Teitl Casgliad: Carmarthen weekly reporter

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 4 o 4
Full Screen
11 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
THE PASSING WEEK

THE PASSING WEEK "Let there be tnes; there are grapes, If old things, there are new Ten thousand broken lights and ehapea Yet glimpses of the true."—TENNYSON. It is inevitable that the secoad anniversary of the outbreak of war should [illd us taking stock of our position. '1 ho pessimists as usual will tell us of the great blunders which we have made, but it is much more satisfactory to con sider the blunders which the enemy made :1al the blunders which we escaped making. *s* Seeing that the Germans have been prepar- ing this war for forty years, it must be ád mtted by their most sincere and devoted admirers that they have made a pretty hash of it. The Germans have been brawling round Europe for the last two years and they havo not been able to give a "knock-out blow" o any of the combatants. Even the little Belgi-n Army is intact, and is now taking part in the war newly equipped with arm's and clothing made in France and England. The Germa have driven the Russians back twice, and the R.ussian tide is now advancing for the .hird time. Von Kluck got so near Paris that li e top of the Eiffei Tower could be seen by lus scouts, and his gigantic army which was tno very acme of organisation was rolled back to the Aisne. In the year 1870, the Prussians got to Paris in nine weeks, and the Army of 18/0 was not one quarter as well prepared as the Army of 1014. There was a very big screw loose somewhere! -oT "Yhat are all the blunders which the Allies have made compared to the blundering cf the Crown Prince and Von Kluck which lost Paris j in the fifth week of the present war and which has left the German Army tied up in a corner of France whilst the British Government set to work to build factories to make munitions to blow them out We have made many blun- ders, but think of the blunders which we might have made and did not make! We might very easily have let the German Army into Calais. A very slight error or a very slight misfortune in the field might just as well have let Calais share the fate of Ostend. If Calais were a German naval base, it is highiv possible than an invasion of England in force could h,ave been effected. *1 If the Germans had been able to invade 'Britain early in the war they would have been able to march through the Kingdom from one end to the other. During the first month of the war our Regular Army had all gone on to the Continent, and we had at home only some 200,000 Territorials. Some of these were well trained and some were not. It is doubtful if in the event of a German invasion taking piace in 1914 we should have had 100.000 efficiently trained men to meet them. Raw recruits were flocking to the Colours; '"Kitchener s Army" was beginning to form. But not only were the 'recruits raw; but the Government had no rifles for them. It does not matter telling the truth now but for months after Kitchener's 'Army was formed, there were whole regiments which had not a single rifle. It was considered that things were getting hopeful when forty or fifty rifles were allotted to a battalion so that the squads could have them in turns for prac- tising the "manual." Six months after the outbreak of war, recruits could oniy be prac- tised in the manual once a week because there was only one rifle to ten or twelve men, iild the squads had to wait their turn. Had not Lord French intercepted the i ush to Calais, a German invasion of England would have been quite feasible, and had the Germans ibeen able to land six Army Co: ps they would have been able to have stamped out ail re.-J st- ance in a fortnight. The Germans must feel pretty disgusted when they think of the fine chance they iost. Had they been able to land 200,000 men in September, 1914, they would have been able to smash up Great Britain beyond hope of recovery during the present war. There would have been no Derby Scheme, no Military Service Act, no munition works, ■no tribunals, no organisation of any kind, for the Mailed Fist would have had London in its grip and all that would have been left for our Government to do would be to accept the con- iquetor's terms. The state of unpreparedness in which the outbreak of war found us is the best possible answer to the German tale that England started this war because she was jealous of Germany and wished to crush her. So far from preparing for a war, it might be said that our different Governments never seem seriously to have considered the possibility of our Army taking part in a European war. The German Chancellor scoffed at the idea of England en- tering into the war because he considered that England could do nothing. The "British Army" was to the German mind rather a good jQke-just like the Army of Montenegro. The German politicians of 1914 decided that the British Army was too contemptible to be re- garded as a serious factor. The German poli- ticians of 1916 now say that this war has been a deep-laid scheme of the British Government to orush German expansion and to check its development. It is very hard to see how these two statements are to be reconciled even by a German intellect. There is one salient fact which is too often ignored in discussing the present state of affairs. It is this-the Germans do not occupy one single square inch of British territory. Germany occupies a large slice of Russia, and Russia holds a good slice of Austrian territory. Germany holds a considerable strip of France, and France holds 3. little strip of German terri- tory in Alsace. Great Britain has captured hundreds of thousands of square miles of Ger- man colonies in Africa and elsewhere. Ger- many has not captured as much British terri- tory as could be covered by a cucumber frame. This is a great and a very significant fact. This great and significant fact explains a. good deal. Germany has a certain amount of loverage which she can bring to bear on France or Russia. Germany can offer Wtrsaw to the Russians, and Lille to the French. What in- ducement can she offer to Great Britain to oome to terms? None! Germany has nothing to offer us. Germany can't bargain with Great Britain except as a beaten foe. This explains the murder of Captain Fryatt and the Zeppelin raids. The shallow-minded Germans think that they can frighten the British Government into making peace in order to make an end of this "frightfillness." The German as usual is a clever fellow but a-fool all the same. Fright- fulness does not terrorise a proud people. It only rouses them. Were we otherwise inclined to make peace, these horrors would only make us determined to crush the vile brood which is responsible fo.r them. The Germans han be- come like the Algerine pirates of old—a mere gang of criminals who are a menace to civilisa- tion. We do not make terms with nests of vipers. We simpiy trample them to death.

