Teitl Casgliad: Carmarthen weekly reporter

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 2 o 4 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
11 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
Advertising

nrnm 1\ ESTABLISHED 1854- RUN I T tH DAVID TITUS WILLIAMS IBOOIKIIBIIsriDIEilR,, Etc, M M I CHAPEL ST., CARMARTHEN. i Magazines, Periodicals and all kinds of Publications Bound to suit the owner's taste. Hymn Book@, Bibles, etc., repaired and re-covered. Books Bound in Publishers' Oases at Publishers' Prices. BOOKBINDING TO THE TRADE. Autumn and Winter season idio-io. Misses LEWIS & CLARE have the pleasure to announce that they have now on view a grand Show of High-Class Millinery, repleat with the very Latest Novelties. The favour of a visit is cordially invited. I Cavendish House, 41 King Street, Carmarthen. Å- :8:- STOODLEY, ELECTRICAL' ENGINEER & CONTRACTOR GARFORTH, BARN ROAD, CARMARTHEN. Electric Lighting and Power, Private Plant, Bells and Telephones a Speciality. tggf All Business will receive my Personal Attention. WATCHES & CLOCKS REPAIRED. JEWELLERY REPAIRED LIKE NEW. GILDING AND ELECTRO PLATING. HIGH-CfciSS WORKMANSHIP. ESTIMATES GIVEN ALL WORK GUARANTEED T JOHN WILLIAMS Watclmiakcr, Jeweller, & Silversmith, 9 & 10 Lammas Street, OARMARTHEK- Established 1S36, J The Welshman's Favourite. | MABON Sauce j As good as its Name. 4 DON'T FAIL TO GET IT. V J Manufacturers—BLANCH'S, St. Peter St., Cardiff, a r WEDDING CARDS. Anyone requiring the above should, before placing their orders, send for our NEW SPECIMEN BOOK CONTAINING THE CHOICEST DESIGNS CARDS AND PRICES SUITABLE ton ALL CLASSES W. S. MOKUIS, Wholesale Grocer, Corn, Flour and Seed Merchant, O.A. BMABTHEH. Nat. Telephone, 50. Telegrams, Morris, Merchant Carmarthen." SEND FOR PRICE LIST ¥ENO'S LIGHTNING COUGH CURE The Ideal family remedy. Contains no opium, morphine, paregoric, or other harmful drug. Cures at all ages, COUGHS.COLDS & INFLUENZA Veno's is the surest and speediest cure for these winter ills, the nest pro- tection Against more serious dangers, CHILDREN'S COUGHS Soon yield to Veno's—even Whooping cough. And there is no trouble in 1 giving it, children simpH* 'ove Veno's. Other sizes dHcl 

No title

COAL AND LAHOUR PAVING ARTICLE-—Durug war time SAVE COAL bv usirjj the I).!). Firt'b"k and Fire Chetk?. SA V" T L\ t i: b'i \1<;1 JZ tll (t leLr tfd O Cedar Mop; a pr of of its h:i\i;g given veiy satisfaction, 30i( air. ady so'd. Save Time L-bour and Worry by usirg "The Magnet C othes Washer'' does a weik's wash under the hour.—Ji'hu Colby Evans, General Ironmocger, 122 taunts treet, Carmarthen [Acvt.

