Teitl Casgliad: Carmarthen weekly reporter

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 2 o 4 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
17 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
G R

G R The following is a List of the names of Men who have failed to themselves at the Recruiting Office, Carmarthen, after being called up either under the Group System or the Military Service Act, 1916. v y y No V* Art' Group System AAML (SURNAME URST) AGE. LAST ADDRESS. or Military — Service Act 1 M°r^an' Francis 40 years 18 Kerry Road, Pencader Class 23 1 nomas, David 28 „ Wernmachwith Farm, Class 11 40 years 3 Thomas, David 28 IVernmachwith Farm, Class 11 T Llanfihangel-ar-Arth 3 Jones, William 23 „ Penlwr Mill, Laugharne, St. Class 16 T Clears 4 Jones, David Samuel 20 „ Penlan Voss Farm, Carmar- Class 3 tt ^en 5 Evans, Rhys James 19 „ Tircyd Farm, Carmarthen Class 2 ayne, Frederick 18 „ Penybank, Yelindre, Class 1 Henllan 7 Hudson, William Colston John 19 „ Penylan, Hebron Class 2 8 Peters, Ben 38 28 Mill-street, Carmarthen Class 21 tft d'-i 38 „ Water-street, Carmarthen Group 21 rickett, Fred 19 „ Remount House, Priory- Class 2 street, Carmarthen inomas, David 35 „ Frondeg, Pennwch, Llan- Class 18 geitho, Cardigan geitho, Cardigan Jones> Jenkin 39 Lleithi, Rhydargaeau Road, Class 22 Carmarthen 13 homas, David tg Llanchynadda, Llanllawddog Class 2 14 Cranmer, Frederick Carl 18 „ Blaengwen, Pencader Class i .w?° .can ffive information regarding any of the above-named invited to do so, either personally or by letter, to the nearest Recruiting officer. dlstiosedameS of the individuals giving such information will on no account be j closed. =====================================^^

Advertising

| SUMM=-IZ7 1916. | MISSES LEWIS & CLARE I HAVE PLEASURE IN ANNOUNCING THAT THEIR SUMMER SHOW OF HICH-CLASS MILLINERY II MODELS IS NOW OPEN AND WILL CONTINUE THROUGHOUT THE SEASON Ostrich and Marabout Stoles, Fancy Neckwear, Veilings, &c., &c. A cordial invitation is extended to visit their Showrooms. CAVENDISH HOUSE, 41 KING-ST., I BOOKBINDING. I Established Over Fifty Years. D. TITUS WILLIAMS BOOKBI1TDER, Etc, I CHAPEL STREET, CARMARTHEN. The Best and Cheapest House in South Wales for all Classes of Binding. Those who are taking any Histories of the War in parts, should get them put into cases or bound before they become torn and worthless. Books bound in Publishers Cases at Publisher's Prices. BOOKBINDING TO THE TRADE. I BOOKBINDING. I WATCHES & CLOCKS REPAIRED. 3JEWBLLERY REPAIRED LIKE NEW. ■3.GILDING AND ELECTRO PLATING. HIGH-CLASS WORKMANSHIP. ESTIMATES GIVEN ALL WOBK GUARANTEED AT JOHN WILLIAMS Watchmaker, Jeweller, & Silversmith, 9 & 10 Lammas Street, 

No title

MUSICAL SUCCESS.—Master Willie Leyshon. son ol Mr and Mrs Lewis LeFslioll, TirydaiJ, darmerly of Priory street. Carmarthen, has passed the senior examination of the Trinity College of Music, witli lioiiutti-s. We wish him every (success. UNIVERSITY DISTINCTION.-We are pleased to record the success of Mr J. Lloyd Thomas, an old St. Peter's Boy, son of loan Myrddin, in securing his degree of B.A. with 2nd class honours in Latin in his third year. Consider- ing the extreme difficulty of concentration in these times lie is all the more to be congra- tulated on his brillant success. He is an old pupii of Queen Elizabeth's Grammar School. His brother, too, Mr G. E. Thomas, has suc- ceeded in passing hi,s inter B.A., with a second ytar course in Welsh. MATOB'S RELIEF IN BELGIUM FUND.—Elim Chapel £1.; Babell, Penearn 10s. MAYOR'S PRISONERS' OF WAR FUND.—Mrs Wm. Thomas, Hall-street 21 la.; Rev. J. Myrddin Jones, Mahoney City 1:1.; Elim Chapel 10s.

