Teitl Casgliad: Carmarthen weekly reporter

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 2 o 4 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
13 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
Advertising

dam Oak IL H| HH ESTABLISHED 1854. K DAVID TifOsHlLLIAMS H mm EOo^iBiisTiDEiK/, ietc, ■ ■ I CHAPEL ST., CARMARTHEN. HHHI ■^■HHnnenBMHnHBnaaraBOHamHHnnHaMaHi BHH |BH| Magazines, Periodicals and all kinds of Publications Bound mem to suit the owner's taste. Hymn Books, Bibles, etc., repaired and re-covered. Books Bound in Publishers' Cascs at Publishers' Prices. BOOKBINDING TO THE TRADE. I-" I I tUti k (Etoe igft-(jHa$5$5 It iniutrt I (Jarandislt t11t5t, I 41 Street!, Carm, ar?thon I H. stoodley, ELECTRICAL ENGINEER & CONTRACTOR GARFORTH, BARN ROAD, CARMARTHEN. Electric Lighting and Power, Private Plant, Bells and Telephones a Speciality. tgiT All Business will receive my Personal Attention. WATCHES & CLOCKS REPAIRED. JEWELLERY REPAIRED LIKE NEW. GILDING AND ELECTRO PLATING. HIGH-CLASS WORKMANSHIP. ESTIMATES GIVEN ALL WOBK GUARANTEED AT JOHN WILLIAMS Watchmaker, Jeweller, & Silversmith, 9 A 10 Lammas Street, CARMARTHEN. Established 1936. r- The Welshman's Favourite. 2 MABON Saucer As good as its Name, 5 DON'T FAIL TO GET IT. 5 j Manufacturers—-B'lanch's, St. Peter St., Cardiff. 5 kvv^Nvvvxxwxxxxvvvxvvvvvvvvxvvvvxv! WEDDING CARDS. Anyone requiring the above should, before placing their orders, send for our NEW SPECIMEN BOOK CONTAINING THE CHOICEST DESIGNS OABDS AND PRICES SOITABUC FOB ALL CLASSES GLAMORGAN EDUCATION COMMITTEE. THE HIGH SCHOOL FOR GIRLS, ■ UOWBBIDGE. Extensive grounds, and most healthy situation in the picturesque Vale of Glamorgan. Special care taken of delicate children. Preparation for Oxford Locals and London Matriculation. Special attention given to domestic subjects. Fees very moderate and inclusive. Children of eight years and upwards ) are admitted to the School. For particulars apply to the HEADMISTRESS. W. S. MORKIS, Wholesale Grocer, Corn, Flour and Seed Merchant, OA 11.v.fART:a:EN. Nat. Telephone, 50. Telegrams, "Morris, Merchant Carmarthen." SEND FOR PRICE LIST Pleasant Outing to BANKYFKLIN THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 2nd. THE Public are invited to spend a pleasant and instructive day on the Banks of the Cowin where a HORSE & CATTLE SHOW, HORTICULTURAL & AGRICULTURAL PRODUCE EXHIBI- TION, SHEEP DOG TRIALS, Besides several other NOVEL COMPETITIONS, in which Visitors can take part, And finish icith a GRAND CONCERT in the Evening Excellent Prizes in Money, Cups and Medals. Admission One Shilling. No Sixpenny Tickets issued. The holder of a Shilling Ticket will be admitted to the Horse and Cattle Show, Sheep Dog Trials, and to the Produce Exhibition. Show Grounds open to the Public as follows :— Sheep Dog Trials—10.30 a.m. Horse and Cattle Show—12.30 p.m. Produce Exhibition—1 p.m. Visitors will be well catered for by the Villagers. Schedules, Day Programmes, &c.. may be had of the Secretary, Mr J. P. WALTERS, Penllwynbach, Mydrim, St. Clears. LAST DAY OF ENTRY, AUGUST 28th. C ARMARTHENSHIR E. VALUABLE PiTWOOD FOR SALE. Growing on Forest-fach Farm, near Kidwelly, in the Paris of Llangendeirne. TENDERS ARE INVITED for the following Lots :— LOT I.-About 4], Acres of well-grown Pitwood, chiefly Larcb, and numbered 2,301 on Ordnance Sheet. Boundary trees not to be sold. LOT 2 -AI)out 3a. Or. l(ip of well-grown Pitwood, chiefly Larch, and numbered 2,302 on Ordnance Sheet. Boundary trees not to be sold. Mr Jones, Foreat-fach Farm, will show the Lots. The Trees are of excellent quality, and convenient- ly situated to roads, important Collieries and Railway Stations. Tenders to be sent to Mr G. GRIFFITHS, Surveyor and Estate Agent, Maeayffynon, Llandilo, on or before August 31st, 1915. The lowest or any Tender will not necessarily be accepted. August 10th, 1915. JOINT COUNTIES ASYLUM, CARMARTHEN To Butchers, Coal and Fish Merchants, Curriers, Drapers, Grocers, Farmers, Millers, Ironmongers, etc. TENDERS ARE INTITED for supplying the above Asylum with Butcher's Meat, Flour