Teitl Casgliad: Carmarthen weekly reporter

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 2 o 4 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
14 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
Advertising

BTTiMIIuriEIR,, 191S. MISSES LEWIS & CLARE HAVE PLEASURE IN ANNOUNCING THAT THEIR SUMMER SHOW OF HICH-CLASS MILLINERY MODELS IS NOW OPEN | AND WILL CONTINUE THROUGHOUT THE SEASON Ostrich and Marabout Stoles, Fancy Neckwear, Veilings, &c., &c. A cordial invitation is extended to visit their Showrooms. CAVENDISH HOUSE, 41 KING-ST., OARART:a:EN. I BOOKBINDINGT I Established Over Fifty Years. D. TITUS WILLIAMS BOOKBINDER, Etc., I CHAPEL STREET, CARMARTHEN. The Best and Cheapest House in South Wales for all Classes of Binding. Those who are taking any Histories of the War in parts, shpuld get them put into cases or bound before they become torn and worthless. Books bound in Publishers Cases at Publisher's Prices. BOOKBINDING TO THE TRADE. I BOOKBINDINGT WATCHES & CLOCKS i: REPAIRED. JEWELLERY REPAIRED LIKE NEW. GILDING AND ELECTRO PLATING. HIGH-CLASS WORKMANSHIP. ESTIMATES GIVEN ALL WORK GUARANTEED \T JOHN WILLIAMS Watchmaker, Jeweller, & Silversmith, 9 & 10 Lammas Street, OAR.M.ARTHEN. Established 1336. WEDDING CARDS. Anyone requiring the above should, before placing their orders, send for our NEW SPECIMEN BOOK CONTAINING THB CHOICEST DESIGNS CAKD8 AND PBICES SUITABLE FOB ALL CLASSICS W. S. MOKKIS, Wholesale Grocer, Corn, Flour and Seed Merchant, O.A. RMABTHEU. Nat. Telephone, 50. Telegrams, Morris, Merchant Carmarthen." SEND FOR PRICE LISr Carmarthenshire War Agricultural Committee. APPLICATIONS are invited from Farmers who are prepared to train a limited number of women for farm work in the county. Fall particulars may be obtained from, and applications addressed to, the undersigned, DANIEL JOHNS, County Agricultural Organiser. Coanty Offices, Carmarthen. Carmarthen Borough Education Authority. TWTOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Audit XI of the Accounts of the Authority for the year ended 31st March, 1916, was concluded on the 2nd day of June, 1916, by Mr J. E. Pughe-Jones, District Auditor. A copy of the audited accounts may be Inspected during office hours at 31 Qnay Street, Car- marthen. Dated this 3rd day of June, 191G. THOMAS WALTERS, Clerk to the Education Committee. SOLDIERS AND SAILORS FAMILIES' ASSOCIATION. CARMARTHENSHIRE BRANCH. THE GENERAL ANNUAL MEETING of the above will be held at the GUILDHALL, CARMARTHEN, on FRIDAY, JUNE lGth, at 2.15 p.m. Miss Eleanor Rathbone, Organising Secretary, Liverpool, will addrens the Meeting. 013 A Conference will subsequently be held, at which the work of this Association after June 30th will be discussed. It is sincerely hoped that all Presidents, Vice-presidents, Office Bearers, and Subscribers will make an effort to attend. The general public, friends and associates from the Cardiganshire and Pembrukeshire Branches are also cordially invited to be present. BEATRICE GWYNNE HUGHES, President. TO ADVERTISERS. PREPAID SCALE OF CHARGES FOR ADVERTISING IN THE "REPORTER. No. of One Three Six Words. Insertion. Insertions. Insertions. s d 8 d s d 20 1 0 2 3 3 6 28 16 3 8 4 6 36 2 0)4 0 5 6 f. 2 6 4 6 6 6 The above scale only applies to the Situations, To Lets," and To be Sold by Private Treaty," clases of Advertisements, and must be paid for in, advance, or the ordinary credit rate will be charged, HALFPENNY STAMPS, or Postal or Post Office Orders. payable to M. LAWRENCE, ab Carmarthen, Repliea may be made addressed to the Reportei Office, and will be forwarded to advertisers when stamped envelopes are sent. FMEMORIAM CARDS-We have a large and ..L assorted stock to select from. Prices to suit all classw.—Reporter Office, Carmarthen. JAMES JONES, Billposter and Advertising Agent for Kidwelly and neighbouring Villages. All work duly executed. Address .'—Station Road, Kidwelly. VISITING CARDS from Is 6d for 50; Printed V on Ivory Cards. -Repo?-ter Office, Carmarthen. TO LET, Four Roomed Cottage, with garden, at Cwir-oernant.—Apply, Rogers, Oakfield, Car- marthen. TO LET a fully licensed free Public House in centre of Carmarthen.—Apply, Lloyd & Thomas, Auctioneers, Carmarthen. rrio LET-No. 1 Barnsfield Terrace, Carmarthen JL (immediately).—Apply, Morgan, 24 King St., Carmarthen. WANTED-COOK-GENERAL (Welsh) for TV Welsh family in healthiest part of London; good home and good wages.—Apply by letter to A.B Reporter Office. ANTED NUP.SE-HOUSEMAID, age 16 V V (Welsh), for Welsh family in healthiest part of London good home and good wages.—Apply by letter to A.B. Reporter Office. WANTED (immediately) Good GENERAL SERVANT.—Apply, Mrs Morgan, Hillside, Carmarthen. WANTED, 2 BLACKSMITHS.-Apply, Win. Isaac, Old Foundry Carmarthen. WANTED TEMPORARY LADY CLERKS, competent knowledge of Shorthand and Type- writing and essential qualification. Wages 20s. to 30s. per week.—Apply by letter, Surveyor of Taxes, 1 Hall Street, Carmarthen. WEDDING CARDS—Prices and styles to suit all Classes. Speciment Book, containing the Latest and Choicest Designs, sent on application.— Reporter Office, Carmarthen.

