Teitl Casgliad: Carmarthen weekly reporter

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Llun 1 o 4 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
8 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
Advertising

PLEASE CULL TO SEE OUR STOCK OF 1U^ I. AGRICULTURAL MACHINERY. 771, to II I 3: r 11. f110 & SO IE0M0NSERS, HOUSE FMISHEBS. ■ AND A&EICUIMAL EMEUS, O^IRM^RTIIiEJlT. Ironmongery-10 Hall Street and 9 Priory Street. Bedstead Showrooms5, St Mary Street. Furniture Showrooms-I St Mary Street. FartTi Implements—Market Place, Carmarthen, Llanelly, Llandyssul, and Llanybyther. Telegrams-" Thomasg Ironmongers, Carmarthen." Telephone-No. 19. PRINTINGI. PRINTINoil GOOD CHEAP AND EXPEDITIOUS PRINTING EXECUTED &T TRB "REPORTER" PRINTING & PUBLISHING OFFICES, t s blue-street OARMARTHEN ORDERS BY POST receive prompt and careful attention. p R ICE S ON AP P LIe A T ION. rile Carmarthen Weekly Reporter PCBMSHKD EVEBY THURSDAY EVENING, Circulates throughout South Wales generally, and has the LARGEST IROULATION IN THE COUNTY OFCARMARTHEN PBIO* ONK PKNNT POST FRZZlf9 PER QUABTKB THE BEST ADVERTISING MEDIUM FOR aLL CCA3SHS OF ADVERTISEMENTS. NOTICES TO QUIT FROM LANDLORD TO TENANT AND TENANT TO LANDLORD, Mt.) be obtained at the "RzpoBTM Oprloi;" Blue-atreet, Carniartbea. ^PRIvE.ONE PENNY. EORGE PLLLS A MARVELLOUS REMEDY. For upwards of Forty Years these Pills have held the first place in the World as a Remedy for PILES ind GRAVEL, and all the common disorders of the Bowels, Stomach, Liver, and Kidneys; and ■ there is no civilized Nation under the Sun that has not experienced their Healing Virtues. THE THREE EULZMS OF THIS REMEDY No. 1—George's Pile and Gravel Pills. No. 2—George's Gravel Pills. No. 3—George's Pills for the Piles, Sold everywhere in Boxes, 1/8 & 3/- each. By Post, 1/4 & 3/2. I PTTOPRIEFOR-J. E. CWKGB, B.a.p.s., HIDWAIN, AJSEKDASE. X STOP ONE MOMENT Y iOh Dear Doctor MUST I My Darling die? There is very little hope, "1- But try J TUDOR WILLIAMS PATENT | BALSAM OF HONEY. WHAT IT IS Tudor Williams' Patent Balsam of Honey Is an essence of the purest and most effica- cious herbs, gathered on the Welsh Hills and Valleys in their proper season, when their virtues are in full perfection, and combined with the purest Welsh Honey. All the in- gredients are perfectly pure. WHAT IT DOES I Tudor Williams' Patent Balsam of Honey Cures Coughs, Colds, Bronchitis, Asthma, Whooping Cough, Croup, and all disorders of the Throat, Ohest. and Lungs. Wonderful Cure for Children's Coughs after Measles. it is invaluable to weak-chested men, delicate women and children. It succeeds where all other remedies fail. Sold by all Chemists a.nd Stores in Is lid,, 2s 9d. and 4s 6d bottles. Great saving in purchasing larger size Bottles. WHAT IT HAS DONE FOR OTHERS. "What the Editor of the "Gentlewoman's Court Journal" says:- Sir,-The result of the bottle of your splendid Tudor Williams' Balsam of Honey is simply marvellous. My mother, who is over seventy, although very active, every winter has a bronchial cough which is not only distressing, but pulls her down a lot. Its gone now. With best wishes for your extraordinary preparation. W. Browning Hear den. YOU NEED NOT SUFFER! Disease is a sin, inasmuch that if you act rightly, at the right time, it can, to a great extent, be avoided. Here is the preventative The first moment you start with Sore Throat tae a dose of TUDOR WILLIAMS' -PAT:E:IsTT BALSAM OF HONEY. It has saved thousands! It will save Youl It is prepared by a fully qualified chemist, and is, by virtue of its composition, eminent- ly adapted for all cases of Coughs, Colds, Bronchitis, Esthma, etc., it exercises a dis- dinct influence upon the mucous lining of the throat, windpipe, and small air vessels, so that nothing but warmed pure air passes into the lungs. It's -the product of the Honeyoomb, chemically treated to get the best results. The Children like It. THEY ASK FOR IT So different from most medicines. Nice to Take Cuies Quickly For vocalists and public speaker* it has no e^ual, it makes the voicc as clear as a bell. Manufacturer • Manufacturer Tudor Williams, MEDICAL HALL, A BE RD A RE. TO POOR RATE COLLECTORS, ASSISTANT OVERSEERS, Ac. FORMS ot Notice of Audit, Collector s Monthly Statement, &c., Poor Rate Receipt Books, with Name of Parish, Particulare of Rate.&'c., printed in, can be obtained at the RieporLTER OFFICE at heap Rates. Send for Prices. J THE OMARTBEN BILIJPOSTING COMPANY, NOTT SQUARE, CARMARTHEN. BILLPOSTlNGand ADVERTISINGS all iti Branches, throughout the Counties of Carir » then, Pembroke, and Cardigan R. M JAMRS. Manager. Carmarthen Connty Schools. THE GRAMMAR SCHOOL. HEADMASTER: E. S. ALLEN, M.A. (CANTAB). COUNTY GIRLS- SCHOOL HEADMISTRESS: Miss B. A. HOLME, M.A., Late Open Scholar of Girton College, Cambridge. FaRs:-kl 9s. per Term (irclueive). Reduction when there ate more than one froru the same family. The Term began Tuesday, January 18th. Boarders can be received at the Grammar School. 1/1J WE CLAIM THAT 2/9 JDtt- rE-Z-S"S DROPSY, tIVER, AND WIND PILLS oraa Constipation, Backache, Indigestion, Heart Weak- ness, Headache, and Nervous Complaints. Mr. John Parkin, 8, Eden Crescent, Went Auckland, writeK. dated March 12th. 1912 "I must say that they are all that you represent them to be, they are splendid, indeed I wish I had known about them sooner. I shall make their worth known to all whobuff er from Dropsy." ?o!e Maker- S. J. COLEY A CO, 57 HIGH ST, STROUD,CLOS. WEDDING CARDS. NEW SPECIMEN BOCiK CONTAINING 1 LATEST & EXQUISITE DESIGNS Sent to intending Patrons at any add rese on receipt of an intimation to that effect. PRICES TO SUIT ALL CLASSES. j REPORT ER OFFIOE 3, BLU 81

