Teitl Casgliad: Carmarthen weekly reporter

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 2 o 4 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
16 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
PRUDENTIAL ASSURANCE COMPANY LIMITED CHIEF OFFICE HOLBORN BARS LONDON

PRUDENTIAL ASSURANCE COMPANY, LIMITED CHIEF OFFICE HOLBORN BARS, LONDON. SUMMARY OF THE REPORT PRESENTED AT THE SIXTY-SEVENTH ANNUAL MEETING, HELD ON MARCH 2ND, 116. ORDINARY BR A NTH. -The number of. pdlieies issued during the vear was 68,785, assuring .the sum- of £ 6,619,218, and producing a new annual premium income of £ 457,217. The premiums received during the year were £5).57,516. being an increase of L121,891 over the year 1914. The claims of the year" amounted to £ 4,330;768, of which £ 145,536 was in respect of War Claims. The number of deaths was 11,358. The number of endowment assurances matured was 25,559. the premium income of which wad £ 137,797. The number of poLiciefr in force at the end of the year was 935,514. INDUSTRIAL BRANCH.—The premiums received during the year were £ 8,506,063, bein £ an increase of £ 329,861. The claims of the year amounted to JE3;930j596, of which £ 425,499 was in respect of 25,379 War Claims. The bonus additions in- cluded in the claims amounted to £ 276,721. The total number of claims and surrenders, including 15.505 endowment assurances matured^ was 429,510. The number of free policies granted during the year to those policyholders of five years' standing and upwards who desired to discon- tinue their payments was 88,384, the number in force being 1,984,523. The number of free policies which became claims during the year wm 51,417. The totaJ number of policies iw force in this Branch, at the end of the year was 20,859,887 th«u: average duration exceeds thirteen years. The War Claims paid during the year, in both- Branches, number 26,826 and amount to 9571,035. The total paid up to the present on this account since the outbreak of War exceeds £ 750,000 in respect of over 34.500 claims. GENERAL BRANCH. — Under the Sickness Insuranoe Tables the premiums received during the year were £ 9,06o and £ 5,468 was paid in Sickness claims. The whole of the Jund of 216,965 is reserved for future liabilities. The assets of the Company, in all branches, as shown in the balance sheet, are £ 4,794,798 being an increase of £ 3,592,454 over those of 1914. 'Bhe Directors, after careful consideration, feet justified in paying a bonus on all partici- sat-fflig policies of the Ordinary Branch which become claims either by death or maturity during the financial year, but in view of the present unsettled conditions it is not proposed to make a general distribution of bonus, and "bhe athareholdena will not therefore receive any part of the profits of this Branch. The inte- rests of participating policyholders are safe- guaorded by a Special- Contingency Fund of 9700,000. Th» proviisions relating to Industrial Assur- ance contained in the Courts (Emergency iPowers) Act, 1914, have resulted in a severe ifftra^n upon the Company's resources, which has reduced the surplus shown on the opera- tions of the year, and whilst these provisions remain in force the strain must continue. In these circumstances the Directors have not felt justified in drawing upon the £ 300,000 set as last year to meet contingent liabilities created by the Act. but have met the loss out of revenue, and in addition have felt it neces- sary to increa.se the amount set aside by £ 50,000. The Courts (Emergency Powers) Act Reserve therefore stands, as at 31st De- cember, 1915, at £ 350,000. The profit sharing scheme in the Industrial Branch provides that after payment of a fixed dividend to the shareholders anv surplus profit shall be divided into six parts; one part being retamed by the shareholders, one distributed among the outdoor staff of -the Company and the remaining four parts being alloted by way of bonus to the policyholders of the Industrial Branch. The sum which has already been paid or allotted under this scheme by way of bouns to the Industrial Branch policyholders and out- door staff. amounts to £ 2,825,000. The amount of surplus shown this year does not permit of a,ny increase being made to this sum, there is, however, a substantial balance still remaining, from which bonus additions will be made to the sums assured on all policies in the Industrial Branch of over ten years' duration which become claims eitiher by death or maturity 'of endowment from the 3rd of March, 1916, to the 1st of March, 1917, both dates inclusive, at follows:— Premiums Paid For Bonus Addition I To Sums Assured. 10 years and less than 35 years— £ 2 10s p. cent 35 years and less than 40 years— £ 5 per cent. 40 years and less than 45 years— £ 15 per cent. 45 years and less than 50 years— £ 30 per cent. 50 years and less than 55 yeaxs-k40 per cent. 55 years and less than 60 years-L50 per cent. 60 years and upwards — £ 60 per cent. The strain imposed upon the Company by the operation of the Courts (Emergency Powers) Act and the necessity of reserving I funds to meet the liabilities which this Act unnecessarily and inequitably creates, are in a large measure responsible for the temporary suspension of the profit sharing scheme; this year there will be no surplus profit sharing by the shareholders or by the outdoor staff, while the fixed dividend of the shareholders will be ..reduced by £ 100,000. In addition to the reserves, held against the liabilities shown by the valuation the total amount reserved for contingencies, including amounts carried forward, exceeds £ 4,100,000. The Balance Sheet includes amounts total- ling over £ 13.000,000 in War Loan and Trea- sury Bills'. The increase in the holding of British Government Securities compared with last year is £ 11,849,133, against a decrease of tS.26,885 in the Balance Sheet item "Rail- way and other debentures, and debenture stocks and gold and sterling bonds—Home and Foreign." Apart from the purchase of 4i per cent. War Loan, this is principally due to the sale to the Government m July last of the whole of the Company's holding of United States securities. The following letter was received from the Chancellor of the Exchequer in connection ] with the transaction:— (Copy). TMASUBY CHAMBERS, WHITEHALL, S.W., Dear Sir, 4th August, 1915. I have to thank the Prudential Assurance on behalf of His Maesty's Government for the patriotic spirit they have shown in placing the whole of their American securities at the dis- posal of the Treasury at a fair and reasonable price. The transaction has been of consider- able asistance in facilitating. Exchange opera- tions, and the greatest credit is due to the Company for its prompt action. Yours very truly, R. McKENNA. G. E. MAY, Esq., Secretary. Prudential Assurance Company, Ltd. The six Prudential Approved Societies formed under the National Insurance Act 1911 continue to make satisfactory progress, and the valuable services rendered to the mem- bers by the Agency Staff are highly appre- ciated. The amount distributed in benefits to the members at their homes during the year amounted to £ 1.414,100, making a total ex- ceeding L4,400,000 since the commencement of the Act. It is with feelings of pride and satisfaction that the Directors are able to report that no fewer than 9,221 of their staff axe either serving with the Colours or have attested or been rejected for service; 1.305 from the in- door staff and ,916 from the outdoor staff.

