Teitl Casgliad: Carmarthen weekly reporter

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 2 o 4 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
14 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
Advertising

I I 1 ESTABLISHED 1854- DAVID TITUS WILLIAMS EOOKEINDEE, ETC, I CHAPEL ST., CARMARTHEN. Magazines, Periodicals and all kinds of Publications Bound to suit the owner's taste. Hymn Books, Bibles, etc., repaired and re-covered. Books Bound in Publishers' Cases at Publishers' Prices. BOOKBINDING TO THE TRADE. Autumn and Winter t Season 1916-160 I Misses LEWIS & CLARE have the pleasure to announce that a Show of High-Class Millinery will be Open to, inspection on and after Tuesday, October 6th, 1915. The favour of a visit is cordially invited. # Cavendish Bouse, 41 Zing Street, ———— Carmarthen. A. EC. STOODLEY, ELECTRICAL ENGINEER & CONTRACTOR GARFORTH, BARN ROAD, CARMARTHEN. Electric Lighting and Power, Private Plant, Bells and Telephones a Speciality. fr All Business will receive my Personal Attention. WATCHES & CLOCKS REPAIRED. JEWELLERY REPAIRED LIKE NEW. GILDING AND ELECTRO PLATING. HIGH-CLASS WORKMANSHIP. ESTIMATES GIVZN ALL WORK GUARANTEED AT JOHN WilliAMS Watchmaker, Jeweller, & Silversmith, 9 & 10 Lammas Street, M;?., r r -T= I OJL^J^A-3BLTI3:B3

LOCAL INTELLIGENCE

LOCAL INTELLIGENCE. COAL AKD LABOUR SAVING ARTICLIS.—During war time SAVE COAL by using the D.D. Fireback and Fire Cheeks. SAVE TIME by using the celebrated O Cedar Mop; a proof of its having given nvery satisfaction, 309 already sold. Save Time, Labour and Worry by using "The Magnet Clothes Washer" does a weeks wash under the hour.—John Colby Evans, General Ironmonger, 122 Lammas Street, Carmarthen. [Advt.

An Interesting Scotch Proverb

An Interesting Scotch Proverb. "Bread; is the staff of life, but the pudding majkas a good crutch.—that is if made with ATOKA Beef Suet. More digestible and economical than if you use raw suet. Ask your grocer for it; refuse substitutes. 10id per lib carton, whether block or shredded, and Ziid per ilb carton.

