Teitl Casgliad: Carmarthen weekly reporter

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Llun 1 o 4 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
6 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
Advertising

THE BLACKSTONE T CK OIL ENGINE THE GREATEST LABOUR SAVER on the FARM. SIMPLE RELIABLE ECONOMICAL. Never Beaten in Competition. < Several Sizes. can be seen actually at work, at our Market Depot. WE SUPPLY A 5 h.p. "PETTER'S" OIL ENGINE FOR A32. ALL SIZES OF PETROL ENGINES IN STOCK. W e are Sole Agents for the Celebrated I "INTERNATIONAL" PETROL ENGINES. u P R L E G EXPERT ENGINEERS sent to all parts of the country. ESTIMATES FEEE. W. TlltliS k mx AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERS, CARMARTHEN. Bedstead Showrooms-5, St Mary Street. Furniture Showrooms—i, St Mary Street, 33 Quay Street. Branch—9, Priory Street. Farm Implements—Market Place, Carmarthen, Llanelly, Llandyssul, and Llanybyther. EORGEO' PILLS A MARVELLOUS REMEDY. For upwards of Forty Years these Pills have held the first place in the World as a Remedy for PILES -qucl GRAVEL, and all the common disorders of the Bowels, Stomach, Liver, and Kidneys; and there is no civilized Nation under the Sun that has not experienced their Healing Virtues. THE THREE uRMS OF THIS REMEDY: No. I-Ge0rgG'S Pile and Gravel Pills. I No. 2—George's Gravel Pills. No, 3—George's Pills for the PHes. M everywhere in Boxee, la. ld. and 2s. 9d. each. By Post, Is. 2d. ana 2s. lOd PR$PMEMR-J. E. GEORGE, H>JKJP.&> HIBWAIN, AnERDAII. -PRINTING! PRINTING! eirood CHUJAP AND EXPEDITIOUS PRINTING EXECUTED AT THE I "REPORTER" PRINTING & PUBLISHING OFFICES, 3 BLUE-STREET OARARTHEN I ORDERS BY POST receive prompt I and careful attention. p l ICE S ON IPPLICATION. J- The Carmarthen Weekly Reporter PUBLISHED EVERY THURSDAY EVENING, Circulates throughout South Wales generally, and has the LARGEST IRCULATION IN THE COUNTY OF CARMARTHEN l PEIGB ONSPKFNY; POST Fit z 1119 PEB QCABIKB .THE BEST ADVERTISING MEDIUM tOR ALL OTAAASS OF ADVE XTISEMEKTS. NOTICES TO QUIT FROM LANDLORD TO TENANT AND TENANT TO LANDLORD. Ma be obtained at the "REPORTICH OYFICB," Blue-street, ICarmarthen. PRICE ONE PENNY. x STOP ONE MOMENT x Oh. Dear Doctor MUST Iffy Darling die? There is very little hope, i But try TUDOR WILLIAMS' j PATENT BALSAM OF HONEY. WHAT IT IS Tudor Williams' Patent Balsam of Honey Is an essence of the purest and most effica- cious herbs, gathered on the Welsh Hills and Valleys in their proper season, when their virtues are in full perfection, and combined with the purest Welsh Honey. All the in- gredients are perfectly pure. WHAT IT DOES I Tudor Williams' Patent Balsam of Honey Cures Coughs, Colds, Bronchitis, Asthma, Whooping Cough, Croup, and all disorders of the Throat, Chest and Lungs. Wonderful Cure for Children's Coughs after Measles, it is invaluable to weak-chested men, delicate women and children. It succeeds where all other remedies fail. Sold by all Chemists and Stores in Is., 2s. 6d., and 4s 6d. bottles. Great saving in purchasing larger size Bottles. WHAT IT HAS DONE FOR OTHERS. What