Balance Sheet of the Prudential Assurance Company Limited being theI 4hi

Balance Sheet of the Prudential Assurance Company, Limited, being the I 4hi Summary of all Branches, on the 31st December, 1915. I LIABILITIES, £ a d Shareholders'capital 1,000,000 0 0 Life assurance fund Ordinary branch 947,381,780 6 7 Life assurance fond Industrial Branch 42,322,260 5 10 Sickness insurance fund General branch 16,955 6 11 89,722,995 19 4 Investments reserve funds .2,600,000 o 0 Contingency fund 700,000 0 0 Courts (Emergency Powers) Act Reserve 350,000 0 0 Claims under life policies intimated and in course of payment 267,084 8 10 Annuities due and unpaid 2,856 10 4 Balance of bonus under life policies reserved for distribution in In- dustrial Branch 151,661 12 7 294,794,798 11 1 „ ASSETS.: £ d Mortgages on property within the United Kingdom 9,433.218 13 3 Mortgages on property out of the United Kingdom 310,165 14 4 Loans on parochial ann other public rates 1,864,386 0 9 Loans on Life interests 1,123,287 0 11 Loans on Reversions 50,884 8 5 Loans on stocks and shares 75 385 2 0 Loans on Company's policies within their surrender values 3,043,561 5 7 Loaoa on Personal tecurity Nil. Loans to Educational Instituoions secured on income, &c. 41,989 11 4 Investments:— Deposit with the High Court (216,266 13s 4d 4i per cent War Loan 1925-1945) 16,080 19 1 Carried forward E26,958,158 15 8 ASSETS-continued. £ 8 d Brought forward 26,958,158 15 8 Investments (continted) :— British Government securities— 4 per cent War Loan 1925-1945 24,912,421 19 0 Treasury Bills 8,199,256 9 7 Government An- nuities, &e. 64,307 16 4 Local Loans Stock &c. 88,002 0 0 ———-——— 13,263,988 4 11 Bank of England stock 143,117 2 10 Municipal and county securities, United Kingdom 1,673,037 13 5 Indian And :Colonial Government securities. 4,639,591 12 8 Colonial provincial securities 1,359,655 5 10 Indian and Colonial municipal securities 3,558,890 19 9 Foreign Government securities 6,151,487 17 6 Foreign provincial secretaries 791,846 12 10 Foreign munictpal securities 3,417,044 17 11 Railway and other debentures and debenture stocks and gold and sterling bonds—Home it Foreign 12,971,059 0 11 Railway and other preference and guaranteed stocks and shares 3.243,090 4 1 Railway and other ordinary stocks and shares 2,856,222 9 10 Rent charges 597,710 16 6 Freehold ground rents and Scotch feu duties 4,775,293 0 6 Leasehold ground rente 9,878 14 5 House property 4,263 067 18 6 Life interests 34,626 14 6 Reversions 1,283,446 1 6 Agenti;' balances 6,025 2 10 Outstanding premiums 614,662 14 1 Outstanding interest and rents 124,497 12 10 Interest dividends and rents accrued but not payable 510,720 13 1 Bills receivable Nil. Cash-On deposit 20,000 0 0 In hand and on current accounts 1,527,678 4 2 4, 7_9, 798. 11 i The values of block Exchange securities are determined, under the Articles of Associa- tion-of the Company by the Directors. Due allowance has been made for accrued interest, and the book value of these securities as set forth in the Balance Sheet stands considerably below cost price. A careful investigation as to the actual saleable value on 31st December 1915 (all minimum price quotations being greatly reduced), compared with the book value, snow's that the lnventments Reserve Funds are much more than sufficient to meet any depre- oiation of the permanent securities. Terminable securities have been valued on a basis whtdh, with Sinking Funds already established, provides for the equalisation of the book values and tho redemption valiies at the date of maturity. certify that in our belief the Assets set forth in the Balance Sheet (having regard to the standards indicated) are in the aggregate fully of the value stated1 therein less the In- vestment Reserve and Contingency Funds taken into account, and make ample provision tor all the liabilities of the Company. No part of any fund has been applied directly or in- directly for any purpose other than the class of business to which if- is applicable. THOS. C. DEWY, Chairman. A. C. THOMPSON, Gettet-al Ifanager. J. BURN. Actuary G. E. MAY, Secretary. W. J. LANCASTER. t I JAMES MOON, 1 Dmetor*. lie report that with the assistance of the Chartered Accountants as stated below we have examined the foregjoing accounts and have obtained all the information and explana- tions that we have require-d and in our opinion such accounts are correct and the foregoing Balance Sheet is properly drawn up so as to exhibit a true and correct view of the of ..the Company s affairs according to the best of our information and the explanations given to us and as shown by the books of the Company. No part of any fund has been applied directly or indirectly for any purpose other than the class of business to which it is applicable. PHILIP SEC RET AN, 7 W. H. NICHOLLS, j Auditors. We have examined the cash transactions (recipts and payments) affecting the accounts j of the Assets and Investments for the year ended December 31st. 1915, and we find the or same in good order and properly vouched. We have also examined the Deeds and Securi- ties, Certificates, &c., representing the Assets and Investments set out in the atiove account and we certify that they were in possession and safe custody as on December 31st, 1915. 15th- February 1016. DELOITTE. PLENDER, GRIFFITHS & Co., Chartered Accountants

