Teitl Casgliad: Carmarthen weekly reporter

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 2 o 4 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
17 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
Advertising

nuuusii ESTABLISHED 1854. K DAVID TiTOslLLIAMS H H ZBOOIKBHtsTIDIEilR,, ETC, ■ ■ I CHAPEL ST., CARMARTHEN. Magazines, Periodicals and all kinds of Publications Bound to suit the owner's tate. Hygin Books, Bibles, etc., repaired and re-covered. Books Bound in Publishers' Cases at Publishers' Prices. BOOKBINDING TO THE TRADE. I t ( I H-Viris & (Store (glass fjjHillitwrs, (Jrardisft mnust, 41 Nifig Street, Carmarthen A- H. STOODLEY, ELECTRICAL ENGINEER & CONTRACTOR GARFORTH, BARN ROAD, CARMARTHEN. -p-r- I Electric Lighting and Power, Private Plant, Bells and Telephones a Speciality. 4W All Business will receive my Personal Attention. Galvanized Corrugated Sheets. :For Excellence of Quality aud Durability Buy the p 0 Brand, and for Good Value in GALVANIZED AGRICULTURAL FEEDING REQUISITES AND WIRE NETTING, ask for LYSAGHTS MAKE. Catalogues and Articles are supplied by any Iron- monger or Agricultural Implement Dealer. WATCHES & CLOCKS REPAIRED. JEWELLERY REPAIRED LIKE NEW. GILDING AND ELECTRO PLATING. BIOS-CLASS WORKMANSHIP. ESTIMATES GIVEN ALL WOBK GUARANTEED AT JOHN WILLIAMS Witch maker, Jeweller, A Silversmith, 9 & 10 Lammas Street, OIL im 1q. Established 1836. i The Welshman's Favourite. i flHABON Sauce l As good at its Name, 10, DON'T FAIL TO GET IT. 2 § Manufacturers—BLANCH'S, St. P«ter St., Cardiff. S WEDDING CARDS. Anyone requiring the above should, before placing their orders, send for our NEW SPECIMEN BOOK CONTAINING m8 CHOICEST DESIGNS CARDS AND PRICES SUITABLE IROB ALL CLUB. W. S. MORRIS, Wholesale Grooer, OWn, Flour and Seed iceraw,fili, O-AU RMA^THEIT. Nat. Telephone, 50. Telegrams, Morris, Merchant Carmarthen." SEND FOR PRICE LIST j TO ADVERTISERS. PREPAID SCALE OF CHARGES FOR ADVERTISING IN THE "REPORTER. No. of One three Six WORDS. INSERTION. INSERTIONS. INSERTIONS. < did I d 20 10 2 3 3 6 28 1 6 3 6 4 6 36 2 0 4 0 5 6 44 2 6 4 6 6 6 The above scale only applies to the Situations, To Lets," and To be Sold by Private Treaty," clasns of Advertisements, and must be paid for in, advance, or the ordinary credit rate will be charged, HALFPENNY STAMP3, or Postal or Post Office Orders, payable to M. LA wanton, at Carmarthen, Replies may be made addressed to the Reporter Office, and will be forwarded to advertiseos when stamped envelopes are sent. IN MEMORIAM CARDS—We have a large and assorted stock to select from. Prices to suit all clasm.-Mporter Office, Carmarthen. JAMES JONES, Billposter and Advertising Agent for Kidwelly and neighbouring Villages. All work duly executed. Address :—Station Road, Kidwelly. VISITING CARDS from Is 6d for 50; Printed on Ivory Cards.—Reporter Offioe, Carmarthen. WANTED-A LAD; Good Prospect.—Lipton, Carmarthen. WEDDING CARDS—Prices and styles to suit W all Classes. Speciment Book, containing the Lateet and Choicest Designs, sent on application.— Reporter Office, Carmarthen. WRITING PAPER AND ENVELOPES. vv Large quantity always in Stocke-Reporter Office, Carmarthen. WANTED, a clean, respeotable woman as CARETAKER of the English Baptist Church. Applications to be sent to Mr Fred James, Leicester House, Secretary. WANTED, an ERRAND BOY; full time. Apply, Reporter, Carmarthen. WANTED, Board-Residence for two gentlemen, during first ten or fourteen days of September, in or near Carmarthen Two Bedrooms, Sitting room and attendance. -State inclusive terms to, A.B.C. Reporter Office, Carmarthen. AUGUST FAIRS. 7. Llanboidy. 9. Llandilo. 10. L&andiovery, Sennybridge (sheep), Tal- garth, Haverfordwest. 11. Narberth, Aberayron. 12. Carmarthen, Knighton, Hay. 13. Carmarthen, Llanfynydd. 16. Llandilo Bridge. Swansea, Lampeter. 17. Maenclochog, Whitland. 19. Conwil. 20. Newcastle Emlyn, Cilycwm. 21. Caio. 23. Llandilo. 30. Llandilo. YOU CAN RELY ON Clarke's B41 Pills as a Safe and Sure Remedy in either fc>ex, tor all Acquired or Constitutional Discharges from Urinary Organs, Gravel, Pains in the Back and kindred complaints. Over 50 rears Success. Of all Chemists, 4s fid per box, or sent direct, post free, for Sixty Penny Stamps by the Proorietctrl-The Lincoln and CLARKE'S B41 PILLS I., Midland Drug Co, Ltd,Lincoln.' rM lroin Mercury

