Teitl Casgliad: Carmarthen weekly reporter

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 4 o 4
Full Screen
12 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
THE PASSING WEEK j

THE PASSING WEEK j "Let there b& tfeistlea; there are grapop If old things, tbetre are new; Ten thousand broken lighta and shapea yet glimpses of the true."—Tiwnfbcn. This war is going to be lost and won within the next three months. The beginning of the winter will find the German Army broken and in retreat or it will find the Allies "held up" after a struggle and forced to make peace on the German terms. ••• This is the real reason which is behind the Prime Ministers appeal to the workers to forego August Bank holiday. Our Armies re- quire a flood of munitions. On a front of UU miles we require to be able to pour high explo- sives on the German front at the same rate that the fire brigade pours water on a fire. The great requirement of our Armies is "high explosive" shells. The Germans have to be blasted out of France and Belgium in the same way as a quarryman blasts a rock which cannot bt dislodged in any other way. It may be impossible to blow the Germans out of the trenches; but it is quite possible to blow the trenches in on top of the Germans. If the latter course is successfully carried out. the British Army will be able to advance over the erstwhile trenches now turned into graves. To bring about this state of affairs, it is necessary that the munition workers and everybody directly or indirectly associated with the out- put of munitions should do so without any holiday at the present time. ••• There is no denying the fact that the workers do not like this they regard it as one of the sacrifices which they have to make as a result of the war. It is curious how the idea of the sacredness of bank holidays has grown up since their inception some forty years ago. Bank holidays were established by Act of Par- liament in 1871—mainly by the efforts of Sir John Lubbock. Previous to that time there were no public holidays except Good Friday and Christmas Day, and many classes of per- sons-such as shop assistants-had no other respite from their labours. The Bank holiday has grown into the national life to such a way that it has come to be regarded as the one saared institution. There is a, large section of the population which has no respect at all for the Sabbath. It is fashionable to regard the Decalogue with contempt; but there is no such broad-mindedness in dealing with the deerees of Lubbock. There are plenty of British workmen who are quite willing to work on Sundays provided they are paid for it. But they very often object to working on Bank holidays at any price. ##• The most striking feature of present day life is the manner in which Sunday has quietly dropped out of sight as a day of rest. The fact that workmen object to working on Sunday has often been taken to indicate an assertion of Sabbatarianism. Investigation usually proves this view to be quite erroneous. The trouble is caused by the attitude of'a certain type of employer who tries to get seven day's work for six day's pay. It will usually be found that the British workman has no objection at all to working on Sunday providing he gets an extra day's pay for it-or provided he gets another day in the week off. The hypocrisy of the British public is such that they rise up in arms against a proposal to open a museum and to let the workers look at curios and natural history specimens on Sundays but they do not object to men driving engines, and motor cars, and to men toiling at blast furnaces and doing nawv work on Sunday. Indeed men who pro- test vigorously against the sale of a bottle of "pop" or a packet of sweets on Sunday often petronise Sunday trains which employ drivers, firemen, guards, signalmen, platelayers, por- ters, ticket collectors, and others at laborious work when they ought to have a rest. ••• Bank Holiday is the one sacred institution of the present day. A good deal of the discon- tent which exists amongst railway workers is due to the fact that they have to work on Bank holiday. The day which means a rest for nearly everybody else means increased labour for railway men. The railwayman is the "victim" of the present day system of pleasure. He is sacrificed in order to give other people a holiday. It is true that he can get a day off at another time. But that is itot the same thing. There are advantages in having a holiday at the same time as the rest of the community; and the man who takes his holidays when other people are working loses a good deal of the excitement. There is a good deal in the "atmosphere." When crowds of people all do the same thing together it developes into a great mental force. When big congregation take part in religious ceremonies the effect of the united action on the indi- vidual is to promote a high level of enthusiasm. The same thing applies to armies. When half a million of men move forward on a narrow front, each individual is acted on by the mass in such a way that he is quite capable of a degree of heroism and endurance which he could never attain to on his own account. The mass developes a certain "atmosphere." If a "conscientious objector" were placed in a regiment with a fine tradition the chances are that in a few weeks he woold develope a most martial spirit and would crave for the blood of the Germans like the most hardened veteran. It is the holiday "atmosphere" which is the benefit to be derived from the whole nation going in for organised enjoyment at the same time. When one is a member of a holiday • making crowd his spirits rise, and he enjoys himself by the mere fact of mixing with others similarly disposed. ««« To develope such a spirit at the present time is immoral. No man or woman has any right to expect to enjoy himself (or herself) at the present time. Millions of men are fighting at the front in order to enable us at home to live in peace and security. Hundreds of families daily are receiving the news that the son cr the brother or the father of the family has been killed'. This is no time for enjoyment. ■If it were not that our armies are holding up the Germans so well we should by this time have had our country overrun by German savages, and our cities and villages would be reduced to the same condition as those of Belgium. The Belgians who are starving at home and being knocked about by/the Prussian jack-boot do not get any bank holidays. The least we can all do is to take life seriously until the war is over at any rate. The men in the trenches do not get any Bank holidays, and if the munition workers have a Bank holiday and its inevitable sequel for the rest of the week, it may mean that thousands of the lives of our soldiers will be sacrificed. ••• It is undoubtedly a sacrifice for the workers to lose their holidays. Men who are doing heavy laborious work require relaxation. It is very easy for people who sit in their arm- chais to sneer at the demand for holidays on the part of men who spend day after day at nerve-wrecking work. It is much the same as people who eat five hearty meals a day sneer- ing at the pangs of hunger. There are tens of thousands of people in this country who have never done an honest hard day's work in their lives. These are the people who want to know why the workers want holidays. It woudd be a great change for some of these good folks to do a hard day's work occasionally for a diversion—just as the workers like a day's idling now and then by way of change. It is the workers who have got to win this war. And when the war is won. the fact will have to be recognised. There is a gang of "Profiteers'' who fancy that this war is a scheme by which they can feather their nests. When the men who have fired the shells come home, they and the men who made the shells will rule this country, and they'll make it a home for the masses. The men who smash German tyranny will make Great Britain and Ireland a home for freemen.