No title

Prospectuses and other information can beobtained of the District Superintendent Mr T. Reed, 2, St. David's Avenue, Carmarthen or the Assistant Superintendents, Mr W. Gr 4 Rrahmond terrace, Carmarthen; Mr R. A. Evans. Devonshire House, Llandilo; or Mr T Morreli, Hill House, St. Clears.

Advertising

WATCHES & CLOCKS REPAIRED. JEWELLERY REPAIRED LIKE NEW. GILDING AND ELECTRO PLATING. HIGH-CLASS WORKMANSHIP. ESTIMATES GIVEN ALL WORK GUARANTEED kT JOHN WILLIAMS Watchmaker, Jeweller, & Silversmith, 9 10 Lammas Street, OARMARTHElsr. Established 1836. W. S. MORiilS, Wholesale Grocer, Corn, Flour and Seed Merohant, O.A. MARTHEN. Nat. Telephone, 50. Telegrams, "Morris, Merchant Carmarthen." SEND FOR PRICE LISH WEDDING CARDS. Anyone requiring the above should, before placing their orders, send for our NEW SPECIMEN BOOK CONTAINING THE CHOICEST DESIGNS CARDS AND FBIOKS BUITABL8 "tOB ALL CLASSES BOOKBINDING — O. TITUS WILLIAMS IBOOIKIIBIIsriDEilR,, ETC, I CHAPEL ST., CARMARTHEN. Magazines, Periodicals and all kinds of Publications Bound to suit the owner's taste. Hymn Books, Bibles, etc., repaired and re-covered Books Bound in Publishers'Casts at Publishers' Prices BOOKBINDING TO THE TRADE. __n r. .I" ;i ;:i'¡.> Hi bw 0 IV 10 cl(fss i, tit n eios. Lewis Sf Clare, CAVENDISH HOUSE 41 KING STREET, CARMARTHEN. Re Evan Howells (deceased), Eím Merchant, John Street, Carmarthen. ANY PERSON having any claim against the above estate, are requested to send particulars thereof to me the undersigned on or before the 18th day of March, 191G. W. THOMAS. 18 John Street, Carmarthen. TO ADVERTISEttS. PRKPAID SCALE OF CHARGES FOR ADVERTISING IN THE REPORTER. No. of One rhres Six Words. Insertion. Insertions. Insertions. s did d 20 1 0 2 3 3 6 28 1 6 36 4 6 36 2 0 4 0 ri6 44 2 6 4 6 6 6 The above scale only applies to the Situations, To Lets." and "To be Sold by Private Treaty, clasns of Advertisements, and must be paid for in, advance, or the ordinary credit rate will be charged, HALFPENNY STAMPS, or Postal or Post Office Orders, payable to M. LAWRENCE, at Carmarthen, Replies may be made addressed to the Reporte* Office, and will be forwarded to advertisers wheu stamped envelopes are sent. IN MEMORIAM CARDS—We have a large and assorted stock to select from. Prices to suit all classes.—Reporter Office, Carmarthen. JAMES JONES, Billposter and Advertising Agent for Kidwelly and neighbouring Villages. All work duly executed. Address :—Station Road, Kidwelly. LOST.—Bull terrier dog, answering to the name of "Terror," marked with brown spot on fore- head. Missing since December 18th, 1915. Whoever returns same to Richard Evans, Lower Brickyard, Carmarthen, will be rewarded. MOLE SKINS.—Augustus C. Edwards & Sons (The Furriers of the West), 16, 17. & 18 High Town, Hereford, give 30s per hundred for best Winter Skins. Largest buyers in England. VISITING CARDS from Is 6d for 50; Printed on Ivory Cards.— Reporter Office, Carmarthen. WANTED, Oat-door APPRENTICES (Mais and Female) for the General Furnishing.— Harries, Towy Works, Ltd., Carmarthen. WEDDING CAHDS—Prices and styles to suit all Classes. Speciment Book, containing the Latest and Choicest Designp, sent on application.— Reporter Office, Carmarthen. WRITING PAPER AND ENVELOPES. Large quantity always in Stock .—Reporter Office, Carmarthen. WORK IS DESIRED, in or near Carmarthen (charing, cleaning, etc.), for a strong Belgian Girl.-Apply to the Housing Secretary, 54 King Street, Carmarthen.

