Teitl Casgliad: Carmarthen weekly reporter

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 4 o 4
Full Screen
12 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
THE PASSING WFPK 1

THE PASSING WFPK 1 "Let there be thistles; there aro grapø, If old things, there are new; Ten thousand broken lights and shapes Yet glimpses of the true."—Tbnntson. We are suppo cd to have arranged a political I truce during the war. But the truce is more honoured in the breach than in the observance by some people. It does not matter very much I when some tenth-rate ecolessiastie assures us that aH the troubles which have befallen us are due to the passing of the Welsli CLurch Bill. But it matters a good deal when there are very obvious intrigues to hustle certain members out of the Government, and when asertive poditicisans say in almost as many words that it is they and not Mr Asquith who ought to be at the head of affairs. It is too evidently a case of "Codlin's the friend, not Short." We have had quite a crop of Kitohener canards. First rf all we were told that the deficiency of "munitions" was entirely due to his neglècL For a moment it appeared as if Lord Kitchener ought to be conveyed to the Tower making Ids entry by the Traitors' Gate, and that he ought not to he seen in Sublic until he came up for trial before the Ocuse of Lords—to emerge of course with the axe turned towards him. That wild uproar died away. The Biitish public is perfectly sane and is not to be led away by a baseless agitation. Lord Kitchener rather rose in popularity. Those who had not up till that time taken much interest in him personally. hegan to ifeel that he was a man who had been rather badly treated. < When this uproar had died down and we thought that we had heard the last of this kind of thing we are again treated to a series of Kit.chener yarns. One was that Lord Kitohener had thrown up his job at the War Office without even giving a month's notice. When that statement was denied, we are told that Kitchener handed in his notice, but that he withdrew it only on the personal appeal of the King. We conjure up a picture of Kitchener saying I can't stand Asquith and that there Lloyd George isn't my style at all, but to oblige your Majesty 1'1!1 try and stirik them a little bit longer." The Kitchener canards are all very much like the confiden- tial information which we get sometimes from a man whose brother-in-law has a lodger who is engaged to the daughter of a grocer who supplies the household of a Clerk in the NVi-r Office. We often get very valuable informa- tion from that man and from others who have an equally good chance of getting at Cabinet secrets. And the crop of Kitchener revela- tions is about the best thing in that line which we have had since the. war started. All this nonsense would not matter if it were only harmless nonsense. We can aid enjoy a little tomfoolery—and it is but natural that at the present time we should be glad of any- thing which reieves the strain. But the non- sense has been carried so far that it has forced the Government to disclose a fact which per- haps it would have been better to have kept secret. Lord Kitchener left the War Office because he was sent to perform certain duties in the Eastern theatre of war. It would have been much better if Lord Kitchener could have gone where his presence was needed without the fact being published to the world. But it is better to publish the real facts rather than let a crop of wild rumours grow up. We know now in what direction Lord Kttohener has gone—although we don't know exactly whether he is gone to the Dardanelles, to the Persian Gulf, to Egypt, or to Servia. But wherever he is gone, the British public ma.y depend on it, that Kitchener will be "on the spot." .H There is no use denying the fact that Lord Kitchener is /lot popular in "Society." For years "Society" was predominant in the Army and appointments were made through influ- ences which would appear incredible if set down in print. Kitchener had always a healthy contempt for the Society darlings If a man was not fit for his job in South Africa or in Egypt, Kitchener quickly let him know that the sooner he sent in his papers the better for all parties. This is quite contrary to the old notions of the Service according to which certain persons were entitled to good posts if they were one grade above sheer idiocy. We have heard a good deal a.bout Kitchener's "efficiency" in former years. That is just his drawback. The man who is efficient is not likely to allow himself to be interfered with by outside influences. The man who does not know his work is more tolerant; he is a handy tool who will allow other people to dictate to him. It seems a curious statement to make, but it is undoubt- edly true that there is in many quarters a pre- judice against people who know their work thoroughly. It extends from a prejudice against trained nurses to a prejudice against efficient soldiers who despise "influence." The inefficient because they are inefficient close theiir ideas to many things which the efficient will not tolerate. # And after all we have to remember Car- lyle's dictum "There are thirty millions of people in England-mo.stly fools." An American put it in another way "If you are ever going in for a contest try and get all the fools on your side. If you do you are sure to win, because the fools are always in the majo- rity everywhere." It is all very well to talk of efficiency in the abstract; but to attempt to put it into practice is not the. direct route to popularity. He who offends the inefficient offends the majority, and any attack on him will certainly be popular. A man may stand for righteousness, or he may stand for popu- larity but he can seldom combine them. The Government cannot yet be said to be showing any undue harshness towards aliens. At one of the London Courts on Friday a German was charged with a breach of the lighting regulations. It was stated that this gentlema,n had been repeatedly warned about he lighting of his shop, and that on the night of the recent Zeppelin raid the light was particularly bright. The defendant when summoned did not appear at the police court. He sent a message to the effect that he was too busy to come. He was fined £ 51 What would happen to an Engisli baker in a German town who disregarded the lighting regulations and who showed a particularly bright Light on a night when the Allies made an air raid? His conduct might be merely due to stupidity; but at the same time the German military authorities would give him short shrift. The people who murdered Miss Cajvell are not particularly scrupulous. We have a maxim that it is better to let a hun- dred criminals go free than to injure one innocent person. The German military