Teitl Casgliad: Carmarthen weekly reporter

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 3 o 4 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
16 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
Carmarthen Rural Tribunal

Carmarthen Rural Tribunal The Carmarthen Rura Tribunal sat at the Guilhall on Saturday. The members present were Mr J. Jones, Plas (chairman), Mr Liew. Morgan, Mr W. Brazell, Mr M. J. Evans, Mr W. Williams, and the Rev J. Herbert. Mr J. J. Bowen represented the agricultural interest and Capt. Margrave the military. TRAVELLING IN TYPEWRITERS. A Llangunnock farmer applied for leave to appeal for a single unattested man aged 27. The man was in his service for a fortnight. He hod come down from London. The Clerk: What was he doing in London ? Applicant: Travelling in typewriters. Did he leave London to escape military ser- vice?—No; he came down for a holiday and I engaged him. In reply to further questions, it was stated that the man had been registered in this dis- rict but had left afterwards and gone to Lon- don. The application was refused. FARMERS' SONS DON'T WORK VERY HARD. Mr J. J. Bowen, of Pantglas, Llangunnock the representative of the Board of Agriculture, appealed for exemption for a man named Thomas Evans, of Derwen, Llangain. The man worked most of his time with appellant; but he assisted on other farms. Mr Bowen said said that it would be a serious matter for the country if all the workmen left. A good many farmers' sons were exempted, but they did not work as hard as they might do. In answer to questions, Mr Bowen said that he had another man who was over military &ge. The Tribunal decided not to grant the appli- cation. LLANARTHNEY APPLICATION GRANTED An appeal was lodged for a farmer's son at Glascoed farm, Llanarthney. The appeal was made by his father, who farmed 214 acres, of which 40 were ploughed and 60 under hay. Mr W. S. Jones was stated to be the plough- man and horseman. An exemption had been granted, and the appeal was for renewal. Mr Wallis-Jones, solicitor, appeared for the appellant. The father was too ill to attend. Evidence was given by a brother. He said that it would be impossble to carry on the farm without this man. Absolute exemption was granted. A GOOD MANY LIES TOLtD. A farmer from Llangunnock district said that exemptions had been granted to others who were less entitled to it. Capt. Margrave replied: There have been a good many lies told me for the purpose of getting certificates. They will all be brought before you for review when I hope you will deal with them as they deserve. WOULD WANT THEM ALL. A farmer in Llanllawddog parish said that he could not spare either of his sons. He re- quired them both to gatherin 25 acres of crops. Capt. Margrave If you had a dozen sons, you would not be able to spare one. You would want them all. nLJ.;Iilll'S CASE DEFERRED. iMrs Picton, who keeps Monk's Mill, Cwm- felin Mynaeh, appealed for exemption for her son, aged 26. Appellant was represented by her daughter. I' The facts disclosed showed that the holding was only 13 acres of land, but the appellant was chiefly dependent on the mill. If this son Mt, the mill would have to be closed. The mill worked for the farmers in a very wide area. The mill ground 600 sacks of mixed corn since January. It was stated that the son suffered with his eyes, and' the case was referred to the Medical Board. APPEARANCES DECEPTIVE. Mr Howell Davies, solicitor, appeared in the appeal by the tenant of Pentrenewydd, Llan- dilo-Awin. for his son. Capt. Margrave How old are you ? Appellant: I am 51. Do you enjoy good health?—Pretty fair. I can't complain. You look very weHF-Perh,aps I look better than I am. Capt. Margrave: Appearances are deceptive Sometimes. Temporary exemption was granted until 1st September on condition no fresh application were made without the consent of the tribunal. A QUESTION OF IDIOCY. A farmer appealed for exemption for a man who he alleged was an idiot. Appellant did not appear; but sent a letter in the course of which he said, "Now any man is coming and take it from me, lie must mind and take care about it." Mr J. J. Bowen: Who is supposed to be- weak minded—the man or the employer P Capt. Margrave: I should like to see him to Bee what kind of figure head he has. One of the members of the Tribunal said he knew the case. The man was an idiot. Capt. Margrave: Are you sure you know one when you see him ? Absolute exemption was granted. A QUESTION OF NATIONALITY. A TWech farmer appealed on behalf of his Bon. He stated that the son was born in America and came to this country 15 years ago. The Chairman asked whether the son was in American citizen. 'Mr HoweM Davies (who appeared for the appellant) said that he would not like to say whether the son was an American or not. Temporary exemption was granted. LOOKS AGAIN DECEPTIVE. A Llanwinio farmer appealed for a servant j man. Appellant said that he was not in good health himself. Capt. Margrave: How do you look so bad? You look worse than I do, and I am bad enough. What did the doctor say was the matter with you? -Bronchitis. Capt. Margrave: I can't see it. Appellant: I cannot see it myself. I can feel it very bad. Capt. Margrave: Looks are deceptive. 1 should have thought tha.t you were one of the strongest and finest men in Carmarthenshire 'and that your wife might be proud of you. Mr J. J. Bowen I have no doubt she is, Captain. Captain Margrave: Is this the only one you have? Appellant: Yes. Capt. Margrave: You ha.ve not a little boy of 25 anywhere? Appellant said that he had not. TWO FOR HOJJI ORDERS. A Llandefeilog farmer applied for total ex- emption for his son. He said that one son was lame. Capt. Margrave asked if there were any other eons. Appellant said that he had a son in Norfolk who was a curate. He had also a son who was studying in Lampeter College for Holy Orders. Capt. Margrave suggested that the son ap- pealed for should join the Army, and that one of the other sons come home to work the fann. The Chairman: I wonder could they do any work on the farm. Capt. Margrave: If they were under me, they'd do it pretty quick. The application was not granted. ST. CLEARS DRIVERS. The driver of the public conveyance between St. Clears and Laugharne appealed. He farmed 3*2 acres of land. He owned six horses and four motor cars. He had four brothers in the Army. The Chairman said that they granted exemp- tion so long as the appellant remained in his Present occupation. Appellant: If I give that up, T will join the Army. The driver of a. public conveyance between St. Clears and Pendine made a similar appli- cation. He had served twelve years in the Army. and had been through the South Afri- can war. He had two brothers in the Army. He thought that the famly had done its fair share. Captain Margrave: I think so too. Absolute exemption was granted. LLANSTEPHAN FAMILY BUTCHER. The tenant of the Edwinsford Arms, Llan- stephan asked for exemption. He said that he was a family butcher and was his own slaughterman. He was also a cattle dealer and publican. The Tribunal granted total exemption. HEAD TEACHER'S APPLICATION. The Headmaster (aged 35) of an elementary school in Llangunnor applied for exemption. If he could not get absolute exemption, he asked for time to allow him to sit for the final examination for the B.Se. (London). His studies had been interrupted before, and if this happened again it would probably be two late considering his age. COipt. Margrave said that the Board of Edu- cation exempted some teachers direct; the Educatiun Committee appealed for others. As neither supported this appeal, the inference was that he was not required. He could do three months fighting before sitting for his I examination. Mr Ll. Morgan Will your guarantee him time to study for his examination. Capt. Margrave: Is the war to be lost for the sake of a man sitting for his examination. I am surprised to hear you talking. The application was refused. CONTRACTOR'S APPEAL. A contractor appealed for a builder's labourer. He said that he had a contract on hand now to build a stationmaster's house at Bronwydd. The man was 40 years of age. Capt. Margrave said that he would like this man to go to the munition works to release a single man. Exemption until the 1st August was granted after which the man will be required to work on munitions. ILLNESS OF A MEMBER. We regret to hear that Mr John Lewis, of Pontantwn. a member of the Tribunal, js seriously ill. He was taken suddenly ill on the 6th inst., and the doctor had to be sum- moned in the middle of the night. Mr Lewis is is suffering from pleurisy.