Carmarthenshire Assizes

( Carmarthenshire Assizes The Carmarthenshire Assizes were opened on Tuesday at the Carmarthen Guildhall before i JU6t^ce Atkin. He was accompanied on the Bench by Mr J. H. Thoma-s (High Sheriff of Carmarthenshire), Mr W. W. Rrodie (the lender-Sheriff), Rev Canon Wateyn Morgan of Carmarthenshire), Mr W. W. Brodie (the lender-Sheriff), Rev Canon Wateyn Morgan (Sheriff s Chaplain).

THE GRAND JURY

THE GRAND JURY. THE GRAND JURY. The following gentlemen were sworn on the Irraml Jury Mr Mervyn Lloyd Peel (foreman), Mr C. Froodvale Davies, Mr W. Gordon Neville, Mr Luttrel Bruce Blake, Mr R. Whittaker Evans, Mr W. Llewellyn, Rev T. Lewis, Mr J. Lews (Mayor of Carmarthen), Mr H Dawkin Evans. Mr W. B. Jones. Mr J. Lewis (Ammanford), Mr H. E. Blagdon- Riohards, Mr Joseph Roberts. Mr W. E.*C>cil Tregcning. Mr Owen Williams, Mr W. Wil. liams, Mr Arthur Morgan, Mr T. Morris, and Mr T. Thomas. THE CHARGE. His Lordship in his charge to the Grand Jury said that lie was glad to that the Calendar which was to come before them was a very light one. This shows that in this county as elsewhere the diminution of crime during the period of the war is still apparent There were three cases on the Calendar; but three of them were cases which had very pro- perly been remitted from the Quarter Sessions to the Assizes for trial. The one case which would come before the Grant Jury was not a very serious one in its .nature, and one can only hope that the county in these times would be -as wai-like as it (is Jaw-abiding. A PAY TICKET SWINDLE. William Henry Richards was charged with converting to his own use a sum of £2 4s the property of Richard Erans. Mr Maria v Samson (instructed by Mr T. R. Ludford) appeared for the prosecution. The case as disclosed by Mr Samson was that the two men were working as partners, and that in tho ordinary course prisoner drew Evans's money from the office. The allega- tion was that Richards drew Evans's monev with the intention of depriving him of it Richard Evans, Rurry Port, a trammer at the Achddu Colliery, said that he worked five days on the day shift between the 20th and the 24th. Richards was working the night shMt. The wages due to witness amounted to 1:2 41.. Id. He went to the office for his money. He d:d not get it. In consequence of what he wa" told lie went after Richards. He asked Richards "What about my monev:" Richard replied "I haven't got your money." Richards said that lie had only 1:1 7s 5d. Witness ald that lie wanted to see the par ticket, and the defendant said that he had lost it. Witness then asked the defendant if he would come up and face the clerk. Defendant said that he would not. He said that he would call the following Monday. During this week the wit- ness had been working "piece work" with the defendant. When two men are working toge- ther on piece work, the joint tonnage is given to the checkweigher. The pay ticket is made out in the joint names, and either can draw it. Williani Thomas Williams. the pay clerk at Achddu Colliery, said the sum of £ 4 Os 8d was due to Rehards and Evans— £ 1 16s 7d for Richards and t2 4s Id for Evans. Defendant called for the money and had £ 4 Os Bd. In answer to a question by the Judge, the witness said that £ 4 Os 8d was more than one man could have earned as a trammer in the f" time. Defendant could not have thought it was aM for him. T-9 Lw^lirr Bonm-Jl, A.n-n a-i; the ".01. liery, said that he saw the envelope. Witness s-aid to defendant "You have been working on jobs last week, and you have Dick Evans's money in the bag." Defendant said "H'rn." Richard Da vies, weigher, said that he saw the money paid. He heard Bonnell tell the defendant that he had Dick Evans's money. ] John