Teitl Casgliad: Carmarthen weekly reporter

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 4 o 4
Full Screen
13 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
THE PASSING WEEK DLL1lAfDL

THE PASSING WEEK D ..L L1)' .l \.A ,f DL "Let there be wtles; there are gra. If old tilings, there are new; Ten'thousand broken lights and shapes et glimpses of the tr Lie." -f-zNNYSCN. Tii;* death of Lord Kitchener affordol a chance niongering. We were assured that lie had been dogged by spies, and tint a (Icniiiiii submarine had lain in wait for NI-141(.Il he was travelling to Rr -i i and lit it to the bottom. #*» One of the most firmly rooted dogmas of a is that the Germans are a race posted ci -upernaturaI ability. Not only wore they able to find out exactly when Lord Kitchener would be a a certain time. but in spite of a!1 the elaborate censorship they were able to send the information to AYilhelmshavon so as to have a submarine dispatched punctu- ally to the locus in quo. It would take some little time tor the inforniation to get from London to AYilhelmshaven, and it would take a little time for a snhmarine to get from AVil- helmshaven to the Orkiiev,-foi- submarines are not ocean greyhounds. Still practical details of that sort never trouble the novelists who sketch out the great German spy plot. Our scaremongers can make German spies do things with as little regard for practical diffi- culties as the chief villain of a sensational film. The writers in the daily press on the German spy question are not out to give us facts. They want to give us "thrills." Suppose for the sake of argument that the "Hampshire" had been torpedoed by a German submarine! Would that prove that the Ger- man submarine commander knew that Lord Kitchener was on board? Not at all. The Hampshire was a big cruiser. The "County Class" are all first class cruisers—second only to the battle cruisers. There are the "Cum- berland" and the "Sussex" and others of the same type—all big cruisers which anybody would recognise ten miles off. If a submarine were prowling about trying to make its way from the North Sea into the Atlantic is it at all wonderful that spying a first class crtriier it should fire a torpedo at it. A submarine commander who saw a big enemy warship could no more be expected to miss such a chance than a. sportsman could let a covey of partridges pass him without having a. shot at them. Had Lord Kitcener travelled in a fish- ing smack or a cargo boat and she were sub- marined. it would certainly look suspicous. We should be inclined to ask "Why did the submarine commander think it worth his while firing a torpedo at such an insignificant look- ing craft?" But in the case of a first class cruiser the fact would require no explanation. A German submarine commander would natur- ally try to sink any enemy warship which he saw—and it would be a feather in his cap in any case. So even if it were proved to the hilt that the Hampshire was sunk by a submarine, there would be no evidence of German espion- age. Any British cruiser would be a mark for a German submarine at any time. Now it has been clearly established to the satisfaction of the Admiralty that the Hamp- shire was sunk by a mine. It is by no mere chance that this event foilowed so closely on the fight in the North Sea. The German ships in a battle throw mines overboard at a most lavish rate when they are being pursued. We know what happened in the case of the bombardment of Scarborough Last winter. The fleeing cruisers threw floating mines overboard and the sea was strewn with these for some time,, the result being that several merchant ships were blown up. In the battle off Jutland the other day. the last phase was a race m which the British fleet was trying to overhaul the Germans who were heading straight for home. There is not the least doubt that the German ships in the course of their flight dropped mines overboard in the hope that their pursuers would bump into them and go "sky- high." After a sea fight with the Germans. the water is as thickly strewn with mines as the floor of a room is with "fag ends" after a smoking concert! What happens when mines are dropped in the water ? They drift until they meet an obstruction or until they are cast ashore. If a mine were dropped into the Towy at ebb-tide from Carmarthen Quay it might drift f, thousands of miles. Theoretically there is no reason why it should not get into the