Carmarthenshire Insurance Committee

Carmarthenshire Insurance Committee. The quarterly meeting of the Carmarthen- shire Insurance Committee was held at the Carmarthen Guildhall on Saturday. Mr Dd. Evans, .Manordaf (chairman) presided. "RIEP. MIST." A committee which had been appointed to consider the difficulties arising out of the pre- scription "Repeat the Mixture" given by some doctors presented its report. It recommended that doctors should not give guoh a prescription after a month, and that when they did so they should write the reference number of the orig- inal prescription on the scrip.—The report was adopted. EXEMPTION FOR CHEMIST. The Clerk reported the steps which had been taken to .secure exemption for chemists en- gaged in National Insurance work. Several members stated that there was a chemist at Llanelly who was entitled to exemp- tion and; who had not been able to procure it. Mr Walter Lloyd (Carmarthen) said that it must be his own fault. Exemptions had been obtained for all those who sent in their names to the Pharmaceutical Society. DOCTORS PENALISED. It was reported that a sum of £12i 10s Ex- chequer Grant had been withheld because cer- tain medical men in the county did not keep I "record cards" at all or di.d not keep them adequately. A sum of £80 was withheld in the case of one panel doctor, and the amount in one case was 10s. An appeal had been made to the Commissioners to allow the doctors time to comply with the regulations, and the Com- missioners allowed 21 days. BURRY PORT DIFFICULTIES. A communication was received from Burry Port with regard to the medical benefit of a large number of persons employed there who are on the panel of doctors in the Midlands and elsewhere. One young man who had required attendance for an injured hand isaid that he had been living in the county for seven months and did not intend to "transfer." Mr W. Lloyd said that if these people pre- ferred to be treated privately what could the Committee do? The Chairman said that it was a serious loss to the funds to have a large number of persons residing in the county whose panel fees went to other counties. Those who required medi- cal attendance might transfer or get travellers vouchers, but for majority the medical fees went elsewhere. It was proposed that the Commissioners be asked to make a regulation that all persons changing their residence should be compelled to transfer within three months. Mr J. H. Evans moved, that they send the whole correspondence to the Commissioners for their views on the matter.—This was agreed to SANATORIM TREATMENT. It was reported that a patient had been dis- charged from Udal Tor Sanatorium for gross disobedience. It was also reported that another person who had been recommendedfor sanatorium treat- ment had refused to go to a Sanatorium. A Jetter was read from a. female patient who had been in a sanatorium. The sum of 1:8 9s 2d sickness benefit which had accrued to her during the time she had been at the Sana- torium had been deposited with the Insurance Committee as it appeared she had no depen- dents. This is the usual practice. She now asked for the money. She said that her mother was dependent on her. It was agreed unanimously to pay the sum over to the Approved Society for the benefit of the patient. THE PAYMENT OF EXPENSES. Mr Rees Davies (Whit-land) moved "That in view of the war and the great demand for economy all members of the Insurance Com- mittee should attend all meetings and confer- ences eall-ed by the Clerk at their own expense for the duration of the war and six months after," and "that printed minutes be dispensed with for the present." Mr Davies in moving the motion said that this was in accordance with the spirit of the times. All public bodies took steps to reduce their expenditure at the present time. The motion was not sooonded. INFANTILE MORTALITY. Mr J. H. Evans moved "That the Carmar- thenshire Insurance Committee is pleased to not that the County Public Health Committee is taking steps to carry out a. scheme for maternity a-nd child welfare outlined in the circular of the Local Government Board of July 29. 1915, and suggests that until the scheme can he accepted in its entirety the assistance of local District Nurses be utilised as far as possible, and as the diminishing of infantile mortality is of national importance the scheme should be adopted by all local Health Authorities throughout the county." Mr Evans said that he did not think that the maernity benefit of RI 10s sufficient. In Aus- tralia £5 maternity benefit was paid out of the Exchequer. This would only amount to five millions a year. If we could spend five millions a day to destroy life we should be able to pay five millions a year to preserve life. Mr Griffith Morris seconded the motion, which was carried unanimously,