No title

ANNUAL WHITE SHOW.—J Davies & Son, Cloth Hall, Carmarthen, are now holding a 4 Days White Show. All White Goods are marked at special prices. QUEEN ALEXANDRA'S ROSE DAY. For the first time Queen Alexandra's Rose Day is to be held in Carmarthen on Saturday, June 24th. All the roses which are sold are made by the Crippled Orphanage in London. The arrangements are in the hands of the TVar Relief Committee, and the proceeds are to be given to the Carmarthenshire Infirmary, which is t450 in deibt. Twelve Jbe-ds in that hospital are reserved for wounded soldiers. Will everybody please buy a rose and help ? COMMERCIAL TRAVELLERS ASSOCIATION. The half-yearly conference of the South Wales and Monmouthshire Commercial Tra- vellers Association was held at the Boar's Head Hotel, Carmarthen, on Saturday, when there were about 50 delegates present from various districts. Mr T. A. Jones, Carmarthen, pre- sided. and a discussion took place on the ques- tion of benevolent institutions and schools. CARMARTHEN V.T.C. Orders for the week commencing June 19th. Company drill in the Market on Friday at 8 p.m. on Friday, and on Sunday afternoon at 3.30 prompt. Will members please attend so they may know their own section commanders. Rifle instruction and practice on Monday evening at 7.30. A new recruit squad is being formed, drill on Monday and Friday at 8 p.m., also on Sunday afternoon at 3.30. Recruits can be enrolled before any drill. All those who have passed their seventeenth birthday are eligible.—By order. Lieut.-Col. F. D. Williams Drummond, Officer Commanding.

Advertising

FOR OLD AND YOUNG. MORTIMER98 COUGH MIXTURE FOR COUGHS, COLDS. WHOOPING COUGH, ETC., ETC. — OVER — 70 YE&RS REPUTATION IN THIS DISTRICT. THIS CELEBRATED WELSH REMEDY la now put up in cartons securely packed for transmission to all parts of the world and contains a Pamphlet, written by an eminent Medical Authority, dealing with the various beneficial uses of this specific Price Is l £ d and 2s 9d per bottle Tht larger bottle is by jar the cheapest.

Carmarthen Students Must Join

Carmarthen Students Must Join. DECISION OF COUNTY APPEAL TRIBUNAL. The Carmarthenshire Intermediate Appeal Tribunal has at length given its decision in the matter of students preparing for the Congre- gational ministry. The decision exempts students in their third year (the final year). Students in the first and second years are regarded as subject to the Act.