ocean which washes the shores of New Zealand. Practically this is unlikely. It might blow up a vessel in Carmarten Bay a few hours after it was dropped or it might be cast ashore on the coast of Devon. Alines drift with the ocean currents like sealed bottles, and are often picked up hundreds of miles from the spot at which they were dropped. Alines dropped off the coast of Jutland during the last great sea fight would in the ordinary course of things drift westward, and being caught in the numerous cross-currents which churn around the North of Scotland might go circling round the Orkney Islands for weeks. This is how things happen in real life. King William III. went out galloping on the heath. His horse stumbled over a mole hill and threw him. When the king was picked up he was found to have his collar bone broken, and the injury brought about his death in a few days. William III. was regarded by the supportti-s of the Stuarts as a usurper, and the Jacobites for many years afterwards used to drink the health of the "little gentleman in the velvet coat," meaning the mole which made the mound which overthrew the horse and so killed the Prince of Orange. But nobody was ever so foolish as to suggest that the Jacobites knew where the King was going to pass and that they arranged to have a. mole hill in his way. Many great men meet their deaths by very small chances; and Lord Kitchener and King William III. are two historic instances. «** The seas around the North of Scotland are amongst the roughest and most treacherous in the world. From the North Sea out to the Atlantic there are only two i-outes-throtigh the English Channel or around the Orkney Islands. The route around the Orkney Islands is so difficult and dangerous to navigators that nobody would ever attempt it if the English Channel were open. When the Spanish Armada fled before Drake who held tTie Channel they tried to escape round the North of Scotland. and great galleons were piled on the rocks of the Shetlands. Although therefore there are on paper two routes there is in fact only one. This affords a clue to the German efforts to capture Calais. The Germans said that they are cooped up and that they have no right of way to the outer world. They say that Eng- land holds one side of the gate and France the other and that Germany "is therefore depen- dent on the goodwill of her enemies for leave to carry on her foreign trade. Things are even worse than that. Germany has Colonies-or. rather she had. She cannot send a company of infantry or a box of cartridges to her own garrisons in Africa except she passes them between the British and French fleets! Nobody would navigate these Northern 1 waters who had any other choice..The British mission to Russia would in peace time have either travelled overland or have taken some ),tlior and safer sea route. For instance there s the beautiful Mediterranean route through he Dardanelles a.nd the Bosphorus to the Ila,ek Seq. But that is closed by war. Then here is the route through the Baltic to Cron- adt; but this again is closed by war. The ily communication possible Iwtween Great Britain and Russia is around the North of Scotland to Archangel. The port of Archangel freezes a little before or a little after Christ- mas according to the character of the season, and it remains frozen until some time in April as a rule. In the winter therefore Russia has no sea. outlet except by the will of other nations The aim of Russia all through the centuries has been to get an "ice-free port." That is why she has struggled for Constantinople so per- sistently that is why she tried to get Port Arthur and came into collision with Japan; that is why she was supposed to have designs on India. Russia has no exit to the outer world in winter except in times of peace. consideration of this fact may explain the collapse of the Russians at certain times; and it may explain too why they have shown sticii a revival of late. »*» Nobody need ever have imagined that Russia "was done for." Russias resources are un- touched. She has twenty to twent.iv, millions of men of military age. If Britain and Franco made peace. Russia could (, ii- tinue the war on her own account for the ne\t ten years. Russia could keep the war on until the Germans in desperation would have to offer her any terms to stop. No ,i,oii(! Germany begins to talk of peace terms. Germany thought the war over, it had not pv- perly begun.