Retireinent of Mr D Morgan Headmaster of Ffairfach School

Retireinent of Mr D. Morgan, Head- master of Ffairfach School. The place that had known Mr D. Morgan, the headmaster of fairfach School, for 41 years and seven months, will know him no more, as on Thursday the 7th of October he retired from that position. His old scholars and friend-s took advantage of the occasion, by a social lathering in the afternoon and a public meeting 1m the evening, to express their appreciation of his services to the school and locality. At the Tabernacle Sdhool, the scene of his former labours, there was a large gathering of his friends and past and present pupils by whom he was entertained to tea, and on his arTi,val-, along with Mrs Morgan, isB Aldwyth K. Morgan, B.A., Mr Wilfrid P. Morgan and Mrs Wilfrid Morgan, Mr J. S. Morgan and his fiancee, Miss Davies, with her sister, Mrs Bucknell, who for nine years was an assistant at Ffairfach School, he was warmlY received. The schoolroom had been iavisfoiy and taste- fuHy decorated with evergreens, flower, flags and mottoes, nihilist the taSfctes were loaded with delicacies, all of which had feeen freely given by high and low of the locality, and amonggt the contributors were Mre Gwynne- Hughes, Mrs J. L. Thomas, Caeglas, Mr and Mrs Powell, Carregcennen, Mr and Mrs Evan I Jones, iManoravon. The tables were also decorated with a pro fusion of Bowers. Among ilinw whrt mirtnnt nf fAm were Mrs Gwvnne- Hughes, Mr Towyn Jones, M.P. (who had trtu- reHled from Brecon to be present) and Mrs Jones; Mrs Hy. Herbert, Bryrnnarlais; Miss Nichdlas, Rryntedlo; Mirs Roderick, Bryn- amlwig; Mr Gwvnne-Jones, B.A., County •School and Mrs Jones, Mrs C. G. Phidlips, Miss NeiKe Painter, L.L.A., LLandebie, Mr J. Young Davies (an old P.T. of the Tabernacle School). Mrs Williams, Newfoundland Villa, and a large numlber of parents of present and past pupils. In the evenim-a a densely packed audience assembled at the Council School, when Mr D. Morgan was presented with an illuminated address and a cheque. Tito platform was, adorned with plants sent from Tregeyb. Mrs Gwynne-Hiughes presided and was supported on the platform by Mr and Mrs Morgan, Mrs M. A. Jones, iMianoravon, Miss F. A. Thomas, Mr and Mrs L. N. Powell, Mr J. W. Nicholas, Mr J. Picton, Truscoed, Councillor W. Evans, Ammanford, Mr W. Thomas, Mr J. Young Davieq, Mr D. Jones, Mr T. James, and Mr D. M. Thomas. Lady Dynevor telegraphed (from Scotland regretting that. her absence from home prevented her attendance. iMrs HiUhes, in the course of an eloquent referred to the pleasure she had in presiding on the occasion. She was there not on behalf of hersedlf but also of Mr Gwynne Huglies, who wished her to congratulate Mr Morgan on his long and honoured service, and to art-ate that if he Mr (Hughes) had been in Mr Mor- gan's place half the time he would not only have cracked the heads of the scholars but cracked his owln as well (loud laughter). She referred to her connection with Mr Morgan, not onfly wifth regard to his work in school but out of it as and, said it had always been a pleasure to her to converse with him, as he was a man of varied ajcoompHMiments and whatever subjects she discussed with him she always felt she had gaiiined some know- ledge. She had known Ihilm for 33 years and bad always found him Tviilling to take up any work for the good of the community. That he had a good ihertpmeet in Mrs Morgan she well knew. She trusted that for both of them there might be many happy and useful years yet in store. Councillor Wm. Brams. Ammanford, said that along with Mr W. Thomas and Mr J. Young Davies he was ipresent at the Taher- naicite BmilShScihool when Mr Morgan took charge of it in 1872. He described the condi- tion of things when the new master arrived and that up to that time the masters only came to go again, but they had a premonition when Mr Morgan came there he had come to stay. He found them a rough lot, and his love of his work soon told. and a different state of tilings prevailed. His love of singing —'and they had seen that might that he still maintained it-put. the scholliars in tune (laughter). He spoke in eulogistic terms of Mr Morgan's life and work. He was followed in the same strain by Mr W. Tliomas, Monumental Works, Ffaiiirfach, who as was aeen by what had taken place that day had 'been casting his bread upon -the waters and after many days had found it. He had pleasure in -handing him the address, j (This was beautif ully illuminated and bore on I the two upper corners photos of the Ffairfach Council Scinool and of the old Tabernacle School, whilst between them was the WeMi dragon with 'Y ddraig goch ddyry cychwyit" »njd tlhe date October 7th, 1915.The following is a copy of the address "Presented to Mr Da-vid Morgan on his re- tirement from the headmasitetrehip of the i Council School, Ffairfach, Uandi-to. Your J former pupils and friends feel that they can- not allow the occasion of your retirement from the foeadmas/tersliitp of the Ffairfach Council