No title

WILL.—Mr David Thomas Harries, of 8, Francis terrace, Carmarthen, who died on the 29th June last, left estate of the gross value of £210, and probate of his will has been granted to his son, Mr Noah Henry Harries, and Air I. H. Ungood Thomas, solicitor, Car- marthen. CONCERT.—A very sucoesful concert was given at Priordy schoolroom on the 9th inst., in the presence of a large audience. The chair was occupied by Aid. L. D. Thomas, who car- ried out his duties in a creditable manner. Appended is the programme:—Part son, "Cor y Wynfa," Choir; pianoforte solo, "Graceful Dancies," Miss Bessit Morgan.; song, "Cymru Fad," Miss Agnes Williams; song, "Y Ddwy Delyn," Mr Torn Davies; song, "Whisper and I shall hear," Miss Oeridwen Davies; recita- tion, Hywel Myrddin (encored); duett, "Mae'r Byd yn llawn o Garni," Miss Gwladys Jones and Miss Agnes Williams; violin solo, Mr A. 1. Jones; glee, "Y Goedwig," Choir; song, "Laddie in Khaki," Miss Agnes Williams (en- cored); song, "A Slave Song," Miss Gwladys Jones (encored) octette, "Ti Wyddost," Mr John Thomas and friends; recitation, Hvwel Myrddin (encored); solo, "Lead, Kindly Light," Mr John Thomas violin solo, Mr A. I. Jones; chorus and solos, "Clyw fy Ngweddi" (Mendelssohn), Choir, Miss Oeridwen Davies and Miss Gwladys Jones. The singing of the choir was of a high standard and reflected great credit on the conductor, Mr W. Dunn Williams, G. and L. The accompanist was Miss Olwen Hopkins, A.T.C.L., who discharged her duties in her usual able manner. The usual votes of thanks were passed and the singing of "Hen Wlad fy Nhadau," the solo being taken by Mr Tom Davies, terminated a very enjoyable evening.

Sad Occurrence at Castell Howell

Sad Occurrence at Castell Howell. DEATH OF FARMER'S SON. On Wednesday morning Mr John Davies, aged 32, a farmer's son living at Castlehowell, Llanegwad, died suddently. Mr Davies had been in weak health for some ti.meand was under medical attendance. He got up at 5 a.m. on Wednesday and drank a doge of some preparation he had in bin room. Shortly afterwards he died. An inquest will be held.