Bonnell, manager of the colliery, said • that the defendant had asked to be placed on i piece work or on "job" as it is called. Wit- ness that Evans would be on the same shift and that the money of both would be on the pay ticket. P.S. Mitchelmore gave evidence as to charging the defendant. Defendant said "I only had my own money in the hox." Defendant gave evidence on his own behalf. He said that he called at the office and had JE1 7s 5d. That was all he had. Cross-examined by Mr Marlav Samson: 1 have never been working on piece before. J had previously been on day work. I did not know that the. pay of two men was supposed to be on the same pay ticket. He had lost the pay ticket. It bore his own name only, and £1 7s od entered as the amount. The Jury without leaving the box found the prisoner "Guilty." They added that "We do not think it a right policy to have two men's pay in one bag." His Lordship The Colliery Co. can consider that. P.S. Mitchelmore, recalled. sa.d that the defendant had been convicted once of drun- kenness. The Judge said that if it were drink which had brought the defendant to this lie had better give up the drink. It was a very mean kind of theft. The sentence would be three months imprisonment with hard labour. ANOTHER PAY TICKET SWINDLE. Joseph Kieffe. a boy 17 years of age, em- ployed at the .Munition Works, was charged with forging a pay ticket. It appeared from the facts disclosed that the defendant had had "broken time" and had earned 15s. He d!d not wish his mother to know that he had missed so much time. He therefore altelied the pay ticket and so obtained 23s from the office. Mr Ma' lay Samson nros?cuted. and defen- dant pleaded "Guilty." The Judge said that the defendant had com- mitted a very wrong action. He was anxious to prevent his mother- knowing that he had missed a certain amount of time at the works; but his mother would .rather know that than know that lie had committed forgery and been arrested and tried at the Assizes. The offence was one for which there were serious penalties. On account of his previous good character, lie would be bound over in the sum of £ 5 to come up for judgment if called upon. EXTERNAL APPLICATION OF THE BOTTLE. Edward Scott was charged with wounding Clarence Osborne at Kidwelly. Mr Mervyn Howeill prosecuted. Clarence Osborne, Gwendraeth Town, Kid- welly. a water works jointer, said that on New Years Day. he wa& in the Bell Inn. Scott was there. They had a conversation about wages. Scott tried to strike him, and he struck Scott. Nothing more happened at the time. As witness was leaving the house the defendant hit him on the head with a bottle. Mrs Anne Daviee. of the Boll Inn. gave evi- dence as to the quarrelling, and the blow being struck. She saw Osborne strike first, Dr Griffiths described the wound. It was a wound caused by a blunt instrument. The bottle had eridentty not broken. P.C. orris produced the bottle. It was broken. The Judge. It is evidently broken off at the handle. What did he hit him with—a small Bass ? P.C. Morris: No a Welsh ale. Prisoner who made a statement from the dock, said that they were the worQ{> of drink. The other man hit him and he acted in self- defence. The Judge said that the bott!e was dan- gerous to these men in any form whether they swa.llowed its contents or applied it outside in this way. If however a man were attacked he should not u^e a bottle but use the weapons that nature gave him. Still when a man was acting in self-defence his actions were not to be weighed too carefully. It was for the jury to say whether they thought he had gone too far. The Jury found the prisoner "Not guilty." This concluded the business. The Court only lasted for an hour and a half.