CARMARTHEN UNDER THE SEARCHLIGHT

CARMARTHEN UNDER THE SEARCHLIGHT. Corne. come, and sit yon down:-job shall DOt badge, Fu- shall not go, till I set you up a glass Where yon may see the intnoet part of you. Ekakmpbaxb. We hear a good deal of talk at Corporation meetings about "wasting"' water. Seeing that we are in the midst of the wettest summer on record, and that the population of the town is less than it has been for the last forty years, we can afford to taike the "waste" calmly for a while. The population of Carmarthen is usually a little over 10,000. During the last thirty or forty years it has fluctuated between 10,300 and 10,040. If a census were taken in the middle of the week at present it would pro- bably be found that the population is little over 8,000. The war has brought nobody to town, and it has taken away between 1,200 and 1,800 young men. • «* It would be well for everybody to bear in mind the fact that temporarily the population of the Borough has been reduced by 20 per cent. This is true of a good many other towns. We can't have an army of five or six millions in France and elsewhere without leaving a good many blank spaces at home. It would be a good thing if everybody would adjust their ideas to the fact that a large section of the populations is "not at home." I am afraid there is a good deal of nonsense talik-ed about this outbreak of juvenile crime- or alleged outbreak of juvenile crime. And at the outset I feel bound to say that I consider it my duty to withdraw an expression of opinion which I made during the first year of the war. I then advanced the theory that the fathers were in the Army, that the mothers could not manage the children, and that the youngsters were running wild. This seemed a very plausible theory; but I am bound to armit that facts do not seem to uphold it. <.<* Thus in Carmarthenshire during the last quarter, we had 69 juvenile offenders brought before the Courts. Of those 69 only two had fathers in the Army. It can hardly be argued that these two children took to crime because their fathers were away; otherwise we must argue that the other 67 took to crime because their fathers were at home. On the whole therefore it would seem to be much more dan- gerous for their fathers to stay at home. ••• Then we are told that the outbreak of juvenile crime is due to the Cinema. It used to be cigarettes. Ten years ago, it always transpired in courts that boys "pinched" coppers to buy cigarettes. The boy pinched the coppers and the copper pinched the boy. I believe there was once a boy who stole a penny to buy a packet of "fags." He gave this explanation in court, and the chairman of the Bench shed tears and patted the boy on the head and condoled with him as a victim of the Nicotian Fiend. After that every wicked little boy who was found out pleaded "cigarettes" as his excuse, and received a vote of condol- ence instead of getting what his mother ought to have given him long ago. This "wheeze" was worked so well that an Act of Parliament was passed to prevent any cigarettes being sold to boys under 16. The only result of this is that boys under 16 pur- loin their father's ciga;rett,es-a most repre- hensible practice. Before the cigarette "wheeze" came to light, all juvenile crime was due to the "penny horrible." The favourite type of juvenile literature in the Victorian epoch was the "Highwayman" story. The adventures of Dick Turpin, Claude Duval, Jack Shephard, and Sixteen String Jack formed the youthful literature of many men who are now in the Cabinet and in other honourable positions. In these days there was plenty of juvenile crime too nd it was all put down to the penny horrible. *«• There are no "penny horribles" today. The poor criminal in modern juvenile literature never gets a chance. Sexton Blake or some other famous detective runs him down, and the law is vindicated. A study of boy's papers to- day leads me'to the conclusion that it is the police who are the heroes and not the criminal. So in default of "penny horribles" and penny "fags" we now blame the cinema. *«• The denunciation of spectacular entertain- ments for children is no new thing at all. 1 remember an institution which used to be called the "penny gaff." The theatre was a shed, and the actors never got any salary. They used to divide the gate money between them. The theatre usually occupied a piece of waste ground which was awaiting the specu- lative builder. You could get a reserved seat for threepence; but the price for the "pit" wa,- a penmy. Any attempt to chage twopence was considered rank extortion. The plays which were produced at the "penny gaff" were of a most blood curdling chararter. "Maria Martin, or the Murder of the Red Barn" was the type. It was a good penn'orth. **# I have a recollection of a terrific sermon being preached against a penny gaff. The future fate of the parents who allowed their children to attend such places was painted in more lurid colours than any production on the stage. A few days afterwards the most terrific storm which ever swept over the British Isles broke out. It carried away the Tay Bridge and a train with three hundred people ran into the North Sea. and all were lost. The crazy old theatre which had evoked the pulpit denunciation was blown to the four corners of the field in which it stood. every- body—including the proprietor—accepted the result as the direct outcome of the sermon. Such things don't happen nowadays. I don't believe there is anybody living to-day who could raise a storm wnich would blow down a cinema. And now the citlema, is said to be the cause ol the increase in juvenile crime. The whole thing is a delusion. There is no increase in juvenile crime at all. The same Act which restricted the sale of cigarettes set up Juvenile Courts. Everybody knows now that there are courts for trying naughty boys and girls. If you caught a boy in your front garden stealing geraniums thirty years ago you gave him a whack with a peastick and there the matter ended. If the case was more serious, you went to see his father, and the father "paid up" to prevent the boy being sent to jail. I remem- ber scores of boys stealing apples and turnips from farmers, and half the fun was the pursuit by the farmer with his dog and his stick I i» Sometimes the dog made work for the boy's mother to repair, and sometimes the farmer got in with his stick a-nld gave the boys "what for." If .,t farmer gave boys who stole a.pples the treatment which often followed such raids in the eighties, the N.S.P.C.C. would take the matter up, and the farmer would get six months hard labour. So the farmer puts it in the hands of the police, and the boys are brought before a juvenile court, and the Chief Constable tabulates his statistics and the re- sult is appalling! ;4 Wo have more juvenile offenders brought before the courts, but is there really more juvenlei crime? Is iit not the fact that our methods of dealing with bad boys are different now to what they used to be? The matter of juvenile depravity is not one to be belittled by any means; but after all there is no need to be pessimistic about it. The cinema has not brought any new feature into the national life. Some films are "improving." and some are not. Some newspapers are elevating and some are not. Wo require some effective control over films; but it is only a part of the much bigger, question of the control of public morals. ALETHEIA.