the Editor of the "Gentlewoman's Court Journal" says:— Sir,—The result of the bottle of your splendid Tudor Williams' Balsam of Honey is simply marvellous. My mother, who is over seventy, although very active, every winter has a bronchial cough which is not only distressing, but pulls her down a lot. Its gone now. With best wishes for your extraordinary preparation. W. Browning Hearden. YOU NEED NOT SUFFER! Disease is a sin, inasmuch that if you act rightly, at the right time, it can, to a great extent, be avoided. Here is the preventative The first moment you start with Sore Throat tae a dose of TUDOR WILLI AMS' PATENT 1 BALSAM OF HONEY. It has saved thousands! It will save youl It is prepared by a fully qualified chemist, and is, by virtue of its composition, eminent- ly adapted for all cases of Coughs, Colds, Bronchitis, Esthma, etc., it exercises a dis- dinct influence upon the mucous lining of the. throat, windpipe, and small air vessels. so that nothing but warmed pure air passes into the lungs. It's the product of the Honeycomb, chemically treated to get the best results. The Children like it, THEY ASK FOR IT So different from most medicines. I Nice to Take Cures Quickly For vocalists and pablic speakers it has no equal, it makes the voice as clear as a bell. Manufacturer Tudor Williams, MEDICAL HALL, ABERDARE. If' TO POOR RATE COLLECTORS, ASSISTANT OVERSEERS, &c. FORMS of Notice of Audit, Collector s Monthly Statement, &c., Poor Rate Receipt Books, with Name of Parish, Particulars of Rate.&cc., printed in, can be obtained at the 'REFORTZB OFFics at Cheap Rates. Send for Prices. THE CARMARTHEN BILLPOSTING COMPANY, NOTT SQUARE, CARMARTHEN, BILLPOSTINGand ADVERTISINGin all its JD Branches, throughout the Counties of Carir then, Pembroke, and Cardigan R. M JAMES. Manager. Carmarthen County Schools. THE GRAMMAR SCHOOL. HKADMASTEB E. S. ALLEN, M.A (CANTAB). COUNTY GIRLS SCHOOL HEADMISTRESS Miss B. A. HOLME, M.A., Late Open Scholar of Girton College, Cambridge. FEES:— £ 1 9s. per Term (inclusive). Reduction when there are more than one from the same family. The next term begins Wednesday, September loth. The Headmistress (at the Girls' School) and the Headmaster (at the Boys' Sohool) will be pleased to hee the parents of new pupils from 11 to 1 on Saturday September 11th and from oO to 5 on Tuesday, September 14th. Boarders can be received at the Grammer School. IVE CLAIM THAT 2/9 :D:E?,i TYES DROPSY, LIVER, AND WIND PILLS cm Constipation, Backache, Indigestion, Heart W eak- ness, Headache, and Nervous Complaints. Ma. John Parkin, 8, Eden Crescent, West Auckland, writes, dated March 12th, 1912 "I must say that they are all that you represent them to be, they are splendid, indeed I wish I had knowD about them sooner. I shall make their wortn known to all who suffer from Dropsy." Sole Maker- S. J. COLEY & CO, 57 HIGH ST, -STROUD, A LOS. WEDDING CARDS. # NEW SPECIMEN BOOK CONTAINING LATEST & EXQUISITE DESIGNS Sent to intending Patrons at any address on reoe pt of an intimation to that effect. PRICES TO SUIT ALL CLASSES. REPORTER" OFFICE 3, BLUEST.