Theft of Brass at Carmarthen

Theft of Brass at Carmarthen. A specal Borough Police Court was held at the Carmarthen Guildhall on Tuesday before Mr T. Thomas (chairman). Mr J. B. Arthur, Mr W. Lloyd. Mr T. Bland Dario-,i, and Mr D. Lewis. Theodosius Jones. Cambrian place. was charged with stealing tome brass fittings valued at -is 3d, the property of Towy Works, Limited. Mr T. Jones, secretary of Towy Works, said: I know the prisoner'. He was employed by our firm for about three months. 1 identify the batter-joint produced as the property of the firm. There is a private mark on it. 1 cannot swear to the either articles. I missed the boiler joint on the 9th. I ean't say when I saw it safe. P.S. Jones said: About 1 p.m. yesterday IN company with the Head Constable I went to the prisoner's house at 28, Cambrian place. The Head Countable said "We have reason to believe that you have some brass here, and we desire to search your house." Prisoner said "I have found three or four old brass tops on the domenau—what is that in Baesoneg? She (pointing to his wife) sold them to the rag- man." The wife SAID "Yes I did. but they were honest." Prisoner said "There is a bit more here." He went to a small cupboard and took out five pieces of brass produced and t said "You can search the house now. You won't find anything else." We did search the house and found nothing more. The two taps produced we found at the marine stores of Thomas Page, Blue street. Subsequently,, about 1.30 p.m. I arrested the prisoner at the police station. L cautioned and charged him with stealing seven brass fittings from Old Towy Works. He replied "Well, I will tell you. I had them from the yard." t The Head Constable (Mr Mayall) said that Mr Han ies, Towy Works, asked him to state that he hoped the Bench would not send the defendant, who is the father of several chil- dren, to prison. Defendant could earn 35s o 38s a week, but his home was in a wretched condition. It was due entirely to drink. The Bench bound the defendant over for six months. He would have to pay the costs. Mr T. Jones said that the Co. would pay 'he costs. The Head Constable said that the Company ought not to pay the costs. If they desired they could pay it through prisoner. The Chairman: We can be no parties to that.