Carmarthenshire Appeal Tribunal

Carmarthenshire Appeal Tribunal The Carmarthenshire Appeal Tribunal sat at the Carmarthen Guildhall on Friday. The members present were Mr W. Griffiths, Llan- elly (chairman); Mr Dudley Williams-Drum- mond, Mr T. Morris, Mr J. Lloyd, Mr Joseph Roberts, Mr H. E. B. Richards, and Mr D. Williams together with the Clerk (Mr J. W. Nicholas) Capt. Cremlyn represented the Military Authority, whilst the agricultural interest was represented by Mr H. Jones-Da vies. Glyn- eiddan, and Mr D. John, the agricultural in- structor for the county. PROPOSED ADJOURNMENT FOR. AGRI- CULTURISTS. Capt. Cremlyn before any cases were heard suggested that all the agricultural cases should be adjourned until after the harvest. A cir- cular had been received from the Boa,rd of Agriculture referring to that and practically asking that the military representative of every Tribunal &hould consent to this adjourn- ) ment. The Chairman said that they had considered that point, and they would take every case on its merits. They were not going to adopt that course. They had not heard anything of the circular. Mr H. Jones-Davies offered to hand in a copy of the circular. Mr W. W. Brodie said that as members of the Tribunal they had not received any cir- cular. Mr H. Jones-Davies said that in the county of Norfolk it was agreed between the Board and the Military Representative that the agri- cultural cases should be adjourned during the corn and hay harvest. As they knew the weather had been very unpropitious; the hay harvest was very late and everybody would be at the hay making at the same time. Military labour was not available to the extent required The Chairman said that it was very strange that no communication had reached the 'Tri- bunal. Mr Brodie said that the only communication they had received was that from the Small Holdings Commissioners. The Tribunal then proceeded to adjudicate on each case individually.