autho- rities act on quite a different principle. Their motto is that it is better to murder 81 hundred innocent people than to let one dangerous individual escape. This explains the differ- ence in our treatment of aliens to that meted out by Germany. «** It is true that the German baker in this case was a, British subjept. He had been naturalised. That really makes his offence much worse. A native of an enemy country who professes to have renounced his natural allegiance and to have become a British sub- ject should above all others be careful to obey all regulations which are made for the De- fence of the Realm. A man who was born in Germany or whose father was born in Ger- many ought above all others to do nothing which in the most remote way might be use- ful to the enemy. And a person who was bom in Germany certainly ought not to complinn of police interference. It is a new thing to us to be surrounded by police regulations; but the Germans spend their whole lives under police supervision. The police regulations are so strict in Germany even in peace time that the whole population may be said to spend the term of their lives on "ticket of leave. #*# One of the prolems which will have to be considered after the war will be the question of the naturalisation of foreigners. We are rather inconsistent illl this matter. If British subjects migrate to foreign countries, our Foreign Office considers their children and grandchildren born in those countries as British subjects. This may easily be gathered from the regulations printed on the back of the form of application for a passport. The descent of course must be traced through the male line, for a child is regarded as being of the same nationality as his father. Thus if an Englishman settles in Brazil his sons and his daughters born in Brazil are British subjects. The cbiklren of his .sons are also British sub- jects. If the daughters married Brazilians of course their children would be Brazilians. It is perfectly dear that our Foreign Office ins prepared to extend its protection to two generations of persons of British descent born on foreign soil. But this rule does not work the other way. If we adopted a similarly sane method, the children and the grand'-h ill :en of Germans would be regarded as Germans even though born in this country. If two generations of foreign births don't deprive a British subject of nationality. should it uo: abo he held that Germans remain Germans oven though two generations of the family are born on British soil. There is no getting away from the logic of this position. We have two rules—and they can't both be right. Yet the children of Germans born in England are regarded as British subjects—although until the week before the war they used to hold regular German re-unions which wound up with the singing of 'Deutschland, Deutschland uber a lies." We may claim these people as British subjects; but the German Government re- gards them as Germans. There is no doubt about it that the German Government is being urged by its financiers to make peace. The financial outlook in Ger- many is to say the least of it rather depress- ing. We have heard a good deal of the "starving out policy." It means a good deal more than merely stopping food supplies. It does not matter very much what the price of food is, if you have not the money to buy it. The life of a modern state depends upon its industry. If all the factories in Germany are closed up for a couple of years, there will be no money forthcoming to pay the soldiers or to purchase munitons. The stoppage of the exports is almost as fatal blow to Germany as the stoppage of the imports. Some of the financiers 'have given the Ger- man Government to understand that the pre- sent state of affairs canot go on much longer. The fact has been denied, but it is none the less true that the Kaiser said that the war would be over in Ocober. That statement was made in August to a group of German finan- ciers who drew attention to the situation. The Kaiser really believed at the time that « lie would have been able to finish off the war by October. He has found now that he can't. German leaders make no secret of the fact that they are going to make a bold bid for Constantinople, and then to propose terms of peace. A curious little item of corroborative evidence is-the fact that the British prisoners are latterly being better treated in German? than they were at the .start. The Germans are now worse off for food themselves than they were twelve months ago. When they ha,d plenty of food they starved the British prisoners. Now that the food is really scarce in Germany they are treating the British prisoners better. Why ? The German Gov- ernment knows that it can't win, and it does not want the prisoners to carry back too harsh memories of their sojourn in Germany, nor does it want to exasperate British opinion too much. Twelve months ago these considera- tions were left out of sight. Then the Ger- mans were going to rule the earth and it did not matter what anybody thought. German soldiers now do not fight to the death. When they consider they are beaten they surrender automatically. They do the thing so neatly that a military authority has expressed the opinion that the German soldiers have been drilled to "Surrender" when the occasion arises. Germany is determined to save up all her best men for the next war. Germany sees she can't win. The rush failed, and in the long tussle she is getting "winded." Therefore what Germany ireally wants is a. rest of four or five years. By that time she will be quite ready, and wilil net make the mistakes she made tli's time-so she hopes. -t,e i According to one version of the terms .she was ready to evacuate Belgium and Northern France on the payment of an "indemnity" of two hundred million sQveIiei.mns- just as much as the Allies pay for carrying coi. the war for three or four weeks. They say this quite seriously. One might imagine a burglar paying compensation to a householder but the German has other views. The burglar wants a trifle towards the expense of a new kit of tools, as the old set have been badly damaged. ■Jfr-Sfr-vfr Such terms of course cannot be discussed. An honest householder cannot compromise matters with a felon. We do not discuss whether it is che.alpe,r to buy the felon out or to go to the expense of putting hian where he will do no harm. And there is one thing very certain. The Germans know they have tailecf. They would not offor to evacuate Belgium on any terms if they felt they could hold it. But it is burning their fingers lalready. And it will be a good deal hotter before long. A new beating apparatus is being got ready, and it would be a great pity if the Germans did not sample it before the war finishes.