I CARMARTHEN UiNDERTHE SEARCHLIGHT1

CARMARTHEN UiNDERTHE SEARCHLIGHT. 1 UOJUe, come, and sit you down; you shall not budge, tfo- shall not go, till set yon up a gjasa Wnere you may see the inmost part of you. SHAKCSPRABS. The Carmarthenshire Insurance Committee on Saturday rejected a proposal that members should pay their own expenses. This is not at all surprising. It is a curious fact that all the proposals for economy which have been popu- lar are for economy on the part of somebody else. Whenever it is proposed to any body that the members shall forego something them- selves. the proposal falls through. The Car- marthenshire Insurance Committee has many illustrious precedents. A curious inference was mentioned at the County Court on Saturday. It was stated that daffodils were growing in the corner of a certain field, an da solicitor suggested that there had been a house there at one time. This is a highly probable inference; but it is not at at all an absolute certainty. There is a field between Carmarthen and Llanstephan called "Banc-y-bloclau," which is covered with daffo- dils in the spring time. ««• It is highly probable that these clumps of daffodils-especially of really good daffodils— are "escapes" from gardens. Some so-called "wild flowers" are really "escapes" which have become naturalised. Sweet peas can be found growing wild on the sandy burrows on some parts of the Carmarthenshire coast. It does* not follow that they are wild flowers in the real sense of the term. Somebody grew sweet peas —the seeds being procured from another coun- try—in his garden. Some of the seed blew amazingly and in the autumn scattered dozens of peas which came up next year and died off. But there was one hardy individual who was able to take care of itself and it flourished amazingly and in the autumn scatered dozens of seeds which in ten years covered miles of couiftrv with their progeny. Naturally a plant. which has to hold its own under such circum- stances degenerates: the flowers are much poorer than those of its more delicate ancestors There are several cases of this kind. There is a pink and lavender garden primrose which blooms wild in the hedge-row in a certain dis- trict of Carmarthenshire. In some cases rhododendrons have begun to "escape" ana are attempting to naturalise themselves out- side a garden. If they succeed, somebody may believe in another century that the rhododen- dron is a native of Britain. It is quite pos- sible that many flowers which we consider British wildflowers and which our forefathers considered British wild flowers are really the deeseendants of naturalised foreigners. The columbine for instance might have been intro- duced by the Romans from Italy and planted in their villa gardens in England and Wales. This would explain the existence of the colum- bine in this country and would also explain why our wild columbines are so inferior to the Italian specimens. From what we know definitely of the history of the fuchsia we can believe almost anything in the way of naturalisation. The fuchsia was unknown in this country until the early part of the 19th century. The name of the man who brought the first plant into this country from South America is known. I am not sure that there are not people yet alive who saw him. Yet there are already parts of the King- dom in which you will see hedges of fuchsia flourishing like hawthorn. When we see mag- nificent plants in gardens and greenhouses and "poor relations" in the hedgerow we usually assume that the poor specimen is the original and that the glorious individuals are improved varieties. It is just as likely to be the other way about. The "poor relations" may be the degenerate descendants of aristocratic an- cestors. The Carmarthen Electric Supply Co. has put forward a proposal which means that the people who use gas are to have a slight ad- vantage in their rate-bills provided that the people who use electricity pay more in their lighting bills. I don't know whether the matter has been fuly grasped by the members of the Town Council. But if it has. all the shareholders in the Gas Company ought to he very enthusiastic supporters of the latest pro- posal. _w- There is a dispute between the Company and the Council about the public lamps. At the worst the Council may have to pay £ 65 for the lamps which they do not wish lighted, I do not say that the Council is bound to pay that or that the Company insist on it. But at tho very worst, that is the most which the Council could be expected to pay if the Company won their case and would listen to no terms. And the concession which the Company is prepared to give on terms is t:30 a year. They are pre- pared to allow £:35 ()s 6d (half of the original price, t70 Is Od). The Company say they need not allow more than £5 12s on an equitable J arrangement. So the exact difference between the best which is to be hoped for and the worst to be feared is t29 8s 6d. This is a farthing rate. A penny rate pro- duces between £ 100 and £ 120 according to its incidence. 1 ake therefore the case of a house- holder who is rated at £ 20 a year. The gain or loss to him is only od a year. That is what the trouble is about. It is all over a farthing rate. The Company says "If we allow you this t29 8s (id we require permission to raise the f

I CARMARTHEN UiNDERTHE SEARCHLIGHT1

charge for lighting to private consumers." The man who is rated at £ 20 a year pays per- haps £(5 a year for lighting his house. If the charge is raised a penny per unit his bill will be increased toti or £ 7 5s. The practical effect ol the proposal then is: Some ratepayers would have 5(1 in rates and pay 25s in their lighting bills. Other ratepayers (i.e.. gas consumers) would lose od in rates, but pay the same for lighting as ever. I put it to the Company as business men — is this calculated to promote the use of elec- tricity or to drive users back to gas. There are two sections of ratepayers in Carmarthen —those who use gas and those who use elec- tricity in their homes and the proposal tends to benefit one at the expense of the other. Naturally those who use electricity would rather pay more in rates to keep down their lighting bill. I fancy when this is properly understood all the friends of the Gas Co. w 

Advertising

J The Welshman's Favourite. 2 |MAB0N Sauce! £ As good as its Name. I S DON'T FAIL TO GET IT. 2 S Manufacturers—BLANCH'S, St. Ptter St., Cardiff, f