WEATHER AXI THE CROPS

WEATHER AXI) THE CROPS. Glorious weather has prevailed for nearly a fortnight, and the crops have ripened by night and by day. There has been no excessive heat to terrify milky matter in the ear of the corn and give shrunken grain. Haymakers have finished work in most cases without excessive strain, and are now ready to tackle the cereals. There have been no high winds to iay the corn, and the labour of the harvest should con.se- neqntly be rapid. Farmers are talking about 32 bushels of wheat, 36 barley, and 40 oats, but it is a backwkard season, and estimates are Ktill premature. Rye is be-ing cut. and also minr armtx.. j

CARMARTHENi L it JL JiJi 11 i v ru I v As ZA i ii a K LiIGr fa A

CARMARTHEN i /L ä-it JL JiJi 11 i: v :r?u? v ■> As Z.A i ii a. K) LiIGr fa* "A\ slii.li nub till set. you cp a gfass i::ay sos t L, a ijimt/si part of yea. SHAEEBI'SAUB. A red-Iieaded man who is caught without his hat on is liable to bo prosecuted under tho I Defence of the Realm Act for displaying an unshaded light. Several very pointed remark, have been made at the meeting of the Corporation on the subject of the bad smells which are to be noticed in the streets of Carmarthen. It cer- tainly is somewhat peculiar that the members of the Town Council should listen seriously to complaints about defective eaves-troughs on some houses whiist everybody is aware that the Corporation property itself gives rise to more public complaint than all the private property in the town. Coleridge the poü-the author of the Ancient Mariner—wrote a stanza on the smells of Cologne. He there perceived some 24 different stenches-all well-defined and separ- ate. I sometimes wish Carmarthen was hke that. There is a monotony about the odours which we encounter in Carmarthen. It cer- tainly is a fact that Cologne used to be a very evil smelling town; and it is said that the people invented the perfume known as "Eau d. Cologne" in order to counteract the other odours in which they lived. There is at times considerable scope for somebody to invent an Eau de Carmarthen, or shall we call it "Dwr Caerfyrddin" ? # A man who lived at a place called "Cefn Tnwni" appealed for exemption at the Car- marthen Rural Tribunal on Saturday. The llame-I am advised by an eminent authority on the Welsh language—means "the ridge of misery." Possibly it is poor land compared to the rich meadows of those who bestowed on it that rather uncomplimentary epithet. The appellant however had not such a poor opinion of it for lie is determined to lodge an appeal rather than leave it. if; This does not of course prove that the spot is a comfortable dwelling place. One of the curiosities of humanity is that people develope the warmest affection for some of the bleak- est spots on the surface of the earth. The attachment to home seems in many cases to increase with the material discomforts of the locality. Even when economic pressure forces people to leave such spots in order to earn their In ing. it will-,be found that they usually have the idea of returning home when they have made their fortune. This particular "Cefn Trueni" is in the neighbourhood of Kidwelly. I heard once of a "Cefn Trueni" in the parish of Llangunnoek. Ilv-ave since been informed that there is no place of that amine in Llanguhnock parish perhaps it is only a nickname applied to a ccr- .111 district. At any rate the existence of such a name in different parts of W ales is evidence of a touch of genius in the allocation of nomenclature. I here is a field nut many miles from Carina r- j then which tells the same taie. It Is called empty stomach Agriculture had not reached a very high level in the age when the name was evolved. Tho Scotch crofter was more hopeful. As Sandy tethered his cow amidst the rocks 011 the moun- tain top he remarked "Well, Ro&ie; if you have not much to eat you'll have a beautiful view." Another appellant on Saturday gave as a j reason in his own favour the fact that lie sup- plied milk to the people of Llanpumpsaint at 1 threepence a quart summer and winter. There have been milkmen in Carmarthen who pro- posed to sell milk at 3d a quart in summer 1 but they were induced to see the errors of their ways. The Union has evidently some scope for missionary work in the neighbourhood of Llan- pumpsaint. **» One of the effects of the summer weather is seen when pigs are allowed to run loose. They may be actually seen taking a dip in cold olear water. Human beings .keep pigs in dirt, and them call them dirty pigs. But Piggie loves his bath when lie gets the chance. «** One of the statements made at the war meet- ing on Friday night was that every man who buys a coat he can do without, and every woman who buys a hat or a blouse she can do without is helping the Germans. The proper patriotic thing would therefore appear to be to try to close up all the tailors and outfitters, all the drapers, milliners, and dressmakers. The less money you spend with local trades- men the better apparently, and the most patri- otic thing would be to spend none at all. if every business establishment in Carmarthen is closed up therefore and we achieve universal bankruptcy we shall have attained the very pinnacle of patriotism. • The who propose the closing of public- houses for the period of the war are not sum- ciently courageous in their proposals. What we want is not merely to close the "pubs," but also the shoemakers, the confectioners, the tobacconists, the watchmakers, and furnishers as well as those previously mentioned. In fact if we only carry war economy to its logical con- clusion. we shall close up every establishment in Carmarthen except that situated at No. 1, Penlan road. How it is to be kept open when there is no property with any rateable value in the town. 1 don't know; but that is another question. ALETHEIA.