Stitch io Time

Stitch io Time. There is an old saying "A stitch ill time .gae.a nine" and if upon tLe first YUJptome of anything being wrong with our health we weie to resort to soma simple but proper means of correcting thb nrisciEtl. line-tenth* of the suffering that invades oar homes would be avoided. A dojo of G vilym Evans' Quinine Bitters taken wien y y.j feel the least bit out of sorts is j.st tho, t ;stitch in time." You can "et Gwi47m H ans' Qiunine Bitters at any Chemists or Stoi eo in bottles, 2s {1,d and 4s 6d each, but mmeniber that the only guarantee of genuine! 

Llandilo Board of Guardians

Llandilo Board of Guardians. At the fortnightly meeting of this body held at the Board-room on Saturday last there were present: Mr R. Matthews (vice-chair- man, Lord Dynevor, Rev J. T. Jenkyns, and Messrs W. Hopkin, Arthur Williams, Dan Jones, John Lewis, Gomer Harris, Pritchard Davies, D. W. Lewis, W. Richards, J. Hum- Shreys, W. Lewis, J. Bevan, W. Williams, J. 'icharcls. D. Jones, Caleb Thomas, D. Davies, T. Harris, D. Thomas, L. N. Powell, J. L. Williams, J. Thomas, W. Stephens, and Glyn Jenkins; the Clerk (Mr R. S. Lewis) and the Deputy Clerk (Mr D. J. Morris). DECREASE OF VAGRANCY. The Master in his report stated that the number of vagrants who visited the House during the fortnight numbered 27 against 92 in the corresponding period last year. Ser- vice had been held by the Rev D. Jones, curate. PRECEPTS. Precepts for a county rate at 8d in the £ were ordered to lie signed, amounting to £ £ 4.153 lis 2d. The Clerk said he had made the calls payable to their treasurer on the 11th December and to the county treasurer on the 16th December.—Mr L. N. Powell: How does that compare with the correspond- ing quarter last year.—Clerk About the same He said there were also special calls for schools that had been bulillt in different par- ishes. They were Llansawel t30 7s 4d, Am- manford L171 7s Id, Cwmamman £169, Quar- urbaùh £ 125,^ Llanfihangel Aberbytych £66 3s 4d.—Mr W. Williams: What about Llan- debie pii-isli P-Clerk: No calls for Llandebie. Mr W. Williams (Llandebie): I can't realize it somehow. MORE VACILLATION OVER. COTTAGE HOME. Mr J. Richards, who had given notice to rent out Bank House as a cottage home, hoped it was not necessary to say much in favour of the motion. During the last few years they had been forced continually by the L.G.B. to spend very large sums of money, but since the war broke out the L.G.B. had quite altered their attitude and now advised us to econo- mise as much as possible, and lie considered that a splendid opportunity to make a start in that direction. In his opinion the rent of the house will be a very expensii ve item to the Guardians. It would cost about £ 300 to furnish it and would then cost about L200 a year to keep it going, and personally lie could not see they were going to derive much bene- fit from that money. At the present time there were very few children at the Work- house. He believed no more than eight. They were well looked after and well treated and quite different to what they used to be yea-rs ago. They were clothed like ordinary ohiildren and were allowed to go to school with other children. They were allowed to play with other children and go out when they liked. Considering the state of the country it would be advisable to keep them there and let the house to a tenant. He had been speak- ing to the Clerk about it, and lie says it would be very difficult to get a yearly tenant for the house, but lie believed they could lease it for seven years, if they could get a suitable ten- ant. He did not think that whenever the war ended anybody living would see the country get back to its normal state. He proposed they should make an effort to get a tenant for Bank House.—Mr Matthews With a lease.— Mr J. Richards I don't speak as to any num- ber of years definitely, but i/f necessary I pro- pose seven yeaa-s.—Mr Caleb Thomas: I beg to second'.—Lord Dynevor: Might we have a report of the Boarding-Out Committee of the exact state of the House, and what has been