I A Prowling Fox

A Prowling Fox. 11AID ON CARMARTHEN HE-N ROOSTS- A large quantity of poultry has disappeared in Carmairthen of late. Hen roosts ha,ve been entered in the middle of the night, and the fowls have been carried off. There is a thoory that owing to the fact that the county has not been properly hunted of late, the foxes have become very numerous—a well known effect of the war in many English shires, j An investigation of the facts shows that the depredations in this case are the work of a very sly fox. This particular fox drinks beer. smokes cigarettes, and wears hob-nail boots. A good inany traps have been laid for him, but so far he has escaped. The huntsmen however are not without hope.

Obituary

Obituary. MR T. BOWEX. Mr T. Bowen died at his home in Lammas street on Monday. The deceased had been 25 years in the employment of Messrs D. Jones and Sons, decorators, Carmarthen. He had met with an accident some months ago, and he had never wholly recovered from the effects of it. MR;S MABEL JONES. Mrs label Jones, wife of Mr Christmas Jones, died suddenly OR Sunday at her home, 43, Parana in street. Mrs Jones, who was 34 years of age, had only been married a couple of years. She was out on the Saturday pre- vious to her death. The greatest sympathy is felt with the bereaved husband, who is well known and highly respected in Carmarthen, being a member of the staff of the County Offices and a well-known musician.

Carmarthen Corporation and Carpentry Bills

Carmarthen Corporation and Carpentry Bills. DISCUSSION AT THE TOWN COUNCIL. Alderman W. Spurrell presided at a meeting of the Carmarthen Town Council on Wednes- day evening. Mr Oliver Jones asked how much the Cor- poration paid for carpentry bills during the past year. The Surveyor (Mr Finglah) said that the bills for labour for ordnary work last year amounted to f;26 16s 4d. Besides this there were several special bills for work caused by the storm. The repairs to the barrel-posts cost £ 7 6s 2d; sheep pens. t6; Park. £2 18s üd; and there was special work at the disin- fector amounting to JM 7s 6d. This made a total of JE22 Is 8d for special work, bringing the lot up to t48 18s. The Chairman: Is that for labour only? The Surveyor said that it was for labour only and did not include materials. Mr Oliver Jones asked if it were not the case that they had a bill for a day's work in June 9 hours at 6d and that the only job done was fixing two locks. The Surveyor said that the carpenter was" paid by the day. All that was entered for that day was fixing two locks. That took about three hours. It was difficult to find out what had been done for the rest of the day..The man who did the work had now been called up. Mr W. Evans asked if there were not also repairs to the doors. The Surveyor could not say. The Rev A. F. Mills said that it was pro- bably "repairing doors, etc." The Chairman: You don't give very full details in bills of that sort. The Surveyor said that he thought the car- penters letter to the press was a mistake. There was nothing said that he need be offended about. The Chairman: There was no reflection on h'm at all. Mr Dunn Williams There are queries raised at the finance meeting about many things. If people write to the papers about every query raised they would keep the papers going. The Chairman Some people are more sensi- tive than others. Mr Oliver Jones asked what the amount paid was last year. The Surveyor had not the figures handy, and it was decided to have the information for the next meeting. PLENTY OF WATER. The report showed that there was 42ft. 4m. of water in the reservoir the previous day- being not quite a foot less than that day week. AN HOURS MORE LIGHT. Correspondence was read from which it ap- peared that the Electric Light Co. had offered to keep the "midnight" lamps burning to 1 a.m. summer time—the old midnight. Mr Oliver Jones: Is that done? The Surveyor said that he could not say. Mr J. B. Arthur: I believe they are, but I cannot say for certain. PENSIONS COMMITTEE. The Mayor's War Relief Committee wrote asking the Council to apply for a sub-com- mittee for the Borough to administer the Naval and Military Pensions Act. It was decided to ask the County Council whether they would appoint a sub-committee for the Borough and allow the Town Council to nominate the whole or part of it.

