Teitl Casgliad: Carmarthen weekly reporter

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 4 o 4
Full Screen
19 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
THE PASSING WEEK

THE PASSING WEEK "Lot there be tfehtles; there are gra, If old things, thi-re are new; Ten thousand broken lights and shapes Yet glimpaes of the true."—T*NNYSCN. It is now quite c'ear that the so-called "Unionist Party" is the greatest obstacle to the unity of the Empire. This is a strong state- ment; but the events of the last few weeks prove it to be an undeniable fact. There is no more ludicrous misnomer in the English lan- [7 n. guage than the word" F nionist" as applied to modern politics. The chief aim of the Union- ist Party is to perpetuate hatred between Gt. Britain and Ireland, and to keep the two sec- tions of Irishmen grappling for eacli other's throa ts. *-1: Even Sir Edward Carson is disgusted with the Junkers of the Unionist Party. Sir Edward CSarson has in h;s day taken up a very violent attitude. In his way Sir Edward Carson has been as much of a rebel as any of the Sihn Fein leaders who were executed after a trial by court martial. But whatever error Sir Edwad Carson made he was acbing in the inte- rests of a certain section of the Irish people. He was voicing the opinion of a certain section of people in the North West oflreland. As an Irish leader he had a distinct locus standi in Irish affa;rs-however unreasonable he might be in his attitude towards other sections of his countrymen. One of the effects of the rebellion was that Sir Edward Carson and Mr John Redmond were induced by the intervention of Mr Lloyd George to agree upon a plan of settlement. A scheme of Home Rule was already drawwn up to which Sir Edward Carson and the Irish party he represents were quite agreeabie. Mr Re,dmond had several conferences with his followers and induced them to accept the scheme of Home Rule was already drawn up ists of Ireland agreed upon a scheme one would expect that there would be no opposition to it. But there was! So long as Sir Edward Carson and the Irish Orangemen served the ends of the English Tory Party, they were ali right in their way: The so-called "Unionist" leaders in .London cared no more for the Protestants of Ulster than they cared about the Eskimo of Baffin's Bay. There were certain party interests at Westminster in which the Irish Orangemen headed by Sir Edward Carson were very handy tools. Once however Sir Edward began to think of what was good for his followers in Ireland and not what was best for certain English wirepullers, the Unionist party had no further use fo,r him. **» There are certain big vested interests which depend upon "keeping the pot boiling" in Ireland. Politics is frankly a trade to a good many people, and there are many very pro- minent people in this country who view an Irish settlement with much the same feelings as butchers would "view the general adoption of vegetarianism. **# These people have always counted oil the hopelessness of any Irish settlement to enable them to keep their business going. When therefore they at length see both sections of Irishmen agreed on a Home Rule Measure they begin to get alarmed. Three years ago they said, "Redmond and lil4 friends can't have Home Rule, because Carson and his friends object to it. Carson and his friends are glorious fellows and we must back them up." Now they say "Both Carson and Red- mond are bad lots. When they agree it is all the more reason why an eye should be kept on them. The Irish are not going to have Home Rule, even if Irishmen of all parties agree to it. Irishmen have nothing to do with Irish affairs. Ireland must be ruled to suit England." 1 17, This is at any rate perfectly frank. We can imagine Von Bissing, the German Governor of Belgium, talking to a Belgian deputation in this strain. One of the chief objects of these English "patriots" is to make Great Britain look ridiculous in the eyes of Europe. We have proclaimed loudly that we are determined to allow the "small nations" to choose the gov- ernment under which they shall live. jThe Tory Junkers say "That iti all very fine as a senti- ment to hurl atGernvany; but don't ask us to put it into practice at home." -Now that the issue has been cleared it is possible that some very startling results will follow. The Irish Orangemen have been used as tools long enough to serve the ends of the English Primrose League. Perhaps they will realise it before long. If Sir Edward Carson and Mr John Redmond join hands they would be able to form an "All Ireland" Nationalist Party. We may yet live to see Dublin and Belfast demanding Home Rule with one voice 'and agreeing to work together for their coun- try, nd not to serve the ends of any English Party. Canadians and South Africans have their differences and they have different poli- tical parties in their own Parliaments; but they have nothing to do with English parties. We have been so used to German atrocities that each fresh outrage now makes little differ ence. We have come to expect no more from the Germans than we should from any other pack of savages on the war-path. But the murder of Capt. Fryatt. of the S.f;. Brussells, is so cold-blooded an assassination that even those who are saturated with German horrors will admit that it is something fresh. **# Capt. Fryatt sailed his ship regularly be- tween Harwich and Rotterdam. The Germans laid mines but Capt. Fryatt sailed between the mines and laughed at them. The Germans set submarines to sink the Brussels: but the master of the Brussels hunted the suvmarines ,and the U boats had to fly for their lives. He nearly rammed the German boat U 33 when It attacked him on the 28th March. The famous U 33 which had to "skedaddle" from the attack of a passenger steamer was the laugh- ing stoc kof the Americans. ««9 The Germans sent out a fleet of torpedo boats and they at length captured the Brussels. Capt. Fryatt was tried by court- martial for a breach of the laws of war in that not being a combatant lie tried to sink an enemy ship—namely submarine U33. He was sentenced to death, and ho was shot on Fri- > day last! This is a typical specimen of the German attitude towards the Laws of War. The Germans violate every law of war. They assumed the right to murder non-combatants. For instance in the case of the Lusitania they deliberately murdered over a thousand passen- gers—men. women and children. It is per- fectly legitimate for a German to murder non- combatants but it is not legitimate for non- combatants to defend themselves. If a Ger- man submarine can sink a passenger steamer well and good; the crew and passengers are drowned. If they attempt to escape then they will be murdeed for breaking the rules. The Germans themselves laugh at the rules but they execute Britons for any technical iu- fraction of the rules. In any event Britons .r-

