Teitl Casgliad: Carmarthen weekly reporter

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 4 o 4
Full Screen
16 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
THE PASSING WEFK JT1I

THE PASSING WEFK | J T 1- "Let there IYJ thistles; there are g apw, 11 If old tilings, there are new; Ten thousand broken lights and shapes fet glimpses of the true."—Tenntscn. It would be a y:o-d thing if the Government could arrange a truce for a tortnight so as to give all pessim and pro-Germans a chance of cleai n

THE PASSING WEFK JT1I

ilike by shrinks tfg the adoption of National Service. If British Ficedoill means freedom to refuse to do anything to defend one's country, then the stoner British free do.-a is dead and buried the better.

Advertising

♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ | MOTHER$ Seigel's Syrup i ♦ For weak and ailing jj Thousands have # ♦ stomachs, a sluggish proved (hat its ♦ ▼ liver, or inactive scientific blend of ♦ T bowels, there is no extracts regulates the ♦ i stomach and liver, + A fetter tonic and cor- 'i j i > J X Y ,r and restores tone and + + rectuc than Mother vitality to the whole ♦ ♦ Seigel s Syrup. digestive system. ♦ ♦ IS AN EXCELLENT » ♦ | DIGESTIVE TONIC. | ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦J

CARMAll 1 1JEIS UNDER THE SEAKOHLIGHT

CARMAll 1 1JEIS UNDER THE SEAKOHLIGHT, Come, corne, and s(t you down; you that! not budge, r". shall not go, till I set yon op a glass Where you may see the inmost part of you. Bkakkspsasi. The employment of girls is proceeding apace in various offices in Carmarthen. When one requires an office boy now, an application to the headmistress is likely to bc, more success- ful than an application to a headmaster. **• It is almost incredible, but there really are people in Carmarthen who are in grave doulbts as to the meaning of the letters "G.R." The most popular theory its that it means "George Reigns." It is not a bit of use anybody sug- gesting that the letters represent "Georgius Rex," the Latin for "King George." That is too far fetched. HJUt A statement made in this column last week has been quoted in another quarter, and made to appear as something quite different to that which it really is. It is true that the "Town Council meetings" have been shortened; but that is no evidence at all that there is an economy of eloquence. It means that the business is not done at the "Town Council meetings." What happens is this. The Council meets at 7.30 p.m. The minutes are read and some little formal business done, and at 7.45 p.m. or so the announcement is made "That is the whole of the business." Not a member of the Council leaves the room but all outsiders clear out, and the Council continues to Srit until 8.30 p.m. or possibly 9 p.m. The Town Council meetings are as long as ever; but practically all business is done behind closed doors. It is difficult to understand what earthly object is gained by this policy. No real secrecy is attained or can be attained by such methods. A good deal of trouble has arisen from time to time as to certain things said at Council meetings; but it is curious that it is always over thing said at the private meet- ings. A good many years ago the Carmarthen Town Council decided to consider the ques- tion of purchasing certain property. It was agreed to have a private meeting of the Council to decide what offer should be made. No possible objection could be taken to this. It is essential when anybody intends to bid at an auction that nobody else shall know how far he is prepared to go. Two hours after the "private meeting" of the Council, everybody knew the price which the Corporation was prepared to pay for the property. It would be easy to quote more recent cases of tro-uble following statements made at "private meetings" of the Council. It is a great mistake to fancy that anything is or can be kept from the knowledge of the public when it is discussed at a public body. The facts leak out, and they lose nothing in the telling. *«* The water in the Cwmtawel reservoir is at its lowest pitch. In fact there- is only a little drop in one corner of the bottom. There is not the least chance of the water being turned on "full time" in the immediate future. As fliinL),.q LyninLr an, it Hnos not look fli if we are likely to 'have a full supply of water this side of Christmas. ••• < There really is some mystery connected 11 with our water supply. This is one of the subjects which are never mentioned at the public meetings of the Town Council. For a year or two, Nantowmtawel supplied a reason- able amount of water; but latterly it has been a complete failure. It is very curious that while the, town has been without water for 18 hours a day for months, .not the slightest re- ference has been made to the subject at the meetings of the Council. Not one member has referred to th0 subject in public. The silence is however more elpquent than words. It is not commonly realised that the Boiro magistrates have power to order dogs to be "destroyed" when it is shown that the dog i a public, nuisance On Monday the justices made such an order. It was stated that the owner had already visited on the dog the penalty of his crimes; but the magistrates decided to make the order nevertheless in order to be on the safe side. The Head Con- staible very properly pointed out that there was no legal evidence that the dog was dead. Unless the owner brought the dead dog into court, it is difficult to see what evidence lie could produce, and perhaps if he did that the magistrates might object. **< There are a good many dogs in Carmarthen which ought to be "destroyed." Probably the owners in nine cases out of ten do not realise the savage character of their pets. Even savage dogs are, usually civil enough at home. A dog which is as gentle as a lamb at home is sometimes as dangerous as a savage wolf when he. gets out. The character of the dog at home has no bearing at a.111 on the question of his guilt. It is quite true to say that many dogs are "fond of children." Some of them enjoy a bite out of a child more than they would a mutton chop. Chestnuts are responsible for a good many exciting scenes just now. If you should see a number of boys dropping from a high tree, and an adult pursuing them, you can be quite sure that it is a chestnut tree which is the cause of the trouble. It has never been pro- perly explained why boys are so anxious to get the chestnuts and why their elders are so anxious to prevent them gietting these articles. It is a game on both sides.