Cur ma ft h e n Accounts

Cur ma ft h e n Accounts. Accounts of far-off happenings may vary, but the accounts appearing week by week of good that is happening in Carmarthen never vary. The Carmarthen men and women who have cause to praise Doan's Pills, do so whole- heartedly, and in complete agreement. Here is a case in point: On January 10th. 1913, Mrs J. Jones. o| 13, Magazine Row. near St. David's Church, Car- marthen, said :—"I was very bad with lumbago about eighteen months ago, and was obliged to stay in bed for a few days. 1 could hardly turn over for the pain in my back was very bad. I think it must have been a chill on the kidneys, that was the cause of the disorder. "There were urinary troubles as well. but- 1 got relief from Doan's backache kidney pills. They eased my back at once, and in a short time J was quite well again. I am pleased to say I have enjoyed good health ever si lie e. Doan's pills are splendid, and I always recom- mend them." On February 14tli, 1916. over three years later. Mrs .Jones said "Doan's pills have done me so much good at various times that I can- not praise them too highly." Kidney complaint occasions many ailments. for when the kidneys are clogged and faulty, uric acid and fluid waste-are thrown back upon the system, causing rheumatism, stone, bladder inflammation, dropsy, Sciatica and obstinate pain and discomfort. Icuiable diseases may follow if treatment is neglected, but timelylielp is generally success- ful. Doan's pills have saved thousands of men and women from uric acid poisoning and kidney disease, and even in advanced stages have, affected many cures. Of all flea lei s, or 2s Od a box. from .Foster- McCl'ellan Co., 8, Wells street, Oxford street, London. W. Don't ask for backache or kidney pills,—ask distinctly for Doan's backache kid- ney pills, tho same as Mrs Jones had.