SEVEN DAUGHTERS AND ONE SON

SEVEN DAUGHTERS AND ONE SON. The first appeal taken was that of Albert John Williams, of 7, Water street, Llanel'y. He helped his father to carry on business as a coal and hay merchant. Mr T. R. Ludford, solicitor, appeared for the appellant. Mr Brodie pointed out that there had been an adjournment to enablo the appellant to make other arrangements. Appellant said that he had been passed "fit for garrison service abroad." The father who appeared stated that he was in ill-health. He had seven daughters, the eldest being 18. It was very hard to get a suitable man. A man could cheat him of a good deal before he would be aware of it. The appeal was dismissed. TWO BROTHERS ON A FARM. An appeal was made by his brother for Thos. ;Howelfe. Penrhiw, Bronwydd Arms. The case had been adjourned to enable the brother to go before the Medical Board. The report showed that the brother was fit for garrison service abroad. i Mr Howell Davies, solicitor, who appeared I for the appellant, said that it Was a very diffi- cult farm to work. There were only the two brothers and the sisters on the farm. Exemption until September 30 was granted. UNFIT FOR SERVICE. Laurence Ferrigi, of the Dental Surgery, Ammanford, appealed. The report of the Mledical lioard was that he was unfit for Ferviooe, and the appeal was allowed. ONE POSTPONEMENT, William Thomas, Soar, Salem, Llandilo ap- pealed for his son Morgan Thomas. Mr Howell Davies appeared for the appellant. Appellant stated that be was 69 years of age. He produced a certificate stating that he was suffering from rheumatism and chronic bronchitis. Pontponement until August 14 was granted. PENCABER LOCAL UNIVERSITY. Capt. Margrave, the Recruiting Officer, ap- pealed against the absolute exemption granted to Willie Jones, New Inn, Pencader. The re- spondent is a blacksmith. The father had seven sons, two of whom are in the Army and one waiting to be called up. The respondent said that two of his sons worked in collieries and one was a curate. The son for whom he appealed had been at the Pen cader Grammar School until he was 20 years of age. Capt. Cremlyn asked if the son had been a teacher there. The father said that the son had been a pupil. Mr Dudley Williams-Drummond: It is a Grammar School; it is a kind of local univer- sity (laughter). The appeal was allowed. '1 LLAXDYSSUL COAL MERCHANT'S OASiK. Mr Wallis-Jones appeared1 for the respon- dent in the case in which Capt. Margrave ap- pealed against the exemption granted to E. D. Evans, Pontwelly, Llandyssul. Mr Evans, the employer, said that he was the father and employer of the young man. His son helped him in the "business as a coal merchant and vendor of artificial manures. Respondent also carried on business as a builder's merchant. Capt. Cremlyn said that the checking of weights could be done by women. Many of the weighing machines at railway stations were in charge of women. The appeal was allowed. TOTAL EXEMPTION. Capt. Margrave appealed against the exemp tion granted to Thomas Davies, Gwarcwm, Alltywalis. Mr Wallis-Jones appeared for the respondent. Respondent said that he had 100 acres of land of which 33 were ploughed. A cortificaite was put in showing that the father was suffering from two complaints which precluded him from doing heavy agri- cultural work. Total exemption was granted. MILITARY REIPREHEINTATIVE'S EXEMPTION. Mr T. R. Jones, J.P. and C.C., Pa.ntglas, who clamed the exemption of the only servant on his farm, alleged that the chief reason for the withdrawal by the Newcastle Emlyn tri- bunal of the exemption they originally granted was that he was the military representative, adding, "They are not very keen on military j representatives, (for some farmers in the dis- trict have conscript sons. There are farms of 50 acres in that district with two or three sons at home, and as lily farm is over 100 acres 1 am certainly entitled to one man. My own son has been wounded." Absolute exemption was granted. I EXEMPTION FOR SUB-POSTMASTER, Capt. Margrave appealed against the exemp- j tion granted by the Whitiand Tribunal in the case of T. S. Lewis, of Hebron farm. Mr Wailis Jones apeared for the respondent. It trans- pired that the respondent carried on a farm of 40 acres, and also acted as sub-postmaster. He had to send out six letter carriers every morn- ing. Mr B. John, County Councillor for the dis- trict, gve evidence in favour of respondent. The Tribunal dismissed the appeal. MILITARY APPEAL DISMISSED. Capt. Margrave appealed against the exemp tion granted to J. Gibbon, Brynbank, Whit- land. The respondent was represented by Mr Howell Davies, solicitor, Carmarthen. It was shown that then were 25 milch oows on the farm. A medical certificate was put in show- ing that the farmer himself was suffering from a complaint which prevented him doing much work on the farm. The appeal was dismissed. A ROUGH FARM. Mr John Griffiths, Pistyllgwynne, Whitiand appealed in respect of his son, W. J. Griffiths. He said that the farm required a good deal of labour. It had been sadly neglected before he took it. The hedges were down and the land covered with furze. Exemption until October 1st was granted. AGRICULTURAL APPEALS. Sarah Rees, Glanrhyd, Hebron, appealed in respect of her son Henry Edward Rees.. Mr Wallis-Jones appeared for the appellant. Con- ditional exemption was allowed. Capt. Margrave appealed against the exemp tion granted in respect of Gad Protheroe, Cwm Ferry side. The appeal was dismissed, and conditional exemption was allowed for the man. Elizabeth Morris, Lanygorse, Llangain, was allowed exemption until the 30th September for Dd. Richard Morris. The appeal of Richard Williams, Wern Farm, Maesybont, in respect of Thos. Williams was allowed. An exemption was granted to David Hus- band, Waunbacke, St. Clears, who appealed on his own account. The appeal of Esther Davies, Hendy, Llan- gain. in respect of Dd. Davile8 was dismissed. Mr L. B. Lewis, Capel Dewi Hall, Carmarthen obtained an exemption until the 1st September in favour of John Owen. Thomas Lewis, Cilyngwynne, Bronwydd, ob- tained a postponement until the 30th Septem- ber in favour of Richard Lewis. The appeal of Mr D. B. Evans, Plasmari, St. Clears, in respect of Mr W. J. Bowen was dis- missed as there was "no appearance." David Jones, Dynevor Lodge farm, was granted a. postponement for his son, Johnnie Jones. John Lodwick, Pantglas, Abergwili, was allowed an exemption until 30th September for Edwin Thomas. George Harries, Wernelly, Llangendeirne, was allowed a postponement until September 30th for W. J. Harries. LLANSTBPHIAN CARRIER. Mr Wallis-Jones appeared on behalf of Mr J. Thomas, Llanstephan carrier, who appealed for his brother, Mr D. Thomas. The two brothers act as public carriers between LIan- stephan and Carmarthen. The application was refused. LLANSTEPHAN GROCER AND TAILOR. Mr Geo. Thomas, Mount Pleasant, Llanste- phan, grocer and tailor, was allowed until the 31st August. LAUGHAR.NE FERRYMAN. James Roberts, the Laugharne ferryman, appealed against the decision of the Carmar- then Rural Tribunal. The appeal was dis- missed. TILL 31ST AUGUST. The following were allowed until August 31: —John Pearce, Frog street, Laugharne, fish hawker; Thomas Michael Black Horse Llan- arthney; Johnnie Lewis, Placpant, Bankyfelin who assists his mother to carry on an egg and butter business; and Dd. Jeremy, Ffynon- ddrain, who assists in carrying on a market garden. Mr Wallis Jones appeared for the last named. ABERGWILI CARPENTER'S APPEAL. I The Tribunal dismissed the appeal of H. I Rees, Llaincefnhengil, Abergwili, carpenter. ) who said that lie was the support of his aged mother. N