Carmarthen Town Council

Carmarthen Town Council. The monthly meeting of the Carmarthen Town Council was held at the Council Cha n- her on Tuesday evening. The Mayor (MR John Lewis) presided. DIQINFECTOR DIFFICULTIES. The Town Clerk (Mr H. Brunei White) said that he had written to Mr Spowart, the Town Clerk of Llanelly, asking what they charged the Rural District Council for disinfecting clothing, etc. for their area. The reply was that the Town Council only charged the out of pocket expenses. THE MANURE TROUBLE. The Mayor said that the accumulated manure at the Remount Depot had been re- moved since the last meeting. INCOME TAX ON WATER PROFITS. Mr David Williams asked if the Town Clerk had taken counsel's opinion on the subject of the income tax an the water works. The Clerk said that he had not yet done Eio. He had seen Mr Manson, Surveyor of Taxes, who had promised to see -his predecessor, Mr Easton, on the matter. Mr Manson still I in- ferred to the case of the Glasgow water works POLICE PAY. The Watch Committee recommended that a non-pensionable war bonus of 2s a week be granted to the constables and sergeants. They also recommended that the allowance to the wife of P.C. Spurry, now in the Army, be in- creased to 8s a week, and that 10s a year be paid as a retaining fee to those members of the Fire Brigade who attend at least six drills. The report was adopted. THE TIME OF THE MEETINGS. Mr J. Lloyd had A motion on the agenda to have the weekly meetings held on Friday instead of Wednesday. Mr Oliver Jones asked if the motion was IN order. Mr J. Lloyd said that if Mr Oliver Jones had only waited a second or two it would have been unnecessary to raise the question. He did not intend to proceed with it. Mr D. Samuel said that the motion ought to be proceeded with, because the Wednesday meetings interfered with the drills of the V.T.C., of which the Mayor and several Coun- cillors were members. Mr D. King Morgan said that he did not see any objection to this. No objection had been raised to the alteration of the hours. The Clerk said that the motion was out of order as six months had not elapsed since the motion which it was proposed to repeal had been passed. THE DRILL HALL FtiD. A letter was read from the Charity Com- missioners in regard to the Drill Hall Fund. It appeared that the appointment of Mr H. S. Holmes as trustee at a previous meeting was irregular as it was made before time. It was decided to formally appoint Mr Holmes.

MAYORS BELGIAN REFUGEES FUND

MAYOR'S BELGIAN REFUGEES FUND. Parish of St. David's: L16. Parish of St. Peters: £ 8. Lammas street Chapel: £ 5. English Wesleyan Church: £,1 6a. Priordy Congregational Church: JE4. English Baptist Church L3. Water street Chapel: £ 3. Elim Chapel: t2. Parish of Llanllwch: tl 8s 6d. Tabernacle Chapel: tl.

MAYORS NATIONAL COMMITTEE FOR RELIEF IN BELGIUMj

MAYOR'S NATIONAL COMMITTEE FOR RELIEF IN BELGIUM. j The War Relief Committee beg to acknow- ledge the receipt of the following subscrip- tions to the above Fund :— Parish of St. Peters: £13. Parish of St. David's: £10. Water street Ohapel: 1:10. Priordy Congregational Church: £10. Medical Staff Mental Hospital, Carmar- then t3 3s. Union street Chapel: L2. Mrs Lewis, Church street: £1 Is. Mr F. Soppitt, Nantyfelin: £1. Elim Chapel: 91. Tabernacle Chapel: 7s 6d. Refugees at Rhydygors: 78 3d. A sum of JMO has been forwarded as a first donation, to the Hon. Treasurer, Trafalgar Square, London.

FRENCH RELIEF FUND

FRENCH RELIEF FUND. The (Mayor of Carmarthen begs to acknow- ledge the receipt of the following subscriptions to the above Fund:— Parish of St. Peters: 1:4 17& 6d. Water street Chapel: L3 lis 3d. Union street Chapel: kl 10s.