Second Anniversary of the War

Second Anniversary of the War, ADOPTED AT CARMARTHEN. A public meeting was held at the Camar&hon Guildhall on Friday evening the 4th inst., being the second anniversary of the declaration d war by Great Britain against Germany. Tho meeting was timed to commence at 8.30 p.m. (new Bummer time) so that it was broad day- light when the proceedings commenced. There was a large attendance; the hall was e.'owded. As one looked through the audience one could not help being struck by the fact that a very large number of those present had lost mem- bers of their families in the course of the war. An i mmenso proportion of the faces suggested the memories of bereavement. Nevertheless there was but one sentiment expressed—that the war must be carried on until the Prussian Militarism is destroyed. The chair was occupied by the Mayor John Lewis). At the outset the Chairman read the resolution which was to be proposed— That on this the second anniversary of the outbreak of war this meeting of the citizens of Carmarthen records its inflexible deter- mination to continue to a victorious end the struggle in maintenance of those sacred ideals of liberty and justice which are the common cause of the Allies. After a reference to the many bravo men who had died in the war, the Chairman said that we must fight this war to a victorious end and put an end once for all to Prussian ty- ranny. We did not want this war; were nob prepared for this war; but when Germany violated Belgian territory we sent an ulti- ma,tulll. The murder ol' Nurse Ca.veil and of Capt. Fryatt were the most dastardly outrages ever committed by a civilised nation. The only way in which an end could be put to German tyranny was by putting an end to the German war machine. The Chairman ga.ve a list of the various War Funds to which the Carmarthen public had subscribed. In calling upon Mr John Hinds, M.P. to propose the resolution, the Chairman referred sympathetically to the bereavement which Mr Hinds had recently sustained. Mr John Hinds, M.P., in proposing, the reso- lution said that he did not wish to intrude his grief upon them; but he desired to thank the Mayor for his kind expression of sympathy He had that week lost one of the dearest of mothers. When he thought of it. what do we owe to the mothers of England to-day ? He was there that evening because he believed it was his mother's wish that lie should do his duty. Thank God, the mothers of England had done their duty nobly during the last two years He had had occasion to see Mr Tennant, the Under Secretary for War. latterly in connec- tion with some enquiries, and that gentleman remarked to him "It thrills me to think what the mothers of England have done for this :;g1r.;¿wæ>,I7"S.Wf(i'&?': QAN £ V33KL3TS'3EN HERO. Lance-Corporal DAVID Jotis DA VIES, Welsh Regiment, who died of wounds received in action in France oil July 22nd, ] a lG, and was interred at Heilly Military Cemetery, France, on July 23rd, 1&1G. The deceased,who was a son of the late John Davies, weaver, 16 Chapel Street, was, previous to joining the colours, employed as a rural postman at Rhandirmwyn, Llandovery. war." In spite of all their sorrow they would not have it otherwise than that their boys should go. Here we are after two years of war. There was a god called Janus in Ancient Rome. Janus had two faces—one looking forward and the other backward. At the present time, we can look forwards and we can look backward. We all remember that August Bank Holiday of 1914 when the thunderbolt came down on us as a nation. Our Foreign Secretary was doing all lie could to prevent a European calamity but we were forced into the war. To-day when we know all the circumstances in- volved, we know that Sir Edward Grey tried time after time to get all the questions put before a conference. All these efforts failed, a.nd if the Government had not then declared war on Germany we should not have done our duty to the cause of Freedom. We as a nation have always stood up for freedom. Freedom was in danger, and Prussia violated the treaty which she herself had signed. It was a noble thing for this country to have sent the 150,000 men that we had to stop the rush to Paris and then to the Maine. When we think of the sufferings that our soldiers endured during the first winter in the trenches for which they were not properly prepared, we ought to be proud of our men. THE HEROES ARE NOT OF THE PAST ONLY. We have seen our young men go out proud to fight for the flag. Many a home is sad to- day because of the loss of thesee young men but those who are left behind are proud of the memory. They had died for all that maikes Ijfe worth living. One of the things which had gladened us was the Unity of the Empire which the war had produced. The Colonies had sent 700,000 men to fight in the war. No other country could have achieved such a result as the enlistment of five millions of men voluntarily. Personally lie did not like tho idea of compulsory service but when he was convinced that it-was necessary in order to win the war he voted for it. Ho belileved that the dawn was not fa.r off when wo should have a new world, when all the old prejudices and battles of party shall have passed away, and when we shall build on a different foundation to any on which we had built before. Then we shall make the butchers of Potsdam pay the price for their cruelties. They ha.d done the same to international law was they had done to the treaty guaranteeing the neutrality of Belgium. If he believed that a tariff would prevent Germany being a menace to Europe ft gain he would put a tariff round her; but he did not believe it was necessary. He believed in the freedom of trade. Lieut.-General Sir James Hills-Johnes, V.C., G.C.B., in seconding, said that in this war the Welsh troojjb had upheld their former good name for valaur. We must go on with the war; we must crush the Hun we must drive them had: on the Rhine and fefeat them so thoroughly that they will never again disturb the peace of Europe. Mr W. Spurrell in supporting referred toti-lo need of national economy in the prosecution of the war. He said that every man who buys a coat he does not require, every lady who buys a hat or a blouse she can do without, is help- ing the Germans. The motion was carried enthusiastically. The Rev A. F. Mills in moving a- vote of — — thanks to thespeakm, referred to the sorrow which had fallen on so many homes recently neluding that of Mr John Hinds. He regarded James Hiils-J-ohncs as having been some- thing of a prophet. Sir James who inspect- ing the National Reserve a vow years ago at the Barracks told him "In five or six year, we shall require all the forces that Britain can bring to bear." Mr John Hinds in responding, said he would like to see another Fund started—to take care of the graves of the soldiers who had died in Carmarthen. France is looking after the graves of her soldiers in a wonderful way. Sir James Hills-Johnes said that he would be happy to help in the movement.