THE PASSING WEEK

seem certain to be murdered whenever a Ger- man gets the chance, so it is as well for Britons to get in the first blow. And yet there are people who "conscientiously object" to killing Germans. One might as well conscientiously object to killing a cholera microbe or a tuber- culosis germ. The extermination of German- ism is as much in the interests of humanity as the extermination of cholera or typhoid or any other loathsome plague. The Defence of Realm Act is a most useful and a very proper measure. But it would be well if those who are concerned with its ad- ministration had a little imagination and a little sense of humour so as not to make British justice provide scope for American satire. There is an Irish member who is known as Mr Laurence Ginneli, but whose name in Irish is Lebrach Macfingall. Ther eis no doubt at all of the latter fact; Irish Post Office clerks were called who proved that lie received letters ad- dressed to him in that name. This gentleman went to see some of the Sinn Fein prisoners, and he signed his name in the book as Lebrach Masfingall. He was charged with "giving a false name," and lie has been convicted, and fined £100 with the alternative of a month's imprisonment! The Court which is responsible for this sent- ence would seem to agree with a certain char- acter in Borrow's "Lavengro," who said "Irish is -only spoken in Ireland and not even by re, spectable people there." • •• This decision opens up tremendous possi bilities. There is a highly respected Calvin- istic Methodist minister in Cardiff who is known to a limirted circle as the Rev Evan Rees. It is only his more immediate friends who know him by that name. He is known all over Wales and to Welshmen the world over as "Dyfed." If he signed himself "Dyfed, there is evidently a possibility that he might under certain circumstances be charged under the Defence of the Realm Act with "giving a faise name." At least if the authorities took up the same attitude towards Welsh that they do towards the Irish language this is what would happen. Defence of the Realm is a most essential proceeding. At the present time the Realm requires most of all to be de- fended against proceedings which make British justice look rather ridiculous. The Court which convicted Mr Ginneli did the Empire far more damage than did that gentleman when, he signed himself "Lebrach Macfingall." There are times when the British Empire wants saving from its friends. The Empire is strong enough to defend itself against its enemies; but its friends are the danger.

Advertising

The Welshman's Favourite. 0 | MABON Sauce | J As good as its Name. 5 DON'T FAIL TO GET IT. 4 J Manufacturers—BLANCH'S, St. Ptter St., Cardiff. 5 L\\vvvvvvvxxxvvxxxxvvvxvvxv\vi»vv«vv!

Advertising

YOU CAN RELY ON Clarke's B41 Pills as a i Safe and Sure Remedy in either Sex, for all Acquired or Constitutional Discharges from Urinary Organs, Gravel, Pains in the Back and kindred complaints. Over 50 years Success. Of all Chemists, 4s 6d per box, or sent direct, post free, for Sixty Penny Stamps by the CLARKE'S 841 TILLS Proprietors—1 he Lincoln and e Midland Drug Co, Ltd.Linaoln. (Free from Mercury

Carmarthen Guardians and Cottage Home Family

Carmarthen Guardians and Cottage Home Family. CHILDREN REFUSED TO MOTHER AND GIVEN TO FATHER. At the meeting of Carmarthen Guardians on Saturday (Mr LI. Morgan presiding), j The Clerk (Mr John Saer) said that Eliza- beth Edwards on her release from prison had called at the Cottage Home and asked for her children. She was refused in accordance with the resolution passed by the Guardians. Next day the father called. He had not been con- victed of any offence against the children, and the children were handed over to him. The father had been discharged from the Army and is now employed in a munition factory. Rev A. F. Mills said that they ought to be very careful about letting children go out. He remembered some ladies interesting themselves in a girl and getting her a situation where she would be away from the influence of her mother The mother came after her and induced her to come away. As the girl was over 1(5 it was impossible to do anything to prevent this. The girl is now with her mother in a house in Car- marthen which is under the observation of the police.