Presentation to Mr Bancroft MA R MI of Schools

Presentation to Mr Bancroft M.A., R M.I., of Schools. A meeting of the Llandilo and Llandovery Teachers' Association was held on Saturday last at the National School, Llandilo, with a view to present Mr J. Bancroft, late H.M.I. of Schools for the district, will a. carriage dock as a mark of esteem on his retiring from the post. Miss F. A. Thomas, Ffairfac-h Infant Schools presided and expressed the pleasure it gave then! to meet their old friend. They had met to show their appreciation of one who after long and Jionourable service in that county and elsewhere had decided that the time had come when he should seek rest. She wished to express on her own behalf and her felow teachers—some of whom were absent serving their country—the regret all felt at losing Mr Bancroft. That regret was tempered by the reflection, that though officially they should know him no more, there need be no break in the friendship they valued so highly. Mr Bancroft was the teachers' friend. She had always appreciated his unfailing courtesy, kindness, consideration and sympathy. Thev had missed him already, and it was not. in any fear that he would forget them that they had gathered together that day to ask him to accept as a parting gift that clock as a token of their great esteem and regard. I Mr Jenkyn Jones, Brynamman, said he was sure they were all glad to so j M r Bancroft onc« more. From the day lie had come amongst them up to the present the universal opinion of the teachers was that in him they had a thorough inspector and a thorough gentleman. He stood in the front rank of inspectors, and as a gentleman. If ever the teachers had a true friend they had it in him. His counsel was always wise. Fairness was a trait in his character. Then he always encouraged the teachers in their work. His resignation caused consternation amongst them. He was so fair, so straight, so kind, so tactful. He was too a. lover of children. He made mountains of difficulties dwindle to mole heaps. The children love him and respected him. He trusted lie would iive many years to enjoy his rest. His memory would stimulate them in their work. .Mr John Lewis, Ammanford, felt great plea- sure in being present. Their hearts were in what they were doing that day. He had been struck with Mr Bancroft's gentleness and his willingness not to impose changes in the code unduly on teachers, and his wish to keep away anything in the form of a whirlwind. He (Mr Lewis) had always been struck with Mr Bancroft's powerful influence. Such a power as Mr Bancroft possessed was called a sixth sense. Tact too was in him a second nature. They all regretted his departure from amongst them, but they would not forget him. Some Inspectors they remembered more than others He said it without hesitation that their remem brances of Mr Bancroft wculd be impregnted with the finest feelings of respect. Mr R. Matthews. Llandebie, said lie agreed and reiterated all that the previous speakers had said. What was good for the school Mi- Bancroft would always discover. It was al- ways a pleasure to see him coming in. He (Mr Matthews) always smiled at the time. Mr W. Wlliams, Penygroes. said lie had little to say in addition to what had been said. He agreed with it all; but it was no pleasure at all to him to be there. He could wish such a meeting held many years hence. What had been said in a general way he could confirm. He felt that Mr Bancroft had always treated him with every fairness and sympathy. He had the very warmest feelings towards him Every teacher in the school felt lie had the support of Mr Bancroft. They were all sorry to hear he had left them. and had hoped to have kept him amongst them many years. He had always sympathised wiwth and trusted the teacher. He was always willing to consider the ieas of teachers. There was no desire on his part to have teachers overwork themselves. In his retiring he carried away with him the warmest feelings of teachers and children. If he ever came that way again a visit from him would be welcomed. 'Miss Painter. L.L.A., Ammanford thought there was very little to say in addition to what had been said. Mr Bancroft had succeeded without any effort in making all the teachers his friends. He had a gift in that way, and they would never forget him. His resigna- tion came as a shock of surprise to them and all expressed their sorrow. She could only wish him in conclusion lang life and happiness in his retirement. Mr D. Morgan, formerly of Ffairfach, thanked the teachers for inviting him to that meeting and inviting him to speak. Some of the speakers Had been reminiscent, but he him- self felt too young for tha.t as yet. They had not come there to bury Mr Bancroft but to praise him, and he would like to add one or two peans to the praises already sung. Mr Bancroft as an Inspector drew them as teachers insensibly towards him. In a quiet way he could impress them and influence them in their school work for the great good. He compelled them to be critical of their own actions. To the young teachers who were pre- sent and had known no other Head Inspector but Mr Bancroft lie would say "Thank God for Mr Bancroft" and pray that'his successor may walk in his steps. The only Inspector he ha.d ever been able to compare with Mr Bancroft was the Inspector of his boyhood's days-a Mr Bowswtead, who like Mr Bancroft was the perfect gentleman. Teachers and especially young