Teitl Casgliad: Carmarthen weekly reporter

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Llun 1 o 4 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
6 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
Advertising

PLEASE CALL TO SEE OUR STOCK OF AGRICULTURAL MACHINERY. 11e illc CO-RJ-FICK Latest ff/cI^HORSE^BINDE? TEE LlCHTEST BINDER EVEB MADE. SOME POINTS- RIGID MAIN FRAME. STRONG DRIVE CHAIN. STEEL PLATFORM. WIDE RANGE OF ADJUSTMENT FLOATING ELEVATOR, SIMPLE KNOTTER. THE McCormick Windrow Loader PICK UP A TON OF HAY IN Built entirely of Steel. Made to pass through ordinary Easy in Action. IJ: Light in Draught.> Light in Draught. soil IHONMONQEES, HOUSE FUnNISREnS AND AGRICULTURAL EiGINEIRS, CJLIRIlVt-A.^TIIEIJSr. Ironmongery-io Hall Street and 9 Priory Street. Bedstead Showrooms-5, St Mary Street. Furniture Showrooms-I St Mary Street. Farm Implements—Market Place, Carmarthen, Llanelly, Llandyssul, and-Liaiiybyther. Telegrams-" Thomas, Ironmongers, Carmarthen." Telephone-No. 19. -7.7- if-7- t EORGES ILE GRNEL )j PILLS A MARVELLOUS E F, D Y -c; For upwards of Forty Years these Pills have held the first place in the World as a Remedy for FILES and GRAVEL, and all the common disorders .,I of the Bowels, Stomach, Liver, and Kidneys; and there is no civilized Nation under the Sun that has not experienced their Healing Virtues. « MBMMOBM THE THBEE uRMS OF THIS REMEDY No. I-Ge')rg6's Pile and Gravel Pills. No. 2 -George's Gravel Pills. No. 3 Ge orge's Pills for the Piles, old everywhere in Boxes, 1/3 & 3/- each. By Post, 1/4 & ,3/2. PQOPRIErOK-I, E. GEORCE, M.B.P.S., IIIBWAIN, ABERDARS. PRINTING! PRINTING. .õ» GOOD" "CHEAP AND EXPEDITIOUS PRINTING EXECUTED AT Tl-lB 's REPORT ER" a PRINTING & PUBLISHINGTOFFIOES I* B L U E'STJR.EET OA H ]VC J-T B N" ORDERS BY POST receive prompt and careful attention. [ p It ICE S ON A P P LIe A T ION. Hie Carmarthen Weekly Reporter PUBLISHED EVERT THURSDAY EVENING, Circulates throughout South Wales generally, and has the LARGEST IRCULATION IN THE COUNTY OF CARMARTHEN PRICE ONEPENNY;POST FEES 1/9 PSB QCABTER THE BEST ADVERTISING MEDIUM FOR ALL CTA3S>S OP A DVB TTISEMEKTS. NOTICES TO QUIT FROM LANDLORD TO TENANT AND TENANT TO LANDLORD, May he obtained at the "REPORTER OFFICE," Blue-street, Carmarthen. ONE PENNY. x STOP ONE MOMENT x lOh Dear Doctor MUST My Darling die? There is very little hope, But try TUDOR WILLIAMS' < PATENT r BALSAM OF HONEY. WHAT IT IS Tudor Williams' Patent Balsam of Honey Is an essence of the purest and most effica- cious herbs, gathered on the Welsh Wills and Valleys in their proper season, when their virtues are in full perfection, and combined with the purest Welsh Honey. All the in- gredients" are perfectly pure. WHAT IT DOES I Tudor Williams' Patent Balsam of Honey Cures Coughs, Colds, Bronchitis, Asthma, Whooping Cough, Croup, and all disorders of the Throat, Chest and Lungs. Wonderful Cure for Children's Coughs after Measles. it is invaluable to weak-chested men, delicate women and children. It succeeds where all other remedies fail. Sold by all Chemists and Stores in Is 3d, 