The Churches

The Churches. Bishop Powell of Poplar conducted a "retreat" at tlie Carmarthen Training College "retreat" at tlie Carmarthen Training College this week. »»* The St. "Peter's Sunday School had a "treat" at the Church House on Thursday the 13th inst. The Rev Parry Griffiths, the Vicar, pre- sided. All afterwards attended a special per- formance at the Picturedrome. Presentation-, have been made to the Hev T. M. Roderick, Tabernacle, Cwmgorse, and his bride. Mrs Roderick is a direct descendant of the hymnologiist, Williams, Pantycelyn. 1 On Thursday the 13th inst., the English Congregational Sunday School had their annual outing to Llanstephan. The party started at 9 a.im. and reached Llanstephan at 9.30 a.m., travelling in motor cars. Those present included the Rev D. J. Thomas (the pastor) and Mrs Thomas and Mr Fred Adams, the secretary. Luncheon was provided on the Green, the arrangements being carried out by the ladies of tho church. Excellent weather prevailed and a very enjoyable day closed at 9 p.m. when a start home was made. Thanks to the rapidity of the cars and the Daylight Saving EiJI. it was still light when home was roaclieU.

Local WeddingsI

Local Weddings. 'I PBlLLIPi—JENKINS. The wedding was solemnised on Tuesday at the Tabernacle Chapel, Cwmgors, the Rev T. M. Roderick officiting, of Captain Stanley Phillips, R.A.M.C. (only son of Mr George Phillips, chemist, and Mrs Phillips, Hall street, Carmarthen) and Miss Grace Jenkins, the youngest daughter of Mr Samuel Jenkins, J.P., and Mrb. Jenkins, Cwmgors. The bride, who was daintily attired in a French robe, was given away by her father. The duties of best man were performed by Dr Lloyd Davies, of Camberwell Infirmary. Capt. Phillips is only home on "short leave," and is under orders for Mesopotamia. THOMAS—DAVIES. The marriage was solemnised at Trinity Church, Newcastle Emlyn, on Tuesday, of Mr Thomas Morgan Thomas, Plume of Feathers, Carmarthen, to Miss Annie Davies, youngest daughter of Mr and Mrs John Davies, Gwvnfa., Newcastle Emlyn. ;1"ho officiating ministers were the Revs Gruffydd Evans, B.D., vicar, and Griffith Thomas, vicar of St. David's, Carmarthen.