KIDWhLLY NOTESI

KIDWhLLY NOTES I On Thursday evening, the 14th instant, a meeting of the Roy Scouts Association was held at tlie Town Hia.ll. Mr H. 15 Smart, the president, in the chair. The balance sheet sub- mitted by the treasurer ('Mr D. O. Jones) showed a small balance on the wrong side, The repcrt was adopted, a.nd the accounts were audited by the Rev D. Ambrose Jones, j Vicar, and Mr D. Thomas. The Scoutmaster, Mr H. E..Hutcheson, having left to reside in Glasgow, his r.esfg;na.boIl was accepted with regret, and a hearty appreciation of his ser- vices was recorded in the minutes. The secretary was instructed to convey the terms of the resolution to Mr Hutcheson, together j with the Association's warmest congratula- tiions on his rccont marriage. Assistant Scoutmaster lyor James was appointed to fill the vacancy pro tern. The usual votes ter- mliinasted the proceedings. The Rev D. Amtbrose Jones presided on Thursday evening last at a meeting convened to consider the restarting of the Rifle Club, which was formed in conjunction with the defunct V.T.G. The memlbers present under- took to contribute towards clearing, off the existing debt, and it was decided to hold a further meeting at the Club at an early date. «*• Mrs Harold Greenwood. The Priory. pre- sided at the fortnightly meeting of the Bel- gian Refugees Committee held at the Town) Hall on Monday evening last. Several matters; of importance were diwus>sed, and a cheque i to meet current expenses were drawn in i favour of Mrs D. Meredith. The next meet- ing was fixed for Monday, November 1st, at 8 p.m. The annual "Fair Wyl Lug" will lie held on Friday and Saturday in next week (Oct. 29th and 30tli), and, given fine weather, shouM prove very remunerative to those who cater for the pleasures of the people in these sad times. Nominally, Friday will be a "hiring" as well as a cattle fair, but the amount of hiring has dwindled in recent years i to vanishing point. The second day is usually devoted to the date of pigs, and, as a rule, extensive business is transacted. Hie pleasure department will be on a. more extensive scale than usual, judging by the large nuimber of attractions that have already arrifved. Money is plenti- ful in the town and district, and "all the fun of the fair" is within the reach of all. j The public will be invited on Saturday the 30th inst. to contribute towards a very de- serving cause—that of our brave Russian Allies, whose, heroic doings on the Eastern j front in the great war have been followed with unstinted admiration by all the peoples of the world. To procure funds to make up of the world. To procure funds to make up in some slight degree for the splendid gaori- fices of this gallant nation, Saturday will be ) observed as Russian Flag Day, and the Mayor (Aid. Thos. Reynolds) makes an urgent appeal to all to contribute to the funds in no niggard- ly spirit. Miss M. Griffiths is, the teasurer, and Mr J. Morgan (secretary. On Wednesday evening in this week a t dtanoe was heMd at the Tow n Hall for the pur- j pose of raising funds to provide all Kidwelly "boys" who have donned khaki with smokes. Mr Oliver T. Stephens was the M.O. Mr D. R. Williams, Burry Port, presided at the piano, while Messrs D. J. Jankins and Harold M. Reynolds acted as treasurer and secretary I' respectively. We hope to have a report in \1 our next issue.

Stitch in Time

Stitch in Time. There is an old saying "A stlitch in timos sarej nine" and if upon the first lynjptome oi 1 anything being wrong with our health we were to resort to some simple but proper means of correcting th* misohie*, fine-tenth* of the suffering that invades oar homes would be avoided. A doae of G rilym Evans' Quinine Bitters taken wben y j j feel the least bit out of aorta is jrat tin t "stitch in time." You can 7et Gwijyra L ans' Qiunine Bitters at any Chemists or Stoi as in bottles, 25 Ptd and 4s 6d each, but rameiiiber that the only guarantee of genuineness is the name "Uwilym Evans" ou the la -ol, stamp an<' I' bottle, without which none i ? genuine. Sole Proprietors: Quinine Bitten Manufacturing Company, Limited, LUnclly, South Wale