EXECUTOR AND SOLICITOR

EXECUTOR AND SOLICITOR. The Clerk reported that he had written to a person near Carway who was executor of a will. A widow and children chargeabie to the Guardians were said to be beneficiaries under the will. The executor wrote stating that he had placed the whole matter in the hands of Mr Claude Davies, solicitor, Llandilo, and had repeatedly written to that gentleman but could get no answer. Mr Stephens: Where is Mr Claude Davies? Mr Gilbert: Nobody knows. The matter was left in the hands of the Clerk.

MASTERS REPORT

MASTER'S REPORT. The Master in his report stated that Divine Service was conducted in the House on Sunday 2nd July by the Rev D. Morgan Davies. Swan- sea, on behalf of Lammas st. Congregational Church; on July 9th. by the Rev Morris B. Owen, Pemiel Baptist Church on July 16th by the Rev D. J. Thomas, English Congrega- tional Church; and on Sunday July 23rd. by the Rev Joseph Jenkins. Welsh Wesleyan Church. The number of inmates was 52 as compared with 53 for the corresponding period last year; the number fo casuals was 32 for the four weeks as against 74. Periodicals were given the inmates by Miss White, and rhubarb by Mrs Morris, Brynmyrddin. The Rev A. F. Mills visited the House on the 22nd July, and saw ail the inmates, especially those in the sick wards, and found everything satisfactory.

HELP FOR THE INFIRMARY

HELP FOR THE INFIRMARY. A letter was read from the Secretary of the Carmarthenshire Infirmary asking for a special donation on account of the debt on the insti- tution. It was decided to vote a special donation of £ 10 in. addition to the ordinary subscription of £ 20.

THE LATE MR JOHN LEWIS

THE LATE MR JOHN LEWIS. The Chairman proposed a vote of condolence with the family of the late Mr John Lewis, one of the Guardians for the parish of Llan- gendeirne.

A HEALTH VISITOR

A HEALTH VISITOR. A letter was read from the Carmarthen Dis- trict Nursing Association stating that they had dispensed with the services of their maternity nurse, and they frould therefore be unable to continue the arrangements into which they had entered with the Guardians. The Rev A. F. Mills said that there was a movement to have a maternity nurse employed by the Town Council. The Notification of Births Committee had met on Friday, and their scheme*was ready. The only thing was that they must not call her a. nurse, but a "health visitor," The matter was adjourned.

DYFNALLTS THANKS FOR BOOKS

DYFNALLT'S THANKS FOR BOOKS. To the Editor Carmarthen Weekly Reporter. ■Sir,—Permit me t) express my sincerest thanks to the Carmarthen friends for the con- signment ofbooks which has just come to hand. Before the day is out. they will be marked, put on the shelves, and given out to the soldiers, and many a lad will sit at the other end of the hut devouring their contents. If any friends have music books which they can spare, they would be very much appreciated out here. We have scores of good soloists, instrumentalists, etc., but music books are scarce. This is the hour of serving the intelli- gence of our young heroes. Yours, etc., J. DYFNALLT ONVEIN. i

