Teitl Casgliad: Carmarthen weekly reporter

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Llun 1 o 4 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
3 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
Advertising

THE BLACKSTONE OIL ENGINE I THE GREATEST LABOUR SAVER on the FARM. SIMPLE RELIABLE ECONOMICAL. Never Beaten in ( Competition. "-ooor 7 Several Sizes can be seen actually at work at our Market Depot. WE SUPPLY A 5Lp. "PETTER'S" OIL ENGINE FOR < £ 32.! ALL SIZES OF PETROL ENGINES IN STOCK We are Sole Agents for the Celebrated "INTERNATIONAL" PETROL ENGINES. EXPERT ENGINEERS sent to all parts of the country. ESTIATES FREE. I. mans! SOI AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERS, Bedstead Showrooms—5, St Mary Street. Furniture Showrooms-I, St Mary Street, 33 Quay Street., Branch-9, Priory Street. Farm Implements-Market Place, Carmarthen, Llanelly, Liandyssul, and Llanybyther. J ORGE G PILLS I ¡ A MARVELLOUS REMEDY. For upwards of Forty Years these Pills have j held the first place in the World as a Eemedy for 1 PILES and GRAVEL, and all the common disorders | of the Bowels, Stomach, Liver, and Kidneys; and | there is no civilized Nation under the Sun that I has not experienced their Healing Virtues. THE THREE i U RMS OF THIS RElEDY No. I-Ge0rge's Pile and Gravel Pillg, No. 2—George's Gravel Pills. No. 3—George's Piiis for the Piles, ¿: .r-' Bild Gvetywhere in Boxes, Is. Ii". and 2a. 9d.eacli. By Foet, 1e.. 2d. anct :9 10d VHIPBIEROH-J. E. GEORGIA K.».5\S«, « PRINTING', PRINTINCII A- GOOD CHEAP AND EXPEDITIOUS PRINTING EXECUTED AT THE "REPORTER" PRINTING & PUBLISHING OFFICES, S BLUE-STREET o^iRM-^iE^TiEaiEisr 'OPVDERS BY POST receive prompt [ and careful attention. 'J> RICES ON ^PLICATION. Ble Carmarthen Weekly Reporter PUBLISHED EVEny TEUBSDAT KVENIKQ, Cltireiisates throughout South Wales generally, and has the tASTf IRCULATION IN THE COUNTY ] OF CARMARTHEN POST FnEB 1/9 PEB QDABTIB j ¡ THE BEST ADVERTISING MEDIUM FOR ii*LL UL- B.SSFS OF ADVE STISEMEKTS. • I ■ i ^— —' jjfr NOTICES TO QUIT FROM LANDLORD TO TENANT AND TENANT TO LANDLORD, i May be obtained at the "REPolinm OFFICE," ) Blue-street, [Carmarthen. ONF PFNNY. X STOP ONE MOMENT x <0h Dear Doctor I MUST [ My Darling die? ',There is very little hope, 1 But try I TUDOR WILLIAMS' PATENT i BALSAM OF HONEY. WHAT IT IS Tudor Williams' Patent Balsam of Honey Is an essence of the purest and most effica- cious herbs, gathered on the Welsh Hills and V alleys in their proper season, when their virtues are in full perfection, and combined with the purest Welsh Honey. All the in- gredients are perfectly pure. WHAT IT DOES I Tudor Williams' Patent Balsam of Honey Cures Coughs, Colds, Bronchitis, Asthma, Whooping Cough, Croup, and all disorders of the Throat, Chest and Lungs. Wonderful Cur. for Children's Coughs after Measles. It is invaluable to weak-chested men, delicate women and children. It succeeds where all other remedies fail. Sold by all Chemists and Stores in Is., 2s. 6d., and 4s 6d. bottles. Great saving in purchasing larger size Bottles. WHAT IT HAS DONE FOR OTHERS. What the Editor of the "Gentlewoman's Court journal" says :— Sir,—The result of the bottle of your splendid Tudor Williams' Balsam of Honey is simply marvellous. My mother, who is over seventy, although very active, every winter has a bronchial cough which is not only distressing, but pulls her down a lot. Its gone now. With best wishes for your extraordinary preparation. W. Browning Hearden. YOU NEED NOT SUFFER t Disease is a sin, inasmuch that if you act rightly, at the right time, it can, to a great extent, be avoided. Here is the preventative The first moment you start with Sore Throat tae a dose of TUDOR WILLIAMS' FJLTJEJtTT T BALSAM OF HONEY. It has saved thousands I It will save youl It is prepared by a fully qualified chemist, and is, by virtue of its composition, eminent- ly adapted for all cases of Coughs, Colds, Bronchitis, Esthma, etc., it exercises a dis- dinct influence upon the mucous lining of the thro.it, windpipe, and small air vessels, so that nothing but warmed pure air passes into the lungs. It's the product of the Honeycomb, chemically treated to get the best results. The Children like it. THEY ASK FOR IT So different from most medicines. Nice to Take Cures Quickly For vocaliets and public speakeri it has no equal, it makes the voice as clear as a bell. Manufacturer • Tudor Williams, MEDICAL HALL, ABERDARE. TO POOR RATE COLLECTORS, ASSISTANT OVERSEERS, &c. FORMS of Notice of Audit, Collector 8 Monthly Statement, &c., Poor Rate Receipt Books, with Name of Paritih, Particulars of Rate.