Llandilo Board of Guardians

spent on it. I am rather ignorant myself as to what has been done in the house. Is it ready for occupation.—Mr W. Hopin said that of course they had had tenders, and he did not know whether the contracts had been com- pleted. He should say they were bound to the terms of the contracts. If they wanted to let the house the first thing to be done would be to take the iron bars off the windows. The house appeared at present like a prison. He would see as to whether the contracts had been completed and report.—Mr Pritchard Davies said they would be completed in a fort- night.—Mr Gomel- Harris asked if lie did not think they should communicate with the Local Government Board and its Inspector as to the condition in whic-h they were placed. They had done everything they asked and according to their requirements. If they took any steps then without consulting the L.G.B. the Board would not have the necessary sanc- tion. He moved it as an amendment.—Mr L. N. Powell: I think dt is very necessary we should know exactly where we are situated before we make any change. I agree with all Mr Riichards has said in malking the proposal, but I think we better put ourselves right with the L.G.B.—Mr J. Rtichards: Would it not be sufficient if the resolution is passed to in- form the L.G.B. to that effect. If they have any objection we should have to report again. Mr J. L. W illiams I am quite in sympathy with the motion, but I think we should not* rush it through all at once. Would it not lie Eossible to offer the building as a hospital for (landilo and district. It its. only a suggestion, -Chairman: Would you take it in this wav, that the Clerk communicate with the L.G.B. saying it is the intention of the Guardians to let the house. That would be quite sufficient I think.—Lord Dynevor was about to speak when Mr Hugh Williams, the L.G.B. In- spector, entered the room.-—Lord Dvnevor: Don't you thimk we better asdc the L.G.B. if they are going to insist on their requirements a:fter the war. I see no objection during the war to letting the house, out I don't think we should tie our hands to letting it fourteen years. We might take a short letting.—Mr Matthews We have the Inspector here. Per- haps lie will answer the question. Would it be possible to let the house we have taken for boarding out our children' ?—Mr Williams in reply said he must admit lie was surprised to find 'it was not occupied bv the children. He failed to see why they should have delayed matters because of the Avar. It was undoubt- edly a suitable house and they had a sufficient number of children to put in it. lknd if tliev had not enough they could put some of the clod-out children rn it. Ho wjis 'lTitliPT surprised they should consider the re-letting of the liouso. In other places Poor Law L nions had been able to a.ssist the Govern- ment very materially in finding accommoda- tion for i-b-olir wounded soldiers. Several of these institutions had been converted into military hospitals. Swansea has offered half the inistitutioi there, so that thev were as a result looking out for accommodation for 300 of their inmates. Looking at it from that point of view they would at Lla.ndilo be help- ing the Government by finding room for some of those displaced inmates, by talking away the children from the institution and putting them in Bank House. That was the line they should take. Furnishing should not he a big item. They would onJy place the house as nearly as possible as a working man's house should be. He would suggest they should pro- ceed on those lines a nd not consider re-letting. —Mr Matthews: Will vou, Mr Richards, alter your motion now?^—