No Dealings in Wool

No Dealings in Wool 4 SURPRISE FOR CARMARTHEN FARMERS A large quantity of wool was brought into the Carmarthen Market on Saturday. The farmers who for the most. part were unaware of the recent Order in Council were astonished to find that they were not allowed to sell. Some took the wool home again and others had it weighed and left in the Wool-room pending the arrangements which will be made shortly. County Girls Scool, Carmarten.

County Girls School Carmarthen

========= County Girls' School, | Carmarthen An interesting entertainment in aid of the prisoners of war in Germany was given at the Bounty Girls' School on Wednesday afternoon nhen Miss B. A. Holme, M.A., presided. The entertainment was entirely got up by a few of the girls of the II. and 1A. forms, and they are to be complimented on the pleasing enter- tainment they afforded. The programme was' as follows :-Song. Meirion Owen: pianoforte solo, Nesta Griffiths; song, Cora Jones; recita- tion, Maria Davies dance, Cora Jones sketch, "Back to Nursery Land," in which the follow- ing characters appeal ed Goldie Locks, Hilda Jones; Pied Piper, Nesta Griffiths; Jack Horner, Elsie Jones; Jack the Gian Killer. Marcia Davies; Simple Simon, Daisy Woosnam Polly Flinders, May Hardaker Red Riding Hood, Cora Jones; Old Woman who live in a shoe, Meirion Owen; dance, Cora Jones. Elsie J onesdleirion Owen, and May Hardaker. The Nigger Troupe which consisted of the same girls sang several coon songs; God sa-ve the King. The accompanist was Miss Annie Lewis.

The Churches

The Churches. The anniversary meetings will be held at Priordy, Carmarthen, on Sunday and Monday next. The Rev W. James, of Swansea, will preach. Mr James is one of the best known preachers of the denomination, and was chair- man of the Welsh Congregational Union in 1914. The Rev John Owen, of Anfield road, Liver- pool, will preach at the anniversary meetings in conneotionwith Water st C.M. Church on Sunday and Monday next. • The Rev Joseph Harry, pastor of Salem Con- gregational Church, has been appointed a manager of the Llandovery County School in place of Alderman C. P. Lewis, who on account of ill-health did not seek re-election.

Lord Kitchener

Lord Kitchener MEMORIAL SERVICE AT ST. PAUL'S. The King and Queen and Queen Alexandra attended the memorial service to Lord Kitchener at St. Paul's Cathedral on Tuesday. It was the third occasion, within two years, or a. little over, that Royalty had visited the City to share the national sorrow for the lose of a great military leader. Church and State and every aspect of the nat'on's life were rq., presented in the huge congregation. Unlike the funeral of Lord Roberts, there was no public military ceremonial. Although none of the general public had the privilege of attending the service, crowds began to gather shortly after nine o'clock, and long before the Cathedral doors were opened at 10.15 the thoroughfares in the neigh bourhood were almost impassable. The King and Queen arrived at the cathe- dral promptly at noon, driving from Bucking- ham Palace in an open carriage, with an escort of 1st Lifeguards in service dress. The King wore the service dress of a Field Marshall Their Majesties wor-preoeived at the wesdoor of the cathedral by the Dean and clergy. Queen Alexandra, with Princess Victoria, arrived shortly before their Majesties and other members of the Royal Family. Attend- ing the service were Princess Henry ot Battenberg, Captain Plrince Alexander of Batteniberg, Princess Arthur of Connaught, and Princess Maude. The Lord Mayor and sheriffs attended. The Cblonies and Dominions were repre- sented by Agents-General, and the Ambassa- dors and Ministers of the allied nations also attended. The Grand Duke Michael, accom- panied by two staff officers, represented the Czar, and neutral countries represented in- cluded the United States, Spain, Sweden, Norway, Denmark, and Holland. The Prime Minister and Mrs Asquith arrived just before 11.30 and Sir Edward Grey, Mr Lloyd George, and Mr Balfour followed shortly afterwards, all Government representatives being accommodated with seats under the dome close to those occupied by their Majesties Lord Haldane sat among the Ministers, as did allso Mr Winston Churchill, Mr Masterman, the Speaker and Lord Rosebery. There were a few moments of silence after the Royal personages had been conducted to their seats, and then softly the organist played the opening bars of one of Lord Kitchener's favourite hymns "Abide with me." From the mournful cadences of the psalm "Out of the deep have I called unto Thee. 0 Lord," the choir seemed to pass without a pause into the vigour of life of "The Lord is my Shepherd. Thy loving kindness and mercy shall follow me nil the days of my lif. No one, too, could fail to be stirred by the emphasis and clarity of Croft's antiphon, "1 am the resurrection and the life," sung with remarkable beauty by the choir, unaccom- panied. The lesson, from Corinthians, was read by Dean Inge, and afterwards the muffled note of the drums, gradually increasing until it soun- ded like a salvo of artillery, gave place to the opening mournful notes of the Doad March, played, so it seemed, with particular pathos by the hand of the Royal Engineers. But again came the note of triumph in the liturgy of St. Chiysostom, sung appropriately to the beautiful Kieff chant. "And weeping o'er the grave," sang the choir '"We make our song, Alleluia." Responses and prayers followed, and then another of Lord Kitchener's favourite hymns, "For all the Saints." The Benediction was pronounced by the Archbishop of Canterbury. While the congregation was still standing in complete silence from far away down the Cathedral sounded the haunting notes of the "Last Post," sending a thrill through even the most unimpressionable. "The Call" was played with singular beauty by the buglers of the Royal Engineers, and many people were affected to tears. The crashing chords of the National Anthem signalled the end of the service. It was sung with a depth of feeling and emotion which must have touched the Kiaig himself. The Royal party left shortly before one o'clock, a muffled peal of bells being rung at the Cathedral whilst the Royal visitor de- parted.