School' to pass by without giving expression to their appreciation of ywf long continued and faithful service. For 41 years you have as- master of the British, Board and Council Schools at Ffair- fadh taught generation 'after generation of boys and girls; to these, we know, you have imet only given valuaiblle intellectual training, but you have jilso by your high standard of life and conduct exerted jjpon them an influ- ence which can only have \v/§Fat Davies, Swansea; Mrs M. A. Thomas, Ystradfellite (School, Aiberdare J, James, ironmonger, ■W* J. Morrilsi, Winchester; Miss Bronwen D&vi&Sj Uaneflly; Mr Wm. Hughes, Central Wale# Emporium, Llandrindod Wells; Miss A. Am- brose, Wimbledon; Mr A. G. Butt, Neath Mrs E. Coley, Bristol; Mrs Abram, Truro; Miss Eavina G. Jones, Jrplpad; 'Mr W. Thomas Cwmgorse; Mr IRdbertnoriias, IJlø,.nqeJbie 'l\'l'r D. J. Davies, ewilicitoi*, Miss Lizssie M. James, Llanelly; tho (Misses Ambrose, RedhiH, Surrey: Mr J. M. FWgiis, Aberdare; Mr Williams, "Pearl" Office, lilanejily. etc. Mr J. Youmg Davies, in the oouise of a rousing speech, dwelt on the virtues of his old master, and said- it gave him great plea- sure on behalf of his pilst and present,pupilis and his many friends to present him with a smiali. token (,in the shape of a cheque for £ 56) of their admiration iØdlrl esteem, and in recognition of his valuable se".ic" rendered to them during the past 41 yeam, a 1 sinoerely hoped he might be spared to iivQ ammgot them for mamy yeiftrs and to enjoy his wetl earned rest. Mrs Gwynne Hughes said she was delighted to see Mr Nicholas on the platformi. He was. suich ian elustiVe an that they had to congratulate themselves on having secavred him for the occasion. She called upon him to address the meeting. (Mr J. W. Nicholas in the course of his re- marks, after paying a high tribute to Mr Mor- gan, said t I know how dreary and monoton- ous and hard to bear is the life of a. school- master in an edementary sdiool, and while there are some compensations, no man can be associated for some 40 years of his life with the education of the young without feeling 4 little pain when he ceasies to have any connec- tion with them. The marching in an out, the patter of feet on the floor; all the familiar sounds lie will miss, -because his labour is ended; there is another to take on his work. Not that it will be impossible to replace him. j Nobody in reality was so important that one I could never fitt his place. I believe his place will be very well fit-led, a very excellent young man. one trained by Mr Morgan himself, has been appointed, almost unanimously, and as is well known the Education Committee al- ways appoint the best men (Oh!) and he seems to be an admirable successor. tMr 0. G. Phillips, Nat. School, was afraid that there had 'been little left for him to say, but he joined most heartily in t,he expressions of appreciation of Mr Morgan, whom he had known for so many years. They had always worked very cordially together. He agreed with what had been 8aidm Mr Morgan's energy. He (Mr Phillips) found time for little leisure, !but Mr Morgan found less. There were days that stood out in his annals, but that day, which he (iMr Phillips) understood was Mr Morgan' birthday, would stand out prominently amongst them. Mr J. W. Nicholas had felicitously compared, his retire- ment to the setting sun. Mr PhiUi.p6 dwelt on the remark very feelingly and in conclusion heartily wished Mr and Mrs Morgan every happiness. On rising to respond tMr Morgan received quite an ovation, and Mr C. G. Phillips lied the audience in "For he's a jolly good fellow.' Hie said he had looked1 forward to that meet- ing with pain and pleasure, pain at the thought that he was now about to take his departure from a stage on which for over 41 years he had been the chief actor, playing his Dart, as ibesft he knew, and if he misbt illatvo by the proceedings that diay, playing it to the satiafactitoin of his ever changing audiences. The pleasure came in at the knowledge that his friends and old scholars were determined to make his departure off that stage as plea- sant as possible. It was on the 31st of May, 1863, that he had commenced to teach, and with the exception of two years he had spent in college he had been teaching for 50 years and five months. That day they were really celerbating three events-his birtMeT, his re- tirement, and his jubiliee as a teacher. The prospect was not a pleasant one to a man who still felt young and vigorous to have to be turned out to gjrass, but the memory of the kindly greetings he had received in the afternoon, of the happy faces by which he had been surrounded, of the appreciative refer- ences in the address, of the 'kind words spoken that evening, of the kind deeds by which effect had been in to those words, and of the other ways in which his old scholars had shewn their attachment to him, would help him the better to bear his exile firom those walls. During the long life he had led at the sohools h was grateful for the splendid health he had on the whole enjoyed. On the aver- age he had only been absent from school through ill-health just a little over one day a year, and since January, 1909, had not been absent a single half day through sickness. It looked as if the older he became the better his frame stood the wear and tear of school life.