Advertising

Can't go on. But-The Breadwinner Dares not Give up for Fear of t Losing his Place. u Every Picture tellt a Storu <\ Do YOU Drag Yourself Every Day to your Work, Dead-tired and Burdened with an I Aching Back? Thousands do. And it's so often unnecessary, for in many cases these sufferings would end if 11 relief were given the tired kidneys. Kidney troubles are very common among those who work, but too often the kidney weakness is entirely unsuspected and time is lost in wrong treatment. Blindly the struggle is kept up. The breadwinner dares not give up, for fear of losing his place. Though painting and some other occu- pations are especially hard on the kidneys, I overwork in ANY occupation greatly in-1 creases the blood filtering task of the kidneys, weakens them and brings backache and disturbances of the kidney secretions. It is a good plan to watch the kidneys and keep them well. Any stubborn pain in the back is cause to suspect kidney weakness. So is discoloration or pain or irregularity of the passages. And if there is rheumatic pam, headache, lassitude, nervousness, or dizziness, don't delay. Early kidney troubles are easiest to cure. Doan's Backache Kidney Pills are a safe and reliable kidney remedy for all ages; they are guaranteed to be absolutely pure and to contain no harmful ingredients what- ever. They are compounded under the direction of skilled chemists, and ONLY INGREDIENTS OF THE HIGHEST QUALITY PROCURABLE ARE EVEn USED. These pills do not need to be taken indefinitely, but after a sufficient course their use may be discontinued. They have for years been a favourite family remedy the world over. In 2/9 boxet only, ¡. Never told loote. Of all chemitti or stores, or from Foster-licClellan Co., 8, WtlU-strett, Oeford-itreet, London, W. Btfute substitutes. 9 Doan's -0,0jve*A0 &4( 2 BacfacfieKtdijeyPM/s

SALARY OF MPS

SALARY OF M.P.'S. With an appeal by a circular letter from the Lewisham Board of Guardians against the salaries of M.P.'s, the Boalrd would have nothing to do.

ILlandilo Rural District Council

Llandilo Rural District Council. Mr W. E. Richards occupied the chair. SANITARY MATTERS. The Sanitary Inspector's report was under consideration, chief of which was the Millio Water Suply. The Inspector had met the Surveyor o the Carmarthenshire Education Committee and too him over the proposed works for the water supply by which Nanty- groes School was to be supplied. The Sur- veyor had asked the Council to let the Educa- tion Committee know the terms on which it would be supplied as soon as possible.—Mr 11. Matthews, as chairman of the Sanitary Com- mittee, said that schools paid for water in two ways. Either the committee contributed towards the capita. or paid a yearly payment in rent. He advised that the "Council should aslk for the latter. Three schools at Llande- bie parish paid t7 10s and one a smaller sum. —The report was adopted. I, RECRUITING COMMITTTME. The following members were appointed after some discussion a Recruiting Appeal Com- mittee: Messrs D. W. Lewis, J. L. Williams, R. Matthews, T. Rees .Gllaiiyrafonddu), and R. Thomas. MILLO WATER SUPPLY. For the Millo water supply the tenders were: Howells and Son, Llandebie, £ 260; Pritchard Davies, Llandilo, £ 199 5s; ii. Powell, Whitchurch, C332 10s; W, JOhll: Ammanford, £ 199; Robort Clarke. Pontar- dawe £ 230. That of Mr AV. Joliii-, Amman- ford, was accepted.—It was agreed to charge a rent of £ 7 10s for the water supply to the Na ntv-yroes S hcol. MEN AT THE. FRONT WOULD HAVE TO S UFFEli. Mrs Gwynne Hughes wrote to point out that she had seen in the newspapers a report of the discussion of the Council at their last meeting on the state 01 Breehfa road and that the Council were proposing to take counsel's opinion with regard' to the power to compel the Chenix-a'! Co, to contribute towards the: cost of the maistenanee of the road. -N r.: Hughes thought it was hardly a time to penalise a company working for munitions, They were making what was necessary for They were making what was necessary for high exp!o 've-: and by a spec'a' request from the War Office. 1 lie Company for that pur- pose had spent nearly £ 500 in plant. They were making an acetate that they formerly had from Germany and had difficulties in getting materials up to the works owing to the state of the road and found themselves much hampered in consequence. The extra heavy traffic was due to the extra traffic. Jt did not seem a very patriotic action on the pa.rt of the Council tobring an action against a Company who wede stiving their utmost to satistfv the demands of the Government. It 1 they were penalised now it would have th" effect of ,stopping work altogether, and iit was the men at the front would have to suffer.— Cilerk W e never passed any resolution to take proceedings but only to take counsel's opinion as to our position.—Chairman I think we better take counsel's opinion to see where we stand. 1 think it will be money well spent.— Lord Dynevor We have not had any protests from the Company. Why does Mrs Gwynne- Hughes write. Is it on Mr Gwynne Hughes's j)i,ol)eit-t-v 'I-C!eiqi Y,cs.Al r Gomer Harris: Has our Clerk had counsel's opinion.—Clerk Ntr.—Mr Harris thought it should be ol)- | tained.—Mr Glyn Jenkins: 1 should like to aisik if the writer of the letter was interested. -Cli.ai,t-m-aii Not directly, but the works is on Mr Gwvnne Hughes's property.—Lor J Dysevor I take it the road was in a very bad state before the war broke out.—Clerk Very bad.—Tlie Chairman said the Company who had the works before the present Company took it over had two traction engines plying on the road which was in a bad state then.— Mr J. H'thai'iN: Is not the engine, unsuitob'e for road traffic. have been told some types ( of engines are most dVastrons and this type of engine about tlie wo.^t.—The Clerk saitf he could not tell.—The Chairman said the Sur- veyor could 'f necessary give them the dinien- i sions.—Mr W. Williams I think we ought to reply to Hughes's letter that it was n;,t the intention to de"ll with the Company.— Mr J. Richards: How ii-1, we. going to keep up the road satisfactorily.—Chairman: We have practicallly given the Surveyor a free hand. —Clerk 1 think the County C'outieil ought to assist. It is a main thoroughfare for a large amount of County Council ti-affic.Atr J. Richards thought it was exceptionally haul lines on the Council hav ing to maintain that road at such great expense. He moved they should not try to keep it up. It was the only remedy. The engines could not then travel. —The Chairman said he could not agree with tha.t, itS other vehicles could not then travel ell I, -r.-Nir W. Williams If they are making something for high explosives, it was the men at the front would have to suffei-Cliii man Wo are not geill," ( to em-harass them.— Mr Glyn Jenkins thought it would have been better to have written to the County Council. —Mr R'. Mathews: All this is only talking for nothing.—Mr W. Williams You are letting that fettei- read. It will he in the pre-s and you will let it go out that we are em- harassing the Government.—Clerk: I have toild Mrs Gwynne Hughes that -in my opinion she should try and get the County Council to take the road over or get a grant from us.— I Mr Gomer Harris moved they should write to the County Council.—Mr W. Williams secon- I' ded. They had appealed to them before.— The Chairman supported, but at the same time they were kicking against a dead wall.