Advertising

"IJXSMED COMPOUND" Aniseed. Senega Squill, tolu. etc.) for cough and colds, influe-naa. etc.

Court Martial at Scoveston

Court Martial at Scoveston. A court martial was held at Fort Sooreston Pembrokeshire. Two officers of the 2nd-4th Welsh Regiment, Temporay Major WT. Camp- bell Jones, Haverfordwest, and Captain and Adjutant J. Santa Evans. L-lanelly, were charged with insobriety. The president of the court was Col. C. I Philipps commander of the Severn Garrison), and the court was composed of Col. A. P. James, 5th Welsh Lieut.-W. J. A. Thomas. 2-6th Welsh; Major C. E. Warr, R.G.A.; Major A. E. Gordon, R.G.A.; Major N. B. C- Grounds, Liverpool Regiment; Major Hon. F. H. C. W'ild Forester. 3rd K.S.L.I.; Major G. H. L. Buchanan, 3rd K.S.L.I.; Major T. W. Price, Pembrokeshire R.G.A.; Major W. B. Dixon. 3-lst Breeknocks; Major G. A. Evans. 3-oth Welsh. The case against Major Jones was taken first. and he was charged with drunkenness at Fort Scoveston on August 25 and 26, and at Hearston Camp on November 8. The prosecutor was Brigade-Major Ready, and the judge advocate Major the Hon. H. M. Smith, D.S.O., while Mr Llewelyn Williams, K.C., M.P.. and Mr Trevor Hunter appeared for the accused. Major Ready handed in a written address I which was read by the President. This stated that the accused" was charged with being drunk on three eeparate occasions, some time ago. It was true that some months had elapsed since the alleged offences had been committed, but they were investigated as soon as the episode became known. At a crisis like this the present officer and every man ought to be doing his utmost to be trained in order to take part in the war. drunkenness was not conducive to training. The accused being a senior officer should set an example to his juniors. If the accusation was false it was only right that he should have every oppor- tunity of clearing himself by trial by eourt- iuartiai. The dates mentioned were difficult to prove, and some witnesses only gave approxi mate dates. Sergt. Frank Boxall, 2nd-4th Welsh, stated that on uugust 24th and August 25th he was officers' mes sergeant at Fort Scoveston. Early on the morning of August 25th a party of officers returned from Haverfordwest by motor car. Accused came into the mess with some other officers, and behaved in a very disorderly manner. They ordered drinks, and witness brought them in himself instead of sending waiters in. Candles had been lighted as the electric light had been switched off. Accused put the candles out by turning a. soda syphon upon them. He also ill-treated one of the waiters. Private Bryne. He also dropped some candle grease upon his head, whicn was bald. Bryne became so nervous through the ill-treatment lie had received that ^witness had to send him to bed. Pte. Fisher was the man in charge of the bar and officers' mes«. Subsequently the accused and other officers started to pull some of the tents down. They went to the tent occ upied by Lieutenant Rogers and pulled the tent pegs out.. Lieut. Rogers came out of his tent, without being observed, with a. bucketful of water, which he threw over all of them. Major Jones then gave his evidence. He eajd that he was now attached to 3rd-4th Welsh, but in August he was attached to the 2nd-4th Welsh and was stationed at Fort Scoveston. He was on leave from August 20 to August 24 in London. On the later date he left Paddington by train at 4.30 p.m.. and arrived at Neyland between 11.45 and 12 mid- night. He walked from Neyland to Fort 0ouveTjxojn. and was accompanied by Lanoe- Corpl. Evans who canned his bag for him. When he got to Fort E-ovostrvn ho "irA I!cM up to the top road and straight to his tent. He lit the lamp, undressed and went to bed. That would be about one o'clock. Accused had started to dress when Lance-Corporal Francis left the tent. He did not leave his tent again until he went to early morning parade, about seven o'clock in the morning. Captain and Adjutant John Santa Evans, 2nd-4th Welsh Regiment, said that he remem- bered the sergeants' mess da.nce at Fort Scovston on August 25. He also remembered the previous night, August 24. He went to bed between 10.20 and 10.30 p.m. Have you anything to fix this night in your memory?—I ^member it distinctly because before I retired my servant massaged my foot. I was suffering from an accident which hap- pened six or seven weeks previously. Did you attend the sergeants' mess dance on August 25 :1 did turn in. Were you suffering from your foot then?- I was. Did you dance?—I attempted one square dance. I walked the dance really, and caused some ausement by trying to dance on my lett foot. Where were your quartcMI-in the fort or outside?—In the fort. sir. Having retired to bed at 10.20 p.m. on August 24, what time did you leave your quar- ters?—My usual time, between 6.30 and 7 a.m. on August 25. Did you see Major Jones on the night of August 24 or the early hours of the morning of August 2,") -I did not. Where were you on September 2nd?—1 slept the night at my home at Llanelly on leave. The decision of the Court will be promul- gated in due course.