Fish, Butter, Cheese, Milk, Potatoes, Groceries, Haberdashery, Drapery, Clothing. Leather, Coal and other necessaries, Ironmongery, Timber, Stationery, etc., for the six months endipg 31st March, 1916. Tenders should be sent to the undersigned not later than Wednesday, lab September, marked Tenders for on the corner. Forms of Tender, with the conditions of contract, and any further information, may be obtained on application to R. LLOYD HARRIES, Deputy Asylum Clerk. YOU CAN RELY ON Clarke's B41 Pills as a Safe and Sure Remedy in either Sex, for all Acquired or Constitutional Discharges from Urinary Organs, Gravel, Pains in the Back and kindred complaints. Over 50 years Success. Of all Chemists, 4s Gd rrinrntg per box, or sent direct, post free, l-1* A HUB a for Sixty Penny Stamps by the B41 PILLS Proprietors—The Lincoln and IT, Midland Drug Co, Ltd.Lincoln. ree from Mer c«ry THE GREAT SKIN CURE. BUDDON'S S.R. SKIN OINTMENT. It will cure Itching after one application destroy every form of Eczema; heals old Wounds and Sores; acts like a charm on bad legs is infallible for Piles Prevents Cuts and Festering will cure Ringworm in a few days removes the most obstinate-Eruptions and Scurvy. Boxes ?id. and Is. lid. Agent for Car- mar/hen, Walter Lloyd, Chemist; Kidwelly, L, Jones, VVhitland, Mr Walters; Narberth, Mr Toubrig Jyuderwen, H. Morris. LLOYD & THOMAS' AUTUMN SALE FIXTURES Monday, August 30th— Lletlywilw?, Pontyberem. Tuesday, 31st—Llandyssul Mart. Wednesday, Sept 1st—Annual Ram Sale, Carmar- j then Market. Wednesday, 8th—Carmarthen Mart and Sale of Breeding Ewes. Tuesday, 11th—Llandyssul Mart. j Tuesday, 21st-St Clears Mart. Wednesday, tt 22ad—Carmarthen Mart. i Thursday, 23rd—Llandawke, Laugharne. Saturday, 25th-Sale of Ponies at Brynamman Show. Monday, „ 27th—Esgarhir, Newchurch. Tuesday, „ 28tli—Llandy»sul Mart. Tuesday, 28th— Gelli, Llandefeilog. Wednesday, 29th—Pwlldyfarch, Newchurch Thursday, 30th-Merthyr-fach, Merthyr. Friday, October 1st—Llwyncelyn, Ltandefeilog. Monday, 4th—Pante, Bronwydd Arms. Tuesday, 5th-St Clears Mart. Tuesday. 5th-Ltanlasb, Golden Grove. Wednepday, Cth-Carmarthen Mart. Thursday, 7th-Wernddu, Liangain. Saturday, nth-Pedigree Bull Show & Sale. Tuesday, 12th—Llandyssul Mart. Wednesday, 13th-Pedigree Shorthorns, Ffynone, Boocatb. Thursday, 14th-Rhydlydan, Llangain. Friday, 15th—Penrhiwcowin, Conwil. TO ADVERTISERS. PREPAID SCALE OF CHARGES FOR ADVERTISING IN THE" REPORTER. _————- No. of One Three Six Words. Insertion. ] Insertions. Insertions, ad d II d 20 10 2 3 3 6 28 16 3 6 4 6 36 20 4 0 6 6 44 26 4 6 6 6 The above scale only applies to the Situations, To Lets," and To be Sold by Private Treaty," clases of Advertisements, and must be paid for in, advance, or the ordinary credit rate will be charged, HALFPENNY STAMPS, or Postal or Post Office Orders, payable to M. LAWRENCE, at Carmarthen, Replies may be made addressed to the Reportet Office, and will be forwarded to advertisers when stamped envelopes are Bent. HOUSE TO BE LET at Michaelmas; No. 19 Jjt. Spilman Street, Carmarthen.—Enquiries to Mrs Jones, 30 Quay Street. IN MEMORIAM CARDS—We have a large and assorted stock to select from. Prices to suit all clasties.-Repoi-tei- Office, Carmarthen. JAMES JONES, Billposter and Advertising Agent for Kidwelly and neighbouring Villages. All work duly executed. Address :—Station Road, Kidwelly. VISITING CARDS from Is 6d for 50; Printed on Ivory Cards.-Beporter Office, Carmarthen. rpO LET, large Warehouse alongside Carmarthen JL Quay, containing ground floor and 3 lofts, Could be Let separately if desired.—Apply, Richards, Rosemont, Carmarthen. EDDINIG CARDS-Prices and styles to suit all Classes. Speciment Book, containing the Latest and Choicest Designs, sent on application.— Reporter Office, Carmarthen. WRITING PAPER AND ENVELOPES. Large quantity always in Stock.— Reporter Office, Carmarthen. WANTED, a clean, respectable woman as CARETAKER of the English Baptist Church. Applications to be sent to Mr Fred James, Leicester House, Secretary. WANTED, an ERRAND BOY; full time. Apply, Reporter, Carmarthen.