Llandilo County Court

Llandilo County Court. The Llandilo County Court was held on Thursday the 4th inst. before His Honour Judge Llovd Morgan, K.C. CHURCH BUILDING CASE FROM i l-LANDEBIE. The case of Messrs Williams Smith and Evans, Hill street, Peckham, Londonagainsrt James Evans, Maosyderi, Ammanford. was again mentioned. This was a case heard at the last court and arose over the slating of a church at Llandebie. Mr Hugh Wiiiliams, solicitor, who appeared 3 for the plaintiff said that at the last court i Hs Honour had decided that there was a sum g of £21 4s 8d due from the defendant to the plaintiff. His Honour also decided that the sum was to be paid into Court, and that the x plantiff was to be entitled to judgment for [ the amount except a counter-claim were filed by the defendant. He (Mr Hugh Williams) had seen the defendant's solicitor, who said i that they did not think they would proceed 1 with the counter-claim. He Mr Williams) did 1 not see. how they po siihly could. The letter b from Carnarvon, if it were accepted as coii- r taining the term sof the contract, would show ) t that they had no counter-claim. The Judge: That is to say the claim prac- tically involved the counter claim. The money f is in court, and no counter-claim has been f filed. r Mr Hugh Williams 1 ask your Honour to I enter final judgment for the plaintiff with > oa<;ts. His Honour gave judgment for £ 21'4s 8d, l and ordered the money to be parid out of court fnrtliwit.b. ,& SEQUEL TO ASSAULT. » Mr Hugh Williams referred to the case of Lewis' v. Davies lieard at the October court. This was a case in w hich damages had been claimed for assault. The parties were neigh- hours at Ammanford and a dispute had'a risen ) over a right of way. The assault had taken place and had led to a trial at the Assizes. Lewis, who is now Corporal in the Royal Field [ Artillery, liii, dclaimed £ 50 from Davies for the injuries inflicted. The defendant was stated to be earnng onlv 27s 6d a week. -Mr Will iams said that at tlie last court His Honour had adjourned the case in the hope that some arrangement would be come to as it would be useless giving judgment for a sum which the defendant would not be able to pay. He (Mr Williams) had seen the defendant's solicitor who said that he had been unable to see his client. The Judge: The only question is to assess the amount. Mr Hugh Williams: At that time I did not know that he had received such serious in- juries. I do not think he will ever be able to work as a collier again. He has only two fingers and the thumb to grip with. The .J udge The doctor did not say that lie woiid not be able to work as a coll;ei- again. Mr H. William*: He did not say definitely that he w ouid not be a1}I.e to w ork. but he was very doubtful about it. He would be no good in the fighting line and would have to take some light duties. The Judge: I don't thnk the doctor's evi- depce confirms what you say as to a per- manent disability to work. The Judge: I-think it is a very bad case. I must give judgment for the amount claimed. I think I suggested that it would be better to have judgment for a sum which the defen- dant could pay than for a sum which lie could not na v. not na v. Mr Hugh Williams I have been unable to get anything in the way of an offer. Perhaps I may now that J have judgment. SLANDER CHARGE FROM AMMANFORD. Mrs Maud Kathleen Silverstone, wife of Mr Alfred iSilverstone, bad a claim for £ 20 damages for slander against Mr Thomas Johnson, fishmonger, Ammanford. Mr W. L. Smdth appeared for the plaintiff, and .,it- Leyshon for the defendant. The ground for action was that the defen- dant was alleged to have said to another tradesman in Ammanford "She owes me 5d. Has she done you down for anything. Take care she don't." This the plaintiff contended amounted to a charge of having obtained goods by fab-e pretences. Mr Leyshon said that he was informed that his friend wished to withdraw the case. This he contended the plaintiff could not do. The plioper course; was that the case should be dismissed with costs. The Judge: That is the same thing. Mr Leyshon Not at all. It is very funny to suggest that a statement that a person owes you five pence amounts to an allegation of obtaining goods by false pretences. But we always expect something funny from Am- manford. The Judge: We get funny cases from many other places as well as Ammanford. Mr Smith said that the plaintiff had been held up to ridicule. She had been charged with cheating the defendant of 5d. Owing to the plaintiff suffering from ill-health and owing to the present state of affairs in the country the case would not be proceeded with. His Honour said that the case would be struck out.