Stitch in Time

Stitch in Time. There is an old saying "A sUtch hI time i/irtv nine" and if 1.fn the first lymptomg 01 anything being wrong with our health "e wete to resort to somt simple but proper means of correcting tbfi miw!LW IDe-tentha of the suffering that invades onr homes woald be avoided. A daxs of 0 ciJjm ETaQat Quinine Bitters taken w^en f n feel the least bit. out of sorts is jt tb. t I -Wteh in time." You can "et Gwi1.r.n E ans' Quinine Bitters at any Chemists or Stoi ac in bottles, 2s fid and 4s 6d each, but rroen.her that the only guarantee of genuine* "U is the name "Gwilym Evans" ou the la cl, stamp an bottlo, without which none < tie genuine. Sole Proprietors: Quinino Bitten Manufacturing Ccmpaoj, Limited, Llanelly, South Wale

Cardigan Bay Mystery

Cardigan Bay Mystery. BODIES AND WRECKAGE WASHED ASHORE. The shores of Cardigan Bay are strewn with wreckage, apparently that of a big ship sunk in the recent hoavy gale. The bodies of three men have come ashore north and south of New Quay. Two of the bodies were dressed in unhform trimmed with goltf braid. Sea chests have been picked up containing letters in Spanish and photographs of family groups, and one of a young lady with the name and address of a Valparaiso photographer on the bake: also South American bank notes. Two of the deceased men had gold watches in their pocets, andk in a diary was written the name of Juan Vigo, of Calo Saqwda. Valencia. The diary also contained a certificate showing that Ule owner had passed as a wireless teleg- raphist in June, 1913. Large quantities of tallow have been picked up. also some hun- dredweights of material which looks like lime- stone. but which flares up like wax when thrown on the fire. -Portions of the wreckage bears the names "Francois" and "Westfalen.' Beyond these there is nothing to identify the ship.

LLAiDBIE FATALITY

LLAiDÐBIE FATALITY. At an inquest at Llandebie on Thursday the 13th inst. the jury added a ridor to the ver- diet oi "Accidental death" that the County bye-Jaws should bt,, ifteTed so as to compel the carrying of two lights oil veil idlest instead of one. It appeared that the deceased. Jeremiah Sheelv, had been knocked down and fatally injured bv n horse and trap carrying only one light. The injuries sustained by deceased were concussion of the brain and two broken l ribs which peutmted the lungs.