Teitl Casgliad: Carmarthen weekly reporter

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Llun 1 o 4 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
3 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
Advertising

PLEASE CALL TO SEE OUR STOCK OF AGRICULTURAL MACHINERY. Ihe fcCORMIOK Latest I11lprOved 2- HORSE BINDER LIGHTEST BINDER EVEB MADE. UBr SOME POINTS- RIGID MAIN FRAME. STRONG DRIVE CHAIN. STEEL PLATFORM. ■» WIDE RANGE OF adjustment ^kjfxhmbhhhm^P^^ VBp floating elevator, "T simple knotter. -V 1-1 El McCormiok Windrow Loader S* lifl^ ^BBSaSBSfHBZr/Any WILL PICK UP. A TON OF HAY IN Built entirely pf Steel. Made to pass through ordinary j gatewavs, Easy in Action. Light in Draught. W. TTittiiis & IRONMONGERS, HOUSE FURNISHERS. AND mom AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERS, ,— JL Ironmongery-io Hall Street and 9 Priory Street. Bedstead Showrooms-5, St Mary Street. Furniture Showrooms-I St Mary Street. j i. c* *.t Farm Implements-Market Place, Carmarthen, Llanelly, Llandyssul, and Llanybyther. y Thomas, Ironmongers, Carmarthen." Telephone-No. 19, "°0 EOnn%PIES J GRNEL PILLS A MARVELLOUS REMEDY. I For upwards of Forty Years these Pills have held the first place in the World as a Remedy for }JILES stud GRAVEL, and all the common disorders of the Bowels, Stomach, Liver, and Kidneys; and Niere is no civilized Nation under the Sun that hais not experienced their Healing Virtues. THE THREE 14ORMS OF THIS REMEDY No. I-GeorgE,'s Pile and Gravel Pills. No, 2—George's Gravel Pills. No. 3—George's Pills for the Piles, o\d everywhere in Boxes, 1/3 & 3/- each. By Post, 1/4 & 3/2. PROPRIEfOit-Jg Ii. GEORGE, M.K.F.S., IIIRWAIN, Aluiti)A:I" PRINTING! PRINTING! I (JOOD CHEAP AJS D EXPEDITIOUS j, PRINTING I EXECUTE AT THE "EEPORTEr PRINTING A PUBLISHING OFFICES, BLUE STBERT OABMABTHEIN F ORDERS BY POST receive prompt and careful attention. p R ICE S ON APPLICATION. rheCarmarthen Weekly Beportcr PUBLISHED BVERY THURSDAY BVININO, Circulates throughout South Wales generally, and has the LARGEST IRCULATION IN THE COUNTY OF CARMARTHEN PRI(JZ ONK PKIQNY; POST FREE 1/9. PU QDABIIB THE BEST ADVERTISING MEDIUM FOR ALL CtAaSFS OF ADVE1TISEMEKTS. NOTICES TO QUIT FROM LANDLORD TO T ENA NT AND TENANT TO LANDLORD, Mal I)e obtained at the REPORTER OFFICE," Blue-street, Carmarthen. PRICE ONE PENNY. x STOP ONE MOMENT x Oh Dear Doctor MUST My Darling die? There is very little hope. But try TUDOR WILIJAMS' j PATENT BALSAM OF HONEY. WHAT IT IS Tudor Williams' Patent Balsam of Honey Is an essence of the purest and most effica- cious herbs, gathered on the Welsh Hills and Valleys in their proper season, when their virtues ars in full perfection, and combined with the purest Welsh Honey. All the in- gredients are perfectly pure. WHAT IT DOBS I Tudor Williams' Patent Balsam of Honey Cures Coughs, Colds, Bronchitis, Asthma, Whooping Cough, Croup, and all disorders of the Throat, Chest and Lungs. Wonderful Cure for Children's Coughs after Measles. It is invaluable to weak-chested men, delicate women and children. It succeeds where ati other remedies fail. Sold by all Chemists and Stores in Is 3d, 3s Od, and 5s 6d bottles. i Great saving in purchasing larger size Bottles. WHAT IT HAS DONE FOE OTHERS. What the Editor of the "Gentlewoman's j Court Toumal" says:— Sir,—The result of the bottle of your splendid Tudor Williams' Balsam of Honey I is simply marvellous. My mother, who is over seventy, although very active, every winter has a bronchial cough which is not only distressing, but pulls her down a lot. Its gone now. With best wishes for youj extraordinary preparation. W. Browning Hearden. YOU NEED NOT SUFFER! Disease is a sin, inasmuch that if you act I rightly, at the right time, it can, to a great extent, be avoided. Here is the preventative The first moment you start with Sore Throat tae a dose of TUDOR WILLIAMS' JP-A^TIEmSTT BALSAM OF HONEY, It has saved thousandsl It will save you! It is prepared by a fully qualified uhemist, and'is, by virtue of its composition, eminent- ly adapted for all cases of Coughs, Colds, Bronchitis, Esthma, etc., it exercises a dis- dinct influence upon the mucous lining of the throat, windpipe, and amall air vessels, so that nothing but warmed pure air passes into the lungs. It's the product of the Honeycomb, chemically treated to get the best results. The Children like it. THEY ASK FOR IT So different from moat medicines. Nice to Take Guies Quickly For vocalists and public speakers it has no equal, it makes the voice as clear as a bell. Manufacturer Tudor Williams, MEDICAL HALL, ABERDARE. TO VOCE RATE COLLECTORS, ASSISTANT OVERSEERS, &c. FORMS of Notice of Audit, Collector s Monthly Statement, &c., Poor Rate Receipt Books, with Name of Parish, Particulars of Rate.