Advertising

V0U OAS RELY OS in either SPX, for all Acquired or Constitutional Discharges from Urinary Organs, Gravel, Pains in the Back and kindred complaints. Over 50 years, Success. Of all Chemists, 4s 6d /it ipvpia per box, or sent direct, post free, tor Sixty Penny Stamps by the B41 "ILLS OSSSSSSt. SS&.S? octoSerfairs?

octoSerfairs

2. Abergjwili. 4. Llandilo Bridge. 5. Brynamman, Haverfordwest. 9. Carmarthen, Fishguard. 11. Ll'anfihangel-ar-arth. 12. St. deal's. 13. St. Clears1, Talgarth, Aberayron. 18. Lettcrston. 19. Maenclochog. Haverfordwest, Lampeter, Llangadock. 20. Narherth. 21. Llangadock. ;1.. Llandovery, Newcastle Einilyn and Adpar, Llangadock. 23. Llangennech. 25. Newcastle Emlyn. 26. Pontardulais. 27. Abergwili. 28. Llandilo. 29. Kidwelly, Llanboidy. 30. Kidwelly, Llanybytlier, Pencader.

Carmarthen School of Art 1

Carmarthen School of Art. 1 The annual distribution of prizes in connec- tion with the Carmarthen School of Art was hold at the School on the 23rd ult. The chair was occupied by the Mayor (Mr John Lewis). The Chairman said that lie was afraid that the people of Carmarthen did not take the interest in the school which they ought to take. The School which was established in the year 1854 had only had three headmasters —Mr J. A. Davies,, Mr Horsford (who after- wards became master of the Swansea School), and Mr Wm. Jones, the present headmaster. Three pupils of the school had become head- masters of Art Schools—Mr James Bush, of Cardiff, Mr W. Bush, of Newport, and Mr D. Jones, of Dudley. Amongst other pupils of the School who are Art Masters are Mr W. H. E vans, Woolwich, Mr E. W. Tristram, of the Royal College of Art, Mr J. T. Evans of Hull, and Mr E. O. Jones, of Gloucester, at present serving with the Army in the Dardan- elles. Mr T. Marks, surveyor, of Llandudno, was also a former pupil of the school. The Head 'Master then presented his report as follows Mr Chairman, Ladies and Gentlemen.—1 have much pleasure in submitting to you the report of the School work for the past session. The year has been exceptional owing to the war. The number of students and the regu- larity in attendance was not quite so good as the previous year. 15 of the students of last year have joined the Army or become members of the Red Cross Society. The total number of students attending the school during the session was 94, being 1U less than the previous year and 15 loss than i the average of the three preceeding years. Of this number 65 were eligible students for the Government grant as compared with 68 the previous session. The total hours of attend- ance made was 6247 and for last year 7091. Of the total number 94, the industrial stu- dents numbered 28, school teachers 16, machine drawing class 12, embroidery class 10, and 12 students were from the country area. School Successes. May Morris hasi been awarded the Art Class Teachers Certificate, having submitted satis- factory works and successfully passed the sia examinations required by the Board of Educa. tion. M. Annie Jones and May Morris success- 1 fully passed the examination in Embroidery of the City and GuiMs of London Institute. B. Trivett and E. Lewis having attended for two sessions, the course &et for school teachers, and made over, 70 per cent of attend ances and having done satisfactory work, will be awarded the School Certificate for Teachers At the Test Examination in May, GwiJym Rees was 1st in Freehand and W. Henry Thomas 1st in Model Drawing will be awarded prizes. Mr Grant Murray, the Principal of the Swansea School of Art, adjudicated the School work and selected 20 as deserving of awards. He specially mentioned the Still Life Painting in Water Colours by Tom Davies as being ex- ceptionally good. The Trustees of the British Museum have kindly presented another volume of the School Library—"Reproductions of Illuminated Manuscripts at the Museum." LOCAL AWARDS. Portrait study in pencil: E. May Morris. Landscape from Nature: E. May Morris. Still life (water colours): 1, Tom Davies; 2, May Morris. Painting landscape from copies: Frank Thomas, Jennie Rogers. Shading from the antique: Evelyn Lewis. Painting from the cast: Lilian Davies. Shading from the cast: Edith Harries; commended, D. Pryce. Architectural drawing: Harold Harries. Machine drawing George Twigg. Embroidery Jennie Rogers; commended, L. Collins Davies. Teachers class: Edith Harries. Test examination Freehand, Gwilym Rees; Model drawing, Willie H. Thomas. Preparatory Class. Test examination, Easter term: 1, Arthur L. Davies; 2, William Emlyn Lewis; Emrys Lewis, Bleddyn Waters, Harry Daniels. Summer term: Teilo Thomas. Girls' class Lydia- Williams. Mr D. E. Stephens-Davies said I have been asked to distribute the prizes this evening, and I fee.! that some kind of apology or ex- planation should be forthcoming for my pre- sence here, as as far as what I may call the higher branches of Art are concerned I have little'personal knowledge; the only art of which I have any special experience is that of trying to make a certain class of people pay their debts. The few remarks I intend mak- ing -here to-night I have written out for two rea,sons:-First that in a subject like Art with which I am not in contact (so to speak) often I cannot ,in a speech trust my memory; secondly, I am exceedingly anxious to avoid the use of loose conversational English and 1 can only attain that end by careful prepara- tion of the sentences. Whatever one may think of such phrases as "absolutely ripping" in conversation, let us for heaven's sake keep them out of public addresses, speeches and writings, more part-icularly at an assembly like this, where we have come together to tallk abou-t art. The fact that it is talked about at all rather implies that it is not pro- perly done. The great painters do not speak much- of their art. The greatest scarcely at all. Who does not feel in passing through the Louvre in, Paris. or the Museum in Amster- dam and looking through at the Ian Steyns or the priceless pictures of Remihrandt that we are gazing at something almost above criti- cism. When I have seen in these galleries fine statues and afterwards entered a public assembly I understand well what he meant who said "When I have. been reading Homer, all men look like giants." In the most per- fect human artists there is no doubt added an instinct as much above that of the lower animals as the human body is more beautiful than theirs. Be that as it may human art is dependent upon instinct first and then upon an amount of practice of science and of the imagination which the true possessor of it knows to be incommunicable and the true critic inexplicable except through long process of laborious years and limitless persistency in application. It is not necessary for me here to dweilI upon any of the great common placet) which the follower of knowledge does well to keep always before his eyes and which repre- sent the wisdom of many generations of studious experience. You may have found how good it is to have in your library (how- ever small it may be) three or four of those books to which it is well to turn a few times every week, even if only for a few minutes, after breakfast. Some will choose Milton, others Burke's osg-ayw. To come to what is called lighter literature George Elliot Dickens Thackeray, or Walter Scott's novels. Wiho is not better and in a more cheerful mind for a few minutes with Dick Swiveller, Sam Weller or ENIicawber. Now, Sir, if a. prize giving is. always an occa- sion of lively satisfaction, my own satisfac- tion is all the greater at this moment, because your institute which is doing, I feel sure, such good work in this neighbourhood is the erc-a, tion of people of your own district and is in part at any rate self-supporting. I need scarcely tell anybody here at least that we can only be sure of advancing all kinds of knowledge and developing our national Li-fo ip Pi all its plentitude and variety on condition of multiplying these local centres of art and cul- t-ure mid encouraging each person to fight his own battle and improve his mind in all forms of art to fit him for the battJe of life. When we think how much industry, patience and intelligent discipline, how many hours of hard toil, how many temptations to worthless pleasures resisted are all represented by the young men and the young women to whom I have the honour of giving prizes to-night, we must congratulate ourselves on so much ex- cellence, so many good hopes and such a dis- play of those qualities which are likely to make the world better worth living in, both for ourseli-es aind those who come after us. I need not tell. you that knowledge is worth little until you have made it-so quite your own that you can reproduce it in precise and defini-to form. I once heard an engineer (that is a master of the art) described as a man who can do for a pound what any ass can do for two. As I said here last year I think (what a number of events have happened in the inte- rim) Ars est celaTe artem that is, the essence of art is that it involves no visible or appa.rent effort to obtain its object. A poet again is said to be born not made; if that is so the birth rate in poets must be exceedingly low it is true