LOOAL WAR ITEMSI

LOOAL WAR ITEMS. A unique spectacle was witnessed at (Jrym- mych Eisteddfod on Monday night. A large number of soldiers and sailors on leave were in the audience. The Chairman called them up on to the platform and they stood at attention whilst the audience, led by Mr Dunn Williams, sang "God save the King" and "Hen Wlad fy Nliadau." The effect was inspiring. *•» Leading seaman J. J. Williams, son of Mrs Williams, 10, John street, arrived home on leave on Friday. He was one of the crew of a battle cruiser which took a prominent part in the battle of the Ska.ger Rack. *«• An album which is treasured in a Carmar- J then household contains a. page written by ] [jieut. Gwilym Williams, of the 12th Royal I Welsh Fusiliers, when home recently on leave. Lieut. Williams, who is an old Grammar School Boy, was recently killed in France. The page which he wrote was as follows:— "Si vis pacem, para bellum." "Dulce et decorum est pro patria mori." Roi, la loi, et la liberte." "Gwell angeu na. chwilydd." Lieut. Gwilym Williams, 12thR. W.F., April 16 The two wcHi known Latin lines may be ren- dered "If you want peace, be ready for war." 'It is sweet and glorious to die for one's country." The French line "The King, the Law and Freedom" is the refrain of the Bel- gian National Anthem." The Welsh line which is the motto of the 41st, may be rendered, "Better death than dishonour." Private John M. Davies, of the Welsh Regiment, is home on leave. He is a son of Mr D. Spiller Davies, Parcmain-street, Car- marthen, and raw much fighting at Gallipoli where he was wounded in the left shoulder, and also contracted dysentery and fever. He is now engaged at the regiment's headquarters at Pontypridd. 0*0 Despatch motor cyclist Courtney Snow, son of Mr and Mrs J. Snow, Penllwyn Park, Car- marthen, is home on leave this week. He hae been in France since the early stages of the war, and has had many thrilling experiences. Torpedo-gunner Ben Phillips, of H.M.S. Cumberland, is home on leave this week. He has been for many months in German East Africa (Cameroons) and has also taken part in the clearing of German Commerce Raiders from the high seas, including the destruction of the German warship "KonisbeTg." Gunner Phillips is a son of Mr and Mrs George Phillips, Red Lion Yard, Carmarthen, and is a brother of Signaller James F. Phillips, of H.M.S. Warspite, who is also home on leave after the recent great sea battle. Both were formerly employees of the Reporter Office. The Rev D. Glyndwr Richards, B.A., B.D., leaves Carmarthen shortly for France where he intends to take up work with the Y.M.C.A. ##* In spite of the difficulties which arise through censoring letters in Welsh, a letter from Dyfnallt written in "yr hen iaith" has been received at Carmarthen. «*« Mr W. J. Davies, elder son of Mrs Davies, 17, Bridge street, was one of the recipients of a silver coronation medal conferred upon the staff of the British Embassy at Tokio by His Majesty the Emperor of Japan on the occasion of his eornatiotn last Autumn. *«« Lieut. Ryle Morris, Royal Welsh Fusiliers, son of Mr E. H. Morris, Brynmyrddin, Aber- gwili, has been wounded. «** Carmarthen weaivers have been to London to ask that weavers engaged on military work sliall be regarded as being in reserved occupa- tions. H* Capt. F. W. Kennedy, whose promotion to the rank of read-admiral is announced, is the son in-law of Colonel H. H. Goodeve, J.P., D.L., of Tenby. He has commanded the battle cruiser Indomitable. • Pte. T. V. Morgan, Welsh Guards, died from wounds. He was the son of the late ex-P.C. J. Morgan (Llanstephan), of the Carmarthen- shire Constabulary. Prior to enlisting he was a police officer stationed at Dowlais and Trocd- yrhiw. Charles Ormond, E.R.A., who was lost in the Defence, was the eldest son of Mr and Mrs John Ormond, Cambrian Hotel, Saundersfoot. He was 27 years of a.ge. Sergt. Leslie F. Carter, of the 42nd Royal Highlanders (Black Watch) of Canada, a St. Peter's Boy, who has been at the front for the last eight months, in a. letter dated the 10th inst., writes :—"We have been having a rather exciting time lately. We were in the centre of the fight last week end. We had only left the front line two days when we were called back to re-inforce it. We were at it for 72 hours on end, without a minute's rest. The bombardment was torriihle-the worst ever ex- perienced on the British front. Our brigade held two German divisions and re-took quite a. large part of the ground that was lost in the first attack. We had rather heavy losses, but the enemy lost nearly three times as many. 1 was rather lucky and came through it quite safely except for a. few minor scratches. We are now back in France agiain for a rest and to reorganize."