Advertising

FOR THE BLOOD IS THE LIFE -Clarkea Blood Mixture is warranted to cleanse the blood of all impurities, from whatever cause arising For Scrofula, Scurvy, Eczema, Bad Legs, Abscesses, Ulcers, Glandular Swellings, Skin and Blood diseases Pimples and Sores of all kinds, its effects are marvellous. Over 50 years success. Thousands of 1 testimonials. In bottles, 2s 9d, each of all chemists 1 & stores Ask for Clarke's Blood Mixture and do not be persuaded to take an imitation

Obituary

Obituary. MR DANIEL PHILLIPS, PICTON PLACE. Mr Daniel Phillips, surveyor, died at his residence, Picton place, Carmarthen on Saturday. Mr Phillips had retired about 15 years ago from the post of surveyor for West Carmarthenshire, a post which he held for 25 years. He served his time with the late Mr Burnett, surveyor, Carmarthen, and after- wards went to Brecon as an assistant to the late Mr Kirk. He and the late Mr Da,vies, of Broad Oak. acted jointly as the Carmarthen- shire County Surveyors, one taking the East- ern and the other the Western Division. Mr Phillips is survived by three eons and three daughters—Mrs Annie Thomas, Kingffton-on- Thames; Mr Prosser L'hillipe, Narberth Mrs T. Rees, Pontardulais; Mr D. Phillips, t. Mel Ion's, Cardiff Miss Enid Phil lips, Carmnr- then and Trooper Gwyn Phillips, of the Welsh Horae. The funeral, which was private, took place at the Carmarthen Cemterv on Wednesday. MRS HANNAH ARTHUR, The funeral of the late Mrs Hannah Arthur, of St. Davids street, took place at the Car- marthen Cemetery on Thursday the 5th inst. The Rev Griffith Thomas, vicar of St. Davids, officiated. The chief mourners were Mr John Arthur, Swansea and Mr Llewelyn Arthur, St. Davids street (sons), Mr George Arthur, St. David street (grandson), Mr John Lloyd, Paromain street; Mr Llewelyn Jones, Pentre Cottages; Mr George Martin; Mr Reginald Jones, Chapel street (son-in-law). Wreaths, were sent by Maggie, Llewelyn, and Little George; Nanno and Reggie; Jack and Gladys; Sarah and Llewelyn; Rachel, Lizzie and George; Mrs Jenkins and family; Mrs Walter Evans and family.

Carmarthen Bay Fishery Board

Carmarthen Bay Fishery Board. A NEW CONSTITUTION DRAFPED. A meeting of the Carmarthen Bay Fishe-ry Board was lield at the Carmarthen Guildhall on Wednesday. Mr L. D. Thomas, (chairman of the Board) presided. The chief business of the meeting was to consider the matter of the Provisional Order which had been applied for. The Clerk, in answer to questions, said that at present the Board was constituted as fQllows Members. Carmarthenshire County Council 12 Pembrokeshire County Council 3 Glamorganshire County Council 3 Carmarthen Town Council 4 Brecon County Council 1 CARDIGANSHIRE County Council 1 Elected by net FISHERMEN 3 Ex-otlicio (riparian owners) 10 -1 It was also stated, in answer to questions, that the Pembroke, Brecon and Cardigan re- presentatives had not attended for years. Mr Mervyn Peel said that the present order was modelled on the Lune and Conway Orders. There was a due proportion from the County Council. Representation was allowed to the anglers. The ex-officio members were entirely abolished. Riparian owners were assessed, and were rated, and those rated would have the right to elect representatives. Mr D. Evans pointed out that it would I)e possible to lodge objections after the order went up to the Board. Mr T. Smith moved that the Order le adopted as it stood. Rev A. F. Mills said that it would be a perfect farce to do that. It was decided to consider the various para- graphs seriatim. It was decided eventually to adopt the order without alteration. The Rev A. Fuller Mills said that objections could be considered before the Commissioners who would hold the enquiry. TROUT FRY. Mr Wm. Evans brought forward the matter of stocking the river with young trout, and it was decided to put the a ubject on the agenda for the next meeting.