f Stitcli in Time

f Stitcli in Time. Thcro is an old saying "A stitch hi tirn« iftvoj nine" and if upon the first tymptoms of any til jug being wrong with our health we wore to resort to soma simple brt proper means of correcting th& mischio', rine-tsntha of the suSering that invades our homes woe. It 1 he avoided. A dale of G vilym Evans' Quinine Bitters taken wAen v u feel the least bit out of sorts is jyst th; t, stitch ia tia-.o." You can ^et Gwiljra E "aas' Qiunine Bi fctera at any Chemists oi Stoi eo in bottles, 2s fki and 4s 6d each, but rjmen.her that the only guarantee of genuinfet is the name "Gwilym Evans" ou the la cl, stamp and bottle, without which none t \e genuine. Sole Proprietors: Quinine Bitteif- Manufacturing OcmpMYt Limited. L'anclly, South Wale

Carmarthen Rural Tribunal

Carmarthen Rural Tribunal The Carmarthen Rural Tribunal met at the Carmarthen Guildhall on Saturday. There were present: Mr J. Jones, Plas (chairman), Mr T. Davies. Mr M. J. Evans, Mr William Williams, Rev J. Herbert, Mr D. T. Gilbert. The miiltary interest was represented by Capt. Margrave and the agricultural interest by Mr J. J. Bo wen. Some forty cases in all were dealt with at this sitting. The Tribunal dealt chiefly with applications for irenewal of expired certificates, CAN'T BE DEALT WITH. -Nlr Ei-nit Jones, of Llyii, Conwil appealed for exemption for his son Enoch Jones, who is 28 years of age. He occupied 40 acres of land, of which 10 werearahle. He also carried on business as a butcher. His son acted a« horse- man on the farm and as slaughterman in the butchering business. Capt. Margrave: Have you made any attempt to get another man to replace this man. Appellant: There is none to be had. The Chairman We can't deal with this ca.se. ¡man. It is referred to the Appeal Tribunal. The Clerk The case has been before the Appeal Tribunal and must be dealt with there. A QUESTION OF HEALTH. Mr John Griffiths, of Pantyrhelme, Aber- nant, applied for exemption for his son, Benj, Griffiths, aged 20. The- farm consists of 48 acres of which 15 acres are ploughed. Capt. Margrave sad that it did not seem to be a very large farm. Appellant: It is a very hard farm to work. I want you to understand that thtre is as much work on one fa.rm of 50 acres as there is on another of a hundred. A medical certificate was handed in as to the father's state of health. Capt. Margrave He does not look as if he deserves that certificate. How much did you pay for it. Appellant: I have not paid anything for it yet. Capt. Margrave I suppose it all depends whether you get exemption or not what you pay for it. Appellant said that two donors had said once that lie would not live twelve hours. Absolute exemption was granted. SHOEING SMITH AND BLACKSMITH. Mr James Thomas, a shoeing smith and a blacksmith, of Llanpumpsant, applied for exemption. Appellant said that he was a married man. and carried on an old established business. J A petition was put in from the owners of 121 horses stating that it would be a very serious loss to them if the appellant left the business. Canon Lloyd, vicar of Llaiipumpsaint, said that there aire five roads meeting at this spot. The farmers of the neighbourhood would be seriously delayed if ths man left the forge. Absolute exemption was granted. PLOUGHMAN AGED 18. Mrs Rachel Thomas, if Troedymeirch, ap- pealed for exemption