&c., printed in, can be obtained at the RzpORTZB OFFICE at Cheap Rates. Serad for Prices. THE CARMARTHEN BILLPOSTING COMPANY, NOTT SQUARE, CARMARTHEN. BILLPOSTINGand ADVERTISINGS all its Branches, throughout the Counties of Canr then, Pembroke, and Cardigan R. M JAMES, Manager. Carmarthen County Schools. THE GRAMMAR SCHOOL. ^HCADHASTXB; E. S. ALLEN, M.A. (CANTAB). COUNTY GIRLS' SCHOOL HEADMISTRESS Miss B. A. HOLME, M.A., Late Open Scholar of Girton College, Cambridge. FEES:— £ 1 9s. per Term (inclusive). Rednotion when there are more than one from the same family. <,11 The terms began for the Boys, Tuesday. April 25th for the Girls, Tuesday May 2nd. Boarders can be received at the Grammar School. l/lj WE CLAIM THAT 2/9 JDJEb. TYE7S DROPSY, LIVER, AND WIND PILLS CTOB Constipation, Backache, Indigestion, HeartWealc- ness, Headache, and Nervous Complaints. Mr. John Parkin, 8, Eden Cresctnt, West Auckland, writes, dated March 12th. 1912 "I must say that they are all that you represent them to be, thpy are splendid, indeed I wish I had known about them sooner. I shall make their worth known to all who suffer from Dropsy." Fole Makar— S. J. COLEY & CO, 5 HIGH ST, STROUD,GLOS. WEDDING CARDS. NEW SPECIMEN BOOK CONTAINING LATEST & EXQUISITE DESIGNS Sent to intending Patrons at any address on receipt of an intimation to that effect. PRICES TO SUIT ALL CLASSES. « REPORTER OFFICE," 3 BLXfE 8T

LLANSAWEL DOCTOR MUKDERED

LLANSAWEL DOCTOR MUKDERED. HUE AND CORY AFTER FUGITIVE. On Saturday afternoon one of the quietest spots in Carmarthenshire was the scene of a very startling tragedy which resulted in the death of a highly respected medical practi- tioner. Dr D. T. Glyn Jones,, aged 45. of Llansawel. formerly of Aberdare. was shot dead on Satur- day while on a professional visit to a farmer who lived on a lonely homestead among the Carmarthenshire hill's. Dr Jones had been called to Blaenrhysgfog Farm, situated near Cwrtycadno a picturesque spot frequented in summer by tourists, to attend Mr Davies, the tenant, wlio has been indisposed for some time. At the farm the doctor was met by the son, David Davies, aged 34 years. Mrs Davies heard a slut and went into the yard and there saw Dr Jones and her eon struggling. There was another shot fired, and the doctor fell. With the remark, 'I am going mother to where I have been before," the alleged assailant decamped, leaving no trace behind him. When Mrs Davies returned to the house and informed her husband, who was ill in bed, of what had happened, the shock was so great that the poor man expired almost immediately, As was his custom, the doctor left his motor at the nearest village, Farmers, and as he was long in returning his chauffeur (Mr Scribbins) became uneasy, and proceeded towards the place. On his way lie met the local blacksmith who had started off to break the sad news. In- formation was at once given to the police, and Dr Griffiths, Lampeter.was also sent for imme- diately. Mr Scribbins said the doctor as usua-I left the car at Farmers' Village, and walked a mile to the farm. "As he was longer than usual in returning I started after him and I met the blacksmith, who was on the way for P.C. Rees, and he told me of the affair; so I went up and found the doctor dead on the farm "by the side of the hedge." BLOODHOUNDS USED IN SEARCH. j n their search the Carmarthenshire police were assisted by two trained bloodhounds from Breconsliire. Before their arrival, however, a party led by P.C. Andrews made an import- ant discovery at a spot known at Mountain Gate, threequjirteis; of a miie from the scene ot the tragedy. Here P.C. Andrews found, underneath a huge stone, a 'wallet. empty purse, portions of a knife and shears, and also papers and documents bearing the deceased doctor's name. Deputy Chief Constable Evans directed the operations and spoke in eulogistic terms of the services rendered by the neigh- bouring