The Questionof Health

The Question-of Health The qaestion of health is a matter which it tare to concern us at one time or another when Influenza is so prevalent as it ir just now, so it is woll to know what to e to ward off an attack of this mist weakening disease, this epidemic catarrh or cold of an aggravating kind, to combat it whilst under its baneful influence, and particularly after aiD attack, for then the system is 80 lowered as to be liable to the most dangerous of com- plaints. Gwilym Evans' Quinine Bitters is acknowledged by all who have given it a fair trial to be the best specific remedy dealinc with Influenza in all its various stages, being a Preparation skilfully prepared with Quinine and accompanied with other blood purifying and enriching agents, suitable for the liver, digestion, and all those ailments require tonic strengthening and nerve increas propeities. It is invaluable for those coffer- ing from colds, pneumonia, or any serious ill ness, or prostration caused by sleeplessness, or worry of any kind, when the body has a general feeling of weakness or lassitude. Send for a copy of the pamphlet of testi- monials, which carefully read and consider well, then buy a bottle (sold in two sices, 2 9d and 4s 6d) at yout nearest Chemint or Stores, but when purchasing see that the namo "Gwilym Evans" is on the label, stamp and bottle, for without which Pons are genuine. Sole Proprietors: Quinin- Bittsse Manufacturing Company, limited. 1 lanellj. South Wales.

An Ancient Steed at Carmarthen

An Ancient Steed at Carmarthen. The Carmarthen Borough Police Court was | held at the Guildhall on Monday before Mr James Davies( chairman), Mr T. Bland Davies, Mr J. B. Arthur, Mr Rees Davies, Mr H. E. Blagdon-Richards, and Mr Daniel Lewis. Inspector Millard, of the R.S.P.C.A, charged Elvan Thomas, of 64, Lammas street, Carmar- then, with working a horse whilst in an unfit | state. David Thomas, 64, Lammas street, coke merchant,, was charged with causing the horse to be worked. The Inspector said tha,t the animal was working in a cart. It had canker in the foot. There was a, wound the size of a four shilling piece on the foot. After the witness saw the horse, it was sold, and the purchaser sold it to a. third party. It was eventually destroyed. Mr J. B. Arthur: What were the good points about this animal that it sold so readily. The Inspector: There were none so far as 1 saw. Perhaps the price was low. P.C. Williams corroborated the evidence of the Inspector. Mr C. Morgan, M.R.C.V.S., said that the horse had canker in the feet. The disease was incurable. The animal was totally unfit for work. The Chairman How old was the horse ? Witness: Twenty to twenty-four years old. Tho Inspector said that if the horse had been worked for another month, the pedal bone would have fallen out. The Bench fined David Thomas 10s and 10s 6d coste i nd Evan Thomas was fiued5.