CARMARTHEN j n n is a i i v li a i t i t J

CARMARTHEN j n n is a i* i ■ v < l;i, a i t i _t J .) !J r\ J 'J SEARCHLIGHT. Come, come, and :t soti down yju shall uo* budge, to- shall not go, till I act you np a glass Where yon may see the inmost part of yon. SOAKKSritABS. Farmors who are getting Is 7d a. ib for butter and 10s a cwt. for potatoes in the month of August and who have obtained absolute exemp- tion for their sons are enthusiastic supporters of Friday's resolution to carry on the war. In fact many of them would like to propose that the war ought never to be allowed to stop, but should go on "for even- and ever." Amongst all the flag days for horses and everybody else nobody has yet adopted my sug- gestion to have a flag day for donkeys. What has poor Neddy done to merit this neglect? The Carmarthen Town Council is going to appoint a nurse. For a legal reason, it has been decided that she must not be called a "nurse," but a "health visitor." This is quite worthy of the elaborate distinction made by the celebrated Gladstone who said once that we were not at war with the Zulus but were "conducting military operations in Zululand." • It is commonly supposed that no intoxicating liquor is sold in Wales on Sundays, even to "bona-fide" travellers. Nevertheless it would be charitable to suppose that some of the bean- feasters whom one passes on the roads on Sun- days are merely drunk. If many of them a,re not drunk one Is driven reluctantly to the con- clusion that the lack of adequate asylum accom modation has resulted in some hundreds of lunatics being allowed to roam at large. The popular theory is that the former inmates of the asylums have been discharged in order to enable the buildings to be used as Red Cross hospitals. This theory I have ascertained is untrue; but there is quite enough evidence on the roads every Sunday to excuse its general acceptance. **# The Borough Education Committee wants the teachers to be very economical in the use of paper. What is the matter with slates? The war has curtained the supply of paper but Welsh and Irish states are still procurable! **« I remember quite well when school slates were abolished. It was long after I loft school, and it was at a time when I began to take an "outside" interest in education. 1 remember quite well the chief argument against slates. We were told that the Ger- mans never used slates; we were told that even in the infant schools of Germany the work was all done on paper. In those days you were expected to bow your head when the name of Germany was mentioned! »•» There is no doubt about it; German propa- ganda was very insidious in educational circles twenty years ago. I remember when the Welsh Intermediate Act came into force about 1893 to 1895, you could not attend any of the early meetings of the "County Governing Body" (now extinct) without hearing Germany quoted ad nauseam. In those days people interested in education did not think; they merely copied Germany. *»» I think a good deal of the "conscientious objections" which one trips up against is due to this insidious propaganda. I am very much afraid that in some cases it is not so much a case of objecting to war in the abstract as ob- jecting to fight this celebrated Germany whom they have been taught to admire as the land of culture—education, nmsic, theology, and everything else. I can understand a man really objecting to war in any shape or form; and a man who takes up that attitude on reli- gious grounds deserve some consideration. The difficulty is that a "conscientious objection" is used as a cover for pro-Germans and for slackers so that the few genuine cases are lost sight of. **» During the hearing of a case at the Borough Court on Monday the question of the nature of the liquid in a glass was a matter of cross- examination. A member of the "force" said that it was beer. He was prepared to swear it was beer, and the solicitor who was defending asked the officer if he were an "authority." The sergeant disclaimed any right to pose as an expert; but modestly claimed that he knew the difference between beer and other bever- ages. This is all very good as a humorous interlude; but ought not the Borough to have an expert? There was a time when Carmarthen Borough had two "ale-tasters." If you don't believe nip, ask the Carmarthenshire Antiquarian Society; they know all about it. The ale- taster was a recognised official; he is men- tioned in the charters. It was the duty of the Mayor to hold an "Assize of Malt" in order to ascertain that the malsters were supplying the public with the general stuff. The Mayor of course would be to a great extent guided by the expert advice of the ale-taster in this matter. The ale-taster would be recognised as an expert. # Under these circumstances, the people who drank beer were properly protected. It must have been an inspiring sight to have seen the ale-taster going on his rounds. It is to be presumed that the inn-keepers always gave him a drop of their best in order to secure a favourable report. There must have been a tremendous amount of wire-pulling when there was a vacancy in the office. Owing. to the high price of "feed," the question is now being asked whether it pays to keep fowls. It certainly pays some people. Certain householders feed hens, and find that somebody "pinches" the eggs. The keeping of fowls pays this somebody else. It is scarcely realised that the sale of beer containing less than 2 per cent. of alcohol is legal during the "prohibited" hours. In some parts of the Kingdom this stuff is called "Beero," and there is a roaring trade done in it. This is a point wlrich might be taken for the defence in a prosecution under the Restric- tion Order. There are certainly beers sold which give the impression that they might be supplied at any time without breaking the law. The Towy at Carmarthen was the colour of blood on Friday. Similar phenomena have occurred before; but never within living memory did the river run so red as on Friday. The explanation is very simple. Some of the brooks in the upper part of the county—the Sawdde in particular—run through red soil. When there is a flood in the red earth district and a drought elsewhere, the river is full of water the colour of blood. A thunderstorm on the hills above Liang ad ocik is the very simple explanation of the phenomenon. ALETHEIA.