Old Coats for New Ones

Old Coats for New Ones. THEFT FROM CWNIN FARM. -F A special Borough Police Court was held at Cbrmarthen on Monday before the Mayor (Mr John Lewis), Mr J. B. Arthur, Mr Hy. Howell. and Mr Rees Davies. William Jones, a fanh servant at Clyncoch, Oonwil, wos charged with the theft of a. coat and jacket from Cwnin Farm, Carmarthen. R. W. Webster, a servant at Cwnin Farm, said that he recognised the overcoat and the jacket produced. He recognised them when lie saw them with P.C. Morgan, of Conwil. Ho had previously seen them on the 3rd June (F",jr Dav) in thp stable Ha lninlrpd frvr ilmm I ,& next morning, but found they were gone. lie valued them at 10s. P.C. Morgan, of Conwil, said that at 6 p.m. on the 12th he proceeded to Clyncoch farm, in the company of the last witness. Inside an outhouse where the defendant usually sleeps, lie found the coat and jacket which Webster identified as his property. Witness took possession of the clothing. He failed to trace the defendant, who had gone to Newcastle EmLyn. Next morning the witness went to Clyncoch. Witness told the defendant that he was making enquiries respecting an over- coat and jacket stolen from Cwnin Farm. The defendant said "Yes, I bought them from a man on the road. I don't know who he was." Witness apprehended the man and took him to the County Police Station, and charged him with stealing an overcoat and jacket from Cwnin Farm. Defendant said "I bought them from a man on the road near Carmarthen on the night of the fair." In answer to the Bench, P.C. Morgan said that defendant had been working at Clyncoch for two months. Head Constable Mayall said that this was the evidence in the first case. The next case was a charge of stealing an overcoat belonging to Mr D. Hindis. Mr D. Hinds identified the overcoat pro- duced. He last saw it five or six weeks ago. He missed it the following morning. It was gone, and an old ragged one in its place. In answer to the Mayor, the witness said that he did not know the defendant. P.C. Morgan said that at Clyncoch defen- dant fetched this coat and said that he had bought it from the same man from whom he had bought the other two. P.S. Lodwick, of the Borough Police Force, said that lie received the prisoner into custody from P.C. Morgan on Tuesday. When charged defendant said "I bought that coat also from the same man for 3s." Defendant elected to be dealt with sum- matily; but pleaded "Not guilty." He said that he bought them in Carmarthen. The defendant was then sworn. He said, "I bought the clothes for little money. I have no more to say. I bought them from the same man. He was a small man. He was middle- aged. He had a moustache,but np whiskers." Head Constable Mayall: Did you ask the man where lie got them ? Defendant: No. I bought a jersey from the same man three or four months ago. I have seen him several times. He told me he had plenty of clothes. Where did you see the man?—On the main street. He had a pair of boots that he wished + coll J7"la.. Where did you see him?—Near the Swan. Is there anybody living at the farm besides 1 you?—Yes, master and mistress. Did you tell them you had bought these?— 1 No. | '1 Did they ever see them?—Yes; they could see them on the beam. The Head Constable handed the defendant the defendant the ragged coat found at Cwnin f and asked him to don it. Mr Mayall: Is is rather a good fit? Defendant: No; it is too tight. Did you ever see it before —Never. In answer to a question, the defendant said that he was "guilty of buying." Mr Hy. Howell: Why did you want to buy two overcoats. Defendant: I don't know. The Head Constable said thà 'the defendant had been imprisoned for drunkenness and for not maintaining his wife: The Mayor said that the cases had been j proved. Defendant would be nfied 92 or go to prison for a month. j