1 Carmarthen Borough Tribunal

Carmarthen Borough Tribunal. The Carmarthen Borough Tribunal sat on Monday evening at the Guildhall. The mem- bers present were The Mayor (Mr J. Lewis), Air H. S. Holmes. Air W. V. H. Thomas, Pro- fessor Moore, and Air D. Davies. HELPING THE NAVY. Major E. R. Evans applied for exemption for a man, aged 34vears, who is engaged as timber feller. Air Wallis-Jones appeared for the appellant. Appellant said that the man was an ex- perienced timber feller and that it would be impossible to replace him. The timber was all supplied to coal mines wh'ch are supplying the Navy and munition factories. I The Mayor: How long do you expoct this to last? Appellant Two or three years. From a commercial point of view I would not touch the timber as it would be of more value later; but I am doing what I consider to be my duty in helping to supply these mines with timber so that they can supply fuel to the Navy. Total exemption was granted so long as the man is engaged on this work. AY OMEN WOX'T SUIT. The manager of Towy AYorks appealed on behalf of a young man aged 18. The case had been adjourned in order to enable the man in question to be medically examined. The medi- cal report showed that the man was fit for general service. Capt. Margrave said that the single men ought to go first; the married man ought not to be called up until we were obsalutely obliged to have them. Possibly a woman could do the work. Appellant said that women could not handle iron and oil. They were not willing to do it. Two months extension was granted. FOR GARRISON SERVICE ABROAD. Mr AYallis-Jones appeared in a case in which the tenant of Trefychan-fach appealed for his son. The farm was 65 acres, of which nine were ploughed. The land was said to be very laborious and could only be ploughed one way. There were two sons at home one of them was not strong. A third son was in an hospital at Swansea. Appellant: He is the hospital porter. Capt. Margrave said that the man had been passed fit for "garrison service abroad." That meant that he could serve at Gibaltar, Malta or India. Air H. S. HolmeiS pointed: out that the man's hand was said to be damaged. Could he handle a rifl('? Capt. Margrave said that the Aledical Board knew what they were doing,. If they passed a man as fit for garrison service abroad they con- sidered he was able to serve. If a man could handle the plough, he could handle the butt of a rifle. Exemption until 24th August was granted. APPEAL FOR HOSIERY EMPLOYEE. Mr H. E. BJagdon Richards applied for exemption on behalf of a man who was en- gaged in War Office contracts for hosiery. Appellant did not appear. He sent a letter stating that lie was unable to attend as he was awav. The Mayor said that the application was not granted. ASSISTANT TEACHER'S APPEAL. Ali issistaiit at Pentrepoetli School applied for an exemption. Air D. Maurice Jones. the headmaster, in a tetter said that four of the assistants at the school had already enlisted; the appellant was doing very necessary work. If the Tribunal could not grant him exemption they might allow him until the end of July. Postponement until the end of July was allowed. CO-OPERATIVE CLERK. The manager of the Farmer's Co-operative Society appealed for a clerk, aged 18. Six appeals had been lodged by the Society; five of them as being those of attested married men, had been postponed until the end of August, Air H. S. Holmes asked if this youth had been medically examined. Appellant sa that he had not. The application was adjourned for the medi- cal examination of the man. THE MARMED MEN. The Alayor stated that the cases of all attested married men were postponed until the 24th August.

Advertising

FOR THE BLOOD IS THE LIFE.-Clarkes Blood Mixture is warranted to cleanse the blood of all impurities, from whatever cause arising For Scrofula, Scurvy, Eczema, Bad Legs, Abscesses, Ulcers, Glandular Swellings. Skin and Blood diseases Pimples and Sores of all kinds, its effects are marvellous. Over 50 years success. Thousands of testimonials. In bottles, 2s 9d, each of all ohemists & stores Ask for Clarke's Blood Mixture and do not be persuaded to take an iinitatiou