I I Mr Lloyd George at Trades jCongress

I ——— — Mr Lloyd George at Trades Congress. m STRAIGHT TALK TO LABOUR. Mr Lloyd George in his address to the Trades Congress at Bristol on the 9th inst., said: If you want to realise what organised labour in this war means read the story (f the last 12 months. By the end of Septem- ber the German armies were checked. 'J boy sustained an overwhelming defeat in Fiance. Russia was advancing towards the Carpn- thians and, I believe, in East Prussia. That is not the case to-day. Why? The German workman came m. organised labour in Ger- many prepared to take the field. they worked and worked quietly. and continuously, without stint or strike, with; tit restriction for months and months HIM ugh the autumn, through the winter, and through the spring. Then came that terrible avalanche of shot [ and shell which broke the great Rcssian armies and drove them back. That was i lie j victory of German workmen. The German advance in Russia is the victory of German Trades Unionism. It was not Von Hinden- burg, nor Von Mac-ikensen, nor any other von. It was the workmen who won it. The war has resolved itself into a conflict between the mechanics of Germany and Aus- j tria on the one hand. and the mechanics of Great Britain and France on the other. The sooner we understand that—Government and people—the better it will be for ultimate vie- tory. I believe the British workman is the better workman of the two (hear, hear) and if he chooses to ptH his back into it lie is going to win in the end (cheers). That is the appeal I have to make to organised labour in this country. I was talking a few days ago to the Com- mander-iin-Chief of the British Armies in France. He said lie had seen a good many soldiering days, but he had never witnessed troops more fearless, mere contemptuous of death—men who were ready at the word of command to face any odds—than the troops he commanded (cheers). I am here to ask you to back them up (cheers). We must make —we are making—the most prodigious efforts to increase our war material dining the next few months in order to give our gallant fellows fairplay in the field. This country, at the present moment, is not doing its best. is not doing its utmost, and it is almost entirely—not entirely—a labour problem, and you alone can assist. I am not going to. tell you what I am doing with the employers, but you must allow me to put before you the whole of the facts, quite can- didly. and develop them in my own way. I The machinery of this country which could be employed for war material is not working night and day. You have only got 15 per cent. of the machines which you can use for the turning out of rifles, cannon, and shells j working night shifts. If you could get plenty cf labour to make these machines go night and di 'v-ali, just think of the lives that would be saved! Proceeding. Mr Lloyd George gave further instances where output had been restricted by Trade Union officials, and called particular attention to an instance at an ordnance works where a note had been circulated amongst the men urging them to protest against a workman who had turned out a howitzer in 8 hours instead of taking, as the men contended. 31 hours to do the work. ("Shame.") "That is the kind of information. I am sorry to say," said -Mr Lloyd George, "we are getting from a considerable number of works. It means that there is a deliberate attempt to restrict the output of guns which are "ita.1 for the protection of the lives of our men at the front. Deliberately! Is there anyone here who will defend action of that kind? (loud cries of "No.") Then I have nothing more to say." After all, there are hundreds of thousands of representatives of Trade Unions who have gone to the front, and I want you to give these brave lads fairplay. Restriction of output docs not mean fairplay to them. Mr Lloyd George also quoted a case at Woolwich where an attempt had been made to keep down the output. Before the Labour Advisory Committee a Trades Unionist gave evidence, and he regretted having to acknow- ledge that the workmen in several depart- ments restricted output in order to maintain prices. This practice obtained before the war, and was continued up to the present time. "That is not carrying out the bargain." exclaimed Mr Lloyd George. (A Voice: No; it is not playing the game). Continuing, Mr Lloyd George said that the other day lie had a visit from a very dis- tinguished Socialist—the greatest Socialist orator in Europe. He referred to lion. Vandervelde. No man would challenge his sympathies with labour. He was the greatest living champion of labour, the most eloquent champion of Labour in Europe, and lie came to complain of cases which had happened even with Belgian workmen. The Belgian workman had several reasons for putting his back into his work and pro- ducing munitions of war. but when they worked their best they had been warned that they were breaking some Trade Union custom and had been invited to desist. They did not understand it their homes had been destroy- ed Belgium, their land, had been ravaged j and trodden upon, and Belgian women had I been dishonoured. Belgian liberties had been trampled under foot: Belgium was wiped out as a country under the German heel, and Belgian workmen could not understand en- tering tinto a conspiracy to keep down the output of rifles, guns and shells, to drive the oppness< r from the land winch he had trampled. Jf there was any man who wanted to play when his country was bleeding, let him have the decency at least not to appeal to Belgian workmen not to avenge the dishonour of their country. Why .should I pretend? J was hronght lip in the workman's home. There is nothing you can tell me about the worries and anxieties of labour that I do not know for the first 20 rears of my life. The greatest nobleman I ever met was an old woikmau. He writes me everv day at 81 years of age. T get his lottei- every morning telling me how to put the world right (laughter) and. if you will allow me to say so. however busy I a.m, I never miss writing to this old British workman, and the tenderness I received at the old workman's house will always, if for no other reason, make me the friend of labour. But I beg of yoii. as men brought up in work- men's homes, not to set the sympathy of the world against labour by holding back its men. by regulations and customs when the poor old land is fighting for its life. Let us be one people, and we shall march through to the greatest triumph that liberty has ever yet achieved in any land (loud and prolonged clleers).