—After dealing with Mr Nicholas's re- marks, "Mir Morgan pointed out that all the jokes about the police court did not tell against himself, but told some against Mr J. W. Nicholas, of which he (Mr Morgan) related one. He then went cmrbo say that he attri- buted his good health to his total abstinence, his abstinence from smoking, his love of gar- dening and the open air, and that in his wife he had such a good minister of munitions, who always took care that he was well sup- plied with those materiaiHy neceesary to carry on wlhiat was often a stiff warfare within those walls. It was to him a source of joy that so many of hie .old pupils hiad remained true to the teetotal principles he had tried to instil into tlhem, but lie Was afraid that aa far as smoking was concerned, the name of the smokers amongst them was legion. He caused a good deal of laughter by describing the manoeuvring that went on by some of the old boys to avoid 'being seen by him when they were smoking. Between himself and his old scholars he had always tried to keep up a cor- dial relationship, and if there was any sydh- der between them it was due to them and not to him. After dealing with some of the re- cords in his old teg book with which, as well as the sdhool garden, he would regret to part, he appealed to the parents to give his suc- cessor support and not to expect that his ideas of education would correspond with his own. He knew he was an excellent teacher. In conclusion he remarked that at the outset of his remaroks he said he could not trust him- flelf to thank them for what they had done for him and then feilt he could not do it ade- quately for fear a lump would rise in his throat, but with all has heart and eoul lie thaniked them Td cairry out the tea and presentation, a committee of old scholars, along with Mrsi Gwiynne Hughes, Mrs Jones, Manofravon, etc., had been formed, and by universal admittance they had done their work admirably. To Mr D. M. Thomas, as secretary, the success was due for the unstinted time he gave to his work and for the efficient way he carried it out. He was well backed up by Air J. Young Davies, the treasurer, and the chairman and vice-chairman. As representing the school teachers, Miss F. A. Thomas put in a good share of work. During the proceedings an admirable pro- gramme was rendered. It was opened by a hunting chorus, bv bftys of the tapper stand- ards. Mr David liewis, Miss Agnes Williams, Mr David J. Davies, Miss Rachel Jones, Am- manford, Miss Agnes Fox, Mr W. T. Rees, and Mr S. Jenkins, Ammantfbrd, all contri- buted1 soitios, whilst duetts were rendered by Mr S. Jenkins and W. T. Rees and Mr David J. Davies and Mr D. Davies. To the Amman- fprd sjngers${re Crwynne JJughes gave a high and well deserved Jtoead q'f praise. Appro? priate recitations were given by Miss Claudia Evans and Master Emrvs Evans. The girla of the upper standard closed the programme with "Tlie Khaki Song" in character. The singing of the National Anthem and Hen Wlad fy N'hadau brought the proceedings to a termination. BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH. Mr D. Morgan was born at Hafod, Swan- sea, in 15(49, He educated at the Hafod Copper Works School and subsequently served there as pupil teacher and assasiant. He was at the Borough Road Training College in 1870-71 and had as fellow students Mr Tom John and Principal Salmon, now of Swansea Normal College. After leaving college he became master of Portfi British School' in the Rhondda ValHey, and in 1873 was appointed master of the Keyworth Board &hool, Knotte He entered upon his new duties at Ffairfach in 1874. He takes a keen interest in social and religious work in lilandilo and has always been an aoti-vie temperance worker. He was secretary df the Blue Ribbon movement at Llandilo, artd in 1888 assisted jn establishing the .Towy Rechaibite Tent. He has been District Chief Ruler of the Kechabites of Carmarthenshire. He was one of the founders of the English Congregational Church, of which hp has been secretary, and is now a deacon, superintended of the Sunday school, and leader of the singing. He was a member of Caradog's choir, and was indirect ly the means pf establishing the recent re- fi& ii!ng th unions of 1-he aid members. He has also been an active member of the National pnion of Teachers, and has Ibeen president and secretary of the local association and presi- dent of tho Carmarthenshire Teachers' Association. He was the first teacher In the county to establish a school garden. Hiis hobbies are gardening, bee-keeping and botany. In potitics he is a Liberal, and assisted in establishing the Llandilo branch of the Young Liberal League, of whicti he W'f¡, the first president.