3s Od, and 5s 6d bottles. Great saving in purchasing larger size Bottles. WHAT IT HAS DONE FOR OTHERS. What the Editor of the "Gentlewoman's. Court Tournal" says:- Sir,—The result of the bottle of your splendid Tudor Williams' Balsam of Honey is simply. marvellous. My mother, who is over seventy, although very active, every winter has a bronchial cough which is not only distressing, but pulls her down a lot. Its gone now. With best wishes for your extraordinary preparation. W. Browning Hearden. YOU NEED NOT SUFFER! Disease is a sin, inasmuch that if you act rightly, at the right time, it can, to a great extent, be avoided. Here is the preventative The first moment you start with Sore Throat tae a dose of TUDOR WILLINivi -P -A. IT m IT u: I BALSAM OF HONEY, J It has saved thousands! It will save you I It is prepared by a fully qualified chemist, and is, by virtue of its composition, eminent- ly adapted for all cases of Coughs, OoIds, Bronchitis, Esthma, etc., it exercises a dis- dinct influence upon the mucous lining of the throat, windpipe, and small air vessels, so that nothing but warmed pure air passes into the lungs. It's the product of the Honeycomb, chemically treated to get the best results. The Children like it, THEY ASK FOR IT So different from most medicines. Nice to Take Cuies Quickly For vocalists and pablic speakers it has no efj ual, it makes the voice as clear as a bell. Manufacturer Tudor Williams, MEDICAL flALL, ABERDARE. TO POOR RATE COLLECTORS, ASSISTANT OVERSEERS, &c. FORMS ot Notice of Audit, Collector s Monthly Statement, &c., Poor Rate Receipt Books, with Name of Parish, Particulars of Rate.&c., printed in, can be obtained at the REPORTER' OFFICE at Cheap Rates. Send for Prices. ——————————————————— ————————————— I THE CARMARTHEN BILLlPO STING COMPANY, NOTT SQUARE, CARMARTHEN. BILLPOSTINGand ADVERTISINGS all its Branches, throughout the Counties of Carir j then, Pembroke, and Cardigan R. M JAMES, Manager. 1 Carmarthen County Schools. THE GRAMMAR SCHOOL. HEADMASTER: E. S. ALLEN, M.A. (CANTAB). COUNTY GIRLS' SCHOOL HEADMISTRESS Miss B. A. HOLME, M.A., Late Open Scholar of Girton College, Cambridge. FEES:— £ 1 9s. per Term (inclusive). Reduction when there are more than one from the same family. The terms began for the Boys, Tuesday, April 25th for the Girls, Tuesday May 2nd. Boarders can be received at the Grammar School. 1/1 i WE CLAIM THAT 2/9 -T-.n 7 s DR. T"Z"E'S DROPSY, LIVER, AND WIND PILLS -J-0 f t CURE Constipation, Backache, I n di gestion, Heart W eak- ness, Headache, and Nervous Complaints. Mr. John Parkin, 8, Eden Crescent, West Auckland, writes, dated March 12th, 1912 I must say that they are all that you represent them to be, they are splendid, indeed I wish I bad known about them sooner. I shall make their worth known to all who suffer from Dropsy." Sole Maker- S. J, COLEY & CO. S HIGH ST, STROUD,GLOS. WEDDING CARDS. NEW SPECIMEN BOOK CONTAINING LATEST & EXQUISITE DESIGNS Sent to intending Patrons at any address on receipt of an intimation to that effect. PRICES TO SUIT ALL CLASSES. 'REPORTER OFFICE," 3 BLUE SI