The Question of Health

The Question of Health Tho question of health is a matter which if -sure to concern us at one time or another when Influenaa is 10 prevalent as it if just now, so it is wdl to know wbat to tlwe to ward off an attack of this laist weakening disease, this epidemic catarrh or oold of an aggravating kmd, to combat ii whilst uudar its baneful inlueoee, and particularly altar an attack, for then the system is so lowered as to be liable to the most dangerous of com- plaints. Gwilym Cyans' Quinine Bitten is acknowledged by all who have given it a fair trial to he the best speoifio remedy dealinc with Infloenaa in an its various stages, being a Preparation akilfully prepared with Quinine and aooompaniad with other blood purifying snd enriching agents, suitable for the hrer, digestion, and all those ailments requiring tonio strengthening and nerve increasing propei ties. It is invaluable for those suffer- ing from oolds, pneumonia, or any serious ill new, or tion oaused by sleeplessness, or worry of any kind, when the body has a general feeling of weakness or lassitude. Send for a copy of the pamphlet of testi* monials, which carefully read and eonsider well, then buy a bottle (sold in two sices, I 2d 9d and 4s 6d) at your nearest Chemist or Stores, but when purchasing see that the name "Gwilym Evana" is on the label, stamp and bottle, for without which nne are Senuine. Sole Proprietors; Quinine Bitter* lanufacturing Company, limited, llsaeUj^ Booth Wales.

Carmarthenshire Bankruptcy Court

Carmarthenshire Bankruptcy Court. The Carmarthenshire Bankruptcy Court was held on Tuesday before Mr Registrar Stephens-Davies. LLANELLY FURNISHER AND HORSE DEALING. The adjourned examination was held of Albert James Webley, 77 and 79, Station road and Mona Villa, Coteshill terrace, Llanelly, house furnisher, whose statement Showed gross liabilities of £1,728 98 4d and a. deficiency of 91,330 13s 3d. His failure was attributed to "Losses in horse dealing, accidents to waggons and furniture, and bad trade." Mr W. Davies, Llanelly, appeared for debtor. Questioned by the Official Receiver (Mr H. W. Thomas) debtor said he had purchased goods of the value of t2,495, but he was not a!ble to show how they were disposed of. Most of the goods were sold by auction, and he had not ket the aiOOOunts of the sales. The Official Receiver: I see also you pur- chased 55 horses and ponies for R937 10s and sold them for t771 5s. Debtor: That must be so. Do you know anything about horses P-A little. Sufficient to go in for horse dealing?—It is a very fascinating thing once it gets hold of you (laughter). The Registrar said that the debtor had dis- posed of 1:2,000 worth of goods in 12 months. He was almost a Whiteley. The Official Receiver said that debtor only accounted for t649 of the goods purchased, which meant that he was unable to account for £ 1,800. That was a big amount, for he had only been in business practically 3! years. The Registrar said that this was rather a large amount, and lie was afraid he should have to adjourn the case sine die. This course was adopted. ST. CLEARS CASE CLOSED. Mr Salmon, painter and decorator, St. Clears, came up for his adjourned examina- tion. Mr Howell Davies, solicitor, Carmar- then appeared for the debtor. The examina- tion WAS closed.