Ladies as Colliery Clerks

Ladies as Colliery Clerks? CONFLICT OF VIEWS AT CARMARTHEN TRIBUNAL. At the County Intermediate Appeal Tri- bunal on Thursday the 20th inst., Mr Wm. Griffiths presided, and there were also pre- sent Mr J. Lloyd, Mr T. Morris, Mr H. E. B. Richards, and Mr J. Roberts. Capt. Margrave appealed against the exemp tion granted to Mr D. J. Proctor, a cashier employed at a colliery at Pontyates. Capt. Margrave also appealed against the exemption granted to Rees Edwards, a pay clerk- employed at the colliery. The conten- tion of the, Recruiting Officer was that the work might be done by women as in the case of banks. Mr W. N. Jones, the chairman of directors of the Gwendraeth Valley Colliery Company, said that if this were abank he would not appeal. The work was entirely different. He produced the pay list which contained a scale of decimals of a penny for different classes of work. Capt. Cremlyn (the Military Representa- tive) I believe there was once a Chancellor of the, Excheuqer who did not know what those dots meant. Capt. Cremlyn added that the local tribunal which had granted the exemptions were pro- bably well acquainted with all the circum- sttances of the case. The Tribunal dismissed the. appeal and up- held the exemptions. BUTTER BLENDER AND CHAUFFEUR. Mr Wallis J ones appeared for the respon- dent in a case in which Capt. Margrave ap- pealed against the exemption granted to B. Jenkins, Troedybryn, St. Clears. Respondent Is an employee of Mr Williams, grocer etc., of St. Clears. Respondent stated that he assisted every week in the blending of a ton of butter. Capt. Cremlyn: It was stated in the appeal form that he drove two motor cars. Motor cars will now be allowed 40 per cent, less petrol, and one of them will have to be stopped. Mr Wallis-Jones: You are a married man? Respondent: Yes. Mr Wallis-Jones: And you don't want to go into the Army. Capt. Cremlyn: I suppose that is the chief ground of objection. You are a very handy man. You drive motor cars and blend butter. The Chairman: How do you blend the butter? Capt. Cremlyn: I liopelie does not blend the butter with the same hands as he drives the motor cars with. Respondent said that the butter blending was done by machinery. Mr Wallis-Jones: He turns the handle. The appeal was allowed. THE TALLEY SMITH. The case of Mr D. E. Jones, the Talley blacksmith, again came up. Mr Howell Davies appeared for the appellant and stated that there was a delay in issuing the badges al- though the man is making horse-shoes for the Army The case was again adjourned.

Mental Hospital in War Time

-> Mental Hospital in War Time REPORT OF COMMISSIONERS. The following report of the Commissioners of the Board of Control "was presented at the meeting of the Committee of Visitors of the Carmarthen Mental Hospital on Thursday the 20th inst :— "It has been particularly unfortunate for this Asylum that, just when active steps were about to be taken to improve its general con- dition and to embark upon work long overdue to facilitate administration, circumstances con neoted with the war should have arisen which make it imperative to keep all local expendi- ture, however meritorious, down to the lowest possible limits. The facts however have to !)e faced, and much as our Board regrets to have had to. decline to facilitate the completion It the new laundry and thepurchase of five acres of land in the immediate vicinity of the Asy- lum, under the circumstances there was really no alternative. As regards the laundry thj Secretary of State has allowed the buildings to be proceded with bu has not sanctioned the purchase of the machinery necessary for its complete equipment, while the contract by which the land would have been handed over to the Committee is still in abeyanco. Work nn the buildings generally has been strict. cr iifined to matters of absolute necessity and nothing in the way of redecoration or em- bellishment has been attempted. Under these adverse circumstances the. con- < dition in which I hfeve found the Institution 1 at my visit to-day is very creditable. The wards were bright and well kept, the dormi- tories clean and airy and the bedding on the whole satisfactory. The patients were to-day in their dress and personal appearance and generally well be- haved. No one preferred anything in the nature of a serious complaint, and compara- tively few made appeals for discharge. 1 have no doubt that they are made as comfortable as they can be under the circumstances, a fact whiohwas confirmed by several of the Cardiff patients, who seemed to be rather pleased with their change of residence. The Asylum is of course considerably over-crowded and it has been found necessary to convert the Isolation Hospital and the sewing-room into additional dormitories. The health of the patients to-day was very good, only seven men and seventeen women being confined to bed, while few of them ap- peared to be very seriously ill. There were to-day on the statutory books and in residence 748 ptients, 362 of whom are of the male and 386 of the female sex. Filty- five patients are classed as private, while the out county patients 35 in number (10 men and 25 women) are all received from Cardiff Asylum which is now a war hospital. No inquest has been held and the only serious but non-fatal casualty that has occur- ed was in the case of an old man who accident- ally fell and fractured his right ulna. I thought that more young women might profita.bly be employed in the laundry where all the work is dono by hand, and I noticed a con- siderable number of holes in the sheets which would seem to indicate something defective in the mangles; however caused, these liole6 should be repaired before the sheets are put back on the beds. Although a good number of the attendant staff have left to take up military duties, the remainder, slightly re-inforoed by temporary attendants above military age, seem to be reasonably efficient. The dinner to-day consisted of a substantial plum pudding which appeared to give general satisfaction. The maintenance charge per week is 11s lid for home patients, from 11s to 30s for pri- vate patients and 14s for out county patients. Dr Richards is running the Asylum with the assistance of Dr Doig, who is his only medical colleague. Commissioner of the Board of Control. A. H. TREVOR, Carmarthen Asylum, April 15th, 1916.