Water Supply Difficulties at Carmarthen

Water Supply Difficulties at Carmarthen. COMPLAINTS ATTOWN COUNCIL. A meeting of the Carmarthen Town Council was held at the Guildhall on Tuesday. There were present: The Mayor (Mr John Lewis), Aldermen L. D. Thomas, W. Spurrell, and J. B. Arthur, Councillors H. S. Holmes, J. Jen- kins, David Williams, Dunn Williams, Oliver Jones, J. Crossman, D. King Morgan, A. F. Mills, W. Gibbon, D. J. Davies, W. J. Martin and Wm. Evans. Mr Oliver Jones asked whether instructions had been given to the Corporation employees not to take water from the mains for watering the streets. He had seen them taking water from the main in Lammas street. The Surveyor said that the pipe at the Factory happened to be out of order at the time. No streets could be watered from the Factory supply except those in the immediate vicinity of St. Catheaiue street. Rev A. F. Mills called attention to the in- convenience arising from the fact that there was no water at the Cottage Home. There were 16 or 18 children there and all the water had to be carried. The Surveyor said that this was due to the fact that a private service pipe was leaking. It was a matter entirely for the owner of the property. Rev A. F. Mills said that he would like to call the attention of the Medical Officer to the matter. Mr Spurrell said that if those who own the property did not have it attended to the Coun- cil would have to give instructions to have it, cut 'off. AN ANCIENT CHEST. Mr E. Collier asked the Corporation to hand over a chest in the Town Clerk's Office to the care of the Carmarthenshire Antiquarian Society. The chest was presented to ïthe Car- marthen Corporation by John Newsham, who was mayor in 1738. It was of no use now as the locks are all gone; but it was very inte- resting from an archaeological point of view. It was decided to hand the chest over to the Antiquarian Society subject to the property remaining vested in the Corporation. JAWS. (Mr H. S. Holmes raised a question as to a i bill for £6 16s for jaws for the stone crusher. He said that it ought to have been brought before the Council before the jaws were ordered. The Surveyor said that it was not easy to foresee everything; it was much easier to find fault with people in season and out of season. Mr Dunn Williams said that the Clerk read out a list of requisitions on May 16th. The jaws were included in that. Had they been already ordered. Mr Spurrell: They had been ordered; they might not have come. The Surveyor said that according to the strict letter of the resolution, it was not com- plied with. His point was that it was a matter of no importance; as a matter of rou- tine it was approved of afterwards. Mr Holmes said that the street which used to foreseen at Christmas that these jaws were re- quired. ANOTHER WAR BONUS REQUIRED. A letter was read from the Corporation labourers applying for another war bonus. It was stated that the men were paid 25s and 26s a week now. It was decided to refer the matter to the Public Works Committee. llHiE ALLEGED MORTUARY NUISANCE. A letter was read from Mr Lewis who had complained of the state of the mortuary. He said that Mr Isaac, of the Cambrian Forge, had complained of the nuisance. He said that ift was not true that he had refused to supply the coffin until Monday. On Saturday lie had no definite order. If disinfection were useless as Dr Bowen Jones said, why were such pre- cautions required to be ta'ken and why so many bye-laws. The Head Constable said that he had nothing to add or withdraw. 0 TAR SPRAYING. Mr Holmes: Is it not possible to have some of the streets in the town tar-sprayed? The Surveyor: It its, quite possible; but I thought you wished to save expense. Mr Holmes suggested that if the streets were tar-sprayed, it would save a good deal of watering. The Surveyor said that many of the roads required a good deal of repair now and it would be inadvisable to tar-spray them and then to repair them afterwards. Mr Holmes said that the stret which used to be called Goose street was a real pestilence place for dust. COUNTY PENSIONS COMMITTEE. Mr Holmes called1 attention to the matter of the representattion of Carmarthen Borough on the County Naval and Military Pensions Com- mittee. It had been decided to give Carmar- then one representative. That representative was to be a County Councillor. In answer to questions, Mr Holmes said ihe representative proposed was a member of the County Council for the Borough but he was not a member of the Town Council. He moved tht they ask that the Mayor of Carmarthen