Whitland Tribunal

Whitland Tribunal. The Whitland Alii it ary Tribunal sat at the flotel Giosvenor (;11 Friday. Mr T. Davies, iJanglydwcn. presided and there were also present Air Peter How( il, Air Alorgan Phillips, Air D. Davi s. Alt Levi Davies, Air D. Phillips, Air Lewis, Mr W. Thomas. Air W. L. Alatthias, Mr J. D. Williams, Air J. Owen, Air H. Phillip-, Air John Phillips, and Air D. Richards Air H. Rogers represented the Board of Agri- culture. and IJLr Lewis PhiHpps and Capt. Mar- grave the Alilitary Authority. SOLDIERS FOR THE HARVEST. Capt. Alargrave at the outset said that if any farmer required soldiers to assist at the hay and the corn harvest, he should apply to the Labour Exchange. The officer commanding troops in the district would be communicated with. and he would be careful to send men who are conversant with farm duties. CAN'T BE HEARD. The first case was one which had been before the Narberth Tribunal. The man who lived in the Narberth district had appealed, and his appeal being rejected lie had appealed to the Pembrokeshire Intermediate Tr'bunal. His appeal had been rejected by the County Tri- bunal. He had now come to live in Whitland and appealed to this Tribunal. The Tribunal decided that they could not hear the case. A TAILOR'S APPEAL. A Login tailor said that he had taken five years to build up his business. He had only been passed for "sedentary work at home." He considered lie would do his country better service by remaining where he was. Capt. Alargrave said that he did not think there was much chance of Class IV. B. (for which this man had been passed) being called up. He would probably only be kept on the resei-vcxl list. REFERRED TO MEDICAL BOARD. A posting master at Whitland who appealed said that lie suffered from a chronic disease. Capt. Alargrave said that he had better go before the Aledical Board. MILK FACTORY MECHANIC. The manager and mechanic of a AYhitland milk factory was the subject of the next appeal It was said that 1.500 gallons of milk were dealt with daily, and that the amount was likely to be increased shortly to 2,000 gallons. Capt. Margrave: Couldn't you get a little woman (laughter). The Secretary No they are no good at the machinery. What is the machinery?—The chief thing is the compressor for the ice-house. Is it worked by hyrraulie power or steam?— By steam. What would be the effect on the country at large if this business were a little curtailed? —Some of the farmers would have to stop milking. Appellant said that he had brought this man I down as he could not get a local man. Capt. Alargrave said that if the man were 35 years of age he would agree to exemption. As however the man was 30 and in the prime of life he thought the man well able to defend his country. Another man could be instructed in three months. Air D. Richards: I propose that this man be exempted. Capt. Margrave: You are not a shareholder are you ? Mr Richards: 1 am sorry to say I am not. It is very difficult to get mechanics who are competent for this class of work. Capt. Alargrave: Suppose this man were to eompivss himseif some day? Appelant: It would be a very-serious loss. It was decided to grant conditional exemp- tion. SINO.],+,- NIE-X FTRST. A Clynderweii baker (married), aged 35. applied for exemption. He said that he did not think lie shouid be called up whilst a young single man in 'the same trade was allowed .free. Hesaid that he would be willing to serve when the single men had been called up. The appellant was an employee. It was stated that the employer was not himself a baker. Capt. Margrave Why is he called a baker. The Chairman Because he employs bakers. Capt. Margrave said that he would withdraw the certificate of the younger man und it would come again before the Tribunal. How old was the younger man ? Appellant: 22. Oapt. Margrave c-iii(I that he would agree to conditional exemption for this man. Exemp- tion should be conditional because the farm labourers who were exempted sometimes went back to their employers and demanded £ 4 or t-5 more. If exemption were conditional, it only held good so long as the man remained in his present employment. The Tribunal granted conditional exemption and Capt. said that lie would bring the case of the younger man hefore the Tri- I bllllal. AYHITLAND TAILOR AND DRAPER. A talor and draper carrying on business at hitland appealed for exemption for a jour- neyman. Thro;' months ex-enipt:oii was granted WHITLAND BUILDER'S MERCHANT. A builder's merchant at Whitland appealed for exemption. Capt. Margrave said that his instructions were that where two partners carried on busi- ness one of them ought to go. There would be no objection to allow'ng this man a little time to settle affairs with his partner. It was decided to allow three months exemp- tion. SCHOO LAI ASTER EXEMPTED. The Rector of Pcndine appeared in support of an appeal for the headmaster of Tremoilet School, who was aged 37. The school was stated to serve three parishes—Eglwyscymyn, Marios. Pendine. In answer to questions by Capt. Alargrave, the Rector said that there were 63 or 64 chil- dren at the school. The eldest pupil would pro- bably be 15 years of age. There were two female teachers in the school. Don't you think the school could be carried on without this schoolmaster?—No, sir; I do not think a woman could carry it on Capt. Margrave Don't you think if you had a real Snapdragon she could command the children. Appellant: I don't think we could find one at Pendine. Capt. Alargrave said that as the man was 37 years of age he would not object to an exemp- tion. But if he were a young man he would. Absolute exemption was agreed to. SCIENCE AlASTER JOINED. An appeal had been lodged by the managers of Whitland County School in respect of a science and maetheniatical master; but a later communication showed that he had en- listed in the Royal Engineers. LOOM TUNER, AND TACKLER, A widow who carries on a factory at Login appealed for a son who was described as a "loom tuner and tackier." She had three sons. One of them was an invalid. Mr Dd. Davies said that it was well known that one of the. sons was absolutely no good. If the son for whom the appeal was made were taken away, there would be only one left. One man cannot carry on the factory. It is well

