Teitl Casgliad: Carmarthen weekly reporter

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Llun 1 o 4 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
2 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
Advertising

t Y T IT 7" w T THE BLACKSTONE 1 JL 1 1 \_7 S OIL ENGINE THE GREATEST LABOUR SAVER on the FARM. SIMPLE RELIABLE ECONOMICAL. Never Beaten in Competition. ¡' Several Sizes can be seen actually at work at our Market Depot. I WE SUPPLY A 5 h.p. "PE'I"l'EB,'S" OIL ENGINE FOB iC32 ALL SIZES OF PETReL ENGINES IN STOCK. We are Sole Agents for the Celebrated "INTERNATIONAL" PETROL ENGINES. EXPERT ENGINEERS sent to all parts of the country. ESTIIMZA-TIEUS FREE. !£-. T&T W. TiiiJiM "& m\ oil ACRIGULTIIRIL ENGINEERS, offempol I, Bedstead Showrooms-5, St Mary Street. Furniture Showrooms-I, St Mary Street, 33 Quay Street. Branch—9, Priory Street. Farm Implements-Market Place, Carmarthen, Llanelly, Llandyssul, and Llanybyther. EORGE LEto G ILLS A MARVELLOUS REMEDY. For upwards of Forty Years these Pills have held the first place in the World as a Remedy for PILES and GRAVEL, and all the common disorders of the Bowels, Stomach, Liver, and Kidneys; and there is no civilized Nation under the Sun that has not experienced their Healing Virtues. THE THREE i URMS OF THIS REMEDY: No. I-GeQrge's Pile and Gravel Pills. No. 2—George's Gravel Pills. No. 3—George's Pilis for the Piles, B)id everywhere in Boxer., Is. lId. and 28. SId. each. By Post, Is. 2d. and 2s. led PHOPRlLtfOB—J. E. GEORGE, M.R.i\S„ IIIMWAIN, ABEBDAKE. 4 -'t. t ('" PRINTINGjJWING! GOOD CHEAP AND EXPEDITIOUS PRINTING EXECUTED A.T THE 1 11 Pt E P 0 n fl" r4. IR99 t PRINTING & PUBLISHING OFFICES, 13 BLUE-STREET I CJ.A.IR-IMr.A.IELTIIEjSr ORDERS BY POST receive prompt and careful attention. J^> RICES ON ^P PLICATION. The Carmarthen Weekly Reporter I PUBLISHED EVEBY THURSDAY EVENING, Circulates throughout South Wales generally, and has the LARGEST IROULATION IN THE COUNTY I OF CARMARTHEN PaioB ONE PENNY POST FBBB 1/9 PBB QUABIBB THE BEST ADVERTISING MEDIUM FOR 4LL CT A3SHS OF ADVEILTISEMENTS. NOTICES TO QUIT FROM LANDLORD TO TENANT AND TENANT TO LANDLORD, Ma be obtained at the REPORTER OFFICE," Blue-street, iCarmartheu. i PRIOE ONE PENNY. ) 1 ■■■ ft X STOP ONE MOMENT Y Oh Dear Doctor MUST My Darling die? (There is very little hope, But try TUDOR WILLIAMS' | PATENT I BALSAM OF HONEY. WHAT IT IS Tudor Williams' Patent Balsam of Honey Is an essence of the purest and most effica- cious herbs, gathered on the Welsh Hills and Valleys in their proper season, when their virtues are in full perfection, and combined with the purest Welsh Honey. All the in- gredients are perfectly pure. WHAT IT DOES I Tudor Williams' Patent Balsam of Honey Cures Coughs, Colds, Bronchitis, Asthma, Whooping Cough, Croup, and all disorder of the Throat, Chest and Lungs. Wonderful Cure for Children's Coughs after Measles. It is invaluable to weak-chested men, delicate women and children. It succeeds where all other remedies fail. Sold by all Chemists and Stores in Is., 2s. 6d., and 4s 6d. bottles. Great saving in purchasing larger size Bottles. WHAT IT HAS DONE FOR OTHERS. What the Editor of the "Gentlewoman's Court Tournal" says:- Sir,—The result of the bottle of your splendid Tudor Williams' Balsam of Honey is simply marvellous. My mother, who is over seventy, although very active, every winter has a branchial cough which is not only distressing, but putts her down a lot. Its gone now. With best wishes for your extraordinary preparation. W. Browning Hearden. YOU NEED NOT SUFFER! Disease is a sin, inasmuch that if you act rightly, at the right time, it can, to a great extent, be avoided. Here is the preventative The first moment you start with Sore Throat tae a dose of TUDOR 'VILLIAMS' -P -,4. r-r El IT r-I I BALSAM OF HONEY. It has saved thousands I It will save you I It is prepared by a fully qualified chemist, and is, by virtue of its composition, eminent- ly ada-ploil for all OiMyt,o otf 0-12 "I must say that they are all that you them to be, they are splendid, indeed I wish I known about them sooner. I shall make their wortb known to all who suffer from Dropsy." SoleMakar— S. J. COLEY & CO, 57 HIOH ST, STROUD,BIOS. r WEDDING CARDS. NEW SPECIMEN BOOK CONTAINING LATEST & EXQUISITE DESIGNS t Sent to intending Patrons at any address on race p4 of an intimation to bhat eJect. PRICES TO SUIT ALL CLAbSkb. | REPORTER n OFFICE 3, BLUEST.