Advertising

FOR OLD AND YOUNG. MORTIMER'S COUGH MIXTURE FOR COUGHS, COLDS, WHOOPING COUGH, ETC., ETC. OVER- 70 YEARS REPUTATION IN THIS DISTRICT. THIS CELEBRATED WELSH REMEDY la now put up in cartons securely packed for transmission to all parts of the world and contains a Pamphlet, written by an eminent Medical 4-uthority, dealing with the various beneficial uses of this specific Price Is lid and 2s 9d per bottle. Tks larger lotth it by Jar the oheapett.

Llandilo Board of Guardians

Llandilo Board of Guardians. The fortnightly meeting of this Board was held on Saturday, when there werep-eaent:—Mr Evan Davies (chairman), Lord Dynevor& Messrs Pritchaid Davies, R Matthews. David Davies Arthur Williams, Henry Herbert, W Roberts, W Stephens, D W Lewis, R D Powell, W Wi-liams, John Lewis, J Be\an, John Jones, John Richards, L N Powell, Caleb Thomas, W Hopkins, Gomer Harries, Rev Edred Jones, the olerk (Mr R Shipley Lewis), the deputy-clerk (Mr D Jones Moiris), and other officials. > THE HOUSE. f. The master reported that the number of inmateh was 59 against 58 corresponding period last year. Vagrants relieved for the fortnight 39 against 69 corresponding period last year. Vagrants relieved for the half-year 789 against 1,662 the corresponding half yean TREASURER'S REPORT. The treasurer's report showed that all the parishes had paid and the balance in his hands was jElo9 10* 6d PROFESSOR MKLINI. The Clerk reported that their old friend Professor Melini," whose wife is chargeable to this Union, from whom they had not heard for sometime and who now resides in 1 Edgware Road, London, had following his (the clerk's) last letter sent 30A. He further stated that he would try in the future to remit the amount every four weeks. THE RELIEVING OFFICERSHIP FOR NORTH DISTRICT. The question of the relieving otficership for the North District was again under notice. Mr Matthews asked if it would not be better for the clerk to write to the Local Government Board asking for their sanction to the appointment of Mr Jaines.-The Clerk replied that there was no reason for doing that for the present.—Mr L N Powell said the appoiot- meat of Mr Davies who was acting temporarily was only for the period of the war. Some further dis- cussion ensued and the subject dropped. CHARGE ABILITY AND PROPERTY. The Clerk reported with reference to the property of Ada Jones in the Parish of Llanegwad, that he had written to Mr Lloyd Price, Bryncothi, who replied that (he had left the deeds with him for safe custody and so far as he was aware there was no mortgage or any other charge of any kind on the property. He had no power to consent or dissent as to anything the Board might do in [the matter. He aaw no reason why the place could not be let in the interest of the ratepayers.—The Clerk explained that this matter had been brought forward by Mr Richards a guardian for Llanegwad.—On the proposition of Mr Gomer Harries the subject was further adjourned for a fortnight so that the guardian from the Parish might be present. THE PORfERSHIP AT THE HOUSE. The Clerk said that in response to the Board's Advertisement for a Porter at a salary of t30 a year. he had only received two applications, viz :-from H Greeg, Greenfield Place, Llandilo; and Wm. Ashley, 2 Walter's Road, Ammanford. The first named was 44 and the other 40 years of age. John Evan-, Llandilo Road, Brynamman, had not sent in a fresh application. After considerable discussion the Board appointed Wm. Ashley.—The Master said that he wished to get a man who could make himself gen- erally useful, one who would be able to handle a shovel, as he could do himself, if necessary, and he believed that Ashley who had now been interviewed might be able to fulfil his requirements. He referred to the difficulties he had had with previous porters, some of whom, if the decision had been in his hands, he would not have kept a fortnight. He waa very pleased to see the last one joining the colours as he thought he might improve himself before coming back