in respect of W. S. Evans aged 18, who acts as ploughman. Mr L. A. Lawford Evans, J.P., Pantycendy, gav e evidence in support of the application. He stated that he had filled in the form as the woman is illiterate. Exemption until the 14th November was granted. APPELLANT BEREAVED. Mr David Jones, of Pantywaun, appealed for exemption for W. H. Jones. Mr Wallis-Jones, who appeared on behalf of the appellant, said that the appellant had buried his wife last week. Appellant said that lie had a farm of GO acres, of which Wi acres were under corn. He also carried on business as a general merchant. Exemption until the 14th November was granted. MILK AT HD A PINT. Mr Wallis J ones appeared in support of the appeal in respect of David Evans, Llanpump- saint, a. slaughterman, aged 19. The father was stated to carry on a large business as a bacon purer. Appellant said that he sold nrilk jn Llan- pumpsaint at l £ d a pint and butter at shilling a pound all the year round. Absolute exemption was granted. Mr W. Williams: Will you supply me now. Appellant: That is another thing. Not unless you buy summer and winter, NOT UNDER THE ACT. The Clerk said that they had several appli- cations from people who desired leave to appeal although the time for doing so had expired. The first was from Edward Jackson, of Carway He was 41 years of age having been born on the 22nd February, 1875. Capt. Margrave said that this main did not come under the Militarv Service Act at all. CEFN TRUENI—THE RIDGE OF MISERY. A:i application was also received on behalf of Thomas Edwards, aged 35, who lived at Cefn Trueni, Llangendeirne, Kidwelly. It was stated that he was not aware of the requirements of tho Act. A letter was read from the Vicar of Llaai- gendeirne in which he said that the man had the misfortune to be illiterate and to live in a remote part of the parish- The application was granted. MISCONCEPTIONS. Mr Geo. Evans, Bishop's Mill, Abergwili, wrote that he had been under the impression that he was in a reserved occupation, and that it was not necessary for him to make any ap- plication. Leave to appeal was granted. MrHy. Williams, Marston, Llangunnor, said that he was under the impression that there was 110 need for him to appeal until he re- oeivod notice calling him up. Leave to appeal was granted. CAN'T BE ENTERTAINED. Mr Evan Davies applied for leave to appeal for his son, Morgan R. "Davies, of Nantysaer, Llanlla-wddog. The son, who was 19 years of age had not attested. The case had been before the County Appeal Tribunal. The Clerk Mr (Mr John Saer): He can't start a fresh claim now. Capt. Margrave said that this man ought to have been called up on the lltli June. The Chairman We can't take this case. It was disposed of on .the 3rd March. -L- The Tribunal decided that the application could not lie entertained. iMr Benj. Owen, the head teacher of Car- -3z j tre-fie Council School. applied for an exemption Mr J. W. Nicholas, the ("i o 1 iz to the.Carmar- thenshire Education Authority, wrote dating that the teaching staffs of the schools had been considerably reduced, and if anymore teachers are withdrawn it will be impossible to maintain the teaching at a -satisfactory level of etli- ciency. s „ Appellant said that he had a large school in a rural district. He wsa the. only male teacher oil tlic, staff. Absolute exemption was granted.