LLANDOVERY

LLANDOVERY. The Llandovery Town Council at their meet- ing on Saturday decided not to appoint a re- presentative on the Court of Governors of the University College of Wales, Aberystwyth. for the time being be elected a member. A member of the County Council selected by the County Council could not possibly represent the Borough. Mr E. Collier seconded, Mr L. D. Thomas supported, and the Rev A. Fuller Mills en- dorsed the proposal which was carried unani- mously.

Welsh Congregational Union

Welsh Congregational Union 'TOWYN'' AS VICE-CHAIRMAN. The annual session of the Welsh Congre- gational Union wa.s continued at Brynamman on Wednesday under the presidency of the Rev James Charles, of Denbigh. Not the least interesting item of the pro- ceedings was the election of Mr Towyn Jones, M.P., to the vice-chair of the Union. 'Towyn' as lie is popularly known, has been a leading figure in Welsh Congregationalism for many years, and, before, his election to Parliament, was pastor of the great church at Cwmamman, not far distant from the scene of yesterday's gatherings. At nine o'clock on Wednesday morning there was a meeting of members under the chairmanship of the Rev D. Williams, the speakers being the Rev E. Jones, Colwyn, and the Rev T. W. Morgan, Philadelphia, Car- marthen. There was at the same hour deacons' meeting. Mr W. J. Parry, J.P., being i chairman, and the speaker Mr E. Morgan, f Liverpool. MINISTERS' SALARIES. At the morning meeting there was a discus- sion on the Sustentation Fund. Mr T. G. Williams, of Cardiff, who presided, said that five years had passed since the excellent move- ment was started for the purpose of raising £ 50.000 in order to provide ministers of small churches with a living wage, or at any rate, a minimum satary of £ 80. This. he said, was easily earned in the collieries by lads of 15, and it was a disgrace that some of their pastors had to exist on such n. paltry sum. Unfor- tunately, very little had been done during the past four years, and this fact lie attributed mainly to the apathy of the deacons in the various churches. The ministers were dis- charging their part of the work very creditably but the movement was started by laymen, and the laymen were neglecting it because they had lost their interest in the history and the traditions of the denomination. The great danger of Cbngregationalists was that they they were becoming too independent. lie attributed the prevailing apathy to the fact that they never read denominational liters ture. At present ministers were carrying by far the heaviest burdens of the churches, ,,d self-sacrifice among the laymen was a thing of the past. The future of the Welsh pulpit rested with the churches, and it was the duty of the officials to see that men of character and brilliant talents entered their pulpits Could they expect this at the miserable fialari6 offered? It was no use of blaming the pulpit that it did not lead. It was the fault of the churches themselves, because they did not take sufficient interest in their work to make the pulpit attractive. ELECTION OF OFFICERS. The President occupied the chair at the Union meeting held at 2.30. Gibea Chapel waS crowded with delegates. The voting on the election of officers for the ensuing vear re- suited as follows: -President, Rev Jacob Jones, Merthyr; vice-president, Rev TOWYO Jones', M.P. In response, "Towyn" said Oll he had received from the Union before hard work. The Rev D. Afan Griffiths. Troedrhiwdalar, was re elected financal &eor" tary, and the