we don't expect Homers, Miltons, or Shake&- peare's to be born every month; but I think you will agree with me that the birth rate of that section of the community might well be increased, even if at the expense of some other part of the community, e.g., say the Sunday orator in Hyde Park or the corner polishers. If be was put off the list I don't know that he would be missed. It is true we produce a considerable number of people who dash off englynion and verses of various metres, and get hoisted up in chairs in eisteddfodau: all honour to them, but whether we shall produce a. Milton again at an early date is a point which remains to be seen. 1 confess myself (it may foe bad taste) to a considerable li-king for Matthew Arnold of the latter day poetB, and particularly for his Scholar Gipsy, Solirab Rustrum, and Rugby Chapel. On the quest- tion of music it is assuredly unnecessary for me to speak here to-night. I rejoice as much as anyone can at the proficiency of the people in "this district in that particular art. I have attended in t,he past numbers of eiteddfodau and sat on the ceinyciau cefn and heard the same things trachefn a thracefn. An invita- tion such as has been addressed to me to-night is very flattering but at the same time a source of great embarrasment, as I am, as I have already said before, not conscious of any special knowledge which entitles me to address you on the subject of art. Music, eloquence, poetry, sculpture, architecture. These may broadly be said to constitute the fine arts. Plato says that the punishment which the wise suffer, who refuse to take part in the Government, is to live under the government of worse men, and I ask you to consider how much of that observation applies to our local councils here: and the like regret is suggested to all those in audiences as the penalty of abstaining from speaking- viz., that they shall hear worse orators than themselves: that seems to apply to those present here to-night. Nobody here needs to be reminded that the great successes of the, world have been affairs of a second, a third, nay a fortieth trial. The history of literature, of science, of art all testify to the truth that success is only the last term of what lodked like a series of failures. If a man is despondent about his work the best remedy that I can prescribe is to turn to a good biography there he will find that other men before him have known the dreary reaction that follows long sustained effort and he will find the difference be- tween the, fi-rs-t rate man and the fifth-raite lies in the vigour with which the first-rate man recovers from his reaction and crushes it down. J, S. Mill once said that, he always felt profoundly dissatisfied with anything he had written and it was only by reflecting, that he had always felt the same about other pieces of which the would had thought well, that he could bring himself to send the new produc- tion to the printer. I am myself profoundly dissatisfied with the few disconnected remarks I have here jotted down, and it is only by hoping in a sort of forlorn manner that you will pass an indulgent judgment on these im- perfect statements that I have had the cour- age to come here to-night. I now conclude with the story of Pygmalion and Galatea as symbolical of success attending the highest form of art. Pygmalion was a sculptor and saw so much to iblame in women that he re- solved to live unmarried. He however made such a beautiful statue of ivory of a maiden that no living woman could compare with it. His art was so perfect that it concealed itself and its product looked like the workmanship of nature. Gradually he, fell in love with his own creation. He caressed it and gave it ornaments. The festival of Venus was at hand and Pygmaliiion standing before the altar prayed "Ye gods give me I pray you a wife like my ivory virgin.^ Venus who was pre- sent heard his prayer, and as a favourable omen ce/used the flame to shoot up thrice. On his returning home he laid his hands upon its limbs and the veins when pressed yielded to his fingers. His prayer was granted. His statue was alive. The Rev A. F. Mills, proposed a vote of thanks to Mr and Mrs Stephens-Davies for their presence there. Mr Stephens-Davies had come from Tenby to be present and would have to return to Trawstnawr that evening. Mr E. S. Allen seconded the proposition, which was carried unanimously. Mr StephenswDavies in responding said that they had come to the mutual admiration part of the proceedings. He was reminded during one of the complimentary speeches of the re- mark of Mtes Mowcher to 'David Copperfield,