The Churches

| The Churches. ). 'The Rev J. Meirion Williams will preach his valedictory sermon at Ebenczer Welsh Wesleyan Chapel, Carmarthen, on Sunday 1 next. He will be succeeded by the Rev J. Jenkins, of Aberayron. «*• The re-opening services in connection with Smyrna Independent Chapel commenced on I Wednesday afternoon the 18th inst., when the Rev D. M. Davies, Waunarlwydd, preached as did also the Rev Stephen Thomas Salem, Llandilo. On Wednesday evening I the Rev Rees Williams, Maenelochog, and the Rev James Charles, Denbigh. On Thurs- day morning the preachers were the Rev. W. D. Roww lands, Water street, Carmar- then and the Rev H. Eivet Lewis, London on Thursday afternoon the Rev Samuel Wil- liams, Landore, and the Rev E. U. Thomas, Tabernade, Carmarthen; and on Thursday evening the Rev James Charles, Denbigh and the Rev H. Elfet Lewis, London. It is a long time since such a galaxy of great preachers were seen in this neighbourhood. The congregations were immense. The chapel was not half big enough, crowds coming from Llanstephan, Carmarthen, Cbnwil, and St. Clears. The secretary of the church is Mr D. E. Thomas., Brynymor; and the secretary i of the Building Fund. Mr T. Evans, Baily- sivi. The treasurer of the church is Mr W. Lewis, Meinilhvydion, and of the Building Fund, Mr T. Williams, of the Factory. The chapel which was built by Mr D. Jones to the designs of Messrs Geo. Morgan and Sons, cost some £ 2.200, of which a little over a half lias been already collected. The new organ was played by Miss Evans, Dyffryn, the organist of the church, and by Mr Harries, Gorslas. The friends provided hospitality for the numerous visitors. An individual Communion Set was presented to the Church by Mr T. Evans. Maesgwynne; a Welsh Bible by Mrs Evans, Pantyrin; and an English Bible by Mr AVm. Thomas, Shop Newydd. The chapel is lighted by acetylene, and had a heating apparatus installed, so that it is quite up-to-date. The Rev James John, the minister, is well known in Carmarthenshire for the stimulus lie has given to the recruit- ing movement.