Llandilo Board of Guardians

Llandilo Board of Guardians. The fortnightly meeting of this body was held on Saturday last, when those present were Mr R. Matthews (chairman). Rev J. T. Jenkvns, Messrs J. Richards, Arthur Williams, W. Roberts (Garnant), Evan Morris, W. Stephens, John Hughes, Gomer Harris, John Iew is. Caleb Thomas, W. Thomas, J. Bevan, J. L. Williams, D. Davies, J. Humphreys, W. Williams, Glyn Jenkins. THE MASTER'S REPORT showed that the number of inmates in the House was 55 .against 52 in the corresponding period last year. Thirty vagrants had been at the house against 47 in the corresponding fort- night last year. Services had been held by the Revs T. Vaughan Jones (C.M.) and W. Davies (Ind.) HOUSE COMMITTEE. Mr J. Richards brought in a report of the Housa Committee on the previous dav at which there were present himself, J. L. Williams, W. Roberts and Glyn Jenkins. The groceries, etc., were examined and found according to j tender. The committee had under considera- tion the application of some of the servant maids for a weekly half holiday, and it was decided to leave the matter in the hands of the Master to arrange to give a weekly half holi- day when possible.—The report was adopted. "BYRON" DEAD. A letter was read from the Clerk to the Lampeter Union stating that "Byron" Lewis after being an inmate in that house since last March had died on the 8th inst. He was chargeable to the Llandilo Union.—The. Clerk said they all knew him land he had been in the Llandilo Workhouse for many years. ADVANCE TO PAUPERS. The Clerk of the Bridgend Union wrote to state that they were advancing their paupers one shilling a week in their relief towards the purchase of boots and asked 'Llandilo Union to do it with any paupers there.—Mr J. L. Williams: We better fall in.—The Chairman was not in favour of doing so. They had given the paupers at Llandebie an addition to enable them to pay the water rate, but they found that as Guardians they had to pay the water rate for them after all. Let the Bridgend Boa-rd do it for themselves if they wished to. —It was agreed to carry out the wishes of the Bridgend Board for their paupers. Rural District Council.