CARMARTHENSHIRE INFIRMARY COLLECTION

CARMARTHENSHIRE INFIRMARY COLLECTION. The Committee of the Oarmarthenshire In- firmary find it necessary to appeal to the generous public, by astroet and house collec- tion, for increased financial support. The success of the appeal made to the publio by the Red Crose Society on behalf of its hospitals for wounded soldiers has been as remarkable as it has been gratifying, but the Carmarthen- shire Infirmary has in no way benefited from the funds so raised; for it is not regarded as a Red Cross Hospital. It has however fitted up a ward for the reception of wounded soldiers, and from the commencement of the war has reserved twelve beds for their accommodation. The number of soldiers so treated in the Infir- mary up to the present date is 32 and the average number of days of each in the Institu- tion has been 28. This arrangement for the reception of soldiers haa in no way restricted the aid afforded to the sick and poor in the county. As a matter of fact the number of civilian patients, especially those requiring serious surgical aid, is larger than in. former years. This increase in the number of inmates of This increase in the number of inmates of the Infirmary together with the greatly in- creased cost of all that is necessary for the efficient working of the Institution has proved a strain upon its resources, and iit must result in a considerably overdrawn balance at the bank, unless a generous response is made to the appeal. SATURDAY, MARCH 25TH im the day for the collection.

Liquor Control in South Wales

Liquor Control in South Wales. DEPUTATION llIoMCARiMARTHEN. The Central Liquor Control Board meets at Swansea on Monday. The decision arrived at bv the Board at that sitting is likely to affect Carmarthenshire, Glamorganshire, and Mon- moutliahire. The Mayor (Mr John Lewis) and the Town Clerk (Mr H. B. White) will repre- sent Carmarthen. On Thursday (yesterday) the licensed vic- tuallers of the district had a conference at Swansea in order to formulate their case. The Swansea in order to formulate their case. The trade in Carmarthen was represented by Mr W. H. Jones. Mansel Arms. The report of the Head Constable of Car- marthenshows a striking reduction of drun- kenness for the year 1915.

Theological Students and gl the Army

Theological Students and gl the Army. WAR OFFICE AND LOCAL TRIBUNALS. We understand that the War Office has this week issued a circular stating that ministerial students who have commenced thei,r profes- sional studies are to be exempt for Army Ser- vice irrespective of the time required to lniah the course.

Carmarthen Cymmrodorion

Carmarthen Cymmrodorion. LECTURE OX MUSIC. The Mayor (Mr John Lewis) presided at a meeting of the Carmarthen Cymmrodorion Society held at Water street Schoolroom on Friday the 11th inst. Dr Vaughan Thomas, M.A., Swansea, de- livered a lecture on "Music, how to listen and appreciate it." He explained the difference between singing and music. Music was. not mere sound. Rhythm was as necessary 811 in the case of poetry, and the arrangement of the notes are necessary; a composition must have form. The true musician must have some- thing to say. The romantic element has come into modern music. In order to illustrate his points the lecturer played some classical pieces from Beethoven, and sang Schubert's song "On the River." Miss H. J. Jones sang a solo, as did also Mr Jaok Thomas. The choir, led by Mr William Jones, rendered a part song. A solo from Dr Thomas's work "Yspryd y Mynydd" was sung by Miss M. Jones. A vote of thanks to the lecturer was pro- posed by Mr T. Howell Davies, seconded by Mr Dunn Williams and carried unanimously.

IMCOim

^IMCOim CONCERT.—On Monday night, March 6th. a grand concert was 'held at the Council School under the presidency of Lieut. General Sir James Hills-Johnes, Dolaucothi, who though over 80 years of age was as joyful and active all ever. The Cwmcothi Choir saing admirably and the school children, rendered their parts excellently umdier the I-eademhip of Mr Frederick, the schoolmaster, and Miss Williams the assistant mistress, who had taught the young children easy and interesting recitations A vote of thanks to the chairman was proposed by the Rev Evan "Williams, M.A., Llanddeu- sant, and seconded by Mr Jones, Glanmeddyg, which was unanimously carried and gracefully aoknuowledged by Sir James Hilla-Johnes. The singing of Hen Wlad fy Nhadau and God save the King brought a; very successful meet- ing to a close. FOR THE BLOOD IS THE LIFE.-Clarkea Blood Mixture is warranted to cleanse the blood of all impurities, from whatever cause prising For Scrofula, Scurvy, Eczema, Bad Legs, Abscesses, Ulcers, Glandular Swellings, Skin and Blood diseases Pimples and Sores of all kinds, its effects are marvellous. Over 50 years success. Thousands of testimonials. In bottles, 2s 9d, each of all ohemlsts & stores Ask for Clarke's Blood Mixture and do not be persuaded to isko an imitation