Corrcpondopce

Corrc&pondopce. FREE CIRCULATION OF THE BRYCE REPORT ON THE GERMAN OUTRAGES. To the Editor Carmarthen Weekly Reporter. S'r,—The awful German atrocities as ret out in the report of Lord Bryce's Committee should be read in detail by every grown up person in this country. Unless more atten- tion is directed to this ma-ss of legally proved. and therefore undeniable, evidence there is a likelihood of the horrible nature of German methods being palliated or even forgotten. Already "pacifists," "extreme pacifists," "Compromisers," "Peace^t-any-price," and pro-Germa.116 are beginning to raise their voice with a view of cionolud-ing a premature and inconclusive peace. Further, full know- ledge of the fearful details given in the "Evi- dence," upon which the Bryce "Report" is based, is singularly deficient in middle-class society, in our rural districts and abroad. To supply village clubs, hotel and inn reading- rooms (abroad as well as at home) and gener- ally to circulate the Report and Evidence, Canon Jocelyn Perkins, of Westminster Abbey, and I have started a fund. All the money subscribed is used in the free circula- tion of these two illuminating documents. As an aid to recruiting this work is invaluable. Subscriptions, however small, will be welcomed and acknowledged by Canon Jocelyn Perkins or Yours obediently, J. HARRIS STONE. Hie Caravan Club of Great Britain A Ireland 28. Charing Cross Road, W.C., Secretaries of village clubs and reading- rooms, and proprietors of small hotels and country inns desiring copies of the Bryce Report and Evidence are asked to send names and addresses. An esteemed local correspondent who writes drawing attention to the mater, says: "Per- haps the Education Authorities in West Wales might assist in promoting the circula- tion of what might be rightly termed a National Document. This report should help to show the terrible afflictions which are in store for our hearths and homes should the Germans ever invade our beloved country, whilst at the same time conveying better tha n words to every patriotic man or woman elig.ble ,for service, the supreme duty of doing what he or she can to help in this hour of its great need, and when we are waging A long and righteous war for our national independence, and with out gallant Allies defending the liberties and rights of smaller nations and of treaties." The Blue Book which contains 48 pages is written in a very judicial spirit. In the in- troduciionit is stated :— "The force of the evidence is cumulative. Its worth can be estimated only by perusing the testimony as a. whole. If any further con- firmation had been needed, we found it in the diaries in which German officers and private soldiers have recorded incidents just such as those to which the Belgian witnesses depose. The experienced lawyers who took the depo- sitions tell us that they passed from the same stage of doubt into the same stage of convic- tion. They also began their work in a sceptical spirit, expecting to find much of the evidence coloured by passion, or prompted by an excited fancy. But they were impressed by the general moderation and matter-of-fact level-headedneas of the witnesses. We have interrogated them, particularly regarding some of the most startling and shocking inci- dents which appear in the evidence laid before us, and where they have expressed a doubt we have excluded the evidence, admitting it as regards the cases in which they stated that the witnesses seemed to them to be speaking the truth, and that they themselves believed the incidents referred to have happened. It is for this rason that we have inserted among the depositions printed in the Appendix several cases which we might otherwise have deemed scarcely credible. The Committee has conducted its investigations and come to its conclusions independently of the reports issued by the French and Belgian Commissions, but it has no reason to doubt that those conclu- sions are in substantial accord with the con- cisions that have been reached by these two Some of the details are incredible were it not that they are so wall attested. Children of tender years were killed with the bayonet. Thus at Maline:—"The child (two year's old) came into the middle of the street so AS to be in the way of the soldiers. The soldiers were walking in twos. The first line of the two passed the child; one of the second line, the man on the left, stepped