teachers were always encouraged in their work by Mr Bancroft, and lie (Mr Mor- gan) would never forget the fact that a couple of days before he (himself) retired from the teaching profession Mr Bancroft called to hid him farewell. Mr D. James, H.M.I.. expressed the pleasure he felt in seeing that the teachers of the dis- trict had in a tangible way expressed their regard to I..tlr Bancroft who to them was always courteous, helpful and sympathetic in doing his work as an inspector. It required a great man to be just, and Mr Bancroft had been just to the State and to the teachers. He thought he had succeeded in being so in an eminent way. He did not know a man freer from pre- judice. He (Mr James) had thought it unwise that he should have retired, but it had been decreed by la ws like those of the Medes and Persians. The relation between the teachers and Mr Bancroft had been most cordial. There had been confidence on both sides and as a result the. very best had been got out of the teachers. His criticisms were always helpful. He never found fault for the sake of finding fiauilt, but always with a view to higher ideals. His aptimism was beyond what that word ordinarily covered. They trusted lie would have a long life an be able constantly to look upon the valuaible gifts he had received, and that they would remind him of the affection nd esteem in which he was held. Mr Harris Thomas, Ammanford. said he should like to say one or two words in addition to those of the speakers selected by the com- mittee. He could re-echo all that had been said by them. They were losing the services of a gentleman in the fullest sense of the term. It would be impossible to meet a teacher in the three counties that Mr Bancroft had been over, who had a harsh word to say of him. His criticisms he always tempered with sympathy ana tact. Miss F. A. Thomas then formerly handed over the clock which was suitably inscribed. In rising to respond, Mr Bancroft was ee- ceiyed with cheers, the teachers standing mean while. He said he felt quite sure he had the sympathy of the teachers on such an occasion. He did not know how to thank them adequate- ly for the beautiful present tliev had made him and more especially for the kindness which prompted the idea. He also had to thank them for the kind reception they had given him. It was his last appearance in public in his old dis- trict. He was deeply indebted and obliged to the various speakers who had been so kind as to refer to his services in such nice terms. It was his fifth appearance to receive presenta- tions from teachers, and ho had to congratu- late the teachers on the high standard they had attained to as public speakers. One very plea- sant feature at that meeting, different to all the others he had atended, was that music had been introduced, and he was sure they had all been greatly hcarmed and delighted bv the ex- cellent singing of the two young ladies. Of course lie had to refer also to the skilful accompanist. Circumstances had prevented tht meeting being held in February or March as intended. He had at that time been en- gaged on Government work. He had started his work as an Inspector in 1877 and came to that district in 1900. Apart from the pre- sents he had received, lie had also received nicely worded resolutions from local educa- tional bodies on Iiik; retirement. He was re- tiring in a. pleasant way. He should have re- tired according to strict law three years ago, but Jiad been asked to continue for a while in the work. He had always tried to be perfectly fair and impartial. He was still quite willing at the ago of 65 to do any work that might be needed if called upon. He had been born in Walp;- and his mother was Welsh, and though he had been referred to that day as an Eng- lishman he was not wholly .so. He wished to congratulate the teachers who were J.P.'s. He was sure they were all very proud of them and he thought an intelligent teacher was bound to make an excellent magistrate. It was a pleasure to him to have Miss Thomas in the chair and to bo presented with tho clock by her. He had great regard for her since ho ad known and and they had always been very good friends. He was sure that beautiful clock would always remind him and his wife, to whom Miss Painter had so kindly referred, and family of their kindness, and when he sat down of an evening on the beautiful Chester- field lie had been presented with at Carmar- then that morning he should be watching the hour for bed. He had to thank Mr James for his very kind remarks, and who knew more about him than most people did. He had always found Mr James an excellent colleague. -a very true mend, and a thorough worker and helper. In wishing them good-bye he hoped some of them would meet again. The world was very small now. In any case he wished them wry happiness in their private life and every success and prosperity in their public life. He thanked them once more.. During the proceedings songs were excel- lently rendered by Miss Catherine Jones, of Ammanford and Miss Bronwen Williams, Llam- dilo. The accompanist was Mr J. Harries Thomas. PRESENTATION AT CARMARTHEN. Mr J. D. Jones, of Llandefeilog, presided at a meeting of the Carmarthen and District Teachers Association on Saturday when Mr Bancroft received the presentation of a Chester,field from the members. The presen- tation was made by Miss Hubard, La ugh arne, and eulogistic speeches wore delivered by various members.