MANORD1LO

MANORD1LO. DEATH.-Afte,t- a long illness, Mrs Bowen, wife of the Rev W. Bowen, Cong, minister, Maesteg, eldest daughter of Mr and Mrs Per- kins, Closglas, died at her residence on July 24th. The funeral took place last Friday at Hermon Cemetery, and many relatives and friends from Maesteg and Manordilo were pre- sent to pay the last tributes to the deceased. Several beautiful floral wreaths were sent by members of deceased's family and friends. Much sympathy is felt for the husband, the children and relatives. EXCHANGE OF PULPITs.The Rev J. Harry, J.P., pastor oflSalom Cong. Church, Llan- dovery, occupied the pulpit of Hermon Church on Sunday last in the place of the Rev D. Bowen. who was at Salem, Llandovery. Power- ful sermons were delivered by the rev. gentle- man, which were greatly appreciated by the congregation. SUCCESS.—We are pleased to chronicle the sccess of Miss Bronwen Griffiths, Glanrhyd Station House, who has passed the College of Rreeetors examination. We wish her success in her future career. MEMORIAL SERVICE.—News came to Mr and Mrs Wm. Lewis, Rhiwbach Cottage, that their eldest son, Tommy, who was with the Royal Warwicks, somewhere in France, had died of wounds received in the "big push." Tommy, who was 27 years of age, and therefore in the prime of life, was loved by all who came in con- tact withhim. He was always pleasant and ready to give a helping hand to any good cause. A memorial service was held at the Church last Sunday afternoon, the Rev E. Thompson Jenkins, B.A., vicar, officiating, The sacred edifice was full. This must have been gratifying to the parents to see that Tommy had so many friends. Great sympathy is felt forthe bereaved parents and his brother and sisters.

Carmarthen Soldiers Death in India

Carmarthen Soldier's Death in > India. J Mr George Jones, 10 Parade-road, has received intimation from the War Office, that his son, LCE.-CORPORAL JOHN ERNEST JONES, of the Welsh Regiment, had died from fever in India on the 2nd July, 1916. The deceased who was 24 years of ae, had formerly served in the local Territorials (Engineers). He was a native of Carmarthen, and had served his apprenticeship at the "Reporter" Office. General sympathy is felt with the bereaved The mother of deceased died quite recently, It now transpires that the son was dead before the mother, but the information of his death had not come to hand. -li"

Farmers and Their Fast I Watches

Farmers and Their Fast" Watches. NOVEL DEFENCE IN LICENSING CASE. The weekly Borough Police Court was held at the Carmarthen Guildhall on Monday. The magistrates present were: The Mayor (Mr J. Lewis), Mr T. Davies. Mr Rees Davies, Mr J. B. Arthur, Mr James Davies, and Mr T. Bland Davies. William Thomas, of the Three Salmon Inn, Water street, Carmarthen, was charged with two offences under the Liquor Restriction Order. Two summonses had been taken out in respect of the same 'facts. Mr Wallis-Jones appeared on behalf of the licensee. He pleaded "Guilty" to the offence under one summons and "Not guilty" to the other The Head Constable accepted this, and with- drew the other summons. P.S. Lodwick said that at 11.30 a.m. on Saturday the 22nd inst he visited the Three Salmon Inn. He was accompanied by P.C. Llewelyn and they were in plain clothes. He saw a girl taking a tray on which were two glasses of beer, a bottle of soda, and a glass of whiskey into a room at the back of the house. They followed her. When they got to