Obituary

Obituary. JIR DAVID JOSES. The mortal remains of the late Mr David Jones, plumber, "Cypres House." 28, St. David's street, were laid to rest at Carmar- then Cemetery on Thursday of last week. The Rev W. D. Rowlands, pastor of Water street Chapel, officiated- Tho rev. gentleman referred in most pathetic terms to the ina- bility of the eldest son (D. Howell Jones) to be present as he was aiow attached to the 1st- 1th Welsh Regiment, Mediterranean Expedi- tionary Force. The chief mourners were:— Mrs Jones (widow). May and Doris (daugh- ters), Stanley, Gwilym, and Idris (eons), Mrs Williams, FerndaTie (sister), Mr and Mrs Hopkins, Friar's Park (sister and brother-in- law), Mrs Kingdom, Ystalyfera (sister), and Air D. Jones, Pentrepoeth Cottages (cousin). Among others present we noticed: Mr James Davies, J.P., Ceheldir; Mr Harries, Towy Works; and the employees of T'owy Works, Ltd. Wreaths and floral tributes were sent by the following:—From the sorrowing wife and children; Mrs Hopkins. Friar's Park; Mrs William's, Ferndale; Airs Kingdom. Ys- talyfera Airs H. Thomas, Swansea; Mrs Jeremy, Catherine street; Staff at Towy Works (glass wreath); Airs Evans and Betty. Arum House,St. David's, street; Mrs Smith and Gwenny, Park House, St. Davids street; MVs J. Griffiths, 11, St David's street: Mrs Lodwick, 20, St. David's street; Airs and Aligfs- jinffiths, AlarigoM House, St. David's street; VIrs John Thomas, 27, St. David's street; Mrs Evans. 32, St David's street; Mrs Nicholas, 13, St. David's street Mrs Jenkins, 17. St. }a\ id s street; Mrs E .Thomas, 57, Cather- ne street; Aliss Bessie '1 homas. Bromley ■ Airs Wilson, 62, Catherine street; Mrs May- nard, Catherine street; Mrs W. O. Evans, Alary Evans, and Lewis Evans, Catherine street; Misg, Dora Morgan. Catherine street Airs James, 21. Catherine street; Mi-s Evatis and Airs Davies, 29, Catherine street; Mrs Yt'a.lter Evans, Catherine street; Miss Lewis, Catherine street; Mrs Thomas Evans, Water street; Mrs B. Phillips, AVater street; Mrs W. Griffiths, Water street; Aim Thcs. Davies, Church street; Miss Gertie Morris, Church street; and Mr John Jones, Towy Works. The family wish to thank, the numerous friends who sen letters of sympathy, etc., in their sad bereavement.

Sad Drowning Fatality at Carmat then

Sad Drowning Fatality at Carmat then. BOY FALLS IN THE RIVER. Alfred Silas Walters, tho Neven-year-o!d eon of Air Daniel AValters, landlord of the Railway Tavern Inn, Lammas street, Car- marthen, was drowned in the River Towyn on Wednesday evening. There was a high tide at the time, and it appears that the deceased was playing on the bank of the river, when lie fell in and was drowned before assistance was obtained. The body was recovered later. Another son of Mr Daniel Walters, who is in the Xavy, was on H.M.S. Triumph when it was sunk, but he was saved. A son-in-law of Mr Walters was lost on H.M.S. Cressy. t 1 i 11 1