One Carmarthen Fact I

One Carmarthen Fact OUTWEIGHS 1,000 FOREIGN CLAIMS. The Carmarthen man who states the follow- ing fact, tells more by his experience than a thousand unsupported foreign claims. And facts are what Carmarthen people want, facts that can be verified. Judge this one for yourself. On April 14th, 1915, (Mr J. Evans, of 28, Chapel street, near the Wesleyan Church, Car- marthen, said "My kidneys gave me a lot of trouble at one time, and I had touches of sciatica as well. The pains were stablike in my back and wer very sharp down to the ankle. The water was not right, either, being scalding and very painful in relief. "A friend advised me to try Doan't backache kidney pills, and I am glad I did. They eased my back splendidly & by the time I had taken -SPI several boxes I was cured, for which I was grateful. I am pleased to recommend them to any who suffer as I did. I shall certainly use them again if necessary. (Signed) "J. Evans." On February 15th, 1916—nearly twelve months 1,ate-l)lr Ev,ans said: "Since my cure by Doan's piUs I am pleased to say I have kept very well." Doan's backache kidney pills are NOT for constipation, liver complaint, or stomach trouble. They are solely for disorders of the kidneys and bladder—such as dropsy, gravel, sediment in the water, urinary troubles, back- ache, lumbago, rheumatism, and uric acid poisoning. They relieve ( the kidneys and bladder like laxatives relieve the bowels. Of all dealers, or 2s 9d per box, from Foster- McClellan Co.. 8. Weils street, Oxford street, London, W. Don't ask for backache or kidney pills,—ask distinctly for Doan's backache kid- ney pills, the same as Mr Evans had.

Llanfynydd Eisteddfod

Llanfynydd Eisteddfod. On Saturday the 10th inst. the annual eis- teddfod was held at Llanfynydd in the pavilion erected on a field kindly lent by Mr Henry Evans, Penybont. The attendance considering the threatening weather was better than might have been expeced. L'lr T. Jones, Brynmaer, Llanelly. was chairman: Aid. H. J. Thomas, Penrhos, conductor; Mr John Thomas, Llall- elly. adudioated on the music, and Gwili (the Rev J. Jenkins. Ammanford) the literary por- tion. The accompanist was Miss X. M. Evans. A.V.C.M., Llndebie; the pian was kindly lent by Mrs Cornish, -Greyhound Cottge. Mr Tom Bevan. Glanamman, acted as the harpist, Mr Evan Jones as secretary, and Corpl. Arthur Thomas. R.W.F., home on furlough, as the treasurer. The chairman and vice-chairman of the committee were Messrs Walt Davies, Post Office, and John Rees, Keeper's Lodge. All the local gentry and other friends were patrons and liberal subscribers to the funds which were for such War Funds as the com- mittee decides upon. Appended are the results of the competitions Solo, under 12. "Curo, Curo" 1. M. H. W. Williams, Carmarthen; 2, S. M. Thomas, Breohfa. Recitation under 12. "Psalm 13" 1. My- fanwy Dyer. Llangadock 2, E. Griffiths, Glan- amman. Solo. under 15. "Yr iaith i ti Gyniru" 1, Jemima Lewis. Salem; 2. divided between Esther Davies. C'wnidu and M. Lewis. Salem. Two stanzas, "Brwydr Verdun" Jolo Goch. Best four voices in unison, under 15, "Har- lech" Lettice Thomas and friends, Salem. Recitation under 16, "Wyr Ieuainc Cymru" Millicent Rees, Ammanford. Essay. "Pry da in Heddyw" H. Thomas, Llanybythcr. Quartette, "Y ddwy lili" Four Friends. Poem, 60 Jones, "Y Llynges dawel" (The Silent Fleet): Joshua Jones, Golden Grove. Children's choir. 18 in number and under 15. "Cwsg fy noli" John Harries, Lan. Bass solo, "Y Gwladgarwr" W. H. John, Llandebie. j Penillion. with harp: 1, John Bevan, Glan- amman; 2. Richard Morgan, Cwmgorse. Open recitation: Hywel Myrddin, Carmar- then. Mixed choir, 25 in number. "Y Gwlithyn" Tom Evans, Tirydail. Party of eight, "0 no wawria" J. Harries. Tirydail.

LLANDEBIE EISTEDDFOD

LLANDEBIE EISTEDDFOD. The. tenth annual chair eisteddfod was held at Llandebie on Whit-Monday. The Rev J. Towyn Jones, 'M.P., was the president, and the adudicators were Mr P. Ri. D-aniels, A.R.C.O. Llandilo (music) and Mr^John Harries (lslwyn) Bettws (literature). Priiie, ii awards:- Chief choral: Tirydail (Mr Tom Evans). Children's choir Brynamman Juvenile United (Mr Gomer WTilliams). Soprano solo Madam Mary Lewis. Bryn- amman. Contralto solo: Madam Agnes Thomas. Ammanford. Tenor solo Mr W. Tanner. Baritone solo: Mr Dyfnant Davies, Peny- groes. Rooita,tion (oak chair): Miss M. J. Francis (Llaethferch). Godregraig. Penillion: Mr Joshua Jones, Golden Grove.