the kitchen they found it bolted from the inside. Witness continued In the kitchen we found three men sitting at the table. T. Lewis had a whiskey and soda in front of him and the other two had a glass of beer each. The girl, Maggie Morgan, had left the room. I saw her in the passage. I asked her "How can you account for serving these men at this time." She said, "I have not been here long; and I did not know there was any harm in it." Mrs Thomas, the landlady, came from upstairs. I told her "There are three men in the kitchen with beer and wriskey in front of them. How can you account for serving them?" She said "WelL I know nothing about it; I was up- stairs at the time, and the girl has not been here long; she does not know the way to serve." The landlord was out of the house. I did not see liim. Cross-examined: The landlord was at the market; and I believe the landlady was un- able to leave her room. Mr Wallis Jones said that the girl was a relative of Mrs Thomas and had come down to help Mrs Thomas when she was unable to be about. The girl knew nothing of the business. The offence had been committed without the knowledge of the landlord and although he was legally liable he was not morally respon- sible for the offence. Thomas Thomas, Thomas Lewis, and Thomas Thomas, three local farmers, were charged with consuming liquor on on the premises. Mr T. Howell Davies appeared for the defence. P.C. Llewellyn said that the first deter-d-int had the whiskey in front of him and the other two had glasses of beer. Lewis said "We felt it very warm -after coming to the market." The kitchen door was bolted. P.S. Lodwick gave corroborative evidence. He tasted the liquid. It was beer. Mr Howell Davies: Are you an authority? Witness: Well, I knew it was beer. P.S. Lodwick said that he could not say what was in theother glass. In answer to the Head Constable, the witness said that he tasted the two beers. The Head Constable: Are you satisfied the other glass held whiskey r Mr Howell Davies objected to this question. The Head Constable: Do you generally find people drinking behind closed doors? P.S. Lodwick said that ho did not. Mi- Howell Davies said that the prosecution I ion had to prove their case to the hilt, and it was not proved that the third glass contained- wlyskey. The Head Constable: Do you put that as a point of law ? Mr Howell Davies I am not addressing you. I ani addressing the Bench. The Head Constable I am entitled to ask if Mr Davies is putting this as a point of law. We are required to prove the case beyond a reasonable doubt. Mr Howell Davies: I will not answer any question you ask. You sit down. You have finished your case. Mr Thomas Thomas, who was one of the defendants, said that he saw a bottle of soda- in front of Mr Lewis. It was after 12 when he entered the house. It was a fine day, and he was in a hurry home to the hay. He had a glass of beer himself. The Head Constable asked if it were not a common practice for the farmers to keep their watches fast. Witness said that they were a little bit fast. They always went by their watches. The Head Constable: You were in a great hurry to get home after the police had been there. Witness said that he wanted to get back to the hay. The Mayor asked defendant what time it was by his watch. Witness produced his watch which showed 12.30. It was only 12.15 by the clock in the. Council Chamber. The Bench fined the licensee £ 5 and the other three defendants R2 each.