LOIJAL WAR ITEMS

LOIJAL WAR ITEMS. Another detachment of the P.I.Y. left Car- marthen. last week for Brecon. • Information has reached Mr and Mrs Stephens, London House, Llandilo, that their son, Sergt. W. 0. Stephens, has been pre- sented with the D.C.M. for gallantry at Loos in September last.* He was very severely wounded in the left arm, and, rendered in- capable of using his rifle, he took the revolver of a wounded officer, and as the result of his courageous leadership his men managed to I capture a third line trench. I The following are extracts from a letter written home by Corpl. Willie Davies, of the 10th Royal Welsh Fusiliers, who has arrived at St. John's Hospital, Dore, hear Sheffield, suffering from wounds sustained during the recent German offensive in the region of Ypses. He is a son of ex-P.C. Wm. Davies, Wood's-row, Carmarthen, and was at one time employed at the Town Clerk's Office, Carmar- then :—"I hope you are in good health. I ex- pect not having heard from me this last eight days you are getting anxious, but as I wrote in my previous letter that we were going to be a bit busy Ihope you have not greatly worried. We were put on rest for a month or so doing Army routine. Well the Division that took our trenches lost them and we were sent "up the line" post haste. It is now known that we took them at a walk, it being in the papers (photographs and all) about the bluff. Ihe Third Division (to which the writer belongs) is called "The Fighting Third," and it was read out in Orders before we went into the oharge that it was General Picton's Division in the d-av gone by, and had great traditions, etc. Well to get to the point, I was knocked down twice by shrapnel, and if it was not for my new shrapnel helmet, which we are being dished out with. I would have been wounded worse than what I am, and it has saved hun- dreds. When I got to hospital it was found I was suffering, t^om ,trench feet, bpt.1 am .,t- ing on fine, so do not worry. ••• News was received at Carmarthen this week of the death from pneumonia, in a hospital in France, of Pte. Archie Evans, of the Royal Engineers. He is a son of Mr Evans, saddler, Lammas street, Carmarthen, and was former- ly employed as a clerk at Messrs Morgan (jrriffitns Son and Grosser, Carmarthen. In reply to their request that a captured German gun should be permanently stationed in the town. the Carmarthen Town Council have bee informed by the military authorities that no allotment-of German guns will be made until after the war. ••• Sapper Ritchie Davies, of the 1st Welsh Field Co., R.E., is home on sick leave from a hospital at Buddersifield. Sapper Davies, who contracted fever at Gallipoli, was formerly em- ployed by his uncle, Mr R. M. James, saddler, Nott-square, Carmarthen. ••• The following is taken from the "London Graeette" dated March 2nd, 1916, which ex- plains how Lanoe-Sergt. J. A. Orman, of the 4th Welsh, won the D.C.M.: "For conspicuous galhwitry on August 11, 1915, at Suvla, in con- ducting a reoonnaisance of the enemy's posi- tion under heavy fire. On August 19 he voluntarily carried 'an important message under very dangerous conditions." He lives at Glannant road, Carmarthen, and was for- merly employed as a collier at the Tumble. Lieut. Waliley Lloyd, of the R.A.M.C., has been promoted to the rank of Captain. He is a son of Mr Walter Lloyd, J.P., Lammas street, Carmarthen, and is at present in a large military hospital in London. .9. Sergt. Jones, of the Army Service Corps (M.T. was home on leave last week end. He was formerly employed at the Excelsior Photo- grahpic Co. **• Pte. W. Walter Jones, of the Welsh Guards, was home on leave last week end. He is a brother of Mr J. Tom Jones, ironmonger, Bridge street, Carmarthen. •*« Pte. Arthur Lewis, of the Army' Service Corps, was home on leave this week. Ho has been for several months in Egypt where he contracted fever, but is now stationed in London. Pte. Lewis is a son of Mr Harry Lewis, butcher, Waterloo terrace, Carmar- then. Seaman David Morris, of the Royal Naval Division, Crystal Palace, was home on short leave last week previous to going to sea. He is a son of Mr Evan (Morris, clothier, Lammas street, Carmarthen. ••• Lieut. and Adjutant R. W Ward, of the Lancashire Fusiliers, was home on leave this week. He was for many years on the staff of the Carmarthenshire R.G.A. (Militia) and previous to rejoinng the colours was manager of the Rink and Picturedrome, Carmarthen.

WANTED BllTIEUMAKERS

WANTED, BllTIEUMAKERS. British Butter is nnquestionally better than foreign yet the latter is often bought iu preference. This is an injustice both to the British producer and the buyer. It is an injury which could easily be avoided. The British housewife believes that butter presenting a rich golden uniform eolcur is the ideal. The foreign producer meets her wish, and all his butter has the rich golden colour which sells. A perfectly safe means is provided whtreby the British maker can impart to his butter just that golden colouring which will com- mend it to the eye, as decidedly as its quality will commend it to the palate. The remedy is the "Silver Churn butter colour, manufactured by Oldfielrl, Pat- tinson. and Co., of Manchester, the succeaful survivor of the severest tests at the principal shows, where it has gained First Class awards for 30 years. Equally satisfactory is the high praise it has won in the numerous dairies where it is regularly used These competent approvalt3 are due to the absence of any un. eveuness or muddiness in the Colouring, and to the fact that the use of Silver Churn does not effect the buttermilk. The butter itself is not injured in the process; it is improved. Its delicate creamy flavour is enhanced. It should be clearly understood that "Silver Churn" ii a vegetable product, entirely free from any aniline dye. (A guarantee by the makers to this effect will be given any user desiring it). It n.ay be obtained from Chemists and dairy supply men in 6d., Is., 2s., 5" 8s., and 14s. bottles. To secure sat. isfaction obtain the" Silver Churn" brand. Free trial samples from the manufacturers. Also Silver Churn Butter Powder. Silver Churn Cheese Rennet. Silver Churn Cheese Colouring.