&c., printed in, can be obtained REPOBTXB Orcics at Cheap Rates. Send for Piise THE CARMARTHEN BILLPOSTING COMPANY, NOTT SQUARE, CARMARTHEN. BILLPOSTlNGand ADVERTISINGS all Its Branches, throughout the Counties of Carir then, Pembroke, and Cardigan { R. M JAMES, Manager. Carmarthen County Schools. THE GRAMMAR SCHOOL. HKADMASTEB: E. S. ALLEN, M. A (CANTAB). COUNTY GIRLS' SCHOOL HEADMISTRESS Miss B. A. HOLME, M.A., Late Open Scholar of Girton College, Cambridge. FEES £ 1 9s. per Term (inclusive). Reduction when there are more than one from the same family. The next term begins Wednesday, September 15th. The Headmistress (at the Girls' School) and the Headmaster (at the Boys'School) will be pleased to see the parents of new pupils from 11 to 1 on Saturday September 11th and from 2.30 to 5 on Tuesday, September 14th. Boarders can be received at the Grammer School. Ijlå- WE CLAIM THAT 2/9 ID ]Pv TYE'S DROPSY, LIVER, AND WIND PILLS OVRS Constipation, Backache, Indigestion,HeartWeak- ness, Headache, and Nervous Complaints. Mr. John Parkin, 8, Eden Crescent, West Auckland, writes, dated March 12th, 1912: "I must say that they are all that you represent them to be, they are splendid, indeed I wish I had known about them sooner. I shall make their worth known to all who suffer from Dropsy." Sole Maker— S. J, CQLEY & CO, 57 HIGH SLSTROUD.fiLOS. WEDDING CARDS. NEW SPECIMEN BOOK CONTAINING LATEST & EXQUISITE DESIGNS Sent to intending Patrons at any address on rece P4 of an intimation £ „□ PRICES TO SUIT ALL CLASSES. REPORTER" OFFICE 3, BLUEST. <

IThe Royal Marines

The Royal Marines. [By E. CHARLES VIVIA*} Somebody once went to Eastney Barracks, one cf the Divisions when the Royal Marines go out to the ships of the Fleet and to work o! every kind in every part of the world: that somebody was shown round the various shops and drill grounds and appliances with which a Marine becomes familiar in the course of his training, and finally that somebody turned to the man who had acted as his guide- ''But nobody ever hears of the Marines," he said "What do you DO?" Oh, nothing." his guide answered, rather wearily. The reproof took effect, and the visitor apologised. For the Marines do everything, and the man who sets out to compile a. record of what they do is as venturesome an individual as he who sets out to compile the history of the corps. In the first case, one might set down every form of military and naval activity, and in the second case, one might set to work to write the histories of the Army and Navy, omitting only the military work on the Indian frontier. Ordinary regiments have their colours, on which are inscribed the actions and campaigns in which the owners of the colours distinguished themselves; the Marines adopt as their badge a globe, this stating simply that no colours (though the Royal Marine Light Infantry have them) could contain their world-wide distinctions, and their motto—Per Mare per Terrain" — backs the tacit statement. The word "Gibraltar." at which place they put up their long and memorable defence, and a laurel wreath which commemorates their gallantry in the talking of Belleisle, complete the badge. Such a list of distinctions as regiments place on their colours, would in the case of the Marines, be a recital of prac- tically every campaign, and nearly every action, in which the British Navy and Army have taken part. Raised first when a Charles was on the British Throne, abolished as a corps and then f raised again, the Marines retain onmal1 distinction until this day that calls tor men- tion. In the bad old days when seamen mutinied-RS in the mutiny at the No re, for "instance-the Marines alone could be depen- ded on to support lawful authority, and the trust thus reposed in them was never once abused. In consequence of tin's, the mess deck of the Marines on battleships and cruisers, is placed between that of the &?. men and the officers mess; all cause for this has long since disappeared, but the un-,http- able loyalty of this Royal regiment ;n the earlier days is still marked by the positi in ',f their mess deck on every capital slrp of the senior service. | As already noted, their history is as lengthy a record as a list of their achieve- ments, and thus it has no place here in de- tail. We are more concerned with the Marines of to-day, with the men themselves, than with any dry record of facts. As a corps, they are lacking in one particular; they have never mastered the art of self- advertisement. The man in the street knows that such a body cf men as The Royal Marines are in existence, and usually he has a ague idea that they do something on ships. There, however, his knowledge ends. On entering the Barracks, one is struck by the mere atmosphere of the place in whicli these men are