Llandilo Enral District Council

Llandilo Enral District Council. OUTBREAK OF DIPHTHERIA. The Sanitary Inspector (Mr Evan Jones) re- g>rted that along with Dr Lloyd he had visited feenau owing to the outbreak of diphtheria. After carefully inspecting 12 cases and the con- ditions of the homes, it was quite evident the disease had spread not because of the defects of the house drainage but by contact at school, and it was most marked on the infants. Out of four deaths three had attended the infants class and nearly all the other eases were from the infants department. All the houses ex- cept one were well and cleanly kept. In his opinion the school ought to be closed, and Dr Llovd, who was unable to attend that day, was of the same opinion.—The Chairman said any member could propose and another second that the school be closed.—Mr Glyn Jenkins: Are we to allow concerts to be held in this school? —The Chairman said that was a. good point with which he agreed, but it could be referred to again.—Mr W. Williams said he would not feel justified in closing the school without definite instructions from their medical officer. -Mr J. L. Williams held that one reason why they should now close the school at the present time was that the vacation should come earlier that it generally did.—Chairman: Very little hay there.—It was decided not to close the school without the authority of the medical officer. CONCERTS AND CONTAGION. Mr Glyn Jenkins then took up his point. 1-to held that in case the school should be closed owing to an infectious disease it should not bp opened for any other purpose during the period of closure. Ho proposed it.—Mr J. L. Wil- liams said he would second it as he had known an instance of a concert being held under the circumstance.—The Chairman said they wero sometimes more used than when the schools were not so closed. ROAD TAKEN OVER. The report further stated the committee had recommended the taking over of Tycornel road Brynamman,, but that the application of the Parish Council that the Rural District Council should take over Coronation road be not enter- tained until the road was placed in proper re- pair. The committee is to malke another visit to tho locality and report again in any case before the road was taken over. PIGGERIES. The Sanitary Inspector (Mr Evan Jones) re- ported that he had ordered a pigstye in course of construction at Brynamman to be removed. —The Clerk read a circular letter from the Board of Agriculture urging the necessity of much more being done in this country in the way of pig rearing. Ho said the Rural Dis- trict Council had no special bye-laws dealing with the matter though the Llandilo U.D.C. had. It was a question for the R.D.C. whe- ther the styes were kept in a sanitary condi- tion or not.—Mr Evan Jones said the objection in the case he referred to was that the stye was being put up without a plan and was being put up over a sewer serving a whole terrace.—Mr Glyn Jenkins asked that assuming the stye was not built over the sewer but near another man's house could he then object?-Clerk: It will be entirely in the Surveyor's hands who- there it is a nuisance or not.—The Chairman said the complaint was that he was building it over the sewerleading to one of the best roads in Brynaniiman.—Mr W. Williams said that those of them who lived in populous districts knew there were frequent complaints -from those living near pigstyes because of the filthy condition in which the pigs were kept. Un- doubtedly they were a great nuisance in many cases, because the piggery was not properly constructed. Whtever may be said in favour of keeping pigs, there was great objection to them in the hot days of summer and just now with diphtheria at Blaenau they should be especially careful.—The Chairman In this ease Mr Jones has his remedy and he is to carry it out. THE DipHTHEfRiIA OUTBREAK. Mr J. Bevan contended that with regard to the diphtheria, at Blaenau. the Sanitary In- spector had only given one side. He had attributed the fault to the Education Autho. rities that it started in the school.—This Mr Evan Jones denied. What lie had said was that the disease spread at the school, but did not start there as far as he knew. Contact at the school was the cause.—Mr J. Bevans went on to say that Mr Jones had not mentioned that there was great dissatisfaction at Blacnati because of the unsanitary state of the place. He gave several instances all round in which the sewage ran along the side of the road. The condition of the sanitary arrangements was in a very lamentable state and there was great dissatisfaction. They attributed the diphtheria at Blaenau to it. and not to the school. A public meeting had been called and they were going to cause trouble if there was not a remedy in the near future.—Mr E. Jones said the matter of the outlet of the sewage was a question for the Council and not for him, whether they would treat the sewage or not. With regard to the outbreak at the school, it was evident it spread at the school because it was confined to children in the infant school. and three out of four attacked in the same died. They would find that in no house was there more than one case. It was a wonderful thing. There was not a house in which there were two cases. It was plain it spread at the school. With regard to the drainage it was a matter for the Cbuncil, and if they went into it thoroughly they would have to treat the sewage and it would cost them thousands of pounds.—Mr W. Williams said the matter had been discussed in committee and there was a good deal of anxiety in the place on account of it, but still the condition of things was not worse than in other parts of the districts. The reason of it was that they were only doing a little of it now and again. They had spent nothing the last two years, and there was always room for improvement. They had de- cided that morning,to ask the Inspector for a report with an estimate of dealing with the sewerage of the district.—Mr J. L. Williams said that with regard to that question the time had come for something to be done. He be- lieved that in the village of Llandebie they contemplated joining up with the Amman Valley drainage scheme, and Blaenau and other places could easily be connected with the Llan- debie branch so that they had better leave it to see what expert surveyors said and so in- stead of spending small sums they better join the large scheme.—Mr J. Bevan You are far out of it. It cannot be easily done.-M.r J. L. Williams said that it was the watershed of the locality. They would be relieved of the ex- pense of the main trunk. They would only join up with it and it would be the cheapest scheme they could consider.—The Chairman said that at Llandebie they had not laid a single pipe, but that thev had that great scheme in tlie,,r minds. They had spent hun- dreds of pounds on pipes, but there would not be a single pipe moved. They would all lead to the great trunk. He could not make Mr Bevan out. A great many. some of whom he instanced, had crected bath rooms in their houses, but for the present they could not use them.—Mr J. Bevan: I am not talking about bath rooms.—Mr J. L. ii'llia,ms: A i the new houses have them.—The Chairman They had done all they could to make the burden less. Mr J. Bevan: Let tht. public know what has been done.—Mr W. Williams said they had been spending their money as w.sely as possi- ble. They could do the samo as Quarterback i and run themselves into bankruptcy, but they had been guarding against that. They must proceed cautiously, but they could not go on with any big scheme at once.— Mr J. L. Wil- liams remarked that the wisest plan would be for them to prepare for the main works.—The report was adopted. ONE OTHER LITTLE THING. Mr J. Bevan said that there was one other little thing. They wanted Mr Griffiths, road surveyor, to visit the place and see where the gutters, etc., choked. The roads too were in a terrible state and if not attended to, they had a scheme to get the work done more economically and more efficiently.—Mr W. Williams also would like Mr Griffiths to visit amongst other places Blaenau on wet days and see where the water collected. He (Mr Wil- liams) had no idea sf it until he saw it and he was sure, the Surveyor had not. Children played in the pools and got wet. "GOGGLES." In the report of the Roads Committee there was a recommendation that the stonebreakers should have goggles.-M,r J. Richards said the Insurance Companies insisted on it, because if the man received an injury in the eye, tho Companies would not pv compensation if the goggles were not worn.—Mr Glyn Jenkins asked if the men wore the goggles for a month or more and contracted disease of the eyes by wearing them would the companies pay com- pensation for that.-The Clerk held that they never contracted disease in that way.—Mr J. Richards said it was only occasionally the road men broke stones.—Mr J. L. Williams said that they would be only following what was done in neighbouring counties. It would be safer.-M,r Jenkins again objected.—Clerk: They are used all over the British Islands.— The Chairman said the Compensation Act would cover it.—Mr J. Bevan said it did not. —The Chairman said if the Companies in- sisted on the use of goggles and the men there- by, contracted disease, they could recover. it was common law.—The matter then dropped. BAD ROADS. It was reported that the road from Llande- bie to Garnpica sand quarries was in a deptor- able state.—The Chairman said he walked it every day but had not complained, but now the Surveyor had.—Then there was a com- plaint of water running down the Penybont road, which would render it useless for traffic. —The Surveyor was said to be attending to them, but neither was in a very bad condition and could be put right at small expense, A DISCHARGED SOLDIER. The Surveyor was asked how ho was off for workmen, and he replied he was only one man short.—Mr J. Bevan said he had written to the SuTve-vor about employing a discharged soldier but had got no reply for a we;k. Meanwhile the man had a job elsewhere. MIlLO WATER SUPPLY. Mr W. Stephens moved that in connection with the Millo water supply the work should be started at once.—The Chairman said they had been trying to get a. plumber and jointer, and if they succeeded they could start at once. -Mr J. L. Williams seconded the motion, and It was agreed to.