LOCAL WAR ITEMS

LOCAL WAR ITEMS. Pte. D. J. Bowen, of the 4th Welsh, whose home is in AVater street, is wounded and in hospital in England. Pte. Barnett, of the 8th Welsh, whose home is in Cambrian-place, has been seriously wounded and is in hospital abroad. «*• Xo news ha::> yet been received from Capt. Howard, Haverfordwest, of the 4tli Welsh, who is reported misffing in the Dardanelles. It is reported that Privates Fred John, Port- field; Willie Griffiths, Barn btreet; and Ivor Dixon, Bridge street, members of the Haver- fordwest Company, are wounded, though not seriously. *11 The Rev W. LI. Footman, headmaster of St. Diavid's College School, Lampeter, has received news of the death of Captain W. T. Howell3, a member of the staff, who died from wounds sustained in the Dardanelles between the 8th and 10th inst. Lampeter students and townspeople alike received the news with great regret. Captain Howelis, was very popular in the town and school. A native of Brook, Langharne, young Howells, who was 26 years of age, graduated at Aber- ystwyth College with second-class honours, and came to Lampeter nearly three years ag.o as assistant master. He was an all- round athlete, and distinguished himself chiefly as a footballer. His abilities as a soldier were shown by the several promotions he rceived swice August last. Intimation has been received from the War Office that Captain Hugh Mortimer Green, lst-4th AYeTsh Regiment, who was in action at the Dardanelles on August 10th, is now missing. Captain Green, who gave up the post of secretary of the, Diocesan Traning College, in order to join the Army, is a son of the late Rev T. Mortimer Green, formerly registrar of the University College of Wales, Aberystwyth. During the last 12 months no fewer than 3,000 horses have been purchased in the counties of Carmairthen, Pembroke, and Car- digan for Army purposes. Something like 9,000 remountsi have ben bought in South Wales. The South Wales Remount Service is superintended by Major Urquhart, Clear- brock, and the Carmarthen depot is in charge of Air Kenneth Walker, Tegfynydd, Carmarthen.

AbieBodied Slacker at Carmarthen

Abie-Bodied Slacker at Carmarthen. REFUSED TO WORK. I A special Borough Police Court was held at the Carmarthen Guildhall on Thursday (yesterday) before Mr W. Uloyd (chairman) and Mr J. B. Arthur. James Webster, an able-^jdied young man (aged 32) was charged with refusing his task at the Workhouse. r Air John Saer (Clerk) appeared on behalf of the Guardians. The Master (Mr Rees Price) said that the defendant was admitted on the 24th. He was given a task of IOc-wt. of stone. He Said that he was nlot going to do it. Then he took a bit of board off the door and got out. He found the key and unlocked the door to let the other tramps out. The Chairman asked the defendant if lie had ever worked. The defendant said that he had. J The Chairman: Have you an insurance card ? Defendant: -No; I lost it. P.S. Lod'wick said that the defendant had been 54 days in the Army, but had been dis- charged as not likely to be an efficient soldier The Bench sent him to jail for 14 days hard labour.

Carmarthen Auction Mart

Carmarthen Auction Mart. The fortnightly mart Was conducted by Messrs Lloyd and Thomas on Wednesday last. The mart was the largest held since its formation. The number of entries was ex- ceptionally good, and record prices were ob- tained. Out of the 70 fat cattle entered, all were sold with the exception of two, at prices ranging from-Æor fat cows LI5 to £38, tiat, bulls tlG to t26, and a number of atore cattle were also entered which realised from JE12 to £15. Cows and ea.lves were sold at L15 to L26 apiec, and calves from 2 guineas to £4 10s. Lambs were sold from 33s to 48s apiea. Pigs 50s to 85s apiece. The auction- eiers have now been able to secure the attend- ance of the best buyers in West Wales, and it only remains now for farmers to send their stock to be sold iat this Mart-. The next Mart will be held on Wednesday, September 8th.

CARMARTHEN VT CORPS

CARMARTHEN V.T. CORPS. Orders for week ending September 4th, 1915:—Platoon and section drill, on Monday, Wednesday and Friday at 7.30. Rifle Range: The range will be opened as usual at 6.30. Range Officers Monday, W. E. Williams and F. Hardaker; AVednesday, AV right Davies and Windsor Thomas; Friday, W. H. Jones and E. Croker; Thursday (3 to 5 and 7 to 8.30), E. J. Andrews, J. Evans, and F. King. Will members who are prepared to act ns, section commanders please send in their names to the Secretary without further dela.r.Hy < order, Lieut.-Col. D. F, Willi