Mr Lloyd George and Victory

Mr Lloyd George and Victory. In the House of Commons on Monday night, Mr Asquith said the present vote would bring the total of the Votes of Credit since the out- break of war to £ 2.832,000,000. It would cany us to the end of October. For the 30 days from April 1st to May 20 the expenditure for Navy. Army, and muni- tions tl49,000,000, loans to Allies and the Dominions L74,500,000, food supplies, railways and miscellaneous items £ 17,500,000, making a total of £ 241.000,000. From 20th May to 22nd July. 63 days, the expenditure was for Navy. Army, and munitions L230,000,000, Joans to Allies and Dominions 82! millions, food supplies, railways, and miscellaneous items 5t millions, a total of 318 millions, Therefore, the total expenditure from 1st April to 22nd July. 113 days, was 559 millions. The daily average expenditure for the first period was £ 4.820,000. and for the second period approximately £ 5,050.000. The figures for loans to the Allies and the Dominions from May to July were swollen by and advance of 11 millions to Australia to finance wheat purchases. Mr Churchill complained the Premier had not dealt with the progress of the war. but felt thankful he had corrected "the unfortunate impression created by the loose and slipshod statement of the Chancellor ot the Exchequer regarding daily expenditure, which was calcu- lated to create depression and anxiety. It now appeared the irrecoverable expenditure was only £ 3.600.000 a day. Mr McKenna Out of the vote of credit. Mr Churchill That is what the Prime Minister said. Mr McKenna It is only your loose and slip- shod way of stating it (laughter). Proceeding. Mr Churchill rejoiced that they had a Secretary of State for War in the House of Commons. He criticised the Premier for delay in filling up the vacancy caused by the death ot Lord Kitchener. It was impossible for the Prime Minister to do the work in the odd hours he could snatch from adjusting the recurring crises of the Coalition Government. Mr Churchill repeated his sensational speech deiiveredsome months ago. inquiring whether progress had been made with the reforms he then suggested. He attacked the India Office for general apathy and obstruction. He alleged the Germans lost fewer men than we did in the trench warfare because of their superior trenches and dugouts. and urged a.s a precaution, in case the present offensive did not drive the enemy back to the Rhine, that the contingencies of another winter's trench warfare should be bourne in mind. Regarding labour behind the lines we should not shrink from employment of Chinese. He hoped the War Secretary would pursue experiments with body shields. In the supply ot heavy guns the right hon. gentleman had rendered great service to the country, and when the whole story was made known the nation would ICJHOAV how-mwh they owed to his persistency. foresight, and courage in the face of most extraordinary opposition from the most unexpected quarters. We had a great supply of heavy guns, actual and prospective, but we could not have too many. Mr Lloyd George said he was grateful for the suggestions and instructive speech of the right lion, gentleman. His suggestions would require careful and some of them prolonged consideration. Some of them occupied his attention before he became War Secretary. and they were being considered. It would be highly inadvisable for him to announce what decisions lie had come to. When he said that the more important suggestions were receiving consideration he was not using the words in the officiral sense. He should be surprised if it did not lead to action. Improvements in the trenches and improvements in transport had been interesting them for some time. and there had already been considerable improvement. A good deal more could still be done in these respects. Our steel helmet was undoubtedly the best on the battlefield, and it had saved thousands of lives. He agreed that the use of shields for the body should be developed. They had been tried by most of the armies, but not to any considerable extent. He believed we should have to revert to the old methods of warfare, when protection for the body was considered not in the least to detract from a soldier's valour (hear. hear). Regarding honour he said 8.000 more mili- tary medals had been approved, but were not yet notified. With regard to the proportion of rifle strength to ration strength, the whole question of the use of the man power of the nation had got to be passed under very searching review. It was being done at the present moment, and important decisions Avouldhave to be taken in a short time. i He said Mr Wedgwood had given him the benefit of very strong views as to the possi- bility of using man-power from other parts of the Empire. There was no doubt that our resources were infinitely greater than they ap- peared to be on any papers that had been issued, and it was just as well the enemy should know that. The best way to utilirse those resources required careful consideration. As to the possibility of their being utilised be had never had the slightest doubt, and action would be taken with a view to enabling them to utilise all these great extra resource, which were at the disposal of the Empire. The French had utilised such resources, and there was no reason why Ave should not follow their example. He agreed as to the importance of increasing our heavy gun power. He had alway" Jaken a very strong view about that. and should not forget the conference held at Boulogne about a year ago between British and French arti!- leryists. A French officer with an Irish name made a great impression upon him. and the great programme we started on was due large- ly to the advice given by that distinguished French officer. This country owed him n debt of gratitude. The recent fighting at Verdun and on our front had proved that heavy guns saved the lives of British soldiers when they were attacking. It was true that the number of guns had increased enormously. We were turning out in a single month considerably more heavy guns than the Avhole British Army possessed at the beginning of the Avar. The greatest credit was due to manufacturers and workmen for the way in which they had ap- plied their skiill and energy and given their time and strength for the purpose of equipping I _I)i n g the Army. All the same. they wanted more. and considerably more. heavy guns and heavy shells-, machinery to save lile as Aveli as pre- paring the way for victory. That was why he was delighted to find the readiness with which employers and workmen were prepared to give up their holiday which they were badly in need of until the equipment was complete and over- whelming (cheers). Mr Lloyd George concluded by saying the prospects were good (cheers). Our Generals were more than satisfied with the progress they were making (cheers). But brave men did no boast before the deed was done (heas, hear). They were more than satisfied. They were proud of the valour of the men (cheers). There was nothing in history to com- pare with it. Great as British mfantry were in the days of Wellington and Napoleon they never had been greater than to-day (cheers). One thrilled with pride when one thought tkat one, belonged to the same race as tbeøe men (cheers). They were making headway against enormous difficulties, they were pressing back a very formidable foe which had made a acienoe of war for two generations. Whatever hap- pened in this battle or that he felt confident that victory was assured to us (cheers). the quality our men were showing, the leadership that was being displayed, the improvement in the equipment, and the fact that our men, after a few month's training, had shown that they could use the equipment, were the grounds of his confidence. There never was an army with better material and of higher intelligence (cheers). The late battles had demonstrated that British resourcefulness and British intelligence which in the field of commerce had snatched victory out of apparent disaster, was going to snatch victory again in a few months from what appeared to be something that was in- vincible. There was no doubt at all that the lesson of these battles was that we had simply got to press on with all our resources and with the material at our command, and victory would be ours. At 8.15 the debate was interrupted by Mr Redmond's motion.