aside and drove his beyonet with both hands into the child's stomach, lifting the child into the air on his bayonet and carrying it away on his bayonet, he and his comrades still singing. The child screamed when the soldier struck it with his bayonet, but not afterwards." This is the kind of thing which the Germans are hoping to do here, and there are able- bodied Britons who can't join any defence force because they "have their business to I attend to." The mutilations which were sometimes practised betray a peculiar type of depravity which students of criminology know to be rampant in Germany. The Courts of Great Britain deal every year with about 200 serious offences against women and children. The Gorman Courts every year deal with 6,000 cases of the same type. This is the kind of people the Germans are. The Commissioners state: "In the minds of Prussian officers war seems to have become a sort of sacred mission, one of the highest functions of the omnipotent State, which is itself as much an Army as a State. Ordinary morality and the ordinary sentiment of pity vanish in its presence, superseded by a new standard which justifies; to the soldier every means that can conduce to success, however shocking to a natural sense of justice and humanity, however revolting to his own feel- ings. The spirit of war is defied. Obedience to the State and its War Lord leaves no room for any other duty or feeling. Cruelty be- comes legitimate when it promises victory. Proclaimed by the heads of the army, this doctrine would seem to have permeated the officers and affected even the private soldiers, leading tihem to justify the killing of non- combatants as an act of war, and so accus- toming them to slaughter that even women and children become at last the victims. t cannot be supposed to be a national doctrine, for it neither springs from nor reflects the mind and feelings of the German people as they have heretofore been known to other nations. It is A specifically military doctrine, the outcome of A theory held by a ruling caste who have brooded and thought, written and talked and dreamed about war until they have fallen under its obsession and been hypnotised by its spirit. "The doctrine is plainly set forth in the German Official Monograph on the usages of war on land. issued under the direction of the German staff. The book is pervaded through- out by the view that whateve,r military needs suggests becomes thereby lawful, and upon this principle, as the diaries show, the German offioers acted. "If this explanation be the true one. the mystery is solved, and that which seemed scarcely credible becomes more intelligible, though not less pernicious. This is not the only case that history records in which a false theory, disguising itself as loyalty to a State or to a Church, has perverted the conception of duty. and becomes a source of danger to the world. The Committee have corno to a definite con- clusion upon e-aoh of the heads under which the evidence has been classified. It is proved (i) That there were in many parts of Bet- gium deliberate and systematically organised massacres of the civil' population, accompanied by many isolated murders and other outrages. (ii) That. in the conduct of the war gener- ally innocent civilians, both men and women, were murdered in large numbers, women vio- lated. and children murdered. (iii) That looting, house burning, and the wanton destruction of property were ordered and countenanced by the officers of the Ger- man army, that elaborate provision had been made for systematic incendiarism at the very outbreak of the war, and that the burnings and destruction were frequent where no mili- tary necessity could be alleged, being indeed part of a. system of general terrorization. (iv) That the rules and usages of war were frequently broken, particularly by the using of civilians, including women nnd children, as a shield for advancing forces exposed to fire, to a less degree by killing the wounded and prisoners, and in the frequent abuse of the Red Cross and the White Flag. Sensible as they are of the gravity of these conclusions, the Committee conceive that they would be doing less than their duty if they failed to record them as fully established by the evidence. Murder, lust, and pillage pre- vailed over many parts of Belgium on a scale unparalleled in any war between civilised nations during the last three centuries."