Llandilo Rural District Council

Llandilo Rural District Council. Mr Rees Powell, J.P., the ohairman presided over the proceedings at the meeting of the Rural District Council. PLANS COMMITTEE. Mr Matthews reported that the Committee bad only two plana before them that morning, both of which were passed, one of them conditionally on the drainage being carried out in accordance with the bye-laws and they had no reason to think that this would not be done SANITARY. Mr Matthews reported the the guagings of the springs had been again taken during the dry weather and the committee had come to the conclusion for the figures that there was not only sufficient to meet the present requirements in Bettws Parish, but a good deal more. A parish meeting on the subject of a water supply for Nantygroes and Carmel had been held. This subject had been before the council some- time ago and lpobtponed. At the meeting a resolution was carritd unanimously to the effect that the Llan- dilo-fawr District Council be respectfully asked to carry out a portion of the scheme of water supply for Milo District so far as the new school, the scheme to be extended after the war is over. It was proposed that the cost in connection with the present outlay be defrayed by the levying of a sixpenny rate. The distance from the spring to the school was about 800 yards and the outflow was so strong that it could be connected at onoe with the pipe without at present in- ourring the cost which would be necessitated by the construction of a reservoir. The cost would be from 2150 to JE160. Since the whole of the parish approved of this expenditure he (Mr Matthews) thought the council should pass a resolutian to proceed with the work.-Replying to Mr E Davies as to the number present at the Pariah meeting a member was under- stood to say 25,—Lord Dynevor asked if all in the Parish were going to be supplied or only a certain number of houses.—Mr Matthews was afraid his lord- ship had misunderstood him. It WAS only proposed at present to supply the school. All the necessary requirements in connection with the Parish meeting had been complied with so as to get the whole voice of the Parish in the matter. If people didn't go there it was their own fault.—Mr Evan Jones, Inspector, mentioned being present at the meeting at Llan- fihangel-Aberbythiok. They would save money by running this supply now a certain distance. Not only would there be a saving in connetion with the school but eventually a saving generally to the rate- payers. They are anxious to have this portion of the scheme carried out now primarily for the supplying of the children and secondly to provide water for those in need of it in this and other parts of the district. It was most central for the parish; they did not require a water cart in the same way as in the Parish of Bettws. At the Parish ftieetjng they were unanimously in favour of the proposal and of the Council levying a Hd rate every half-year for the purpose. Ihe estimate for the scheme was £ 400, this portion would cost about £ 200,—Mr Gomer Harries seconded Mr Matthews and urged that this portion of the scheme should be proceeded with immediately. It waa high time the school children abould be provided with a water supply. The matter Wáll referred to the committee to deal with and to invite fresh tenders BY that day fortnight.—In reply to Mr David Davies it was stated that arrangements had been satisfactorily made in RESPECT to PAYMENTS &o. tgent had withdrawn all opposition. ROADS COMMITTEE. Mr John Richards submitted the recommendation of the Roads Committee. The first recommendation was that the steam-roller be not employed in t" North district DURING THE year AND TH^T great CARE should be exercised with regard to expenditure on road metalling which should be carried out only where actually required, with a view to curtailing expen- diture as much aa possible during the present crisis with the country's history. Another recommendation was that the Clerk obtain tenders for steam-rolling in the South district where there were roads over which there was heavy traffic and where they could hardly do without the use of the steam-roller, Attentjog was also caHec| to tfye fact |HAT ^HE JJIMPWORKS Com- Sany had mptalled A yoad at Felin^ye'n which was' a istrict one, without consulting this Council in the matter.—Answering a question Mr Griffiths, surveyor, said the read in question had always been nietajled by this Council and the publip made V^SE of it— Eyan D*yies suggested that the Company should be written tp in regard to the matter.—Advertising to the question of inviting tenders for steam-rolling the I Soutn district, Mr William Willi^IPS «?,I^ ^HAT same of the ?°$D* ^EFE IG a very had condition and they irere DISAPPOINTED in the locality because the steam- rollers which they had been expecting daily had not already been there. HE warpoo thp Council against reducing the quaptliy of metalling especially on sorre of the roads in Llandebie. A reduction there, where the traffic was everything, would spoil them entirely— Mr J. Richards said the Committee did not suggest reducing the metalling where the traffic was heavy.— The Chairman No; only to curtail where possible.- Mr L N Powell said that a lot of damage was done in the bouth district in connection with the water works for the Llanelly Rural Council.—The Chairman 1 said they had written to them several times.-On the mption of Mr Gomer Harries it was decided to write to thepa atp, 4 YSTRADOWEN ROAD. Discussion ensued with regard to the taking over of Ystradowen Road.—Rev Edred Jones presented the report of the Committee who recommenned that the road should be taken over. He complained that neither of the surveyors were present when they yigited the places and thia it was explained was due FO'A misupderafcandipg. Mr Jones further protested against the holding of hole and corner meeting?.—Mr Gomer Harries seconded the proposal to TAKO it over which was PARRIED. '>. "00'1-

FERRYSIDE NOTES

FERRYSIDE NOTES. RzcaulTING-A later recruit-the 75th locally since the beginning of the war-has brought up the number gained from the Recruiting Rally of October 2nd, to four. FUNERAL.—On Thursday, October 7th, one of the oldest communicants of St, Thomas' Church, was buried by the Curate Rev. T WILLIAMS, B.A. The deceased, aged 69 years, was the late Mrs Jones, Eva Terrace, Ferryside, the wife of MR Jones, Contractor, Ferryside and Carmarthen. HARVEST THANKSGIVING SERVICES.—These services will be held at 7.30 p.m. on Thursday (to-day) in St. Thomas's Church, when the Church will be decorated with flowers and fruit.