Advertising

it Paralysed I Nerves Another London Wonder-Cure by ia Dr. Cassell's Tablets n ——————— e Mrs- Hanson, of + 67, Ma,eanley-road. T5aet AjHttplQjEMgMk Ham, London, E., 0 gjStf <$S9 i'l'iess catnie 00 iBtfv witih laryngitis. After >3 /xWf\ a time ther« 

No title

"What a refreshing set of humbugs we are; ain't we my sweet child." Mr Henry Howell proposed, Mr D. Marine Jones seconded, and it was unanimously car- diød that a vote of thanks be accorded the Mayor for presiding. The singing of "God Nave the King" con- eluded the proceedings.

The Question of Health j

The Question of Health — — Tho question of health is a matter which u jure to concern us at one time or another when Influenza is so provalent as it ir just now, so it is wefll to know wbat to taxe tc ward off an attack of this mist weakening disease, this epidemic catarrh or cold of an aggravating kind, to combat it whilst under, its baneful influence, and particularly after am attack, for then the system is 10 lowered as to be liable to the most dangerous of com- plainte. Gwilym Evans' Quinine Bitters 11 acknowledged by all who have given it a fair trial to be the best specific remedy dealinc with Itifluenaa in All its various stages, being a Preparation skilfully prepared with Quinine and accompanied with other blood purifying and enriching agents, suitable for the liver, digestion, and all those ailments requiring tonio strengthening and nerve increasing propeities. It is invaluable for those suffer. ing from oolds, pneumonia, or any serious ill nero, or prostration caused by sleeplessness, or worry of any kind, when the body has a general feeling of weakness or lassitude. Send for a copy of the pamphlet of testi- moniaJs, which carefully read and consider well, then buy a bottle (sold in two sices, 2s 9d and 4s 6d) at yout nearest Chemist or Stores, but when purohasing see that the name "Gwilym Evans" is on the label, stamp and bottle, for without which cane, an genuine. Sole Proprietors s Quinin- Bittsas Mantifactiiring Company, limited, liane4 South Wales.