CARMARTHEN UMKitTiiE s 11 1 IA T tJz1LJitLJ

CARMARTHEN UM)KitTiiE s 1-1 1 IA T. tJ z' 1 {' :'LJ i t LJ Jo/ne, cn::ie, and sit yon down you shall not budge, shall not go, till I set you up a glass nero yon may "eo the inmost part of yon. SBiKUI'XiKI. Carmarthen people may hortly have an opportunity of witnesing the production of the first comedy ever written, in the Welsh language. The Rev J. Dyfnallt Owen is at present engaged writing it. Dyfnallt has already written a farce entitled "Dycld Mawr vn y Pent-re." His new effort in the way of Welsh drama is of a more ambitious char- acter. **•* A deal ol" discussion took place at the Petty Sessions on Monday regarding the time at which it would be advisable to hear the rat.ing appeals on Wednesday. Somebody suggested that the cases would take so long ■. that it would be necessary to adjourn for lunch in the middle of the hearing. One of the magistrates then said that the best thing wouLd be to begin the court at noon and have lunch before starting. This was agreed to unanimously. A good deal of harm is done to public 'business when the demand for lunch necessitates undue dispa.tch of business. **•* The five sons of a local farmer we.re seen on Tu esday in one of the Carmarthen streets engaged in packing about four hundredweight of goods from a shop into a cart. The young men ranged in ages from 18 to 30. This is the kind of thing which makes one extremely sceptical regarding the statement that there is a scarcity of labour in the country. The "scarcity of labour" as it is called is likely to have far reaching effects on our national life. In a good many cases the so- called "scarcity of labour" means, that it is no longer possible to have one man doing a joib and two others fussing around while he is doing it. There is a firmly rooted delusion in town and country that this is a good system. In many cases it has been found that the one man left to hinu-lf has done more work than he and the other two ii-(Yiiii(I do because he did not ha ve them to worry him. Many people who conscientiously believe that they are indispensable—and who can convince others that they are really working hard—are reallv so many handicaps. It appears that there are a few people who would rather be regarded as traitors than as "slackers.' When asked to join the Army there are one or two in a thousand who 'will ask what difference it makes to them whether the Germans or the British win. One very obvious difference would be that if the Ger- mans annexed England, Conscription would be adopted and these "wasters" would be forced to serve in the German Army just as the Poles and the people of Alsace-Loraine a.re. It is no use telling these fellows that, because they know it; what they really want is to stick at home and trust to others being better men than they are. But rather than admit that they are slackers they pretend to be traitors. If their words were taken striiouslv they might be tried by court-martial and awarded anything from two years im- prisonment to shooting in the Tower. But 'it would be a pity to dignify them so much. After all. such men are no loss to any Army. There has a great slump in the sale of hair dye of late. Quite a large number of men dye their hair regularly, and at 5t5 are aMe to pass for 32. Some of them have aged terribly within the last three months. It was supposed at first that the national crisis was preying on their minds; but it now turns out that they have abandoned liair dyes, cosmetics, and other artificial rejuvenators because they have been worried by the re- cruiting OffiOOl., It would be father hard to expect some of these mature young men to enlist. It would !be subversive, of all disci- pline if they were in tne ranks and begin to "cheek" a perky grandson who had been ap- pointed a second-lieutenant. It is possible that before long some endea- vour will be made to adopt some ec-onomical method of improving our water supply. One suggestion is that water might be pumped up from the river Gwili into the reservoir. The water of the GwiJi is probably contaminated more or less; but it is easy enough to arrange a filtering bed. We managed for forty years with water pumped from the Towy, and the town was as healthy then as it is now—to put it mildly. It is probably not known that some of the original inflow to the Cwnioernant reservoir and to the Cvvmtawel reservoir was cut off because there was some suspicion as to con- tamination. If one only carried suspicion far enough, no water Is fit for drinking. In fact I have been told that water is a most un- healthy drink. I know a man who never touched water for 22 years and he enjoyed ,good hea.lth. One day in the beginning of the summer lie started to drink water. He was tulien seriously ill in a couple of days, and if lie had not renounced water he would probably have been dead by this time. As soon he gave it up lie recovered his normal health. and now he says that nothing will ever again induce him to touch it. Albtheu.