LLANDILO TRIBUNALS AND APPEALS

LLANDILO TRIBUNALS AND APPEALS. At Llandilo Rural Tribunal on Tuesday. Mr R. Matthews presiding, Mr J. L. Williams called attention to the number of appeals to the County Tribunal. They knew of cases where appeals went from tribunal to tribunal and the men never got into the Army. He wished the tribunal to exercise their power to refuse appeals from their decision. Mr Evan Davies: Even when they know they have no ground they appeal. I think it is a very reasonable thing, otherwise our deci- sions are simply a farce. The Tribunal decided to exercise their powers of refusal to appeal, and that appli- cants who were exempted should join the V.T.C. It was also decided to exempt all attested married men until September 13th.

LLANDILO

LLANDILO. DEATH OF AN OLD POSTMAN.—The death occurred on the 8th inst. at Park Lane, of Mr J. Haines, at the age of 81. He had been for some time a town postman. Recently lie had been in feeble health. His remains were in- terred at the Tabernacle Churchyard on Tues- day last, the officiating ministers being the Rev D. P. Roberts. M.A., B.D.. and the Rev D. Williams. SAD DEATH OF CONGREGATIONAL MINISTER.— The Essex Cbroner held an inquest on Saturday .last upon the Rev Mr Picton. Congrega- tional minister, and a Lieut. James McLagan. both of whom were killed by the explosion of a liand grenade in the residence of the former. The evidence showed that the Lieut, was in charge of the grenades and took one home to show the Rev Mr Picton. with whom he was staying. The grenade exploded killing the rev. gentleman and the lieutenant. a.nd severely injuring Mr Piot oil's wife and daughter. The rev gentleman was a native of Conwil and a brother to Mr Picton. retired schoolmaster, Narberth. and of Mr J. Picton, J.P., Truscoed, Llandilou The deceased has occupied the pulpit of the English Congregation Church in this town and was again to have done so next August.

Showing Head Lights at Laugharne

Showing Head Lights at Laugharne. DEFENCE OF REALM PROSECL TION. The monthly Petty Sessions were held at St. Clears on Tuesday, the magistrates present being Mr Morgan Jones, Llanmeiio (chair- j man) and Mr J. D. Morse. Supt. Jones charged William Rees, of Glas- fryn. farmer's son. with showing headlights on a motor car within six miles of the sea con- trary to the Defence of the Realm Act. Supt. Jones said that the procoodi ngs were taken under the Defence of the Realm regula- tions and also under the Lights on Vehicles Lighting Order Part II. Part li. forbids the showing of lights visible at sea., and it states that the use of headlights on motor cars of all "descriptions is prohibited. The defendant had used headlights within 100 yards of the sea. The Clerk (Mr C. H. Morgan Griffiths): On what part of the coast was he ? Supt. Jones: In Laugharne. I may say that we might have taken out another summons against the defendant, although we only take proceedings in one case. His lights were larger than what they should be even if they were side lights. P.O. George Henry AYrmington said that at I 9.30 p.m. on the 10th May he saw defendant in Gosport street. Laugharne. Defendant was driving a. Ford motor car. BX 528, proceeding from the direction of Pendine within a quarter of a mile of the sea. He had two powerful electric headlamps' attached to the extreme front. When the defendant got close to the constable the lights were reduced to a mini- mum after passing the constable the lights were again switched on and the car proceeded to St. Clears. As a result of a conversation which the witness had with Sergt. Davies, witness saw the defendant on the 13th and told him wht lie had witnessed at the time and place in question. The defendant said "Yes; I was drivng a car when I saw you. I did not have much light; I know there is an order against powerful lights." Defendant: I had the lights dimmed because I have a contrivance on my car. 1 can get them down to half a candle power. I have a I witness to prove that, and that the car was only just going at three miles an hour. The Clerk That does not matter. Supt. Jones: That is not the charge. The Clerk You are charged with using head lights. Defendant: I could hardiy see my way ten feet ahead of me. Supt. Jones said that the order wic, ex- plained to the defendant when it came into force. Defendant: I am expecting a witness here. He is a minister. The Clerk: When you say-the lights were dimmed. you are admitting the offence. Supt. Jones As long as he bad them lit at all he lias committed an offence. If he had side lights they might be permitted under a certain candle power. Defendant: I cannot see without headlights. The Clerk: You must not motor at night then. Mr J. D. Morse Gosport street, Laugharne, can't be seen from the sea. Supt. Jones: It is within six miles of the sea. Mr J. D. Morse: It is within a quarter of a mile of the sea. Supt. Jones: Probably he used these lights the whole way from Pendine. Defendant said that his witness who was a minister would prove that he said that he won- dered how lie could get about with such small lights. Supt. Jones That would not help your case. It is an offence to have headlights. Defendant: I was only going at the rate of five miles an hour. The Clerk: You are not charged with furious driving. The Chairman asked whether the provisions of the Order were generally known. Supt. Jones: We made a. point of informing every motor car owner when the order came into force. The Clerk: Do you understand that vou must not use headlights within six miles of the sea. Defendant: I liad them dimmed. The Clerk: You must not use headlights at all. I Defendant: I cannot see my way without them. The Clerk: You must not take your motor oar out. Supt. Jones said that although he did not press the charge he asked for a penalty in this case. The Chairman said that the extreme penalty was £100 and six months imprisonment. This was a very serious offence as was shown by the extent of the full penalty. The defendant must take care that it did not occur again. On that understanding the Bench decided to fine him 10s. ASSAULT CASE SETTLED. David Rees. farm servant, Foxhole terrace, St. Clears, charged Thomas Morgan, Maesllan with assault. Complainant appeared and said that he asked the permission of the Bench to with- draw the charge. He had been in the service of the defendant and left it after which the alleged assault took place. The matter had now been settled. The Bench agreed to the charge being witlt- drawn. EDUCATION CASE. Mr J. D. Lloyd, Attendance Officer, had a charge against a local parent named John Phillips. Neither of the parties appeared. The Clerk said that possibly the officer had seen the parent and told him that lie did not intend to proceed4 Mr Morse said that the officer ought to appear then and to state that he did not pro- I ceed.