Kidwelly Town Council

Kidwelly Town Council. The monthly meeting of the Town Council was held at the Town Hall on Friday the 15th inst. at 7 p.m. The Mayor, Aid. T. Reynolds, occupied the chair, .and there were present: Aldermen. D. G. Anthony and S. H. Anthony, Councillors J. Harries (Castle), Dd. Davies, W. Loosmore, Hy. Wflkins, John Morgan (Water street), John Morgan (Priory street), D. Phillips, and E. Cbie; together with Mr W. R. James:. (Town Clerk), Dr T. R. Griffiths (Medical Officer of Health), Mr J. Morgan (Collector), and iMr D. Edwards (Surveyor). MOUNTAIN WATER. It was1 reported that (several residents of the iMynyddygarreg district had not paid the water rate. Coun. Loos.more, did not see why they should be compelled to pay if they did not get water, and Coun. Morgan (Water sfcrett) agreed with him. It 11-1 T\ r. A^il __1 -1-1_- n • i 1_.J ,Muu- IJ- vr, auiuouy vfi e council nau done all they could to supply the district. He did not refuse to pay the rate when he had to go without water. The Mayor pointed out that these people stiM used the Counoil's wntsr. It was ultimately decided to authorise the Collector to taike legal procced-ings against all defaulters. TO WN WATER, The reply of Messrs Xdbcl to the Council's request for permission to connect a. 4in. pipe with the main leading to the Munition Works was read. Before giving a definite reply the Company wanted to know some idea of the quantity of water which might be required under the worst conditions. It was not likely they would be able to spare any during the period of the war, but after the war they would be wiling to meet the Council's needs under certain conditions, especially in view of the ready manner the Council had met them. Several Ùlembers: A very favourable reply. Coun. Cole: A very gentlemanly letter. Aftetr an ilnteresting discussion, the Clerk; was instructed to inform Messrs obel that the maximum requirements woudd be 20,000 gallons per day, but that the Council wouM not expect them to promise any during the progress of the war. RUjMSIEY HOUSE. It was unanimously agreed not to purchase for £2,000 the palatial residence, Rumsey House, which., with its extensive groundo, would make Rinildeall Town Hall with officec;, and a. desirable recreation ground. The offer was rejected as the present time was inopportune to embark on costly schemes. MI SOELiLANEO US. It was decded that the resolutiod of the Co'.uic'i iv the removal of ,tal)-te, from 1'ie x'cinity of the Milliliter liouse should be ad- hered to. The Medical Officer and the Surveyor w> re instructed to see the owner of the cowsheds in Station road with a view to getting the promised ■alterations effected without dehvy. The Surveyor was asked to get tenders for the supply of hav up to the 1st May nnd to suhmit them to the next meeting. -in the meantime he would purchase what was n A sample of the water p.pe supplying the Castle district was handed round for inspec- tion. It was so ibadly corroded that only the smallest quantity of water could trickle th rough. It was decided to ask the residents to ob- tain their supply from a tap in Castle street, which Dr Griffiths gave permission to n-e. If this proved unsuitable a public tap would be placed near Siiloam Chapel. The Surveyor was authorised to get the Portway repared at the lowest possible cost, and to obtain contracts for haulage. The M.O.H. condemned the continuance of the pig-sty near the Slaughter House. The Mayor the Council's support for the Ru-sian Fl-t.g Day on the 30th instant. A letter from the Treasury urged on public 'bodies and employers of laibour the import anoe of paying wages in notes., in order to strengthen the gold reserve of the nation. The Corporation of Glasgow forwarded a resolution in favour of acquiring land near industrial centres for small holdings to meet the needs of maimed and discharged men who would be numerous after the war. The consideration of the matter was de- ferred for a month. A Dramatic Company offered t6 for the use of the Town Hall for three weeks, but the application was refused. The Clerk pointed out that there would be no municipal elections this year, and Alder- men would continue in office for another year. A meeting for the selection of Mayor foi the ensuing yeor was fixed for November 2nd. at 7 p.m. Coun. IVilliins reported that lie had heard of sheep being washed at the Slaughter House, a. proceeding lie characterised as most unfair in these day of water scarcity. It was decided to fix,a fire plug at Pendre. LAND VALUATION. Copies of the provisional valuation of Cor- poration property were handed in by the Clerk. A)d. D. G. Anthony said that men were sent to value land who knew as much about it as the land knew of them Aid. S. H. Anthony agreed and added that he may as well be sent to value a coal pit of which he knew nothing. The Clerk said as far as his experience went the valuers were competent men, and their valuations turned out to be very satisfactory Aid. S. H. Anthony said they may have made good valuations, but it was impossible for any man to value land at first eight. As for the "little clerks from office" they were absolutely at sea. Alderman D. G. Anthony: Millions of pounds have been spent in putting men to value land who know nothing about it. WAR ECONOMY. Aid. D. G. Anthony, who earlier in the meeting had said that in the present great crisis the supreme object was to conquer the Germans, and that men should deny them selves of everything to bring this about, made an earnest plea for economy. All the big towns from Cardiff down had gone in for retrenchment. He proposed that the Sur- veyor be asked to prepare a list of the public lamps which could be dispensed with with the least inconvenience. Coun. Wilikins seconded, and gave several instances of lamps which would not be missed The resolution was carried unanimously.