I ILLAiSDILO POLICE COURT

=== LLAiSDILO POLICE COURT. A case in which considerable interest was taken as evidenced by the crowded state of the court, was heard at Llandilo on Saturday when Win. Morris-, an auctioneer, resident at Llangadock was charged with unlawful wound- 'Ug. and Dd Morris, his son, and John Rees Davies with aiding, and abetting. They were also charged with assaulting the two brothers and with obstructing Alfred Rumble in the execution of his duty. Mr T. R. Ludford, Llanelly, prosecuted 011 behalf of the G.W.IL Co., and Mr Marlay Sampson (instructed bv Mr Claud R. Davies, Llandilo) defended. Wm. Thomas Rumble. a signalman. of Llan- gyfelach, Morriston. in the employ of the G.W.R. Co., said that on Saturday the 21st of August lie came to spend the weekend with his brother a signalman at Ffairfach station. He got to the station about 10.45 p.m. His brother was on duty. The crossing gates were then open across the road against the traffic. Witness went into the booking office and was .speaking to his. brother when David Morris came to the door of the signal box and a'k<'d how long he was going to keep. them at the gates. His brother went ntf) I)ox, but witness dfid not know what lie said. He next heard hi,s brother tell Morris to leave the pre- mises. D. Morris was standing in the door- way outside. The signal hex was lit with gas. ThElre was a train due and approaching at the time. His brother's duty was to take the staff out and exchange it and lie pushed past Morris to do so. His brother got to the platform with the staff and lie followed him and held the gate open for Morris to go out. His brother then exchanged the staff with the fireman of the train. Whilst this was being done Dd. Morris and the two others came on to the platform and stopped his brother going to the signal box. They were saying some- thing but he could not hear what as the train was passing. His brother was pushed about by the three and witness went to his assist- ance. One of them (Davies) hit him with his umbrella.There was a struggle then and wit- ness closed with him,. Witness got himself loose and Davies kicked liini. He had pre- viously kicked him on the leg. After re- covering his .balance witness went to help his brother. He left Davies because he saw Gwynne Jones, tine stationmaster's son. and him struggling. His brother was struggling with Wm Morris and his son. Whes he got up to them he hit Wm. Morris. The son then hit witness. Wni. Morris then hit witness on the head with the staff produced. (The j staff it was stated weighed 41 bs). After that (' witness did not know what happened for a time. When he came to himself lie was lying on the ground and Dd Morris was standing II over him. He said to witness "Get up and fight." Witness did get up but was too weak to stand and staggered baclk against the sig- nal box. He then found he was covered with blood. He afterwards went into the station- master s house and had his head bathed 'and later went to see a doctor who put in two stitches. He had not worked since and had been up to now under the doctor's care. He had received his medical certificate of dis- charge that day.—Cross-examined: Defen- dants were drunk. His brother lived at the station house with the station master. The signal box was separated from the booking office. He could go into the booking office when off duty but not the, siglla,1 box. He west there because his brother was there. He wouKi luav-e vo noSh, fol. a 1£ A.L. WAA IWI/ IIIO- brother. He did not require a pass to go to the booking: office They would not permit them to go to the signal box. but lie could not say as to the booking office.-I suggest that so far as the Railway Co is concerned, you would have no right to sit in the booking office? I can't say. The stationmaster's son was not in the employ of the Company. They were talking together there. They were not playing any games The gates were closed across the road before the motor car with the defendants arrived. —Corroborative evidence was given by Alfred Rumble, brother of the last witness1. He said that defendants when they returned to the platform, made a rush for him first of all. They pushed him about a good bit. He had the staff in his hand. 'He was given a smack in the face by Wm. Moms. Davies kicked him. He saiN- liils brother gett- ing the blow with the staff by Wm. Morris. He examined his brother's head. He had a Tiastv gash. Defendant.- were under the in- fluence of drink.—By the Bench: Morris wrenched the staff out ol' my hand. I was prevented from going out by Dd. Morris. From the time the gates closed until the train came through was nine minutes, but defen- dants had not arrived when they were dosed but just after. He told Dd. Morris he had no business on the pi,el-n i,ses. -,Cross-exaiiii nod: He did not say he would keep them there as long as he liked. He asked Dd. Morris to go off the premises. He refused and challenged him to chuck him out. 