Carmarthen VTC

Carmarthen V.T.C. THE U XI FOR At CONTROVERSY. For the last few weeks the question of uirform or no uniform has been agitating the members of the Carmarthen V.T.C. The argument in favour of obtaining a uniform was 1. That it would add to the dignity of the corps and make the men take their work more seriously. The arguments against getting unform were:— 1. The Government has issued an armlet to eaoli member. This armlet is a "distinctive badge" as required by the Hague Convention and renders the wearer a legitimate com- batant as distinguished from a civilian sniper. If the Germans would not recognise the arm- let they would not recognise the uniform. In the war of 1870, the Prussians executed the francs-tireurs although they all wore distinctive uniforms. 2. The uniforms would be a needless ex- pense.. It has been stated that the uniform would cost from 258 to 45s. The latter would be the price of a good serge jacket and knickers as anybody who knows anything of the price of clothing will admit. The lowest figure would only purchase a coloured calico suit well adapted for private theatricals or rehearsals, but not for real wear. Aloreover there is the question of tha leggings (or puttees) and uniform boots, another sovereign at least. Men in uniform require also uni- I form overcoats in the winter—another JE1 10s at least. This means £ 4 10s, or with cap, belt, etc., etc., £ 5. 3. The purchase would raise invidious dis- tinctions between two classes of men. Men who could not purchase their uniforms would be provided with uniform out of the Funds of the Corps. If all uniforms were provided out of the funds it would be all right. As this is impossible, it would create intolerable distinctions to have one set of men paying their way and another on the Fund. More- over who is to judge whether a man can or can't afford to pay. There are men who never can afford to pay for anything they can get for nothing even were they million- aires, and there are others who would sell their furniture rather than claim help from their fellow member's. There are many men who object to the expense and who would a'lso object to declaring themselves "too poor" to buy their uniforms, and who would solve the difficulty by withdrawing from the corps. 4. The expense would btop recruits coming in Once the grumbling over the price of the uniforms filled the town it would be good-bye to the chance of any more members. 5. One argument used against the Corps is that it is "all swank." The purchase of uniforms would lend colour to this. On the other hand the sight of men practising drilll and shooting in their everyday clothing gives a grim earnestness to the movement. G. The uniform is not recognised by the War Office. This fact is undeniable. The AV ar Office only recognises the armlet (or brassard). The authorities of each corps have as much latitude to choose the design of the uniform as an athletic club has to choose its caps and blazers. A Vohinteor in uniform was recently turned out of a theatre in London for wearing an "illegal uniform" —that of his corps. Legally is is not a uni- form—but merely a. fancy costume. 7. It would not add to the efficiency of the Corps. General Botha's Boers who won the only complete victory in this. war over the Germans wore their every day clothes. 8. The sum of £ 300 to £ 1,000 required to provide uniform for the Carmarthen Corps ) could be spent to better advantage. 9. The contract for uniform would possibly give rise to a good deal of ill-feeling as those who had to pay would probably in many cases feel that the Committee had not made a good bargain and that the uniform cost too much. 10. The members of the Carmarthen V.T.e whether labourers or members of learned pro- fessions have all a decent suit of clothes and appear neat and tidy on parade in their ordinary clothing. 11. If the Government gives the Corps work to do it will provide them with military uni- forms in which case the Corps dress would be discarded. The Corps had a meeting on AVednesday night and decided by an overwhelming majo- rity to defer the question of uniform inde- finitely. Intending recruits need no longer be deterred by the bogey of having to pay for leave to defend their country.

Stitch in Time

Stitch in Time. There is i an old saying "A sUtch in time sarew nine" and if upon the first fyniptome of anything being: wrong with our health we were to reeort to some simple but proper means of correcting thfi mischie*, rine-tenth* of the suffering that invades oar homes would be avoided. A doae of G fi'ym Evans* Quinine Bitters taken wken y )-a feel the least bit out of sorts is icet tho t "stitoh in time." You can ret Gwiqrn IL -ans' Qiunine Bi ttera at any Chemists or Stoi ta in bottles, 2s 8d and 4s 6d each, but ramen.ber that the only guarantee of genuineij&s is the name "Gwilym Evans" ou the IlkÐI, stamp ane bottle, without which none i-Im genuine. Sole Proprietors: Quinine Bitten Manufacturing Company, Limited, Llanelly, South Wale I