Whitland Hiring Fair

Whitland Hiring Fair. Whitland had its great day of the year on Friday. The annual hiring fair has been the notable event in the calendar of the district since it was established 20 years ago or more. Times however have changed in the matter of hiring. The difficulty is not now for servants to get masters; the trouble is for masters to get men. The fair was very well attended—whatever motive it was which drew the people. The trains from Carmarthen and St Clears were packed. So were those from the Ten by branch. Crowds came in from the Clynder- wen direction, and the Cardigan train dis- gorged a mass of people on the platform. There are certain weekly market days in Whitland on which one is inclined to quote the verse regarding the Icelanders which Long- fellow puts in the mouth of one of the charac- ters in King Olaf What's the use Of this bragging up and down When two women and a goose Make a market in your town. There are market days in Whitland in the middle of winter which are so quiet that one ca-n understand the spirit in which those lines were written. Whitland howecver has its busy days and it is getting more of them year by year; but the, hiring falir is the busiest day of the lot. At mid-day the traveller had to elbow his way through the crush. Those who catered for the public had evidently looked forward to reapiugaich harvest; but the arrangement-s broke down utterly. There were long queues of hungry people waiting wistfully in the passages of the refreshment houses hour after hour. Any impatient per- son who got tired of waiting and who went to seek his fortune somewhere else fared no better there. When he came back to the shop he originally visited he found that he had "lost his turn" and had to take his place again at the bottom of the queue. A good many foiks who would have liked something more substantial had to content themselves with what they could get from the stalls pitched in the roadway. We have had the banana introduced since the latter days of (tueen Victoria; but it is curious how the ideas of stall holders at fairs still oling to apples and ginger bread. If one reads the axjeounte of faiirs held in the Middle Ages, one comes across references to ginger bread and to apples-and one comes across piles of these commodities at any fair in the British Isles to-day—whether it be at Yarmouth or Galway at Penzance or Aberdeen. Why is it? One can scarcely believe that the hawkers go round fairs year after year offering for sale commodities which nobody ever buys. And it is an absolute certainty that nobody buys ginger bread to any extent "through the ordinary commercial channels." And one would think that country people ajre about fed up with apples, and do not need to travel by excursion traing, in order to en- joy the rare luxury of eating apples which are not of any particular high-class variety. Can it be that people who do not usually eat apples and who detest ginger bread are, when they visit a fair, filled with a wild craving which can only be satisfied by huge quantities of these comestibles? Why, by the way, do they CiLtl it ginger bread? In the dim and distant past, there used to be a little ginger in it. As much as two ounces of ginger used to be mixed with a sack of flour. But the gfinger has now become a mere theory. The brown colour of the stuff is produced. by the trroolewirtJh which it is miixed. Another article which is intimately asso- ciiated with fairs is the oocoa-nut. There were various booths in which the marksmen were invited to shy something or other at some- thing else—and as a reward they were given cocoa nuts. When they had the cocoa rnits they did not know what to do with them. Stiilll one could meet young men who were sporting their cocoa nuts as proudly as, if they were V.C.'s. It is. always exceedingly diffi- cult to purchase cocoa-nuts at these fairs. The visitor who approaches the proprietor of the "shies" and offers to buy a cocoa nut is now met with the same kind of look as might be expected from the docitor who was asked to give a. bogus certificate for a fee. It is diffi- cult to understand the reason of this. Per- haps the proprietors have a Union and have signed an agreement not to sell cocoa nuts; the offender found trespassing would probably be struck of the rolls, or diBibartred-or some- thing of that sort. Cocoa nuts have, certainly become very scarce. It is to be hoped that nobody will say that this its because of the war. They are perhaps, being made into soap and1 margarine. If the kernel is used for making soap, one might be more reconciled to to the cocoa nut famine. There is still room for more soap in this world. The shooting galleries aildl a good deal of business. There were plently of able-bodied young men who could be seen aiming at the three yards range. It is almost incredible; but many of them missed! Nobody knows what he can do in the way of missing until he tries. For hitting the target, the youths were rewarded with day pipes. We are still very far from being at the last gasp as a nation. Thare is no other country in Europe which it at war, and in which young men of military age could bo found shooting for clay pipes at a country fair. It would not do to close an account of a hiring fair without some reference to hiring. There were a good many farmers present who had come to look for servants; but there were not many servants who had come to look for masters. Able-bodied men got JE35 to £ 40 a year with board, and t45 was certainly paid in a few Cases. The "boys from the homes" who used to be such a- feature of these fairs have now enlisted. A curious fact was thai, a large proportion of the physical "defectives" was to be noticed in the crowd. There has been a steady drain of the best blood away from the rural districts; this process has bee-i rapidly accelerated by the war. The unfit reo main in the country—and in many p' l-.os they form an undue proportion of the number left behind. A curious fact was that "girls" were quite as scarce as "boys." Possibly Sister Susie is sewing shiits for soldiers. Any- how she is not looking for a job as a milk- maid.

Advertising

ENO"S LIGHTNING COUCH CURE The I»li-;il family remedy. Contains 110 opium, niorj'liinc. i^iro^oric. or other harmful drug. Cures ;it nil ages. C0UGHS.C0L9S & INFLUENZA Veno's is tlie purest a:ul speediest cure for tlie.se winter ills, the Ve?t pro- tection ,,ir're serious dru gers.. „ CHJL.DRENS COUGHS Poon yield to Wi-o's-even Whooping cough" Aid there is no trouble in giving it, children sin ply love Veno's. Othir fins 1/1 end 5/9, i a rdp fl J from, chcmittn and to ret Ol JL tvr.-jnrl.ert. I rial ^S 4* «■ Ititvto, thty art not Bottle jvst at good at Vcno't."