The Late Capt E G Davies

The Late Capt. E. G. Davies MESSAGE FROM THE KING AND QUEEN. Mr D. Dvies, Emporium, Carmarthen, has received the following telegram in reference to the death in action of his son, Capt. Ernest Glyn Davies, of the 19th Batt. Royal Welsh Fusiliers:— "Buckingham Palace. D. Davies, Esq., 1, King street, Carmarthen. The King and Queen deeply regret the loss you and the Army have sustained by the death of Captain E. G. Davies in the service of his country; their Majesties truly sympathise with you in your sorrow. Keeper of the Privy Purse." Mr D. Davies and family desire to thank the numerous friends who have sent them messages of condolence. Such messages are too numerous to acknowledge individually.

I LOCAL WAR ITEMS

— LOCAL WAR ITEMS. Lieut. C. Gwynne Lewis, Welsh Regiment, son of Mr and Mrs B. A. Lewis, Morfa House, Carmarthen, is reported wounded in France, j injured in the legs. He is one of four brothers ) who hold commissions in the field, while a fifth is a signaller in the Navy. Pte. S. Evans, 5486, Carmarthen", of the Royal Welsh Fusiliers, is reported wounded. Pte. David Davies, Wiltshire Regiment, the younger son of Mrs A. Davies, Francis terrace, Carmarthen, is reported to have died of wounds. He was 20 years of age, and before joining the Army was employed at a bank at Swindon. Lieut. J. B..Martin, Royal Welsh Fusiliers, lias been wounded in the great British drive. He is well known in the diocese of St David's, having been assistant secretary to the Bishop of St. David's for severalyeaTs, and also secre- tary to the St. David's Diocesan Board of Finance. A brother was killed in acticf. last vear at Ypres1. Official intimation has been received by Mr E. L. B. Allen, of Hill, Narberth, that his son, Second-Lieut. L. R. Allen, South Wales Bor- derers, has been wounded in the knee and ankle. He is now in hospital in London. Capt. D. H. Thomas, Welsh Regiment, has been wounded. In a letter he states that the wound is not of a serious1 nature. Prior to the war Capt. Thomas was employed by the Llall- elly Education Committee1 as a certificated assistant teacher. He played as centre three- quarter for Llanellv Rugby Club. «*• Another young Llanelly officer, Lieut. Ivor Guest Rees. is reported wounded and missing. Prior to the war he was on the clerical staff of the Old Castle Tinworks. He is a nephew of Mr John Rees, G.W.R. divisional superinten- dent," Swansea. HI At Llandovery on Friday, Private Wiilie Griffiths, of the Welsh Fusiliers, was the re- cipient of a presentation from the town fund. He was severely wounded in France, and is now home on sick leave. Pte. David Thomas, of 2, Trefriw, Peny- bank, Ammanford, is lying in hospital at Leicester, suffering from shrapnel wound in the right arm. ««• Pte. John Hughes, Royal Welsh Fusiliers, of Bfcenau Hill, Llaiidebie, has been killed in action. He was 23 years of age. A brother was killed in Gallipoli. Lieut. Laurie Rees, Welsh Regiment, 'has, it was officially notified at Llandovery on Saturday, been killed in action. He was the youngest son of Mrs Rees, Trehyfryd, Llan- dovery, and a brother to Mr J. Conway Rees, the old Oxonian and international Rugby foot- baller. ««* Mr J. Davies, J.P., Commerce House, Am- manford, has received War Office notification that his nephew, Lieut. H. B. Williams, of the Fusiliers, sustained bullet wounds in the neck and shoulder im fighting on the 6th inst., and now liies in hospital in France. Prior to the war he held a scholastic post in Brighton. Pte. David Jones, of the 7th Welsh, was home on short leave this week. He is a son of Mr Jones, Black Lion, Cwmffrwd, Carmarthen and was formerly a journalist at Carmarthen. Motor Despatch Rider Andrews, of the Royal Flying Corps, was home on leave last week. He was formerly a master at the Carmarthen Grammar School. •*« I Pte. Ben Thomas, of the R.A.M.C., was home on leave last week end. He was formerly employed by Mr Haydn Williams, King stree;t, Carmarthen. Mr Harold Harries (son of Mr D. Harries, Morley street) and Mr D. Jones (son of Mr D. Jones, builder, Lammas street) left Carmar- then on Saturday for Farnborough, having joined the Royal Flying Corps as carpenters. Mr S. T. Hanks, Unionist agent for West Carmarthenshire, left Carmarthen on Monday for Grove Park. London, having joined the Army Service Corps (motor transport). un Friday evening last, at 'the Half Moon Hotel, Mr Hanks was presented with a, jewel, suitably inscribed, by the local Order of Buffaloes. •*» Mr Horace W. Bolton, former proprietor of the Empire Theatre, Carmathen," left on Wed- nesday, having joined the Royal Engineers. 1 i ■ "■