Loss of Appetite

Loss of Appetite. Loss of appetite is usually traceable to some form of stomach or liver trouble, and may be taken as a sign that the digestive system is in need of a stimulating tonic. When you can't eat. or when food is distasteful, just try the effect of taking Mother Seigel's Syrup after your meals every day. This splendid herbal remedy tones up and strengthens the digestive organs, sharpens the appetite, and regulates the whole system. Then you not only eat your food with a relish, but, more important still. the food you eat nourishes your body, increases your strength and vitality, and makes you took well, feel well, and keep well.

Carmarthenshire Appeal Tribunal

Carmarthenshire Appeal Tribunal The Carmarthenshire intermediate Appeal Tribunal sat at the Carmarthen Guildhall on Thursday the 20th inst. Mr W. Griffi is. if Llanelly, presided. There were also I i-cht iit Mr John Lioyd, Mr Joseph Roberts, Mr Lav id Evans, Mr W. W. Brodie, and Mr H. E. mag- don-Richards. Capt. Gixjnilyn represented the Military Authorities, and Mr Dl. John, B.Sig. represen- the Board of Agriculture. THE TALLEY BLACKSMITH. The case ot the Talley blacksmith again came before the Tribunal. Mr D. E. Jones, black- smith, of Picton Forge, Talley, Llandilo, ap- peared for exemption on the ground that he was engaged in war work. Correspondence showed that he was working for a firm at Bristol and was supplying them with shoes for mules and horses in order to enable them to carry out an Army contract. It was decided that the appeal should be allowed if the necessary certificate from the Ministry of Munitions is produced by the 9th of August; otherwise the appeal is dismissed- KIDWELLY OASES. Capt. Margrave, Recruiting Officer, appealed. against the exemption granted to Mr E. 31. Edwards. Sea View, New street, Kidwelly. The appeal was allowed. Mr D. Evans, Darwel, Pontyates, carpenter, apealled for exemption on his own behalf. The appeal was allowed. CARMARTHEN BOROUGH APPEALS. The Myrddin Hosiery Co., Queen street. Carmarthen appealed for an exemption for their employee, John Evans. An exemption, subject to certain conditions as to War Office contracts was granted until November 30th. Mr J. T. Jones, ironmonger, etc., Bridge st., Carmarthen appealed for an exemption for Lewis James. Exemption until February 1st was granted. iMr D. O. Jones obtained exemption until 1st January in respect of Evan Williams. Mr D. Davies, 78, St. Catherine street, a student for the medical profession appealed for an extension to enable him to pass a certain examination. The appeal was dismissed. hCONWlL CATTLE DEALER AND FARMER Mr Wallis-Jones appeared on behalf of Mr T. O. Davies, Pantyricket, Conwil Eivet, who appealed for exemption for an employees named David Jones. Appellant carried on business as a cattle dealer and farmer. The Local Tribunal gave as a reason for re- fusing exemption that if the appellant gave up cattlle dealing and devoted his time to the farm or employed femal labour he would be able to release this man. Capt. Cremlyn Are you willing for this man to go at the end of November. Appellant: Yes. Capt. Cremlyn: I will agree if it is quite understood that this is final. Appellant said that he would agree. Capt. Cremlyn: Will lie agree too that he wll not engage another mon of military age. Appellant gave the undertaking required, and exemption until the 30th November was granted. AUCTIONElER'S CLERK. Lieut.-Col. Lloyd-Harries appealed against the exemption granted to Evan Evans, Gwer- nogle-bach, Nantgaredig, auctioneer's clerk. He suggested that the work could be done by a woman. Mr Benj. Evans, the employer, said that the work of going about the country to stock sales would be most unsuitable for a woman. Col. Harries stated that Mr Benj Evans had stated outsde the court whilst the Tribunal were deiiberating his old clerk, who was over be compelled to re-engage his old clerk who is above military age. Mr B. Evans said that whilst the tribunal weredeliberating his old clerk, who was over 70 years of age and had left years ago, came up to him and remarked jocularly "If you fail on this appeal, you'll have to fall back on your old clerk." He replied "I suppose I will." The whole converation was jocular. Exemption to January 1st was granted. SPITE ALLEGED. Mr John Jones, of Dolcoed, Newcastle Emlyn appl led for an exemption in respect of his em- ployee, D. Davies. Mr T. Howell Davies, solicitor, Carmarthen appeared on behalf of the appellant. It was stated that exemption had first been granted, but that the local tribunal had re- viewed the case without any application from the employer or the Recruiting Officer. This it was contended was illegal. Appellant said that lie carried on a huge business as butter blender and also cured a large quantity of bacon. This man was abso- lutely indispensable to him. Capt. Oremlvn said that lie had received a letter from the Recruiting Officer supporting the appeal. The Recruiting Officer stated that the exemption had been reviewed on account of spite against the defendant by mem bers of the Tribunal. Appellant was granted absolute exemption for Dd. Davies. and temporary exemption until the 30th September for John Jones. READY TO SELL UP. Col. Llovd Harries applied against the ex- emption granted to David Hughes, Brynhafod Shop, Maesyorugiau. Appellant said that he H__l_ J"1 "1 omy wante.a a little time. tie was going to sell up if he only got 3d for the business. Exemption until September 30 was granted CARE OF WOODLANDS. Col. Harries appealed against the exemp- tion allowed to B. H. Jones, Tynygrug, Llan- Hwni. The respondent had to look after some plantation on which timber wa.s being grown. Mr B. John said that he was instructed by the Board to support all cases in which men were engaged in looking after woods, as the growth of timber was a matter of inatonal im- portance. Exemption until January 1st was granted PREDECESSOR DROWNED IN HAMP- SHIRE. Col. Harries appealed against the exemption granted to W. Bowen, Penta.lardd, Maesv- crugiau. The Rev E. B. Lloyd, who gave evidence, said that the man who had a wife and four children had to look after 40 acres of land and 600 fowls. He also attended to the plant for lighting S'r Courtenay Mansel's mansion. Sir Sir Couitemv is now i I. The man's predecessor joined the Navy at the outbreak of hostilities and was drowned in the Hampshire. Capt. Crem'yn suggested that a woman could look after the poultry. They might adjourn this case perhaps when Sir Courtenay re- covered he could look after the engine himself. Exemption until September 30 was granted.