Reduce Your Meat Bill

Reduce Your Meat Bill. Puddings made with ATORA Shredded Beef Suet are sustaining and digestible—lib cartons lljd. and jib cartons tkl. with recipes—goes much further than raw Suet. Ask your grocer for it.

Military and Merthyr Pastor

Military and Merthyr Pastor. At the County Appeal Tribunal, held at Merthyr on Saturday, Mr W. R. Davie6, Pontypridd, presiding, Major F. 1. James, the military representative, appealed against the decision of the Local Tribunal, who had decided to refer a number of conscientious objectors to the Pelham Committee. A well-known local commercial traveller was appealed against on the ground that he joined, the V.T.C. and drilled at the Drill Hall, Mer- thyr. and that his conscience plea was not bona fide. Applicant, a member of the Hope Calvinistao Methodist Church, said he was swept off his feet at the outbreak of Avar and "momentarily deserted my convictions." He did not want his conscientious objection to be of financial advantage. The Rev J. Morgan Jones, pastor of Hope Church, said the applicant was thoroughly conscientious in the matter. He was against the war himself. Lieut. Buchanan (military representative): Do you look upon this man as a convert of yours i'—No, not exactly (laughter). Applicant, who was now given non-comba- tant (service, said he could not accept, and a.sjied leave to appeal. In the case of a public official who was lip- pealed aganst by Major James, the Rev J. Morgan Jones was again called on to support the conscientious objector. Lieut. Buchanan: Has there been a differ- ence of opinion in your cong-rega-tion on the a question of the war ? Rev J. Morgan Jones: Decidedly. The great majority of the members of the church take a view quite opposite to mine. Your views are entirely anti-war F-Yes, and entirely pacific. Major James: And Pro-German 9 The Rev J. Morgan Jones: I deny the pro- German business emphatically. Major James: And I insist upon it. The Rev J. Morgan Jones: It is untrue. Major James: Absolutely true. Councillor D. W. Jones (a member of the Tribunal): Is it your view that we should -Ae(,, accept any terms of peace ? The Rev J. Morgan Jones: 1 think that is quite irrelevant. The appeal Avas allowed. A member of the Cliriistadelphian Churcli WMs granted non-combatant service on con- dition that he took up work of national import a nee.

Once Badged Always Badged

Once Badged, Always Badged. A case 01 some importance to badged men came on Saturday before the Somerset Appeal Iribunal. It was that of a, shoeing smith, who was badged while working on Government horse shoes, but had ceased to be so employed. Captain Ala Aver, the military representative, said there was no court lie knew of which could deprive a man of his badge, once-he had it. Tlwre were thousands of men in the country who ought not to be badged, but he knew of no means of coming them out. The badge was the seal of office, butthe office some- times departed. The Tribunal gave the smith, who is now { Avorking for a farmer, till September 16th. on | the appeal of hu, employer.

j BRI11 yH HELP FOR FRENCH HARVEST

BRI11 yH HELP FOR FRENCH HARVEST. Harvest operation in France, and particu- i larly in the neighbourhood of the war eone, have been seriously threatened by a compara- tive scarcity of stocks of binder twine. British farmers have therefore come to the help of the peasant farmers of our Ally and, through the medium of the Agricultural Relief of Allies » Committee, have just consigned a large quan- ) tity of this material to the Marne and the Mouse to enable them to secure their food crops during the next few weeks. Last a ear the Committee distributed among j the struggling farmers in these departments a, iiumber of binding machines. These proved of I the gicatest Aalue and are being put into use I again at the present moment. It will be seen that in giving much-needed help to a brave and industrious farming people consisting en- ( tirely of Avomen, and men over military age, the Committee is taking a. not unimportant j part in the maintenance of the food supplies of J the Allies.