II Lord St Davids Loss

II Lord St David's Loss. CAPT. THE HOIN. R A-.ND PHILIPPS ) KILLED. Widespread sympathy will be extended to Lord St-. David s, the lord-lieutenant of Pem- brokeshire, in the death in action of his second son and heir, Captain the Hon. Roland Philipps M.C., of the Royal Fusiliers. The lamentable news reached Tenby on Monday night, and is all the more regrettable as it was only in May of last year tha,t his lordship lost his elder son, Captain the Hon. Cohvyn Erasmus Philipps. of the Royal Horse Guards, who also nobly fighting fell," and was buried in a hero's grave in France. The double bereavement leaves his lordship without a direct heir to the estates in South Wales. Captain Roland Philipps was also a nephew of Major General Sir Ivor Philipps. Born in 1890, ne was educated at Winchester and Oxford, where he had a brilliant university career. Shortly after the outbreak of Mar he joined the foces as a private, and speedily won promotion in the commissioned ranks of the Royal Fusiliers. Twelve months ago he accom- panied his regiment to the front, where he wa-s wounded in April last. Whilst home recuper- ating he received the gratifying news that his gallantry on the battlefield was to be rewarded with the bestowal of the Military Cross. In the official record of his deed it was stated that the official record of his deed it was stated that (whilst seriously wounded) he killed four of the enemy with his revolver, and succeeded in repelling all attacks upon his position. Previous to the war Captain Philipps took a keen and active interest in the Boy Scout movement, being commissioner of Boy Scouts in East and North-East London and assistant- commissioner to Colonel Lord Glanusk (who has also lost two sons in the Avar) for Wales. He was a cultured speaker, having inherited the literary talents of his late mother. In politics he was an ardent Radical and a candi- date for South Glamorgan. His death, f allow- ing that of Colionel Frank GasKell lin action, leaves the two great political parties in the division without standard bearers. He had a ciharming disposition, and was extremely popu- lar at his old home, Lydstep Haven, in Pem- brokeshire. It is ascertained that Capt. Philipps, with his regiment, took part in the severe fighting ¡ Oil the 7th against the Prussian Guards.