Carmarthenshire Bankruptcy Court

Carmarthenshire Bankruptcy Court. The Carmarthenshire Bankruptcy Court was held at the Guildhall, Carmarthen, on Tuesday before Mr Registrar Stephens-Davies. Mr H. Watkins Thomas, Official Receiver, conducted the examination. CARMARTHEN PUBLICAN. Francis Joseph Bellamy, Falcon Inn, Lam- mas street, Carmarthen, had gross liabilities stated at C253 19s 3d. of which £ 241 10s 5d are expected to rank for dividend. The assets were estimated at £ 98.13s, leaving a deficiency of tl42 17s 5d. Debtor attributed his failure to "Illness of wife and family, paying off debts, shortened hours and no trade in consequence of customers having left for the war." In the year 19Co I understand you com- menced business as a farmer at Seabourne farm, near Fawley, near Ross. Before that what had you been doing ?-I had been helping my father. You had been at home on the farm?—Yes, and dealing and one thing and antoher. When yo?u started business at Seabourne Farm had you any money of your own?—I should not think I had. Didn't your lather give you any stock?—He gave me some, stock. How much do you think you had in the way of stock P-About £ 300 I should think. I can't say exactly. My brother had left Seabourne and gone to a bigger farm. About what was the size of it?—About 17U acres. And how much was the rental?— £ 185. How long did you stay there ?—I left in June, 1913. How did you come to give up the farm? Didn't it pay?—It was a very wet season. I had no money; I was trusted by corn mer- chants and depended on the crops to pay my debts. The merchants trusted me as they pro- bably trusted hundreds of others. I was sell- ing an odd sheep or two to pay the wages. Then this iket season came on and instead of £ 000 cr £ 700 worth of good corn I had only jE:200 or £300. You lost about £ 300 that way?—Yes, per- haps more. I had not much of a crop and that a bad sample. You came to the conclusion that it was no good, so you sold out ?-Ye, my brother took it over at a valuation. What was the amount of the valuation?— About £9ï4. You owed the bank about £150. Did you owe anybody else any money?—Yes; ;perhaps after paying the bank and all my other debts I had £ 150 to the good. When you gave up the farm you had about f;100 to the good?-Yes. I think so, as far as I can say, I never thought this would occur. What did you do afterwards ?—I went from there to Hereford in May, 1913. You commenced cattle dealing?—Yes. Did you make or lose money at the cattlo dealing?—I should think I am sure to have lost a bit. How much did you pay for the ingoing at the Falcon?— £ 148 1585d. You had a valuation when you took over the Falcon ?—Yes. Had you any knowledge of the businessy- No. Nor Mis Bellamy?—A little same years ago, but really nothing worth speaking of. At present you are a munition worker at Hereford?—That is so. Did you keep any books of accountP-Only the takings. That is accurate. There is a great difference in the weeks ?— The billeting of the soldiers made a difference. That is when I ought to have let it last February. The examination was closed. LLANELLY TOBACTTNTKNIFT FATL IRUW. "LA. Ivor J. Evans, 27, West End, Llanelly, a, tobacco dealer, had giros& liabilities E216 16s Id of which £210 6s 1dd were expected to rank for dividend. The assets amounted to L32 5s 2d, leaving a decfiiency of tl78 Os lid. The causes of failure alleged by debtor were were "Bad debts, insufficient profit to cover working expenses; goods spoiled by damp." Debtor, who is 22 years of age, stated that at the age of 14 he commened working at a local steel works and remained there until he was 18. His health broke down and for two years he did no work. In 1914 he, started business as a tobacconist without capital in a lock-up shop for which he paid 5s a week rent. Mr Kammerer, solicitor, Llanelly, appeared for the debtor. The examination was closed. THREE BROTHERS AND A BROTHER-IN- LAW BANKRUPT. David Hugh. 13, Stafford street, Llanelly, crane driver, Llewelyn Hugh, 4, Ann street, Llanelly, slieetmill weigher, and William Thos. Hugh, sheetmill weigher, partners in the firm of "Hugh Brothers and Brown," formerly carrying on business at Penrhos, New Dock, Llanelly, handlemakers, had joint liabilities amounting to L135 4s 10d and no assets. Debtors stated that in July, 1910, they, en- tered into partnership with their brother-in- law. Fred Brown. They acquired the unex- pired lease of the Stanley Foundry, Penrhos, Llanelly. They paid £ 74 and there were 53 years of the lease to run. They provided tl64 lis capital and Brown £99 5s. They expended t70 on machinery and acquired other machi- nery on hire to enable them to carry on busi- • ness. In December, 1910, they mortagaged the sawmill for £100, and in July, 1911 the mortgagee foreclosed and took posession of the premises. Abut the same time the Sheriff seized and realised their stock-in-trade. Fred Brown withdrew from the partnership in 1911 and the remaining partners took upon them- selves all the debts of the firm and indemnified Brown therefrom. Fied Brown, 8, Stafford street, Llanelly, electrician, formerly a member of the firm of Hugh Bothers and Brown had gross liabilities £1.51 16s 10d, of which tl35 were expected to rank for dividend. He had assets valued at £32 13s 4d, leaving a. deficiency of C1012. lis 6d. Mr Kammerer appeared for the debtor, and Mr W. Davies for certain creditors. The Registrar when asked to close the cases declined to do so. He left the matter open. He did not say that the debtors would be re- quired to attend again.

Advertising

Stitch in Time. There is an old saying "A stlitch hi time saved nine and if upon the first fnnptomff of anything being wrong with our health we were to resort to some simple but proper means of correcting tb6 mischief, rane-tenth* of the suffering that invades oar homes would be avoided. A doae of Gvilym EvanisP Quinine Bitters taken -wien 1 H feel the least bit out of sorts is jl-st thu-t "stitch in time." You can -et Gwi jE; '8118' QiUnine Bitters at any Gaemists or Stoies in bottles, 2s Pd and 4s 6d each, but ^member that this only guarantee of genuinfetsfRs is the name "Gwilym Evans" ou the la .,cl, stamp and bottlo, without which none [16 genuine. Sole Proprietors: Quinine Bitteis Manufacturing Company, Limited, Llanelly, South Wale CARMARTHEN—Printed and Published by the Proprietress, M. LAWRENCE, at her Offices, 3 Blue Street, FRIDAY, August 4th, 1916. I