National Eisteddfod

National Eisteddfod. THE POSITION" AT ABERYSTWYTH. The Mayor of Aberystwyth (Alderman Morris) presided over a special meeting of the Executive Committee of the Aberystwyth National Eisteddfod, held at the Town Hall on Friday night Professor Edwards pre- y I sented The report of the deputation to the National Eisteddfod Association at Bangor, and said there was a stron desire expressed by the Gorsedd and the Eisteddfod Associa- tion that the Eisteddfod of 1916 should be held at Aberystwyth The programme sub- mitted by the deputation was regarded as one of the best ever produce. (Hear, bear) Mr Lloyd George, who was present at the Eisteddfod Association meeting, urged upon the deputation the importance of holding the Eisteddfod in a modified form, and pledged himself to attend the meeting at Aberyst- wyth. Mr Jenkin James, lion (secretary, read a letter from Sir E. Vincent Evans, of the National Eisteddfod Association, stating that if Aberystwyth found itself unable to hold the Eisteddfod, the Gorsedd and Eistedd fo ,I Association reserved the right to hold the Natnional E'steddfod elsewhere in 1916. The Rev Charles Evans said lie thought that was something like coercion. ("No. No"). Professor Edwards said that was far from the intention fo the Association. Alderman D. C. Roberts said he did not think they need go so- far as to decide tha.t night. He did feel that it would be quite ■impossible for them to hold the Eisteddfod when that decision was first reached, but he agr eed that what had occurred at Bangor had altered the circumstances. In the light of the strong appeal made by 11r Lloyd George he thonht it was their duty to reconsider the matter very carefully. He presumed it would not be necessary to erect a pavilion, but that a marquee might be used. This point and others required consideration. He would like to know if the Eisteddfod Associa- tion would be prepared to assist them finan- cially. and he suggested that the guarantors should be a-Iced to instruct the Executive Committe etc obtain that information. Professor Edwards said that not a, single member of the Eisteddfod Association would expect them to g!o to the cost of erecting a pavilion. The idea was to hold a really National Eisteddfod on modified lines He thought that a marquee capable of accom- modating 5,000 might be seen red It was agreed that a committee should ob- tain fuH information to lay before another meeting of the guarantors as to the desira- bility of holding the Eisteddfod in a modi- fied form in 1916. The resolution was also adopted by the meeting of uarantors heM the same evening.

Pembrey Railway Fatality

Pembrey Railway Fatality. SOLDIER FOUND DEAD. On Monday morning the driver of a goods train on the Great "Western Railway noticed the body of a soldier in uniform on the up- line near the old Ashburnham crossing. Pem- brey. Oil. reaching Kidwelly he advised the railway authorities, who at once communi- cated with Burry Port. P.S. was soon on the spot, and found .he I-o,v badly mutilated. He had it conveyed to ilie mortuary a.t Pembrey. and finding that the man belonged to the 2nd-5th Welsh Rai- ment he communicated with the mdlitary authorities, with the result that the body was identified as that of Pte. Robert Stephens, a single man, who resided at De Winton-terrace Llwynypia.

THE SUPPLY OF HOMEGROWN BEEF

THE SUPPLY OF HOME-GROWN BEEF. We fear that our supply of home-grown bed will be kept up only with great diffi- culty in fact, it must decrease, for farmers will be sorely tempted to seU freely at the present high prices rather than hold their cattle under difficult conditions. The hay crop was light, and much of it badly got. and all the old stocks have been entirely used up. Oil cakes aud other feeding stuffs arc ab- normally high in price, and except for man- gels the prospect for roots is much below the average. Swedes especially made too late a start to produce a good crop. — "Agricultural Economist and Horticultural Review."

WORK FOR THE VTC

WORK FOR THE V.T.C. At an inspection of Malmesbury Volunteer Training Corps at Malmesbury on Monday, Colonel Steward said they would be glad to see by his presence that the War Office now Recognised the Volunteers and were taking steps to sec how they might be utilised. The Government had sent to the General Officer Commanding the Southern Command to have all the volunteer training corps in the various districts inspected. He (Col. Steward) was required, in abedience to that order, to re- port on the drill efficiency of the corps, and to obtain particulars of the numbers, arms, uniform and equipment. This information was required with a view to the employment of the Volunteers in guarding water works, ra h\ ays and certain prisoners, so as to re- lease other available men of the Regular Army for service in the immediate sphere of war operations.