LLANDILO

LLANDILO. WEDDING.—On AVednesday, August 18th, at St. Gabriel's Church, Swanset, a very pretty weddin gwas solemnised. The con- tracting parities were Wilfrid Paget, elder son of Mr aiDJdMrs D. Alorgan, Bridge street, Llandilo, and Marjorie Louise, elder daughter of Air and Mrs J. Broad Excell, Bryn road, Swancsa. The bridegroom was accompanied by his brother, Mr J. S. Morgan, as best man, and the bride, who was given away by irer father, was attended by two bridesmaids, Miss Aldwyth K. Morgan and Miss Kathleen Excell. Those who witnessed the ceremony included the parents of both bride and bride- groom. The happy pair who were the I c- oipients of many useful and valuable pre. eents, N'O spending their honeymoon in Scotland. SAD ACCIDENT.—A fatal accident occurrej to a woodman named George Pearce. on the 20th inst. Along with Mr W. Jones, Goitan- goch, Llandilo, he was engaged at Capel Hjr farm in felling an ash tree. Both men stood one each side of the tree, on the top of the hedge. Before they were prepared to see the I tree topple over, a sudden gust of winl occurred. They had nearly cut through the trunk. The gust caused the tree to fall sud- denly on the side on which Pearce stood, It fell on him, and right across his chest. His fellow workman Jones jumped on to the roa 1 and just heard Pearcc ive one groan before he died. The tree proved to be somewhat rotten. Mr R. Shipley Lwis, coroner, held an inquest on the body on the 21st inst, when a verdict of accidental death was returned.

I PEAIRROKE MAN ON E13

PEAIRROKE MAN ON E13. Among those killed by the enemy in their attack upon the British submarine E 1;, when stranded on a neutral #10re, was LeaJ- ing Stker AViiliiliiaim iHayes Thomas, son of Mrs Thomas, of Slade, near Pembroke. Thomas was one of the two Pembrokeshire men who were on the Pathfinder when sho Was torpedoed in the North Sea last Septem- ber, the other man, AVilliam Geo. Sheldon of Pembroke Docfk, being drowned. Tffcnias was then in the water an hour and a quarter before he was picked up.