Accident to Col Lloyd Harries

Accident to Col Lloyd Harries As the result of an accident Colonel Lloyd Harries, Llangadock, the recruiting officer for the district, sustained injuries on Wednesday evening. The Colonel, while proceeding on foot from the recruiiting office at Llandovery to catch his train home, was knocked down by a, miik float. He was immediately carried to the North Western Hotel by Inspector Preeoe and Mr W. J. James, and his injuries were treated by Drs Morgan, Llandovery, PhiUip9, Llandilo, and Hopkins, Llangadock. The colonel is 70 years of age.

Alleged Theft of Lead Spelter

Alleged Theft of Lead & Spelter. At Llanelly Police Court on Wednesday, two Llwynhendy men, Dd. Davies, Tycwrdd, and Wm. John Harries, Tabernacle terrace, were charged with stealing lead, spelter and coppet of the total value of 1:51 10s. Mr Leslie Williams was for the prosecution and Mr T. R. Ludford defended. The evidence was to the effect that the moO got a man named EvanWiilliams to convey 9 load of lead "and a bit of everything" to marine store dealer in Swansea. The tstuff was taken to Swansea in a cart by Williams, whO met the two defendants near High Street Station, and both directed him to the marine store dealer's yard. Detective Barry, of the Swansea Constabulary, entered, and que6- tioned the men about the metal. Harris made a long statement to the effect that be was selling the metal for a Gowerton coal mer, chant named Owens, and that he was onlS making a profit of 30s. The detective examined the metal and found there was about one totf of scrap lead, lewt. 3qr& of copper, and aboul lowt. 171bs of spelter, and net being satisfied with Harries' statement, he took possession ol the metal while he made enquiries, and advised the marine store dealer not to buy it. P.C. Hopkins (Llwynhendy) spoke to visitt- ing the premises of Harries in the company of P.C. Lewis. Witness, after enquiring fot Harries, went to the stable, where he noticed | a piece of lead on the floor. He then fouJ14 in the manegr 36lbs of spelter3 £ Mbs of lead, which was covered with straw. He took poS' session of it and then went to Davies's hoD1*' but failed to see Davies. Witness got mission from Davies' mother to make a search and he found 61bs of lead and 51bs of spelter f the fireplace of the back kitchen. They alwo found a sheet of lead in the stables, and respect of this Mrs Davies made a statement When he saw Harries he informed him that was ma-king inquiries as to the lead and IS ter that Davies and he had taken to SwansO and also with respect to that found on premises. Mr Williams: What did he say? The witness was about to gifve a reply vrb Mr Ludford objected, and a note of the 0 jection was entered. Witness then said that Harries replied, is my own property. I lid the lead, zinc, 01 iron, and copper wire from the Brynnis Colliery." Later witness saw Davies, who plied "I am not guilty." The evidence of Mr D. Samuel, mining e gineer. Arcade, went to show that he was 0 of the owners of the Brynmawr Colliery. T were four partners, three being working ners. Harries had the surface control of colliery. There was no lead or spelter t;i to that produced at the colliery. Both deJ. dants approached him, and Harries asked JJ if he would go to Gowerton to see Mr Ovv as they had got into trouble with the police Swansea about some lead, and if he would so he would be a friend to them and would V matters right. He refused to do so. The defendants were committed for trixl the Quarter Sessions, .bail being allowed. >$

Advertising

YOU CAN BELY Clarke's B41 Pills Safe and Sure in either Sex, for all Acquired or Constitutf0^ Discharges from Urinary Organs, Gravel, Paio'J the Back and kindred complaints. Over 50 7* Success. Of all Chemists, 4s 6d oir -a per box, or sent direct, post free, ljA for Sixty Penny Stamps fcy the B41 Proprietors—The Lincoln and, -rfj Midland Drug Co, Ltd,Lincoln. I* ree from m idland Drug Co, Lttdd,LirAoln.