'Soon afterwards his brother came out and G-wynne Jones came after. Dd. Morris obstructed his brother on his way to change the staff. He saw his brother struggle with the lot and falling down after the struggle with Morris. There was a projection on the spot where he fell. IVIII. Morris struck his brother down. Until the train went through the station the gate could not be opened for .anybody. It was a goods train. There was no car near the gate when he shut them. He heard the motor car horn four minutes after he closed the gates across the road. When the driver of the car oame to the signa1 box and asked the reason he was kept so long at the gate he told him that the. train was approaching and that he would open it as soon as it passed. — AJcwyn Jones, Maerdymaiwr Farm. said he saw W111. Morris catch hold of the staff and hit Wm. Rumble. He also saw a struggle.—Thomas Daniels. Glyncyrcb. said he saw a struggle. Wm. Morris did not go further than the in- side of the wicket gate. He carried 011 um- brella in his hand.—John Wm. Jones, station master at Ffairfach. said that in accordance with the regulations the gates must be closed on the approach of a train and the signalman ivould have no authority to open them until the train got into tire station and passed off. Dr J. R. Evans, Dale House, deposed to nxam;ning Wm (Rumble 011 the 28th August. He had previously been examined by Dr Griffiths, who was in charge during his ab- sence. He S' suffering from a wound on the forehead and the adjacent part of the scalp about 11 inches long. It had been sewn back The wound was consistent with his having been struck on the head with such an instru- ment as the staff produced. A reasonable amount of force would have been iiied to pro- duce the wound. He was not in danger when he saw him. There might be danger of blood poisoning after a wouml of that kind. He had discharged Rumble from his care that da,Dr Griffiths, who first attended him. said that Rumble was suffering from a scalp wound H inches long which extended to the bone. He was then a little bit. dazed and suffering from a headache. He sewed up wound up. It could have been caused by the staff.-INiii. Henry Morris, a detective of the G.W.R. Co.. gave evidence to to statements made by Jones, station- master at Llangadock, deposed that W Morris told him to ask the at Ffairfach not to report the scuffle they had on Satur- day night.—Sergt. Morgan, Llaivdebie, de- posed that Wm. Morris and Davies were under the inuence of drink. Dd. Morris was sobei. -Aftei- a hearing lasting several hours, it was announced that, the prosecution had agreed to withdraw the charge of wounding and also of obstructing the signalman on the defendant pleading guilty to common assault. -—Mr Marlay Samson said Mr Morris would compensate Rumble for any expense he had been put to and for the pain lie had suffered. The charge was very painful to him and he felt very keenly the odium that might have been inflicted 011 him if the charge had been -proved, but lie (Mr Samson) thought if the -) case had gone 011 he would have satisfied the Bench that Mr Wm Morris was not the hand I that inflicted the blow. He very much re- gretted the unfortunate fracas and there might have been faults on l>oth sides, but he (Mr Samson) would ask the bench in consider- ing the penalty they imposed to make it clear they approved of the course Mr Morris had taken in associating himself with his son and Mr Davies and not trying to exculpate himself altogether and that they would show he hacl taken an honourable and commendable course (applause).—After a short retirement, the Chairman said they were glad that the parties had arrived at the decision they had. They were sorry to see respectable men charged with the offences and glad the prosecution had consented to reduce the charge to one of common assault. For the assault upon Wm. Thomas Rumble they would each be fined 309 and for the assault upon Alfred Rumble 5s each. ALLEGED ABUSIVE LANGUAGE. A case which lasted hours was one in which Hariy Cook. Great House. Llangadock, was charged with using threatening and abusive language towards passengers in a London and North Western Railway carriage.—Mr Marlay Samson (instructed by Mr Claud R. Davies, Llandilo) defended. Mr T. C'. Hurley. Llandilo. who appeared for the prosecution, said the defendant whilst travelling 'by the 7 o'clock train ex-Swansea on the 8th June used threatening and abusive language to the passengers. He entered the train as it was leaving Swansea., and Mr S. Thomas, of Tredegar, and Mr Dd. Evan Jones if Llanwrtyd. two witnesses, were in the com- partment. Defendant, who was the worse ■ for drink, made use of improper language on entering the compartment. He went to lileep until they reached Llandilo. when he got out and entered the refreshment rooms. When lie re-entered the train lie accused one of the passengers of having taken the seat he for- merly occupied and used very bad language, calling them 10- sharpers and slackers, and wished to-know why they were not in the a^j He put up hi.> (l-^l auU liu i/aielKHl TO st-llke one of the passengers and said that "he would blow out the b— brains of the pair of them." At the same time he put his hand to his hip pocket. Some naval men came into the com- partment and the communication cord was pulled.