Obituary

Obituary. MRS E. L. JONES. Mrs Ellen Lodwick Jones, the wife of Mr J. Jones, srbationmaster of Bynea, near LlaiieUy away on Thursday, Morch 2nd, at the age of 50 yeairsi. Mrs Jones was fairly well up to Thursday, so her death came as a shock to all who knew her. She was a faithful member of Berea. We extend our sympathy to the husband, two daughters and son in their tiad bereavement. The funeral took place on Monday, the interment being at Bryn Cemetery, the Rev J. Evans;, Bryn, officiating at the house and the Revs J. P. Evans (Penygrnig, Carmar- then), Jonest Llwynhendy; Hughes, Swan sea; and Bell, Nasareth-, at the church and graveside. MRS JA.8rE EVANS. We regret to record the death of Mrs Jane Evans, widow of Mr John Evans, Llansamlet (formerly of Carmarthen) and a sister of Mrs Evans, 3, tn&2el street, Carmarthen, which took place on Sunday evening at her residence in Llansamlet. The deceased, who was 69 years of age, had been in ill-heailth for a con- siderable time and had bourne her long suffer- ing with true Christian fortitude. She is sur- vived by three WIllS and one daughter, with whom the deepest sympathy is felt in their sad bereavement. l'he funeral took place at Llangennech Churchyard on Thursday (yeetor- day). MISS XELLA HOLDEN. Miss Nella Holden—niece of Mr J. Joshua, Red street, Carmarthen—died on the 12th inst. at her home in Llanbradach street, Grangetown, Cardiff. The deceased, who was 20 years of age had been ill only for a few days. The funeral took place on Thursday (yesterday) at Cardiff. THE LATE MR W. S. MORRJS. At the English Congregational Church on Sunday evening a funeral service was held in memory of the late Mr W. S. Morris. The Rev D. J. Thomas (pastor) preached, taking ,m his text the Second Epistle of Paul to Timothy, 4th chap., verses 7 and 8, "I have fought the good fight, I have finished my course, I have kept the faith. Henceforth there is laid up for me a crown of righteous- ness, which the Lord, the righteous judge, shall give me at that day: and not to me only, but unto all them also that love his appearing." In Mr Morris they had lost a good friend indeed, who had been connected with the church for some 50 years. He had done a great deal and had sacrificed a great deal for it. Bible which was before' him was Mr Morris's gift, which was very thoughtful of him. During his long connection with the church he had been Sunday School scholar, teacher, organist, deacon and treasurer, and was a man of unassailable rectitude. His word wam M flood M kis Von