BURRY PORT

BURRY PORT. At a meeting of the Burry Port Urban Council, Mr R G Thomas in the chair, the medical afficer of health (Dr. Owen Williams) reported that the condition of the existing slaughter-houses in tie urban area was unsatisfactory and urged the im- portaoce of proceeding with the erection of a public slftughter-bouse. The Looal Government Board has already sanctioned the loan of £ 1,100. The surveyor was instructed to obtain tenders to carry out the work

Agricultural Organisation Society

Agricultural Organisation Society. QUARTERLY MEETING AT CARMARTHEN The quarterly meeting of the South Wales. Branch. of the Agricultural Organisation Society was held last week at the Ivy Bush Royal Hotel, Carmarthen, when there were presentMr W J Percy Player, Mrs Gwvnne-Hughes, Messrs Ben John, H Jones- Davies, Rev Joshua Davies, C D Thompson, D D Williams, Col. Gwynne-Hughes, A A Mitchell, John Owen, Victor Higgon, Daniel John, and the Secretary Walter Williams. THFI chairman reported that in connection with Lord Se'borne's scheme to develop food supplies, the Glamorgan County Committee had appointed the Agricultural Co-operative Societies local committee in the county. It was decided to communicate with other Councils pointing out what had been done in Glamorgan. In connection with the echeme to organise the wool industry the following centres, which are headquarters at societies, were appointed for the purpose of dem- onstration in wool grading:-Haverfordwest, Brecon, Llangadock, Garth, Tregaron, and Crymmych. It was reported that a Basket Factory was about to be started at Llanelly and that it was INTENDED to use the osiers grown in Carmarthenshire for making baskets there. It was decided to communicate with the Carmarthen- shire and Pembrokeshire County Councils asking them to encorraga the growth uf osiers. A grant from the Development Fund has been g, veji towards the the cultivation of osiers in Carmarthen- shire. A resolution was passed urging the necessity for Uniformity of weights and measures. Mr H M G Evans, Llangennech, and Mr Evan Jones, Manoravon, were appointed members of the Committee. Members spoke of the valuable work of Agricultural Co-operative Societies at the present time in the history of the country, as taey enable farmers to procure their feeding-stuffs, manures, seeds, etc., at lowest possible prices, and of the best quality. When there is such a great necessity to develop the growth of food of all kinds, this is of utmost importance'

Carmarthen shire Bankruptcy Coort

Carmarthen shire Bankruptcy Coort I Carmarthenshire Bankruptcy Couit was held at the Carmarthen Guildhall, on Tuesday, before Mr Registrar D. E. Stephens-Davies. BURRY PORT DRAPER'S AFFAIR, The only case which came before the Court was that of Mr Lavid Jones (trading as D Jones & Son), of Crofta House Mansel Street, and Station Ware- house, both of Burry Port, a draper and outfitter. Debtor attributed his failure to "bad debts, falling off in trade, illness of family." The gross liabilities were £ 388 12S 9d of which 2387 10s 3d were expected to rank for dividend, and the assets were escimated at ESO 13S !)d leaving a deficiency of £ 297 16A 6d. The Receiving Order was made on the petition of a creditor. Debtor commenced business as a draper at Pont3 pridd with JE30 capital. He sold this business to his brother-in-law in 1905 for £ 80.. He then opened a fried-fish shop at Cilfynydd which he disposed of in four months for £G5. He obtained employment with a travelling draper and went to live at Burry Port. In 1912, with 1:150 capital he opened a business at Station Warehouse, Burry Port. His employers book debts were assigned to him for £2;4 9s 7d of which £ 62 10* is still due. In answer to the Official Receiver (Mr H W Thomas) debtor said that some of the debts which he took over at their full value turned out to be bad. His takings had fallen off considerably owing to the war. Some of the furniture belonged to his children, having being given to them by their grandmother. The Official Receiver pointed out that one of the children could not have been more than two years of age at the time and the other must have been a baby in arms. Debtor said that he had been married twice. His present wife claimed certain articles of furniture. He had sold them to her when he required money. The Official Receiver said that he did not think the furniture claim would be allowed. The examination was closed.