I mLord Derby at WorkI

I m Lord Derby at Work. INSTRUCTIONS ISSUED TO CANVASSERS On Monday, at 12, Downing street, Lord Derby met the memlbers of the Parliamentary Recruiting Committee and the Joint Labour Recruiting Committee, and further discussed the plan of campaign. It was reported that a large number of replies ihad been received from the local PairWnmenta.ry recruiting com- mittees, and that the canvassing scheme was heing very heartily taken up. Copies of the communications which have been issued to the local Parliamentary Re- cruifting Committee were published on Mon- day night. These include a letter setting forth the dedsliion of the meeting of the Par- liamentary Recruiting Committee and the Joint Labour Recruiting Committee held on the 11th inst., that every man whose name remains unstarred upon the pink forms should be personally canvassed, and enclosing a can- vassing memorandum for the guidance of local committees. This suggests the methods of organisation which local commlittees might adopt. Canvassing sub-committees are to be appointed, and also sub-committees to assist canvassers in getting the men. The directions to Parliamentary Recruiting Committees in the documents which they have received include the following for canvassers: That the cardis that you receive contain I the names of men who, according to the National Register, can be spared to enlist. Make a point of calling repeatedly until you actually see the man himself. You must not the put off by assurances or statements from other people. Make a special report if ultimately you fail to see him. Put before him pliainly and politely the needt of the country. Do not bully or threa- ten if hie hesitates or refuses. Try to find out whalt aire his reasons. Note those carefully. Ascertain whether his difficulties or objections can be removed by furnishing him with information on any I m specific point. For example. pensions, sep- aration allowances, vacancies in particular regiments or by some possible action with his employer or relations. Treat your conversations as confiential, and do not dise-lbse them except to those authorised to know the circumstances. Canvassers must endeavour to get all the mein they possibly can for the infantry. It is the infantrythalt its required to maintain the armieslin the field, and the issue of the war largely dtependfcs upon this arm. They should "be told that their services are equally useful whether they join the Regular, new Special Reserve, or the Territorial Force. Railway warrants for those willing to en- list at once are to be supplied in advance to oommirttees upon application to the district recruiting; officer, and committees are recom- mended to appoint gentlemen of position and influenm t,, travelling inspectors to see that the work of the sul>JCommittees is being done efficiently. The immediate duty of a. can- vassing sub-cornmititee will be to organise a staff of voluntary canvassers of either sex, and it is impressed on committees that as the canvassing work is of a delicate nature care should he taken that those invited to assist shall 'be persons of discretion who can be relied on to approach the men with tact.