—Dd. Evan Jones, builders' supply agent. Llanwrtyd Wells, gave evidence in sup- port of the opening statement and said that defendant used "very corruptive" language. —In cross-examination, witness said he d d not recollect hearing defendant say that he had tried to enlist but that his age was against him and that defendant's son -.iaq in the 4th Welsh. When he came back fro- the refreshment room he called them b- slackers and shirkers. Witness did not complain so much about that as defendant's threat to use a revolver which lie made continually to blow their brains out.—Mr Sidney Thomas who also corroborated said he never had such an experi enüe in his life. He was thoroughly frightened by defendant's conduct. Witness did not hear him saying that- lie was trying to get recruits or that he had been trying to enlist but that his age was against him.—Detective Darrell said that when lie interviewed the defendant, he made the following statement: "When I got into the train at Swansea two other men were in the compartment. They were talking in Welsh, and a remark was pêI. wiiicii 1-tlw iiui lJe. The conversa- tion then turned to 1 +.Kat I did not like slackers and shirkers ana that such slackers and bounders as they appeared to be should be in khaki. I got out at blan- dilo to speak to the guard. W lien I went to the compartment I suppose they did not like my company. "lIen I spoke aoout the war, one of them said 1 did not know what I was talking about, and I sa;d that such slackers as they seemed to be ought to be shot, and that if I bad my way I should not hesitate to do so. I don't carry a revolver and don't use it.-De-feiida,nt Cook denied having used any threats to the passengers or that his language and conduct were abusive and improper. When he spoke of slackers and shirkers lie did not mean the witnesses, but those whom the cap fitted might wear it. He did not threa- ten to strike Mr Jones or blow their brains out. The animosity they might have against him was perhaps because he told them the truth. Mr Thomas was very quiet in the train, but Mr Jones was not so.—Mr James Jones, station master. Llangadock. said he saw the defendant coming from the train. He pa:ic1 him the excess fare from Llandilo to Llangadock. A passenger whose name he did not know complained to witness that the defendant was a German and asked him to send for the police to take him in charge.— Cross-examined He did not complain of the defendant's conduct on the way from Llandilo to Llangadock. nor did he say the communi- cation cord had been pulled.—Mr Marlay Samson submitted that the evidence before the 'bench was not of such a satisfactory char- acter as would enable them to determine to convict. There was the great possible discre- pancy between the testimony of the last wit- ness and that of the principal witnesses1 for the prosecution. The most material moment in the course of events was the way in which the charge was first preferred against a per- son and the person to whom the accusation would be first made would be the station- master who had just told them that the only charge made by Mr Thomas against the de- fendant wa> his statement that he was a Ger- man and that lie ought to be handed to the police. If they accepted the stationmaster's evidence they must come to the conclusion that the description of events as given by Mr Thomas and Mr Jones -was very greatly exag- c)r gerated. Defendant got out of the train at Llandilo to ascertain whether it stopped at Llangadock.—The Bench said they were 17 unanimous in dismissing the case. — THE DLUXK. Sarah Anne Pritchard, Towy terrace. Llan- dilo, was charged by P.C. John Thomas with being drunk in Bridge street at 12 15.3 all Sunday morning the 22nd August. There were previous convictions, the last being in May, 1914. 'She was fined 10s. and the bench intimated that the next time she was charged sh emust attend personally. She was repre- sented by Mr Hugh Williams who plea.ded guilty on her behalf.—Thomas Roderick. Pen- tregwoulaes. Llandebie (against whom there j were 12 previous convictions), was charged hy P.C. Edgar Evans with drunkenness at 1 11.15 p.m.. on the 28th of August.—Fined los. —Benjamin Jones. Typiez-a. Brechfa, was charged by P.C. Richard Davies. with being staggering drunk at (5 p.m. on the 13th August in the village of Xantgaredig. Defen- dant went into the stable of the New Inn, and brought out a horse which he was assist- ed in attaching to a cart. Seeing his con- dition witness told him he was too drunk to be in charge of the horse He was taken home by a friend. Defendant wrote to the deputy chief admitting his offeree and expressing his sorrow This was his first offence. He was not in the habit of taking any drink for the past 15 years Feeling unwell lie had taken sonic I)riiidy.-F iied 10s.—Wm. Peregrine, Cwmnritin. Talley. was also charged with being drunk in charge of a horse, and P.C. Protheroe said he was so drunk that when attempting to mount the horse lie fell off. itness had considerable trouble in locking him up On the way to the station defendant became very nasty and attempted to hit him with a stick. There was a prp- vious oil, 4-1. Dennis l'letcher. a. servant man at Maesyddhirion, was charged with being drunk oil the 18th lilt. in Towy terrace. Llandilo.- Fined Gs.- John Lewis. Glandulais\ Llandilo. charged with being drunk in charge of a horse and cart was fined 15s. P.C. Edgar Evans proved the case.