Rheumatism and Kidney Trouble

Rheumatism and Kidney Trouble. FREE TREATMENT. Rheumatism is due to uric acid crystals in the joints and muscles, the result of excessive uric acid in the system that the kidneys failed to remove as nature intended, and this acid is mostly the cause of backache, lumbago, sciatica, gout, urinary trouble, stone, gravel and dropsy. The success of Estora Tablets for the treatment of rheumatism and other forms of kidney trouble, is due to the faot that they restore the kidneys to healthy action, and thereby remove the cause of the trouble, which neuessarily removes the ill-effects that spring from it, and have curred numberless cases after the failure of all other attempted remedies, which accounts for them fast superseding out-of-date medicines that are sold at a price beyond all but the wealthy. To prove Estora Tablets full warrant their descrip. tion an honest temedy at an honest price—oae fall box of 40 tablets will be sent to readers of the "Carmarthen Weekly Reporter" as a free sample on receipt of this notice and 3d in stamps to cover postage, packing, etc. Sold by chemist*, Is lid per box of 40 tablets or 6 boxes for Ga. For full box sample, address Estora Co., 132 Charing Cross Road, London, W.C.

iLOCAL WAR ITEMS

LOCAL WAR ITEMS. 4th Battalion Welsh Reo:iiient.-L-ieut. Thomas C. Thomas to be temporary captain. ••• Remount Service.—To be Remount Officer: Major Robert H. Col lis, D.S.O., Pembroke Yeomanry (Territorial Force). Mr Charlie Reeves (son of Mr H. Reeves, King street), of the Royal Naval Division, has obtained a commission in the 15tli Welsh (Carmarthenshire) Regiment. A grand concert was given on Redlull Common, Surrey, on Sunday evening the 1st inst. by the members of the several Welsh Regiments now stationed there, amongst whom are several St. Peter's Boys serving in the Monmouth's and Cardigans. Mr Gwyn Lewis (son of Mr B. A. Lewis, manager of tho Carmarthen Gas Works), for- merly the popular outside half of the Carmar- then Harlequins, and now of the Royal Naval Division, ]?As received a commission in the 15th Welsh (Carmarthenshire) Regiment. «*• A bright little chap enlisted in the Bantams some months ago when they were first formed. He was then well within the regulation height Suddenly he started growing. Nothing couid stop him. and now they have had to find a plaqí fQr him in the Welsh Guards. Mr Frank Morgan Lewis, son of Mr John. Lewis, monumental mason. Carmarthen, who is attached to the ammunition transport sec- tion of the Army Service Corps, 19th Division. writes home to say that he has met lote of Cairmarhen fellows out there, including John and Isihnvael Phillips and Bernard Bland.

Advertising

Preachers next Sunday at Carmarthen Places of Worship. UNION ST. INDEPENDENT CHAPEL. Mr Owen Griffiths. Brecon College. LAMMAS ST. INDEPENDENT CHACBL. Rev J. Dyfnallt Owen (pastor). BABELL, PENSARN. Rev J. Davies, Saron, Pumpsaint. BETHANIA (O.M.) Rev Isaac Thomas. Ferryside. PRIORDY INDEPENDENT C. £ APKfe Rev E. Keri Evans, M.A. (pastor). PENUEL BAPTIST CHAPSL. Rev E. K. Jones, Bridgend. TABERNACLE BAPTIST. Rev E. U. Thomas (pastor). WATER ST. O.M. OHAPEL. Rev John Evans, Abermeurig. ENGLISH CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH. Rev D. J. Thomas (pastor). ELIM. Rev D. Roberts, Elim. ENGLISH WESLEYAN OHAPEL. Rev Vincent Taylor, resident minister. ZION PRESBYTERIAN OHUROBL Aid. J. M. Howell, Aberayron. ENGLISH BAPTIST CHURCH. Rev A. T. Ward. West Bromwich. EBENEZER WELSH WESLEYAN SHAFEL. Rev J. Meirion Williams, resident minister. LIST OF ANNIVERSARY SERVICES. 1915. Aug. 18-19.-Re-opt'ning Smyrna Chapel, Llangain. Sept. 19.—Bethania. October IO.-Priordy. Nov. 21-22.—-English Congregational Church Deo. 12.-Zion Presbyterian Churoh.

ST CLEARS

ST. CLEARS. PETTY SESSIONS.-At St. Clears Petty Ses- sions on Tuesday, Mr T. Thomas, landlord of the bite. Lioii Inn, Blaenwaun, was charged with being drunk on his own premises on the 6th July. P.C. Thomas Evans said that he found the defendant sitting at the able try- ing to talk to another man. He was too drunk to talk. The Chairman said that his was a very serious offence as he might jeopardise his license. Fined 10&.—A traiisfer of the license of the Chemical Hall, St. Clears, was granted from Jared Edwards to Richard Morris,

LLANSTEPHAN

LLANSTEPHAN. In accordance with the time-honoured cus- tom the village of Llanstephan on Friday afternoon (the 6th inst.) elected a "nityor" and "mayoress' with the usual ceremony. Mr H. Hughes, Fochriw, was chosen "mayor," and Miss S. J. Roberts, of Treorky, as the mayoress Mr Mat Lewis, Aberdare, was elected "town clerk," Mr Belltin, Llanelly. as "returning officei- and Mr H. Hughes, Tre- harris. secretary. The maids of honour were Mrs Lewis, of Aberdare, and lLiss G. Jones, Morriston. The procession niarelied through the village, the "mayor" and "mayoress" addressed the crowd, and numerous promises were made. Miss G. Jones, Morriston, Bang a. number of verses to the tune of "Hob y derri dando."