farmers. The hounds covered a wide district, but re- turned at 6 o'clock without success. MOTHER'S STATEMENT. The missing man's mother made the follow- ing voluntary statement:— "About 1 p.m. on Saturday I was sitting in the bedroom by my husband. I heard a shot. I at once ran to the door and looked out. and saw a scuffle going on at the end of the yard between my son and the doctor. I ran on to them. Both had hold of the gun and were fighting for it. I got hold cf my son by the coat and tried to pull him away. and said to him, "What are you doing, my boy ¡"" The doctor had hold of the barrel. "The gun wojit off, and the hot passed and struck the doctor, my son saying it, 'It oniv shaved you. mother.' Both fell down. I was still pulling my son away from the doctor. "Both then got up and commenced fighting with fists. The gun was on the ground in three pieces. I was holding on to my son. 1 told the doctor to run to the gateway. 1 then saw the doctor stagger back and fall over to the rick yard. My son picked up the pieces of the gun and went up behind the outhouses. I went to the rick yard where the doctor was lying, and said, 'Doctor, how are you?' but I got no answer. I then returned to the house and again went back to the yard, taking a sheet and placing it over the doctor. "I ran down to Cyllwdy Farm, and asked Thomas Williams if he would fetch somebody, as my son and the doctor had been fighting." Mrs Davies was much affected and spoke highly of her son. She said he was well edu- cated and inteHigent, having been 12 months at 'li Colle,, studying agriculture L:1t(r on lie joined the Pembrokeshire V-o- manry, and when in camp sustained an acci- dent, from the effects of which he never re- covered. THE LATE DiR JONES. The deepest sympathy was a-roused as the news became known in the Aberdare district, where the late Dr Glyn Jones was held in the highest esteem. For nearly 16 years he was in partnership with Dr Thomas, of Cwmam- man. The partnership was dissolved by mutual consent about 12 months ago. The deceased doctor was a favourite among all classes ol the community. He was a specialist in heart cases. Dr Jones was Medical Officer of Health for the I.I ansawel Parish under the Llanditofawr Board of Guardians, and only took up his ap- pointment a few months ago. A similar tragedy occurred in the neigh- bourhood 38 years ago. when the then cha I man of the Ca"niarthen Quarter Sessions was shot bv his butler, who subsequently shot liini- ,f. INQUESTS. On Monday afternoon, Mr R. Shipley Lewis, coroner. Llawlilo. h",d two inquests. tk,- liist at Blaenrhysglog. on the body of 'i.'ho.i.: s Davies. the aged tenant and father of tno accused man. The widow said that her h' s- ban had been unwell for about a week. s'ltti ing from pains in the chest. On the 11th inst. she sent for Dr Row'ands. Lampeter, who cam in the evening of the same day. but did not see him. She was told afterwards that the doctor had been there. Her son did not tell her. On Saturday last she sent for Dr Glyn Jones. of L'ansawet. and he came about mid-day. She was in the bedroom when she heard the shot of a gun. and went out and saw Dr Jones and her son rtrtiggling. iettiirned to her husband, but she did not tell him what she had seen. She felt certain her husband's death was due to natural causes. P.C. Rees. Pumpsaint. bH:d lie had examined the body upon which there were absolutely no marks. The Jury returned a. vcrdi t that death was due to natural causes. Later in the day Mr Shilpev Lewis sat at the Town Hall, Llansawel, and opened an in- quest on the body of Dr Glyn Jones. Mr H. Meurio Lloyd, J.P.. was foreman of the jury. Mr Jeiikin Hughes, of Great House farm, Cow- bridge, uncle of the deceased doctor, gava evi- dence of identification. He said the late doctor settled at 'Llansawel in February, 1915. lie was in his forty-seventh year. Witness knew nothing of the circtiyr.t *ces of his dedath The Coroner said it was recessary to adjourn the inquiry as the police were not ready with their evidence. The inquiry was adjourned until Tuesday of next A ce: The Rev D. C. Richards, Congregational minister, in moving a vote of condolence with Mrs Jones and the relatives, said they had tost a good friend in Dr Glyn ionw. The Foreman seconded, and the Coroner endorse the vote, which was carried in eitance.