Whitland Tribunal

known that each man has his department. Capt. Alargrave said that this man was en- tered on the National Registration form as a weaver. Now he was stated to be a loom tuner and tackier which was a reserved occupation. Mr Dd. Davies said that that was a technical mistake in filling up the form. Mr Wm. Thomas said that it did not matter what money they offered they would not get women to work in the factories. A big factory in the neighbourhood had to close down be- cause they could Hot get female labour. Three month's extension was granted. TAILORS AND COSTUMIERS NOT ESSENTIAL. On an appeal by a Clynderwen talior, Capt. Alargrave said that we did not want. taitors and costumiers in these days. We couJd go hack to the prehistoric days of Adam. Air D. Richards The climate won't suit that Air Win. Thomas We should have the police if not the military after us then. Appellant said that lie had nobody to do the cutting up. Capt. Alargrave If the Germans come here, who will do the cutting up? Appellant: We shall be all on an equality then. The application was postponed for three months. FOR MUNITIONS. Several appellants were asked if they would work on munitions, and replied in the affirma- tive. Capt. Alargrave said he would endeavour to get them jobs and to release young single men for the Army. NO INDUSTRIAL COMPULSION. A question arose as to the meaning of "con- ditional exemption." The Chairman paid that- it was industrial compulsion if a man were bound to work on the same farm. The Clerk said that the condition was that the man should remain in the occupation. A certificate could not he conditional on his re- maining in the service of a particular employer or living in a particular place. The Chairman said that this question had been raised in Parliament by the Labour party, 1 he Clerk said that if the condition were that the man should remain with a certain employer lie would be bound to work for that emplyer j all his life at 4d a day. Air Dd. Davies said that it was no good an employer appealing then the man could leave him to-morrow.

FAIRS FOR JUNE

FAIRS FOR JUNE. 2. St. Clears, Narberth. 3. Carmarthen, 5. Carmarthen, Llanybyther. 8. Narberth. 13. Newcastle Emlyii, Haverfordwest. 14. Lampeter, Liandcbie. 1.5. Newcastle Emlyn and Adpar, Caio. 19. Lctterston, Llandovery. 20. Cardigan. 21. Llandilo. 27. Pontardu la i s. 29. Narberth. 30. Narberth. Newcastle Emlyu and Adpar.

The Question of Health

The Question of Health Tho question of health is a matter which If tare to concern us at one time or another when Influenza is so prevalent as it if just now, so it is wcil to know what to taae ic ward off an attack of this mist weakening disease, this epidemic catarrh or cold of an aggravating kind, to combat ic whilst under its baneful influence, and particularly attv an attack, for then the system it so lowered as to be liable to the most dangerous of com plaints. Gwilym Evans' Quinine Bitters is acknowledged by all who have given it a fair trial to be the best specific remedy dealing with Influenza in all its various stages, being a Preparation skilfully prepared with Quinine and accompanied with other blood purifying and enriching agents, suitable for the liverV digestion, and all those ailments require tonic strengthening and nerve increat propeities. It is invaluabSe for those differ- ing from colds, pneumonia, or any serious ill new, or prostration caused by sleeplessness, or worry of any kind, when the body has < general feeling of weakness or lassitude Send for a copy of the pamphlet of testi- tiioniak, which carefully read and consider wli, then bay a bottte (sold in two sizes, 2 9d and 4s 6d) at yout nearest Chemint or Stores, but when purchasing see that the nainrt "Gwilym Evans" is on the label, stamp iind bottle, for without which i kne are gen nine. Sole Proprietors: Quinin Bittern Manufacturing Company, Limited: laneily, South Wales.

