiding atmosphere of Arcady that, added to the noes of winter, makes for despair. Even the poachers would seem to have retired from business. They have found a regular job or gone to serve their Country; perhaps some have turned gamekeepers. The regular police, 11 p In for all their widespread net, can bring little more to their local bench than man or boy called upon to answer for the hideous offence of riding a bicycle without a light at some hour between sunset and sunrise. Patiently, soberly, and stolidly the countryman faces the future." Several themes of timely interest and im- portance in 4eojiiiection with the War are treated by writers of special authority in the June "Windsor Magazine," and all are pro- fusely illustrated from drawings by clever artists and many up-to-date photographs. Particular interest is attached to a repre- sentative set of reroductions of the many Re- cruiting Posters now in use by the Parlia- mentary Recruiting Committee, which are here given in this comprehensive form for the first time, by special permission of the autho- rities. Mr J. D. Symon contributes a second article on the part of the Universities in the War and their valuable contributions, both of men for the Forces and of other forms of aid in war-time requirements, and Mr E. H. V. Sewell places on record the fine rally of the Crickot- world to the Forces, with many inte- resting biographical details and a valuable series of portraits of well-known players who are serving their King and Country. The fiction of the number includes a delight- ful new story by Eden Phillpotts. a powerful romantic story by Marjorie Bowen, and other complete contributions by such well-known authors as Fred M. White. Owen Oliver, Oswald Wildridge. E. Lester Arnold. F. E. Bailv. and others. Altogether this is a very attractive number for the opening of the new half-yearly volume.

No title

One of the finest vertical sun-dials to be seen in Carinarthenslnre is on the wall of St. Ismaels Church. Summer visitors find it very handy. A splendid horizontal dial occu- pies a prominent position in Llanfynydd Churchyard. The horizontal dials are more ornamental, but they are more liable to be- came in mnrate in the course of time as the po-ition alters by the subsidence of the ground and other causcs. It is curious that vertical dials are not mors common seeing hew cheaply they can be constructed. One ex- cellent tendency of the use of sun dials is to create open sl)aces-for they must not be shaded by tree s.