Welsh University and MPs

Welsh University and M.P.s. CRITICISM AT COUIRT MEETING. Mr D. Lleufer Thomas resided at a meeting of the Court of the Welsh University at Aber- ystwyth on Friday. It was reported that the officials had been appointed to prepare evidence on the various phases of university organisation and work to be submitted to the Commission. Mr Wm. George said it had been reported tc him md a. a i tha the Commission did not intend visiting Wales again as a body, and that they intended taking all the evidence in London. He had also heard that it was not intended to take a shorthand note of the evi- dence, the reason for this extraordinary depar- tureJrom the usual practice being that the Government could not afford the expense (laughter). He proposed that in the opinion of the court it was of the utmost iahportance that the Commission should visit Wales for the purpose of taking evidence of a non-official character; also that the court hoped there would be no departure from the usual practice of hearing evidence in public and of preserving a verbatim record of the proceedings. Principal Griffiths said lie knew as a matter of fact that it was 'the intention of the Com- mission to take evidence of local authorities. The resolution was carried unanimously. iMr Wm. George suggested the appointment of a deputation to wait on the Welsh members of Parliament to enlist their co-operation in presenting the case of the university to the- Commission. Principal Griffiths said he did not see how they could give any deputation authority to represent the views of the court, which were necessarily so diverse. What they wanted was to have every point of view in Wales repre- presented to the Commission, and not to pare down their views to f-ome sort of common agreement. Principal Roberts said this suggested co- operation with -the members of Parliament was in his opinion very essential. Professor Trow, Cardiff, said he held strong views as to the dis-servica done to Wales edu- cationally by its members of Parliament. If Welsh members of Parliament had only done for Wales what the Irish members had done for Ireland they would have a very different state of affairs (hear. hear). He had felt all along that the men who could have helped them best was Sir Isambard Owen and Sir David Bryn- mor Jones, and it was a pity they were not sufficiently united in that court to bay to those two men, "We trust you in matters of Welsh education; we will give you plenary powers .J put our case before the Commssioners." Mr J. H. D?ni?s. Aberystwyth, said that he understood Lord Haldane, chairman of .he Commission had already approached the Welsh members, who had formed a committee to deal with the question. He believed it could be said, without in any way doing the Welsh members an injustice, that their knowledge of Welsh educational methods and of the enor- nictis progress made during the last ten years was slight (laughter). He knew they were willing to learn, and he believed they relied to a great extent on the knowledge of Sir Alfred Mond ("Oh") who on this matter had been the chief expert among the Welsh members. He was sure the Welsh members would welcome any help they could give them. There was nlso the question of the democratic cofitrol of the university, on which the Welsh members would have a. good deal to say. Professor Reichel said they could not expect to get the best terms for W ales unless the re- presentatives of Wales in Parliament under- stood the situation thoroughly and were kept in touch with it by those engaged in working the machinery. They should not assume that they would dislike the the finding of the Com- mission but. oven in that improbable event, no one could give them greater help that the Welsh members. He thought it was exceed- ingly desirable to approach the Welsh mem- bers. Mr Tom John said it wouJd be common sense to co-operate with the Welsh members, and, although they were an academic body, they should not be foreigners to common eenfce (laughter). 1 rincipal Griffiths suggested that a small committeo W appointed to meet the Welsh members to discuss questions raised by the ap- pointment of the Royal Commission. Mr E. T. John. )I.P.. who was invited to speak, said that during the time he had been a member of Parliament the Welsh members had not heard from the university or the coll- eges upon any question affecting the educa- tional interests of Wales. He was surprised to find it admitted that a distinguished aca- demic body like the university court was a body without a mind of its own. He really hoped that position would not be adhered to, and that they would regard the university as standing for the nation, and not for the indi- vidual interests of the three colleges. Lord Haldane had invited the co-operation of the I Welsh members, and he, at any rate, was I under the impression that the members elected ù." the people of Wales had some knowledge of the degree of confidence which was felt by the. Welsh people in t.he:¡r nation a J institutions. Eventually Mr Wm. George proposed the appointment of a committee to discuss matters I with the Welsh members, and this was carried. Principa,l Reichel proposed an expression of opinion "that adequate teaching freedom for the staffs of the throe constituent colleges can be secured wiwthout the disruption of the existing federal university. The mover said I that if they had three universities in Wales I they would find themselves obliged to work to- gether as far as matriculation and the post- graduate work in the higher degrees and I fellowships were concerned. They would also lose the national sentiment by having throe I universities. The resohitioo was seconded and carried. L