trained; outside the barrack gate are jerry-built houses. little shops, and all titat one would expect in thus suburb of a naval town; inside is cleanliness, solidity and neat eflicieney-one passes into a world that is better ordered, better managed, and of more healthy atmosphere than the civilian wcrld outside. From the magnificent mess room cf the officers' mess to the great central kitchen in which the men's meals are pre- pared, one gathers a sense of things done in the best possible way. and that sense persists in surveying the training of the men, the piovisions for their comfort, the range of sport and recreation provided for their r-pare time—tor every detail of their lives in the period of trailing. From this period they pass equipped, mentally and physically, to take their places in the ships of the Fleet, with the Armies in France and the Dardan- elles, in German South-West Africa, or on anti-aircraft service in the United Kingdom. For the Marines are ubiquitous, and in every aspect of this present campaign they have their share. Primarily, of course, the Marines are in- tended for service at sea. where they man the guns of the Fleet. In every capital ship of the service, a certain proportion oi the guns are manned by Marines, and in times of peace there is a perpetual and healthy rivalry between the Marines and the seamen with regard to gun-drill and shooting capa- bilities the magnificent shooting records of the Marines prove that tIps rivalry is not without its uses. On land. the Marines are used for manning coast defences and certain naval bases, for manning siege and heavy artillery in France. Belgium, and South Africa for contributing to the strength ot colonial expeditionary forces, in manning anti-aircraft guns where needed, in working all the motor transport used in connection with their duties, and as an Infantry Bri- gade now forming part of the Royat Naval Division in the Darlanelles. The corps is the most self-contained, the most nearly self-supporting of any branch of the Services; even the clothing and boots worn by the men are manufactured by and under the auspices of the authorities at the Barrac ks; trained as both sailor and soldier. Marines comprise shoemakers, tailors, and mechanics of all kinos; on a foundation of infantry training they build a knowledge of every gun in use in both Navy and Army, and, if the camels used in the Egyptian cam- paign may be counted, there have also been mounted Marines. The colloquialism, "Tell that to the Marines." is in the nature of a compliment to the corps, in reality, though it may appear as ridicule on the surface; its origin lay in the fact that a Marinae is &o well-instructed and so intelligent that, if he will believe a thing, it must be true, and if it were not true the teller would meet lifs just reward. In the matter of instruction, the range of subjects is too great for a derailed list to be ain-eii. A,, an outline, however, it may be said that the foundation of training i; in- < etruction in infantry drill and in musketry, together with the physical • training that every soldier undergoes. T-hou the men are taught to row, to swim, and are instructed in signalling, and after that they cotae to gunnery. There are guns of every caliN4i and kind up to the six inch, aDd mwels a" working parts of the larger guns. Ingenious devioes reproduce -tho-actual conditions en a cruiser or battleship rolling at aee, and under the conditions the men are vaught to at the guns, and to paas out at gun-tart.. before they are drafted to the F. Them are courses of instruction in coast ddiew guns and appliances, of eiege guns and appli- ances, and even in the use of such mighty weapons as correspond to the howiteerg with which Germans battered down the defences of Liege. and Maubeugø. There is training in the use. construction end repair of field telephones, in motor transport work, both heavy and light, in field battery work, and in a score of other subject*. It is not generally known that the Royal Naral, School of Music is at astney, and that all the bands of the British Navy are sent out from the great training establishment of the Royal Marines. From this Tery brief summary of the work of the Royal Marines two or three inevitable conclusions arise. First of the is the unending interest of the work. An infantryman trains to a cer- ta.in routine-and there he hends. He can go on perfecting himself in his work, deveop- ing himself, but there is no unending list of new things such as is at the command of the Marine, who is infantryman, aruileryinan, and generally sailor as well by training. The driving forces of the soldier are discipline and initiative, or perhaps it might be