iRev H. Eynon Lewis, Cardiff, auditor. Mr George Davies, Llantrisant. elected junior secretary for three years, 'lbe secretaries of the Union are Mr J. WiHijft;JJ1S, Waunwen, Swansea, Rev D. H. WiliiaiB* M.A., Barry, and the Rev D. M. Davi-' Waunarlwyd. The treasurer's report, pre- sented by Mr S. Sandbrook, J.P., showed substantial credit balance. The Congregational Publications Committ4O report was presented by the Rev D. M. David Sw ansea, and it was considered satisfactory. Mr D. W. Lewis, Brynamman. reported oø the scholarship of the Eleazer Roberts Endo*' ment J!'und:. and a proposal that it should b8 transferred to the Tonic Sbl-fa College, LoI1Jol1 was agreed to. The Sunday School report showed a satJ6' factory progress. Mr H. Howells, Treorchy. submitted a prO" posal that the teaching of the Welsh language should be adopted in the day schools, and We Welsh Board should be pressed to make it 1* compulsory subject in every school and collet Prof. D. Mia 11 Edwards seconded, and tbe motion was carried with enthusiasm. A resolution was carried rejoicing that tdJØ Central Control Board had included all WalO and Monmouthshire under tho Restriction Mr Isaac Edwards, Cairniarvan, who moved tJ* resolution, urged the advisability of an to the Government to entirely stop the brow ing and selling of intoxicants during the W-4 and six months afterwards. Dr Peter price urged that there should be total prohibition*^ a suggestion that was very warmly received- Mr J. Evan Jones, Skewen, proposed resolution in fa-votir of stricter censorship oyer films exhibited at cinemas for the proteotioØ of children. Rev D. M. Davies, Waunar' lwydd, seconded, and it was agreed to. Captain Chaplain Edward Jones, M.,A" made an appeal for a non-sectarian hut Kinmel Park for the soldiers. This was Ir ceived with enthusiasm. In the evening at Gibea sermons were de' livered by the Rev J. H. Parry, Llansamled" and the Rev D. R. Davios, Gibeon. St. cleso, also at Carmel, Gwiauncaegurwen, by the RelS H. T. Jacob, Fishguard, and J. G.Jones. Ca.J141, Mon. THE NEW PRESIDENT. The Rev Jacob Jones, the new president. J a son of Mr and Mrs D. Jonesi, of Glancenne^1 near Llandilo. He was born on October 29W, 1853, and was educated at the National Soho" Llandebie, whence he went to the Granim1^ School at Llandiiio. He preached his sermon at a weeknight meeting at LlandiJo Tabernacle in 1875, and in January. 1876, be went for preparatory training to the GramiuOf School at Llangadock. a.nd suhse-uqently e-tl' tered Brecon College, where he had a BU ful career.

Control Board Action

Control Board Action DECREASED HOUIts OF SALE, YET MOO DRINKING. There is a possibility of "closing time" i-O licensed houses being extended to 10 p.m., aoj an extra thirty minutes being alowed in clttbsl Also, the "Evening Standard" understand no spirits, not at least 25 per cent. u»<^ proof, must be sold after July 1st. This apphØf to all proprietary brands. Thirty million people are affected by t,1"6 early closinglioui s at present in force. yeti compared with the year preceding outbreak 0 war. when public houss were open from ellrl! morn until midnight, the present consumiptioo of spirits shows an increase of over 3.000,000 gallons. Tihe Liquor Control Board originally 6U,gg ted to the trade that in certain areas spiritb should be sold 50 per cent, under proof. left the decision an optional one to the lice"8^ and only in a few cases was the adopted. Xow the Board has taken more rigid actiOØ, and all Rpirtis must be sold 25 per cent, nndøt proof.