Llandilo Urban Tribunal

Llandilo Urban Tribunal This body met on Tuesday afternoon Vi those present were Dr Jones (chairman), Messrs D. Pritohard Davies, Ben Hughes, J. H. Rees. Capt. Edwards, military r«Jr sentative. ( After a long discussion the large lfcinibefj married men who were waiting outside JL Board-room, as well as members of the geD public, were admitted. « Dr Jone said Well, gentlemen, we have cided to give you all niar-ried men tempt. exemption until September 13th on condity. that you all join the V.T.C., and attend drills. If any of you are not willing to a, by these conditions you will have to say j and then we will take your oases. Those agree their cases are practically finshed. j Mr Harries, auctioneer: What about who have joined and have efficiency badg^ Dr J ones: They have done all that is asked will have exemption and continue. (f Mr Davies (Lima Works, Ltd.): What those who live some miles out in the couojjj —Chairman Capt. Edwards has a su about that.—Captain Edwards said he agreed to the condition laid down by the cb man. The time might come that every in the county might be needed, if they going to win the war. By joining the V-h they would get a certain amount of elemeB^j drill and the intervening co iple of would not be wasted. That was the j exactly. He hoped it would never be ( to call them up. On the one hand it look^ if it would not be; on the other hand sowo the papers seem to think they were losing many men that it might be' necessary. idea in exempting them was that they sh°J do what he had done willingly learn their He remembered as a small boy his father 5 father, as one of the old volunteers, pa?2 for his own uniform and getting up at a o'clock in the morning to drill when the Co, try feared a French invasion. The suggest ( was that they, the married men, should dO the volunteers did Apart from that it Vi do them good.—Dr Jones: You will all h^e\ opportunity to appeal again. It is not Mr Sidney Price Morris asked if men had served four years in the Territorials- whose time were occupied, wore expected^ join the V.T.C. as well.—Gapt. Edwards him if lie was an old Territorial.—He rcFW in the affirmative.—Capt. Edwards sai«JJ know the value of ha vine an old Territot amongst the V.T.C. H wouM be invaluO and they would make.iiiiii a corporal rl" away (laughter). d iJr All the marred men agreed to accept conditions, except Mr Ashley Cooper Hop10 whose appeal was subsequently heard b Two students who had just completed course at the Llandilo Intermediate GcW appealed. Both were exempted until Ktf were nineteen, one attaining that age on 7 loth September and the other on the 3rd June next. W. Williams, an agricultural mechanic, appealed for by his brother, Mr T. M WiU'f* had made every effort to ge<> Amn 'K'i e, -lai1 ,released eight emplo?f> Amongst them his chief mechanic: He W mechanic himself, hut more of a general ir7 monger. The machinery business went oP.w the year.—Exemption was granted until ,J l»th of October, no further appeal to be 1 Ashley Cooper Hopkins. Victoria Hotel. iVp keeper and farmer, appealed. He rented acres and paid C76 reiit. Provided aCCOJJ1 tiel datum on fair days for (50 horses. His WJ wasnear the market and his wife could J> to complete h«s degree.—Replving to Capt Jklwards, he said he had only grazing laUfqil He was granted exemption to September 15 conditionally ^n his joining the V.T.C. j-i o10' k??-nS' Porter appeared for di-Io Saw Mills, to appeal for Lewis, U' worked for the firm and also had a farm acres. He worked as a timber feller-^ Capt. Edwards: He had a wife and threo/V dren. the oldest being eight. H? worked 3 the farm in the evening.—C'apt. Edwards s be, 'as u-itli the case.—Replyi»4j^ i e sa,d tlie^ ha(1 seven cows and hebed 1 i,s wife to milk before to ^ork —Granted exemption as long ng kept to his present occupations,