What the Germans Say of Themselves

What the Germans Say of Themselves. SOLDIERS' TELL TALE DIARIES. The "Committee of Alleged German Atrocities" has published as a sixpenny Blue Book a large unmber of original docu- ments. Pro-Germans might object to evidence given by victims. A Jena Pro- fessor said that the Belgians were the vic- tims of deusions caused by excitement. He said this quite fs-oriouely Kuno Aleycr, who is well known at Carmarthen, said that these tales were merely "folk-lore." born of every war" Every German; soldier carries a diary. The committee print in the Blue Book ex- tracts from German soldiers' diaries. Photographs of the pages are given in the appendix. Here are a few extracts. HERA1.AXN Translation. (A letter written by one. Hermann (evi- dently Christian name), to his parents and brother, from Vievi lie, near Lens, dated 11th October, 1914):—Then we marched as far as Douai, where we had a long rest, and in the morning we had with our breakfast (dry bread), Champagne. Pont a Yendin.-In one house we found a store of about 100 boxes, which contained sardines in oil packed in tins of course every one took what he could carry—I, also, 30 tins. One must in fairness say that our soldiers take only food, also wine, and those who require it also underwear; apart from that we do no plundering. I myself, have already taken shirts and pants, that is necessity, because nothing is replaced by the Army. AVe can no longer wash our things, because rest days are a luxury It is not prohibited, nobody says anything Here is an episide of the street. fighting. A platoon of the 4th Company lay well covered oppo- site the railway station. One saw an old woman coming from the direction of the railway station, (there was no shooting) in our direction She gesticulated and ran along the whole front of the platoon. Then she again disappeared into a house, and she was hardly in it when the French fired at this platoon like mad The result was the platooon had to go back, but with a loss of three dead. and two seriously, and eight slightly wounded. (Strength of platoon 48 men). In this way one can report a lot of all the little fights. The woman was shot later on in the town as a warning example. The 9th Company had caught three civilians who had fired. AVhen storming a barricade (every street was barricaded), lie (the officer) had these three driven in front of the firing line, all three were .shot by their own country men. JOH. VAX DER SCHOOT. Translation Reservist of the 10th Company. 39th Reserve Infantry Regiment, 7th Reserve Army Corps:—16 Aug.. liege. The villages we passed through had been destroyed. In the night of the 17th to the 18th at Liege 40 railway pioneers and 2 officers were killed, the houses were destroyed, otherwise the people are quiet, but only from fear. Aug. 19. In the morning at Utterich: Wynken, 10 o'clock, marched out: quartered Univer- sity Afternoon frolicked and boozed through the streets of Liege. lie on straw, enough booze, little food, or we must steal. Aug. 20th—March out as escort for prison- ers to Cologne, 11 o'clock at Cologne, depart 12.15. In the night the inhabitants of Liege became mutinous.. Forty persons Were shot and 15 houses demolished, 10 soldiers shot. The sights here make you cry. Aug. 21st.—Everything quiet during the day; in the night soldiers were again fired on. we then demolished again several houses On the 23rd August everything quiet. The inhabitants have so far given in. Sev- enty students were shot, 200 kept prisoners. Inhabitants returning to Liege. Aug 24th.—At noon with 36 men on sen- try duty. Sentry duty is A 1, no post anoea,te.d to me. Our occupation, apart from bathing, is eating and drinking. We live HKe God in Belgium. AIATBERN. Translation. (4th Company of the Jager Xo 11. from Marburg). Aug. 6th crossed frontier.—In- habitants very good to us and give us many things. There is no difference noticeable. Aug. 12th.—The (French) aviator recently fired ti on. was again fired on by dragoons of guards and had to come down He had pre- iously thrown down a letter to the mayor of Bastogne asking him for help, and that lie should meet him at an appointed place. This mayor was shot. Aug 23rd, Sunday (between Birnal and Dinant, village of Disonge)—At 11 o'clock the order come to advance after the artillery had thoroughly prepared the ground ahead. The Pioneers and Infantry Regiment 178 were marching in liont. of us. Near a small village the latter were fired on by the in- habitants About 220 inhabitants were shot and the village burnt-artillerv is continu- ously shooting—the village lies in a large ravine. Just now, 6 o'clock in the afternoon the crossing of the Maas begins near Dinant. All villages, chateaux, and houses are burnt down during the night. It was a beautiful sight to s.ee the fires all around us in the distance. Aug. 24th.—In every village one finds only heaps of ruins and many dead. Aug. 26th.—In the afternoon at 4.30 we crossed the French frontier amidst great cheering. Now come the good hours. Eggs, wine and champagne we fairly bathed in. We have never had such a time after four days of starvation. Aug. 27.—This night we lived gorgeously and had a nne time. We had champagne, cream, poultry and wine. Xo. 29. Translation. 23rd October. 1914.—Some aviators flew over us and several infantry bullets whistled over our heads. It wa assumed that they came from francs-tireurs. A house was burnt down and some people locked up. In advancing I aii- a terrible picture. In tho meadow lay a man and his dead wife-cleariv- the parents of a child of about five- years wandering about wounded. I would have liked to have. taken the poor youngster into safety, hut duty called me to lead my men on. The child cried pitiably. All houses round about us were burning—probably also the home of the child." Are wo to believe that the German soldiers took the trouble to write these lies about themsetve.s and then arranged to get killed or captured by the enemy so as to provide bogus documentary evidence. Occasionally one comes across a soldier recording these things with shame; but in the vast majority of cases the. German soldiers gloat over their brutality. Evidence to hand show that when the Ger- man officers requisitioned articles of small value for the use of the Army they gave genuine receipts. But when valuable articles Ave re taken away, the receipt was signed ''Her Hauptmann von Koepeni.ck." This fact in a Blue Book just published by the Committee on German Atrocities. The re- port of the Committee does not explain that the fictitious name given refers to a well- known hoax and is the German equivalent of "Bill Bailor."