Correspondence

Correspondence. SOLDIERS AND SAILORS FAMILIES' ASSOCIATION. To the Editor Carmarthen Weekly Reporter. Siir,-At a meeting of the South Wales Nursing Association, held at Cardiff in September last, it was suggested that if a suitable candidate were found to train as a villaige nurse among the widows of soldiers who have fallen in the war. the county from which she was sent should endeavour to col- lect a grant of £25 to The sent to the South Wales Nursing Association towards her train ing. Mrs Rudman Saunders, of Glanrhydw, base found a most suitable person in her par- ish, a Mrs Griffiths, who has now commenced her training at Ptainston.and I haw grate- fully to aenowledge the following aubsorip- tions to this grant.— £ s d Soldiers and Sailors Families Assoc iation—grant from headquarters 8 0 0 Mrs Rudman Saunders 5 0 0 Lady Hills-Jobnes 5 0 0 Mrs Spenoe Jones 1 1 0 Baroness de Rutzen 1 1 0 Stepney Gulston. Esq, Derwydd. 1 0 0 The Dowager Countess of Cawdor .1 0 0 Mrs Gulston 1 0 0 Mrs J. W. GwynneHughes 1 0 0 G. Henlrev. Esq 1 0 0 Mrs Morgan Jones, Llanniiloe 1 1 0 Mrs Mervyn Peel, Da,nyrallt 1 0 0 Lady Dynevor 0 10 0 Jlrs Dudley Drummond 0 10 0 Mrs Moreton Evans 0 10 0 Lady Stafford Howard 0 10 0 Mrs W. Gwynne Hughes, Glanoothi 0 10 0 Mrs, Owen. The Palace 0 10 0 Mrs Peel, Taliaris 0 10 0 Mrs Bath, Alltyferin 0 10 0 The following is the list of clothes received during the three months. July, August and September: Carmarthen, 25; Llandilo. 11. Yours faithfullv, BEATRICE GWYNNE-HUGHES, !l Tregeyb. Lhvnchlo. -L ltC"lU'UII. I

HRH PRtXCE OF WAGES NATIONAL RELIEF FUND

H.R.H. PRtXC'E OF WAGES' NATIONAL RELIEF FUND. (County of Ctrma,rtlien) To the Editor Carmarthen Weekly Reporter. Sir,—I have much pleasure in acknowledg- ing the following amounts collected towards the above fund: Carried forward 2507 0 0 Employees Bynea Steel Works, Ltd. per Mr n hitaker Evans, manager 10 0 0 Employees Daften Tiiiiplate Co., Llan I elly, per Mr J. 8. Picton 20 0 0 Yours faithfuUv, I J. W. GWYNNE-HITGHES, Lord Lieut. County of Carmarthen. j Tregeyb, Llandilo..

An Interesting Scotch Proverb

An Interesting Scotch Proverb. Bread is the staff of life, but the pudtlin0- f K0°d crutch"!—that is if made with ATO'RA Beef Suet. More digestible and economical than if you use raw suet. Ask your grocer for it; refuse substitutes. 10 £ d per llh carton, whether bloek or shredded and Did per lb carton. Cabmabthsn Printed and Published by the Proprietress, M. LA WBENOE, at her Offices, 'I Blue Street, FRIDAY, November 12th, HJIJ.