Women Workers and the Land

Women Workers and the Land. FIRST MEETING OTCARMARTHENSIHIRE COMMITTEE. At the County Offices, Carmarthen, on Sat- urday the first meeting was held of the Com- mittee which was recently iappointed by the Carm,irthenshire. War Agriculture Com- mittee, to organise a supply of Women Work- ers for Agriculture. Mr Ben. Evans, Gwastod Abbo-tt, occupied the chair and there "were, also present: Mrs Jones, Manaravonj Miss S. L. Rees, Glianyr- afonddu Mrs Evans, Glasailt; Miss Phillips, Greenihili Llangunnor; Mi as Rachel Williams County Instructress; Miss Strachan, Cardiff; Mr W. Harries, Drysiwy: Mr Phillip Phillips, Tredech; Mr H. Jones-Davies, Glynedddan; and Mr D. Joihn, Agricultural Organiser. Mr W. Harries proposed that Mrs Gwvnne Hughes, of Tregeyb (who it was stated was UR- able to be present on account of illnesis) be elected chairman of the committee. Thia was carried unanimously. Miss Strachan at the outset detailed the scheme which was adopted in some other counties. It had worked very successfully m Flintshire and had just -been started in Den- bighshire. The object of the scheme was to get together all the available Woman Labour. The object was to organise all classes of wo- men for agricultural labour not merely the womn of the labouring classes but those, who ha-d leisure. The various county committees .war* in touch with One'another so that if there ■was not sufficient labour inone oounty assist- ance could be procured from another in which there was more available. District represent- atives were appointed for each area in the county. A Registrar was appointed for each village and group of vilages, and it was the duty of the Village Registrar to discover— either by himself or by the aid of a staff of canvassers—the available labour. The work was started as a rule by a publio meeting fol- lowed by a house-to-house ennvass with the obiect of compiling a list of women who were willing to undertake full time, part-time or casual labour. The Registrar would put the farmers in touch with the women. In can- vassing the patriotism of the women shoulld be appealed to. There were many women who did not need to work in order to earn money; but it should be brought home to them that they are rendering a national service-in assist- ing in the cultivation of land. The results of a canvass were often very > surprising. Sh knew one district in which all tne women and girls were said to wortk at a munition fac- tory. A canvass however of four little villages revealed- the fact that-there were 41 workers available—37 women and four men. 20 of the women were able to work full time. Spread over a whole county such results amounted to quite a lot. The Chairman said that the scheme had been put before them very lucidly by Miss Strachan The scheme would have to be modified to suit different counties as there were different cir- oumst:ances in each. He thought that it would be well to get well-to-do ladies to take part in the movement. Before the movement could be made successful it would have to be made fashionable. He would like to see farm work made more fashionable for women and for men as well. There were a great many people of late years who thought that manual labour and work on farms was beneath them. We want to raise the standard of the agricultural worker altogether. The Committee "might be a veritable help to that effect. In his pairt of the oounty the milking and the tending of the cattle was done by women. In the industrial parts of the country, that custom was falling off to some etxent. Mr Phillip Phillips said that the need for women on the land was feilt more in the indus- trial districts. In the rural districts, the women did their best at present as far as his experience went. The Chairman: In our district they malk and attend to the animals; they help at the harvest and planting. Mr Phillip Phillips said thiat in his district the women helped in the planting of potatoes, spreading manure, and assisting in the carting of swedea and mangolds.. The Chairman: Tha.t is not the case in the Vale of Towy. Mr W. Harries: Not at present. Mr Phillip Phillips: It is with us. In fact we could not get on without their labour at present. The Cliairman said that from Carmarthen up to Lampeter a good deal of the work on the farms was done by women. The men had left for the industrial districts. The ten- dency is for farm labourer's girls to shun farm work. They go in for dress-making, inillinery typewriting and other occupations at whicn they can have their half-holiday. It would be well if public opinion in regard to farm work oould be altered. Mr W. Harries: Are the young women work- ing on the farms in your district, or only the mothers. Mr Phillip Phillips: The farmers' daughters do their duty on the farm. Mrs Jones said that at Manoravoai they had is in the small villages we can get them. The woman left, and they hould not replace her. She (íM. Jones) therefore went to the farm like one of the labourers every morning and mil'ked the cews. Mr H. Jonew-D said that the time was to deal with the question. The scarcity of labour was .likely >o become greater as. the months went on. Tribunals had been hardening their hearts as the men were re- quired for the Army, and there had not been so many exemptions obtained as people ex- pected. Mr Phillip Phillips: In my district you never see a girl on a bicycle. In the villagee you can meet half-at-dozen. Mr H. Jones-Davies said that girls on farms often had bicycles. It was -all right for them to cycle when they had finished their work. Mrs Jones: They we much cleaner milkers than men. The Chairman: They humour the row. better too. Mfra Jones said that she knew a farm in Warwickshire on which there was a young lady who had received a superior education, she gets up at 6 a.m. and milk ten or eleven cows. Then ehe went out in a cart and fed the yovng cattle, and afterwards went to see aft. r thtJ sheep. Mr H. Jones-Davies said that on the Con- tinent you would find houses in which there wae a good library including English authors and a piano, and the women did a large share oftha work in the fields. These were educated people who realised the dignity of labour. Mr W. Harries said that 20 years ago Mr Evans, of Altycadno, had six women on the farm. Mr Evans praised them very much, and said that the men were not equal to them* Tho women did everything on the farm, and they were glad to have the work. Mr Phillip Phillips Do you think it possible to get any girls to come on the farms. Mr Harries: If they see hardship, I believe thov will come on. At present we are rather distant from one another. They do not care much for the work and we are getting on without them. [ia Phillips: What age girls would you like? Miss Strachan About 19 to 30. Mr W. Harries If you have young girls to work from 15 on, they are very useful. Miss Strachan The Colleges don't like them Mr W. Harriies: They are very able and willing at that aige and they can milk well. It was decided to arrangt) puhlic meetings at Carmarthen, Llanelly, Llandilo, Llandovery, Whitland, Newcastle Emlyn. and Llanybyther. Mr H. J ones-Da vies and Mr Dl. John were entrusted with the arrangement of the meet- ings. Mr W. Harries: I do not think we will get many in Carmarthen or Llandilo. I think it is in the smal Ivillages we can get them.

Advertising

in— IDC D. 'c.. STOMACH & LIVER r1 TROUBLES II INDIGESTION ► CONSTIPATION BILIOUSNESS HEADACHES a u Restore roar digestive C organs to working erder. by using Mother Seigel's Syrop, and these trouble* will be oompletalt banished. Test it I YIELD TO [ MOTHER SEIGEL'S [ Ll p syrhp [