LLANDILO POLICE COURT

LLANDILO POLICE COURT. The above court was held oi Saturday I tst, before M ssrs L N Powell, J Pictrn and W Ifeij-kin. DANGEROUS DRIVING. Two brothers, hailing from London and of tl,o ,:ame of (Jallender, were charged with drivit>g motor cycles iti a manner dangerous to the public. The defendants di J IlI,t appear but were repn-sented by Mr Hugh -Inspector Peter Jones said at 3. LO p.m. on the 10th of August, he was patrolling the Carmarthen Road, parish of Llangathen, when between the Cottage Inn and Pentiefelin, John Jones passed him on his n otor cycle and procttded towards Broad Oak. Immediately after, he heaid a motor cycle coming frt-m Lhudilo, witness looked back and saw two motor cyclists coining at a terrific pace, they pc ssed witness with their engines working and going down hill and proceeded towards Carmarthen and dis- appeared. He picked up the number of one of them but failed to get the first iiiimber. They travelled at the rate over a cross road and passed two cottages, there was a curve on the road near Pentre- felin at;d they cou'd not see traffic ahead. They were going from 3.3 to 40 ruilfs an hour. They were going too fast for public safety and for any traffic that might have been on the road.—Cross-examined by Mr Hugh Williams He did not know and would not recognise them. As far as witness knew he could not say who the defendants were. They had admitted to the Metropolitan Police they were the defendants (Mr Williams Objected to the answer) but Inspector Jones said it was on the defendants' admissions that the summons was taken out. He knew nothing of the defendants. He did not know one was engaged on Government work. He knew nothing of the defendants whatever.—John Jones, Inspector of Roads under the Carmarthenshire County Council, corroborated the evidence of Inspector Jones. It was about 3 o'clock in the afternoon. Witness was on a motor cycle and he (Inspector Jones) on an ordinary bicycle. He was travelling about 20 to 25 miles an hour towards them and had to swerve one side. He only travelled at that rate where he saw the road clear Inspector Jones re-called said he had no chance to signal for them to stop.—Deputy Chief Constable was about to take pait in the case when Mr Williams objected.—Mr Hugh Williams held that the police should Lob have come forward with the case without some evidence of identity of the defendants.—In- spector Jones said they had anticipated the defen- dants would have been there and if they had, the police would have taken a certain course with a view to prove che case.—Mr Williams said that the defen- dants were entitled to appear by solicitor.—Mr Poweil intimated that the bjnch would adjourn the case for evidence of identity.—Mr Williams on hearing this said he would waive his objection.—The Ci,-ik said that unless Mr Williams pleaded guilty the case woul,1 have to be adjourned.—Mr Williams replied that in order to save the trouble of bringing down a police con,table from London, he would admit the defendants were the drivers of the motor cycles, but he would not plead guilty. — Mr Powell If you dont plead gnilty we adjourn the esse.—Mr Hugh Williams said he was prepared to admit that his clients were the two drivers leferied to and that should satisfy the bench. This admission the bench accepted. For the defence ha urged that having regard to the place where the offence was committed they were not travelling dangerously. He suggested that Jones should be summoned also. There was only a difference of ten miles in the rate at which Jones and the defendants weie travelling. One of the defendants could not b5 present as he was engaged in testing antidotes to German gas poisons and the other was qualifying for a despatch rider. He a, ked thtm under the ciicumstances to treat the case leniently or dismiss it on the payment of costs so as not to discourage these young people.—Mr L N Powell said that the bench bad taken into con- sideration the whole of the circumstances and in- flicted a penalty of lOa and costs in each case. QUEER GIDDINESS. John Thomas, Tanygraig, Llandebie, was charged with drunkenness.—Mr Noyes, dt-fended.-P.C. John Thomas said that on Sunday night the 12th Sept. about 10.30 p.m. he found the defendant staggering drunk in Carmarthen Street, Llandilo, talking to himself and going at people. Witness asked for his name and address and told him that he would report him.—Cross-examined by Mr Noyes Witness was informed he was staying at the Nag's Hend. He went there & another constable with him. Defendant was still drunk. He advised the landlord to turn him out but he said he had taken a bed there but after- wards he went home. He saw him later on the square with three others. When witness saw him at the Nag's Head he was sitting in the front room. Witness did not know it was giddiness defendant was suffering from. Witness had no experience of giddiness.