Carmarthen Board of Guardians

Carmarthen Board of Guardians. The meeting of the Carmarthen Board of G-uardisins was held at the Guildhill on Satur- day. Mr Llewelyn Morgan presided at the earlier stage of the meeting, and the Rev A. Fuller Mills afterwards. MASTER'S REP OIIX. The Master in his report stated: "Divine service was conducted in the House on Sun- day, 12th September, by the Rev D. Moss Davies, Treorky, on behalf of Water street C.M. Church. The number of inmates in the House on the last day of the week was 54 against 60 for the corresponding period Last year. The number of casual paupers reLieved during the fortnight was 25 against 55 for the same period last year. Periodicals were kindly .given to the inmates by Miss G. M. E. White, Lady Guardian. Apples were kindly given by Mrs Evans, Greenhill, and also flowers for the sick wards and apples, by Mr Williams, Thornhill. ISAAC RICHARDS AGAIN. A letter was read from the Cardiff Guard- ians stating that Isaac Richards had been ad- 1 mitted to the Workhouse, and they asked the Carmarthen Guardians to accept liability. The Clerik said that Isaa-o Richards had lately been in the Merthyr Tydvil Work- house, but on hearing that it was proposed to send him back to Carmarthen he bad left Merthyr and gone down the valley.

Advertising

FOR OLD AND YOUNG, MORTIMER'S COUGH MIXTURE FOR COUGIIS, COLDS, WHOOPING COUGH, ETC., ETC. — OTER — 70 YEARS REPUTATION i IN THIS DISTRICT. THIS CELEBRATED WELSH REMEDY lm now put up i cartons securely packed for transmission to all parts of the world and contains a Pamphlet, written by an eminent Medical Authority, dealing with the various beneficial uses of thisspecific Price 18 lid and 2s 9d per bottle. TIf. larger bottle is oy far the cheapest.

Carmarthen Rural District Council

Carmarthen Rural District Council. ] A meeting of the Carmarthen Rural Dis- triert Council was held at the Carmarthen Ouildhall on Saturday. Mr W. Williams pre. sided. CLERICAL ASSISTANCE FOR THE 1 DOC'iOR. The Council considered the. matter of pay- ment of clerical assistance for the Medical Officer, of Health on account ot additional duties devolving upon him by fresh legislation The Medical Officer of HeaJth stated that he had formerly paid 7d an hour for clerical work, and that the work could be done in five hours a. week. Rev J. Herbert proposed that the amount suggested be allowed. Mr Stephens suggested that Mr E. Job, Sanitary Inspector, be pa;i.d £10 for the work. He proposed it as an increase of salary. Mr J. J. Bowen said that it was oak of order to increase an official's salary without notice on the agenda. Mr J. W. Lewis proposed that they appoint Mr Job to do the work and allow the amount of the salary to stand over for further discus- sion. Rev J. Herbert moved that they allow £ 7 10s to the Medical Officer of Health for the cleriical assistance, and that they allow the M.O.H. to employ whoever he liked. Mr Stephens said that if they raised the salary of Mr Job by L10 it would only cost them R5 a-s they would get half of it back. Mr J. W. Lewis said that 7 d an hour aa a rate of payment was a disgrace to the Coun- cil'. He did not know whether Mr Herbert would like to work for 7d an hour. Dr Jones aaid that all he had said' was that in former years he had been able to employ clerks at 7d an hour. The motion of Mr Stephens was carried. Mr J. J. Bowen said that he would send a copy of the agenda to the L.G.B. A SLIGHT DECREASE. J The estimates presented for the half-year ending 31st March, 1916, showed that the sum provided: for highways was £8,368 for the whole year. Half of this was £ 4,184. Various expenses brought the amount up to £ 4,699. Sanitary expenses brought the total up to £6,f)65. The receipts were estimated at JE933 leaving £ 4,032 to be raised by a rate as against £4,128 last year. "I

Advertising

B1F0,R,r™E BLOOD IS THE LIFE.-Clarkes .Blood Mixture is warranted to cleanse the blood of all impurities, from whatever cause arising For Scrofula, Scurvy, Eczema, Bad Legs, Abscesses, Pi^i«a S,k-m and Blood diseases Pimples and Sores of all kinds, its effects are marvellous. Over 50 years success. Thousands of testimonials. In bottles, 2s 9d, each of all chemists & stores Ask for Clarke's Blood Mixture and do not be persuaded to take an imitation Oabmarthun Printed and Published by the Proprietress, M. Lawbenok, at her Offices, 3 Blue Street, ITbumi, October let, 1913. 1 4-