Stitch in Time

Stitch in Time. There is an old saying "A stitch iu tim4 sarej nine" &nd if vipon He first cvnlptomlJ of anything being wrong with our health we weie to resort to some simple but proper means of correcting th4 miechie», rine-tentbo of the suffering that invades oar homes wovild be avoided. A dale of 0 riljm Erant* Quinine Bitters taken w:1en y >i feel the least bit out of sorts is j ,t th. t t;stitch ip time." You can :-et GwiJjra E. 'ans' Qiiinine Bitters at any Chemists or stolao in bottles, 2s gd and 4s 6d each, but r;.men,ber that the only guarantee of genuinei tg is the name "Gwilym Evans" ou the la l, stamp anr bottlo, without which none ie genuine. Sole Proprietors: Quinine Bitten Manufacturing Company, Limited, LVnellv, South Wale

WEATHER AND THE CROPS

WEATHER AND THE CROPS. The growth of wheat is slow and the harvest is likely to be quite ten days late. The plant has tillered fairly well, but needs warmer nights. News of the coming harvest in the form of the ear of corn is not yet to be gath- ered from the wheat fields, but rye is in full ear. Winter beans are well in bloom and so is scarlet trefoil. The scent of sweet vernal is very perceptible in the meadows, and several of the leading grasses arc in flower. April- sown barley and oats look well, and some bar- ley sown in May isaiready showing above ground.—From Monday's "Mark Lane Ex- press."

CROSS HANDS

CROSS HANDS. DEATH.—An old and highly respected inha- bitant of Cross Hands passed away on Sunday morning in the person of Mrs Hannah Davies. Llwydcoed, widow of the late Mr John Davies. registrar for the Llannon district, who was widely Known throughout Carmarthenshire. The deceased lady, who was 76 years of age, was at the time of her death staying with her daughter. Mrs David Lewis. Clifton terrace. LU. nelly.