—Mr Powell Defendant was talking to himself. -Inspector Jones said he saw the defendant about 12.30 p.m. He found P.C. Thomas speaking to him. He was drunk, very unsteady and speaking in coperently. Ten minutes later he again saw him and def- endant spoke to witness. He was evidently drunk. Cross-examined by Mr Noyes His actions were those of a drunken man, but not of a man suffering from giddiness. He had seen the man drunk since and his actions were then the same. Defendant was quite a different man to what he was that day.—P.C. Evana corroborated. He saw him drunk in Market Stieet. He asked witness if he could find a motor car to take him home.—P.C. Protheroe said he accompanied P.O. Thomas to the Nag's Head. De- fendant was then under the influence of drink. Again he saw him at 8.45 when he was very drunk. He spoke to P.C. Thomas and then left them.—Cross- examined by Mr Ncyes In his opinion he was not suffering from giddiness. He asked P.C. Thomas if he could get him a car.—Mr Noyer pointed out that P.C. Thomas had said he did not ask him. Witness said the question was asked. Witness did not get him a car. He did not thiak he was too drunk to be left on the streets. Mr Noyes continued that it was giddiness the man was suffering from, consequent uton the accidents had bad met when as a collier. If the police, as intimated, objected to his putting in a medical certificate they were trying to tolster up a weak case.—Mr Powell said their rule was to have the medical man present.—The defendant sworn, said he was in Llandilo on Saturday the 11th September, and stayed at the Nag's Head Ion. When he met P.C. Thomas he had a bad headache. He had had eeveral accidents. He was not bad at that time, he was alright, this he repeated. He denied he was drunk when charged by P.C. Thomas. He suffered from headache and giddiness and he suffered from it that day. He came up from the kitchen of the Nag's Head to see the constable.—Cross-examined by P.C. Thomas He ha.d had four or five glasses that day he could have drunk twenty or thirty if he liked. The bench intimated to P.C. Thomas he need not oontinue the cross-examination.—David John Thomas said he was with the defendant. Witness too was at the Nag's Head Inn. Defendant was perfectly sober Ha was not staggering and no complaints of him were made ab the Nag's Head Inn.—Cross-examined by P.C. Thomas: Witness was only out twenty minutes with the defendant. P.C. Thomas came to the Inn to complain of defendant's state-The deputy Chief Constable said that twice in 1912 defendant was oommitted on a similar charge of being drunk and disorderly, in one case being fined 5s and costs and in the other 15s and costs and cautioned. He was now fined 10s. AN INSURANCE CASE. Ben Griffiths, Goitre Farm. Llanfynydd, was charged with neglecting to stamp an Insurance Card of one of his employees, named Charles Peny.-Mr J Haydn Williams appeared for the Commissioners and Mr C Hurley defended. The latter admitted that a technical offence had been committed.—Mr Williams said that defendant had neglected to stamp Peny's card for the seven weeks ended August 9th, when Peny left his employ.—There had been an agreement for a year's service between the parties but for pome reason it was broken and the man left the employ.—Mr Handel Jones an Inspector called with defendant on September 9th, who admitted that he had not stamped that card because Peoy had not brought him a card from his Approved Society, but that did not relieve him as he should have obtained an Emergency Card. He however said he would not pay up and that he would he hanged before he did it. He held that he could not be made to pay.—J Handel Jones, Inspector, under the National Insurance Act, situated at Llanelly, gave evidence in agreement with the solicitor's statement, adding that the defendant told him he could take him to Llandllo He knew the magistrates and the magistrates knew him and advised witness to take the same care over other farmers in the neighbourhood to prevent evasion of the Act as he (witness) had taken in his case.—Cross-examined by Mr Hurley He could not say if he had always paid for other employees. He hel i that the offeno was unintentional that the defandaiit did not want to evade payment- He subjected the wilness to a long cross examination.—Cross examined by Mr Williams Witness had his certificate of appointment in his possession when he saw the defendant.—Mr Hurley for the defence said that up to time referred to—seven weeks-defendant had always stamped the card and had not done so for the period because no card was produced. He asked them to deal with it as a first offence and dismiss it on payment of costs.