better put as discipline backed by initiative; the driv- ing force of the sailor is handness-he has to get thngs done and he gets them done; but the Marine ,hybrid by training, has to com- bine discipline, initiative, and handiness with an uncanny quickness in getting things done, and it is safe to say that there is more scope for intelligence in the Royal Marines than in any branch of either Army or Nary. Given average intelligence and the desire to learn. the man in the Marines h¡u; more chance of fitting himself for and taking promotion than any other man. As an instance of this, at the outbreak of war the Royal Marines fur- nised a number of instructors to the Army- and many of those men have already been granted commissions from the units to which they were sent. Yet another point with regard to this diversity of training is the fitness of men for almost any kind of employ- ment on their return to civil life. Infantry, cavalry, or ortiHery. on putting off uniform, are still soldiers by habit; the Marine, having been everything and done everytking, is able to take up any form of civilian work as easily as he turned from the use of a big gun to the repair of a field telephone or the running of a motor car. And the popularity of the Marine service among the men who have served is evidenced by the fact that generation after generation of a family enrols, while not infrequently father and tons are serving at the same time in the same corps. The second conclusion ia the value of the work. Ultimately, the very bread we eat is dependent on the shooting ability of the Marine and his kind. for there is not a capital ship in the Navy that is without Marines to man its guns. and on those guns depend the national food supply—and the lite of tfee nation itself. Coast defence service, anti-air- craft service, service with the big guns, and as an Infantry Brigade in France a,nd in the Dardanelles, are all part of the vital work of guarding the Empire, auxiliary to that main- tenance of aea power with which the Royat Marines have always been so closely con- nected. From a patriotic standpoint, there is no higher form of service than with the Royal Marines. And then. a last conclusion, there is the spirit in which the men of the corps arc trained, and the re-sulting spirit of the men themselves. One may see these things in the elates.training at gun-laying, where every man knows that the score on his carfl must be good, for the credit of the corps of which he is a member; in the squads swing- ing out to drill, made up of finely developed. bronzed, healthy-looking men, from which the best is asked and by whom the best is given for the credit of the corps: in the care, the individual instruction, the study of best methods, wiwth wlii h everry instructor de- votes himself to his task, for the credit of the corps; in the disciplined efficiency evident at every turn. by reason of which the Royal Marines consider themselves—and with jus- tice—the finest body of men in the British forces. It is a corps of great traditions; of un. equalled distinctions. It is "nol>ody's child," soldiers trained for sea service, and sailors ashore, capable of doing the. work of both. This lack of official parentage has given rise to self-reliance and self-efficiency, so that whatever arises to be done, the Marine can do it. In their work and their manner of doing it, as in the matter of pre-eminence in sport, the- Marines yield place to none; the man who joins this corps is not only fitting himself for service with the best trained body of men that the Navy and Army possess, but he is also educating himself in ways that will be useful for the rest of his life.

II WHERE THERE ARE NO TAXES

I-I- WHERE THERE ARE NO TAXES. Sir James Milner Dodds. of the Scotland Office, questioned by the Committee of PAibti43 Accounts as to medical Hid for St. Kilda. said it used to be true that St. KiLda never got nn epidemic of influenza except when visited hy someone from Headquarters. He did not know if that was true now. There was more contact with the island than there used to be. Sir Henry Crach: There is no possibility of getting any rates from St.. KiltlaP-So. There is practically no currency?—No. Mr T/ief Jones: Is the whole public expen- diture of St. Kilda paid out of the rateftP— There is very little public expediture. 80 far as I know they pay no rates, and I am sure they pay no income tar. But is it part of no Local Government area in Scotland?—Yes. it is part of the county of Inverness. How do you determine what bliall be paid out of the county rate and what shall be paid out cf the taxes in connection with 8t. Kilda?—1 am afraid that this is a poser. I ran not ffll y, 11.