Whitland Scavenging Difficulties

Whitland Scavenging Difficulties. DISCUSSION AT DISTRICT COUNCIL. The monthly meeting of the AYhitland Rural District Council was held at the Hotel Gros- venor on Friday. There were present: Air James Davies, Llanboidy (chairman); Mr J. D. Williams, Egremont (vice-chairman); Air WIll. Thomas. Mr P. Al-. Watkins, and Mr Peter Howells, Lilangan; Mr D. Davies and Mr H. Morris, Llandissilio; Mr Morgan Phillips, Kglwysfairaeherrig Mr T. Davies. Llanglyd- wen; Air Levi Davies. Llanboidy; Mr H. Phillips. Llanfalltge; Mr W. L. Matthias. Pendine; Mr T. L. Phillips. Kglwyscymyn; Mr JatMcs Howells. Heiillan; Mr D. Phillips, Cil- maenllwyd and Air W. Ebbsworth, Alarros; together with tre Clerk (Air H. Lewis); the Surveyor (Air Pees Davies); and the Sanitary Inspector (Air D. Jenkins). A let-tet- was read from Air W. H. Cox re- ferring to what he described as the "deplor- able state of the sanitary arrangements at AYhitland." He said that instead of the scavenging contractor calling at the houses twice a week as ordered the interval was somc- times twelve days. The Sanitary Inspector said that the con- tractor was supposed to call at the houses on Tuesday and Friday. Air Watkins: I have had several complaints from the inhabitants of North street. He is not calling regularly. Air AVin. Thomas: They are complaining to nw. Unfortunately there are some houses there with no back lane. I Air Peter Howell: Surely if he does not carry out his work properly we should not pay him. Air Dd. Davies said that as far as he could understand this man blankly refused to ca.rry out the contract. Some deduction should bo made in order to show the Council's disappro- val. It was an insult to the Council that people were allowed to canoy on in this way under the very nose of the Inspector. If they allowed this to go oil. he did not see any use paying the Inspector or the scavenger or any- body else. He proposed that ten per cent, be deducted from the account. The Clerk: There is no ascount to-day. Mr H. Alorris moved, and it was agreed that the Public Health Committee be asked to meet at the earliest possible moment to consider the matter. HOUSING PROBLEMS. A discussion again arose on the housing el problems. Air Wni. Thomas asked whether some of the houses which had been condemned could not be put in order at a little. expense. Air Peter Howell AYe should not press this it is very expensive to build during the war. Air AYm. Thomas said that some of the houses could be improved at a small cost. Thus in many cases it was reported that there were windows which would not open. The windows could be made to close at a cost of a few shillings. Some of the old cottage chim- ntys which were so open tht the soot and the wind blew about the place could be put in order at a. very small cost. He did not propose re- moving the thatched roofs or building the houses anew Air James Howells said that it was no use talkingof the notices strved in the year 1914. People had waste paper baskets in which they put these things. „ Air W m. Thomas said that the number of houses reported as uninhabitable was increas-' ing whereas they could be improved at a very small expense. Farmers are doing so well now that they can afford to spend a few pounds on their workmen. Mr Dd. Davies said that lie did not think there was any great demand for houses in the country now. The Sanitary Inspector said that there were at times thre or four families living in one house in Whitland. Air Wm. Thomas said that in one case ? liusband and wife and three or four children ivero living in one small room. This matter was referred to the Public Health Committee. SOHGOL AlANACiEUS. A letter was read from tho Clerk to the Whitland County School Alanagers asking the Council to appoint two representatives on the Gove riling Body. It was proposed to re-elect Airs R. L. Thomas and Air T. Davies, J.P. Mr Levi Da\ ies: Is the district represented in that way ? Air D. Davies: I think it is. Air AYm. Thomas said that Airs Thomas had a house in Pendine and Air T. Davies lived in Llanglydwen, so that they were both at the opposite ends of the district. ROAD LABOURERS TO HELP FARMERS. The matter of allowing the road labourers to work for the farmers during tho busy season cropped up. The Surveyor: There is a great scarcity of labour. They are all agreable to help.. If we can help each other we ought to do so and assist to bring the war to an end. Mr D. Davies: Is there to be any special claim for members of the Council (laughter). It was decided to give the Surveyor full dis- cretion as to allowing the men to leave the roads to engage in agricultural labour. It was also decided to authorise the Surveyor to appeal to the Tribunal on behalf of any men whom he regarded as indispenable. VACANCY FOR TREASURER. Air Brewer, the manager of the L.P. Bank, Narberth, wrote asking the Council to appoint Air J. Al. Anthony as his successor. Mr J. M. Anthony had been appointed to assist him at the Bank with the object of becoming ulti- mately his successor. Air AYm. Thomas moved that they ask all the banks in the district to send in their terms. Mr D. Davies. in seconding, said that Mr Brewer was one of the best known financiers in North Pembrokeshire. Mr H. Alorris moved that they appoint Mr Anthony. The L.P. Bank had served them very well. Mr Matthias, in seconding, said that the L.P. Bank had treated them very fairly, and it was only right that the Council should con- tinue with them. Mr T. Davies said that he was not inclined to give preferential treatment to any firm. He agreed with all that had been said in favour of his firm; but other banks might have treated them as well had they had the chance. Mr Wm. Thomas said that he believed in the open market. A good many banks had developed business in the district since Mr, Brewer was appointed. It was decided to procure terms from all the banks.