—Defendant was fined 10s and costs. ANOTHER CYCLE CASE. Robert Moffatt was charged with driving a motor cycle to the danger of the public.—P.C. Evans sai.i that at 6.30 p.m. on the 5th instM he saw the defen- dant drive a motor cycle near the Post Office at a rate from 20 to 25 miles an hour. When he was within 20 to 25 yards witness held up his hand for him to stop. Hd failed to do so and witness whistled and he then pulled up near the entrance to Hor3b Chapel. Wit- ness asked him far an explanation and he then said he did not think he was driving fast.—In reply to Mr Noyes who defended, witness said there were no carts about.—The Clerk: The point is the carts that might be expected.—Cross examined by Mr Noyes It was on Tresday, there were several people at out, and were all in danger..He crossed the road for the station and the Cross Road above.—John Lewis, Insurance Superintendant, Llandilo, said he stood near the constable when he saw the defendant driving a motor cycle. His attention was drawn to it by the speed it was coming. It was at about 25 miles an hour. He considered it was dangerous to the public Witness noticed the constable hold up his arms and then whistle after him, then he pulled up.—Cross examined by Mr Noyes He himself had a motor car and had driven a motor cycle. They could not say what traffic might at any rate be on a cross road. lIe covered the three hundred yards in a second.—Sgt. Morgan said when he served the defendant with the summons he said he was bound to put on speed to clear the top of the hill.—Mr Noyes submitted that there had been no proof that the public ware en- dangered. If the witness Lewis was correct, however he had travelled at the rate of 540 miles an hour. Defendant said that he was riding an old and noisy machine. He was going about 14 to 15 miles an hour. He often went along the road and very seldom found much traffic in Rhosmaen Street except Market day. That day he had a clear road as he entered the town. No one had to turn out of his way.—In reply to Mr Bishop, the Clerk said he could have stopped dead at the rate he was going.—D Brinley Rees, 8 Rhosmaen Street, said he was in the street at the time. He saw the constable stop him. There were only two or three people on the road and about eight on the pavement. Cioss examined by P.C. Evans: He worked under the same firm aa "d« fend ant.—Mr L N Poweil paid they did not consider the case a serions one and it would be dismissed on payment of costs. BEGGING. Elias Roberts. Aberystwyth, was charged with begging.-P.C. Evans stated that after receiving a complaint he kept observation on the defendant and found him begging. He was locked up.—He said he was at Llandilo with his wife who had a donkey and cart but they were not gipsies. He was let off but warned not to appear again in this court. NEGLECTING TO DIP SHEEP. Mr Powell did not sit in this case. El zabeth Rogers was charged with failing to give notice of her intention to dip sheep.—Being asked if I she was guilcy, he said she did give notice. -As we all know the weather has been so terrible, she began but was stopped to be told she did not also send in a return after dipping and did not fill up the declaration required by the Act. She said with regard to the last charge her hoy had lost the paper. -Sergt Morgan said that he visited Carregyrgof Farm, Llandyfern, and saw 46 ewe. and lambs belonging to defendant. He akt>d for an explanation for not dipping her sheep She said they had been dipped right enough. He asked her when and by whom. She replied they were dipped about ten times last month in a copper pan in the yard. Witness saw it. It was impossible to dip a sheep in it, they could only have put one side of the sheep in it at a time.-P.C. John Thomas corroborated the last witness as to the size of the copper pan. Her son said in her presence that it was her fault that the notices had not been supplied.—Elizabeth Rogers said that he son paid the rent.—Cross examined by Mr Bishop She had not asked for the receipt for tha rect She had not asked her landlord to put it in the boy's name.—Mr Picton Then it is only a family arrange- ment.—She went on to say it was the real truth that they had been dipped.—Mr Picton said she had not dipped them according to law. She would be looked after.—She went on to say she did not disobey the law Mr W Hopkin said listen Mrs Rogers now we don't want to be hard on you, but the Act of Parliament is that you are liable to be fined jE20 for one of these offences, that is the law, and on the other cases E5, but we don't wish to be hard upon you, but it is a pity you neglected to do this and we cannot do better than fine you a £1 in each case.