1CarmarthenshiIe County Council

CarmarthenshiIe County Council. MEETING OF PUBLIC HEALTH COMMITTEE A meeting of the General Purposes and Public Health Committee of the Carmarthenshire County Council, was held at the County Offices on Tuesday. Mr H Jones-Thomas, Penrhos, presided. DISEASED POTATOES. The Chief Constable presented a report from which it appeared that a case of "wart disease" had ap- peared in potatoes at Brooklands near Ammanford. Notice had been served in accordance with the regulations of the Board of Agriculture. It waa suggested that the cause for the disease was use of slops in the garden as manure. The ground had afterwards been treated with gas lime. Mr Mervyn Peel said that he thought gas lime was the best thing for this. It must be something in the of round. The Chairman said that it could not be doe to any- thing in the ground. He had seen a few cases appear in a field, while the bulk of the crop was all right. UNQUALIFIED PRACTITIONER. Dr E C T Thomas, the acting Medical Officer for the County, stated in his report that the arrangements for Maternity and Child Welfare in the County were very defective. The majority of mothers preferred the old type of midwife wno thinks more of ingratiating herself with the patients than properly caring for the mother and child. A letter was read from Nurse Finnigm who is a qualified midwife, giving the names of five women who practised as midwives without any qualifications. She pointed out that such women were not allowed by law to practise, but they did practise and the result was that it was very difficult for a qualified woman to earn a living. Mr Mervyn Peel said that the difficulty was, that they c,)uld not prosecute successfully except they proved that the women were paid. Mr W Thomas (Whitland) said that good sanitation had more to do with the reduction of infant mortality than the service of trained nurses, Rev A Fuller Mills said that he was not in favour of drastic action against these unqualified women. When Nurse Finnigan had been some time at Car- marthen, matters would adjust themselves. STARTLING STATISTICS Dr Thomas gave some figures regarding Infant Mortality in Carmarthenshire. The average for England and Wales was 105 (deaths of children under 12 months old out of every 1,000 births). The figures for the Urban districts of Carmarthen- shire were Llanelly 130; Carmarthen 161; Llandilo 156 Kidwelly 188; Ammanford 81; Burry Port 116: Cwmamman 144. The figures fo? the Rural districts were Llanelly 132; Carmarthen 153 Llandilo 84 Newcastle-Emlvn llQ; Whitland 94 Llanybyther 88.

Carmarthenshire Standing Joint Committee

Carmarthenshire Standing Joint Committee. STRIKING INCREASE OF DRUNKENESS. Mr Dudly Drummond, Hafodneddyn, presided over the quarterly meeting of the above authority on Tuesday, at the Catmarthedshire County Council Offices, when it was stated that £ 3,000 had been allocated for the ordinary maintenance of the police force for the ensuing quarter. Mr Dqvid Evans, Manordaf, called attention to the serious amount of drunkeness in the county. At a time like this they would have thought that drunk- eness would have decreased rather than increased. An increase of 6t cases and also 27 cases under the Intoxicating Liquor Laws, called for serious con. sideration. The Head Constable said the increase was most prevalent at one place. Thifi waa entirely due to the influx of a population which was rather a rough class CQNIJIATING qf navvies. A large number of these men 4loo went down to Llanelly thus increasing the amount of drunkenness there. Mr Thomas Jones (Llanelly) said there were also a largo number of navvies working on the Llanelly Water Works, and these men accounted largely for the increase of drunkenness in Llanelly. Llanelly itself was as free from drunkenness as any other town Mr Mervyn Peel said he thought the Committee ought to pass an expression of opinion that it would be wise to extend a non-treating order. It struck him that it would be a very useful order for the prevention of drunkenness alone if for no other purpose. He believed that many a man got drunk because he was too popular and was offered many a glass at other people's expense. The Chairman said he thought the Committee ought to make representations that the number of hours should be limited. The Chief Constable said the question WAS con- sidered by the Magistrates, but they could not do anything under the new act without a recommendation from him. The difficulty was principally that of overcrowding. There was not sufficient accom- modation for a large number there. THE huts wore occupied day and night by the men who took it in turns to sleep there When the men could not get into the huts for two or three hours they were obliged to go somewhere, usually into the public-houses. Aooommodation of some kind must be found for these men. The public-houses at Pembrey were no doubt being well oonducted and the amount of drunkenness was not out of proportion to what one ought to expeut considering the class of population. Mr Mervyn Peel said that a year ago the figures worked out that Carmarthenshire was the most drunken county in Wales. The Chairman said he thought it was a serious indictment, and the Committee might pass a resolution that the hours should be restricted, especially in the industrial districts, MR C P Lewis (Llandovery), said he thought 1Q o'clock was quite late enough for the public-houses to close in small places, Col. Gwynne-Hughes (Glancothi), said he under- stood there had been complaints about treating wounded soldiers in Carmarthen. The Chairman We have nothing to do with the borough. The Head Constable was instructed to use his dsscretion in the matter.

Advertising

FOR THE BLOOD IS THE LIFE.-CIarkes Blood Mixture is warranted to cleanse the blood of all impurities, from whatever cause arising For Scrofula, Scurvy, Eczema, Bad Legs, Abscesses, Ulcers, Glandular Swellings, Skin and Blood diseases Pimples and Sores of all kinds, its effects are marvellous. Over 50 years success. Thousands of testimonials. In bottles, 2s 9d, each of all chemists & stores Ask for Clarke's Blood Mixture and do not be persuaded to take au imitation