Carmarthen Forgery Charge

Carmarthen Forgery Charge At the Carmarthen Borough Police Court on Monday, before Mr John Lewis (Alayor), Mr H. E. Blagdon-Richards, Mr T. Bland Davies, Mr J. B. Arthur, Air W. Spurrell, and Mr T. Davies. Charles Tyler, a young farm servant, was charged with forgery. Air Wallis-Jones, solici- tor, Carmarthen, who appeared for the prose- cution. said that it was open to them to charge the prisoner with forgery, with altering a forged cheque, or with obtaining goods by false pretences. The facts disclosed by the prosecution showed that the defendant had been arrested at Gellydywyll farm, near Killay, Swansea, on the 7th i Bst. Jiie had been a farm servant in the employ of Mr Williams, Monaohty, up to the 16th May. Air Williams had a banking account at a St. Clears bank; ho had formerly resided in that district and had kept his account there It was alleged that the defendant went to Towy Works, Carmarthen, bought 2s 6d worth of cartridges, tendered a cheque for JE1 and re- ceived 17s 6d change. The cheque which was alleged to be a forgery bore a. number corres- ponding with one of the counterfoils in Mr Williams's cheque books. The Bench committed the defendant to the Assizes. ALLEGED GAMING. Mr E. Edwards, the licensee of the New King George inn. was charged with permitting gaming. The Head Constable sa d that an application had been made to him to consent to an adjourn meut. He would raise no objection. The Bench agreed to the adjournment for a. fortnight. HAD BEEN THERE. David WilJiam was charged with drunk- enness. P.S. Jones proved the case. The Alayor: How old are you ? Defendant: 28. The Mayor: I don't think you ought to be here; you ought to be in another place. Defendant: I was out there for 17J months and I have been discharged. The Bench fined the defendant 5s. A PUBLIC DANGER. Thomas Thomas, a, farmer, wafined JE1 for being drunk in charge of a horse and cart. P.C. Wm. Davies proved the case. The Mayor said that the defendant was a great danger to the public.

Carmarthen Chamber of Commerce

Carmarthen Chamber of Commerce. At a meeting of the members of the Carmar- then Chamber of Commerce, held at the Council Chamber on Friday evening last, under the presidency of Mr David AYilliams, Ardwyn, 1 enllw yn Park, when there was a good atten- dane, the question of the New Liquor Control Board Order as affecting the residents of the rural area was considered. The information given at the meeting was that owing to the new regulation, by which there can be no salo of spirits after 2.30 p.m. on Friday until Aion- day at 12 noon, great inconvenience as well as trouble and expense was caused to scores of persons, who came to Carmarthen (generally only on Saturday, the market day) to make their weekly purchases, and who from various causes require to purchase a bottle of brandy or other spirits. The population of about 30 parishes lying North. South, East and West of the town make Carmarthen their market cen- tre for purchasing their household goods and to pay a second visit is often the cause of ex- pense and loss of time. The regulation allows of spirits being obtained by a medical maa'liI order, but as farms are often situated miles from a medical practitioner (a fclass of men not often at home), and as there are many occa- sions when householders need to purchase a bottle of spiritwithout necessarily being ill enough to send for a doctor, this concession is of very little use. Further, the carriers from several districts lying from 10 to 15 miles away attend only on Saturday, and so the oppor- tunity of getting home what is needed by the carrier is lost. It seemed to the Chamber very unfair that while a town resident can buy a bottle of spirits on five days in the week from 12 noon to 2.30 p.m. the rural resident Hving miles away is debarred unless he makes a special journey to Carmarthen. The Chamber unanimously decided to peti- tion the Control Board to allow of spirits being sold on Saturday, the market day, between the hours of 11 a.m. and 3 p.m. It was further resolved that cQpies of the resolution be sent to the Control Board the tocal Members of Parliament, and to the Clerks of the Justices for the County and Borough Divisions of Carmarthen. CARMARTHEN Printed and Published by the Proprietress, M. LA WHENCE. »t her Offices, 3 Blue Strsefc, PBIUAT, June 16th,