Advertising

Sleepless & Nerve-worn Business Man's Testimony to Dr. Casseirs Tablets. tllr. Poole, a busi- ness man. of 69, In- firmary-road, Sheffield, savs: Dr. Cabell's Tablets ha.ve simply worked wonders in me. I had become so excessively nervous and run-down that I would jump at ft sound. I had lost con- fidence in myself, and the alertness and business activity I hewl formerly possessed e the alertness and business activity I hewl formerly possessed were gone. My diges- tinn was very feeble, often there was pain and wind, and at night I nsed to wake up with a start and a queer feeling of dread. This had gone on for months, I was getting more and more run- down, when one day I read of similar en-ses cured by Dr. Cabell's Tablets. I got some. and almost at once I felt better. Naturally I persevered, and now I am as well and fit ai any man of my age." Dr. Cassell's Tablets. Dr. Cassell't, Tablets are a genuine and tested remedy for all forms of nerve of bodily weakness in old or young. Compounded of nerve-nutrients and tonics of indisputably proved efficacy, they are the recogimea modern home treatment for NERVOUS BREAKDOWN KIDNEY DISEASE NERVE PARALYSIS INDIGESTION SPINAL PARALYSIS STOMACH DISORDER INFANTILE PARALYSIS MAL-NUTRITION NEURASTHENIA WASTINQ DISEASES NERVOUS DEBILITY. PALPITATION SLEEPLESSNESS VITAL EXHAUSTION ANAEMIA PREMATURE DECAY Specially valuable for Nursing Mothers, and daring the Critical Periods of Life. Chemists and stores in all parts of the world sell Dr. CasselTs Tablets. Prices Is., is. 3d., and 3s.-the 3a. size being the most economical. A Faall: TRIAL SUPPLY will be sent to yon on receipt of name and address and two penny stamps for postage and packing. Address: Dr Cassell's I Co., Ltd., 418 Chester-road, Manchester.

Disabled Soldiers the Land Proposed Settlement on Employment

Disabled Soldiers & the Land Pro- posed Settlement on Employment The departmental committee appointed by Lord Selbourne under the chairmauship of Sir Harry Verney, Bart., M.P., to consider what steps can be taken to promote the settlement or employment on the land in England and Wales of sailors and soldiers, whether disabled or otherwise, on discharge from the Navy or Army, has presented an Interim Report recommending that as an experiment 59 men who have been discharged from the Navy or Army owing to disable- ment should be given a course of training in an Agricultural College, with a view to obtaining for them permanent employment on the land, and in the case of those proving specially capable, fitting them to become occupiers of small holdings. This recommendation has been approved by Lord Sel borne and endorsed by the War Office, and the Treasury have agreed to place funds at the disposal of the Board of Agriculture and Fisheries to defray the cost of the experiment. It is proposed that the men selected shall be sent to the Harper Adams Agricultural College, Newport, Salop, and to the College of Agriculture and Horticulture, Holmes Chapel, Cheshire, where they will be provided with board and lodging and be given a course of training in Agriculture and Horticulture free of charge to themselves. No deductions will be made from the disability pensions. In the first instance the course will extend over one term of about 12 weeks, at the end of which time those men whose conduct and work have been satisfactory and who seem capable of succeeding as small holders, will be given a further course extending over two more terms, so that they may receive in struction in the whole circle of Agricultural and Horticultural operations, There should be no difficulty in obtaining satisfactory em- ployment on farms for those men who are not retained for more than one term. During the course the men will be under the control of the Principal and subject to the ordinary rules of the College. Any men who have been discharged from the Navy or Army on account of disablement and who desire to receive this course of tain- ing, should apply at once to the Secretary, Board of Agriculture and Fisheries, 4 Whitehall Place, London, S.W., for a form of application.

WEATHER AND THE CROPS

WEATHER AND THE CROPS. County returns show the increased area sown with wheat to have been very general. It was most marked in Cambridge, Essex, Linoolm, Norfolk, Suffolk, Yorkshire, North- ampton, and Kent; there was very slight in- crease in area in Northumberland and Dur- ham. wihile Cumberland and "Westmorland have practically ceased to grow wheat. Bar- ley shows genera lily dieoreasied cultivation, to which difficulty of obtaining supplies of new crop at several leading markets is now bear- ing witness. The decline in area, is most severe in Cambridge, Lincoln, Norfolk, Suf- folk and Yorkshire. Oats showed materially increased cultivation in seven counties, but decline in Devon and Cornwall.—From Mon- day's "Mark Lane Express."

OCTOBER FAIRS

OCTOBER FAIRS. 18. 19. Maenclochog, Haverfordwest. Lampeter; Llangadiock. 20. Narberth. 21. L'lngadock. zz. Llandovery, Newcastle Eimlyn and Adpar, Llangadock. 23. Llangenneeh. 25. Newcastle EmJyn. 26. Pontardulais. 27. Abergwili. 28. Llandilo. 29. Kidwelly, Llanboidy. 30. Kidwelly, Lianybyther, Pencadcr.