KIDWELLY NOTES

KIDWELLY NOTES. The marriage has been arranged and 1ria take place at the end of June of Lieut.- Engineer Commander Richard Thomas, son of the late Mr W. Thomas and Mrs Thomas, for- meriy of The Cottage, Kidwelly, and now of Swansea, and Miss Kitty Greenish, eldest daughter of Mr Greenish, of Bushey, near London. Lieut. Thomas, who is familiarly known as "Ric," is a nephew of Mr H. E. Smart. Mountain View, and hag been on active service since the beginning of the war on one of H.M. auxiliary cruisers, having previously been engaged as engineer by the Royal Mail Packet Company. ••• Among the gallant fellows who have been in the thick of the fighting on sea and land, now visiting their homes, are Pte. Arlington Thomas, son of Mr and Mrs D. Thomas, Nat. School, and Mr Fred Northcote, of H.M.8. Malaya. Pte. Thomas was severely wounded in Gallipoli last summer, and has been treated at various hospitals ever since, with the result that, although not yet fully recovered, he is looking very well and hopes of ultimate recov- ery are entertained. Mr Northcote was in the recent naval engagement in the Skager Rack, and although his ship was struck several times with heavy losses among his comradee, he came through unscathed. The following chapels were represented at the annual "Gymanfa Pwnc" held at Morfa C.M. on Whit-Monday: Horeb (Mynyddy- garrog), Morfa, Llandefeilog, Bancycapel, Ferryside. and Liansaint. The various meet- ings were exceptionally well attended, and the various schools acquitted themselves with great credit. Mr Dd. Gravell, Brynhyfryd, i presided in the afternoon, and Mr E. H. Stephens, Coedybrain, at the evening meet- ing. Mr Stephens emphasised the great im- portance of looking after the children's in- struction, and urged upon the churches their duty cf seeing that whatever else might suffer the care of the children should be carried on with increased efficiency. We deeply regret to have to record the deeth which occurred on Whit-Monday of Miss Katherine Augusta Griffiths (Katie), Henblas, youngest daughter of the late Mr and Mrs Thomas Griffiths, and sister of Dr T. R. Griffiths, Hen hl as, Medical Officer of Health for the Borough. Death came rather suddenly although deceased had been in ill-health for a long time. Her family is one of the oldest Kidwelly families, and is held in the highest esteem bv all classes.. Her father was an Alderman of the Borough, and was Mayor of Kidwelly, for three terms. She is survived by one sister (Miss May Griffiths) and one brother with whom the deepest sympathy is expressed in their bereavement. The funeral takes place to-day (Friday) in the family vault in St. Mary's Parish Churchyard. An eisteddfod which turned out very succes- "ully was held at Siloam -yaprtist Chapel on Saturday last, the proceeds being devoted to the Sunday School Fund. Ihe officials were: Adjudicators (music) Mr J. Williams, A.T.S.C., Five H-oads (literature), Mr W. J. Jones. Five Roads; accompanist, Miss Mary Davies. Pwllheli; conductor, Mr John Davies, Pontyates; hon. secretary, Mr Tom Thomas, Water street, Kidwelly; and hon. treasurer, Mr Dd. Davies, Mount Pleasant, Kidwelly. The following are the chief awards:— Children's party: Pontyates (4 competitors). Soprano solo: Miss M. A. Williams, Trim- saran. Teno solo: Mr Dd. Morris, Ponthenry. Bass solo: Mr Gwilym Thomas, Kidwelly. Solo for girls, under 16: Divided between Miss Anita Edwards, Llaneliy, and Miss A. K. Morgans, Trimsaran. Solo for boys uner 16: Master Willie Mor- gans. Llanelly. Solo for children under 12: Miss S. Richards, M ynyd< ly ga.r reg. Children's duett: Miss Anita. Edwards and Master Willie Morgan, Llanelly. Pianoforte solo Master Henry John Owens, Kidwelly. Recitation (open): Divided between Mr Johnnie Hughes, Trimsaran, and Mr David Morris. Ponthenry. Best wit: Miss Gwen Walters, Kidwelly. Impromptu address: Divided between Mr W. J. Rogers and Mr Ed. Walters, Kidwelly.

Advertising

'cz: i□ i at H STOMACH & UVER TROUBLES INDIGESTION Res4ore your digestive 0 0, organs to working order. CONSTIPATION by usinft Mother Seiget't BILIOUSNESS STrup.:tnd these trouble. will be completely ■ HEADACHES banished. Tnt it t» rt»T □ □ 1 YIELD TO f] J MOTHER SEIGEL'S f E SYRUP NEXT bUDA Y'S PKE/YOHERS at Oarmarthen Places of Worship. BABELLTPBNSARN. Cvfarfod Gweddi. BETHANIA C.M. CHAPEL. Rev J. 0. Jones (pastor). EBENEZER WESLEYAN CHAPEL. Rev Joseph Jenkins (pastor). ELIM (IND.), FFYNONDDRAIN. Mr Ebenezer Davies. Presbvterian College. ENGLISH BAPTIST CHAPFAL. Rev Gwilym Davies. M.A., Abergavenny. ENGLISH CONGREGATIONAL OHURUH. Rev D. J. Thomas (pastor). ENGLISH WESLEYAN CHAPEL. Rev Vincent Taylor (resident minister). LAMMAS ST. INDEPENDENT CHAPEL, Rev J. Stephens. Llwvnvrhwrdd. PARK-Y-VELVET UNITARIAN CHAPEL. Rev Prof. Philemon Moore, B.A. (pastor). (Evening onlv at 6.30). TABERNACLE BAPTIST OH A PEL. Rev E. U. Thomas (pastor). PRIORDY INDEPENDENT CHAPEL Rev W. James. Swansea (vearlv meetings). PENUEL BAPTIST CHAPEL. Professor Morris B. Owen, B.A., B.D. UNION STREET INDEPENDENT CHAPEL. Student. WATER ST. C.M. CHAPEL. Rev John Owen, Anfield, Liverpool (yearly meetings). ZION PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH, Rev S. Jones, Rhayader. _8 1916IST °F A^1 ^ERSARY SERVICES. June 18-19-Water st. C.M. Chapel. June 25th-Zion Sunday School. Sept. 10-11—Lammas street Cli.-ilpi. Sept. 10—Elim Cong. Chur-.i. Sept. 24—Bethania. Oct. 29-30-Eng. Cong. Church Anniversary Decern. 3—Zion Presbyterian Church. Dates of fixtures should be sent to the Rev D. Glvndwr Richards, Secretary of the Oarmar. then Free Church Council.

A Revelation

A Revelation. The delicious crispness of fish fried in A TORA Beef Suet, its freedom from all traces of greasiness, and its perfect digestibilitv. is a. II u11' Fri*d « only obtainable when ATORA is used. Sold in lib 1C^; ca.r*ons 6d. For frying, ask for ATORA *n Blocks. Refuge substitutes.

Family Notices

BIRTH. SprRBY.—June 7th at 6. Fountain Hall te-rrae Carmarthen, the wife of Sapper W. T Spurry, R.E., of a daughter.