Advertising

FOR OLD AND YOUNG MORTIMER'S COUGH MIXTURE FOR COUGHS, COLDS. WHOOPING COUGH, ETC., ETC. OV E Ft 70 YEARS REPUTATION IN THIS DISTRICT. THIS CELLBRATED v WELSH REMEDY Is now put up in cartons securely packed for transmission to all parts of the world and contains a Pamphlet, written by an eminent Medical Authority, dealing with the various beneficial uses of this specific Price Is lid and 2s 9d per bottle. T. larger bottle is hyfar the cheapest.

Retiring to Her Native Shir Gar

Retiring to Her Native Shir Gar." 7- A dialogue conducted in Welsh at the Aber- dare County Court on Monday, the speakers being Judge-Bryn Roberts and Mrs Elizabeth Davies, a septugeniarian widow, of Trecynon, who applied for a sum of money out of the compensation awarded in respect of her hus- band's death, so that she might end her days in her native Carmarthenshire: His Honour: Do you intend to live with your daughter? Applicant: No, sir. My idea is to have a little cottage to myself. I don't want much, sir. His Honour: The money is yours, Mrs Davies nnd you may just do what you please with it. I only want to know how much you would like to have. Applicant: Weil, sir, I don't know exactly, but I don't see that it is necessary for me to be too close, too. His Honour (smiling): Not at all, Mrs Davies. It all belongs to you, but I must know how much. What about 10s a. week in addi- tion to the 5s per week which you get as old age pension ? Applicant: I am leaving it to you, sir. His Honour: Ah, no, Mrs Davies. I have to leave it all to you this time (laughter). If you take 10s a week the money will last you about six ye;airs, and I am glad to see by your looks that you are likely to be spared for many years. Applicant; It is good of you, sir, to say that, but I do realty think you may give me 12s a wec,k, :as the prices of food are high now. His Honour Very well, we'll make it 12s a week, and it will be paid to you from May last until next January. We will see further then. Applicant: Thank you, sir.

I What Indigestion Does

What Indigestion Does. Any man or woman who is suffering from indigestion is gradually being starved, because nourishment is not being obtained from the food eaten. That is not all, for the harmful products given off by undigested food enter the blood stream, and are carried to every part of the body, to the great detriment or your health. Thus in-digestion means starving and suffering, too. But Mother Seigel's Syrup possesses such a remarkable power to tone, strengthen and regulate the -action of the stomach, liver, and bowels that indigestion becomes impossible. Good health reigns in its stead. After forty years' testing by ten of thousands. Mother Seigel's Syrup is still re- nowned all over the world as a successful arise from a weak or disordered condition of ainse fro ma weak or disordered condition of the stomach, liver, ot bowels.

WHITLAND CATTLE MART

WHITLAND CATTLE MART. Mr T. Bevan Arthur, auctioneer, Carmar- then conducted a successful sale at the mairt on the 12th inst. Some hundreds of cattle and other stock went through the ring at the fol- lowing prices:— Cows with calves up to £ 20, fat bullocks up to JE27, store cattle up to 912, ewes up to f;2 8s 6d, lambs up to R2 5s, porkers up to £ 316s, hulls up to L27, and suckers up to 3Gs. Porkers and suckers were very scarce. Business was exceptionally brisk. CARMARTHEN-Printed and Published by the Proprietress, M. Lawrence, at her Offices, >3 Blue Street, Fbidat, July 21st, 1916.