Farming During the War

Farming During the War.. DISCUSSION AT CARMARTHENSHIRE CHAMBER OF AGRICULTURE. The quarterly meeting of the Carmarthen- shire Chamber of Agriculture was held at the sale room of the Ivy Bush Royal Hotel, Car- marthen, on the 1st inst., Mr W. S. G. Morris, Ystradwrallt, presiding. In the course of an address on "Farming dur- ing the War," Mr J. J. Griffith, adviser in agricultural chemistry at Aberystwyth College, said that speaking generally, the ultimate object of the farmer should be the production of human food, and at the present time it was one of the few important things that mat- tered. Of course, there must be a divergence of opinion as to the system of farming, or the type of cultivation, which was calculated to provide the best va.lue to the public. In his opinion the case of the market gardener was often very much exaggerated. All credit to the market gardener for what he did, but he (the speaker) thought he got more than was due to him at tho expense of letting the far- mer down. The market gardener seemed to be everything the farmer nobody. To judge their relative merits let them consider what was th nature and merit of the produce each brought into the market? The gardener brought into the market vegetables and fruit, which in the main were luxuries—none of them were necessaries. The farmer brought to the market butter, cheese, beef, bacon, and mutton and the raw material for the production of leather. He also brought potatoes, wheat, barley, and oats, and so on. All these things were necessaries; none of them could be re- garded as luxuries. Farmers had served the public well in the past, but no doubt they could go one better. The farnier who did well to the public', did well to himself also. Deal- ing with the question of food production during a.nd after the war, Mr Griffith said they had first of all to increase the capacity of the soil, —that is, they had to manure well and feed properly. With regard to manuring the soil, they had difficulty last season, and the diffi- culties during the coming season were likely to be very much greater. Manures were getting more costly, but in spite of that he believed in spending well on artificial manures, and re- garded it an a sound investment. Cutting down expenditure in this connection during the coming season would be false economy. Let them spend as much as possible, but they must spend wisely. They should be broad- minded and progressive enough to take ad- vantage of any of the new manures which were coming into the market nowadays. Let them not cling too tenaciousy to the old manures they had been accustomed to. The tendency of farmers was that if they could not get super phosphates they would not take anything at all. Instead of superphosphate, they could get ground mineral phosphate. There were many advantages iu giving a trial to the new things. It would be useful to get them as rivals to the old manures, and it would tend to brijig down the cost. Another advantage was that it would lead to the establishment- of iic-ii- in this country. There was a tendency in some districts to go back to the practice of using compound manures. Instead of doing that they should give a trial to the new manures. It was difficult to know what compound manures were let them avoid them at all cost. With the present system of cropping in this country, it was absolutely impossible to get the best out of the food and make the best of their animals, unless they did something to supple- ment those foods to counteract the deficiency. It was impossible to make the best out of the soil with their present system of cropping. In the first place the foods were too bulky and fibrous, and were not easily digested. They contained too much of some things and too little of other hings. That meant a loss of good food, and throughout the country the waste was appalling. What were they to do? There were only two alternatives, and they had to choose one or the other, or adopt a coalition of both. In order to get the best out of the foods produced from the soil, they should pur- chase wisely concentrated foods such as meals, cakes. The other alternative was to alter the system cf oripping in such a way as to repro- duce more of those foods which were rich in albuminoids. Mr Daniel John, B.Sc. (County Agricultural Organiser) said that he looked upin the market gardener as an deal for farme- to foil iiv. The important point was to prodti-,e as much as possible at different times of the year. T:1 market gardener would produce potatoes when there was a scarcity, and he thought the farmer should follow the market gardener and produce crops at all times. A discussion followed in which Messrs John Jones, Plas, Ferry side; S. H. Anthony, Pen- lan; John Williams; W. J. Harries, Red- holme. Pontargothi; and Col. Gwynne^Hughes, Glancothi, took part. Mr J. J. Griffith, in responding, said they certainly had a great deal to learn from the market gardener, and lie agreed with Mr Johns that in many respects farmers should take the market gardener as their ideal. What he maintained was that there was room for both. FARM COLONY. On the motion of Col. Gwynne-Hughes. of Glancothi, seconded bv Mr John Williams, a resolution was passed thanking the Welsh members of Parliament for their efforts in securing the establishment of a farm colony in Wales for disabled soldiers.

Rectors Dennnciation of COs

Rector's Dennnciation of C.O.'s. 1' A SYLU M~NEEDED. Strong denunciation of conscientious objec- tors was uttered at a patriotic meeting at Bath by the Rev C. W. Wilson, chaplain to the Forces, and rector of Walcot-, who went through the Gallipoli campaign. He said that as a clergyman of the Church of England, as a minister of the Gospel,.as a Christian, man, he denounced the conduct of the conscientious objector as utterly cowardly and unworthy of manhood. Let them put their consciences in their pockets, and come up and lie on the bare ground under shot and shell, .sweat under the blazing sun, be covered wwith filth and grime tili no friend could recognise them, chew hard biscuits and bully beef, be scorched in the Eastern sun. and see if such treatment did not produce a manhood which was absolutely absolutely absent from them at the present time. If the conscientious objector had the face to .stand up after and say he was not a coward there was no hope for him; it must be the lituatic asklum that he needed.

No title

A verdict of "Accidental death" was re- turned 011 Monday at an inquest held on Edwin Davies, the adopted child of the land- lord and landlady of the Eden Arms, Ci-Irliedyn Carmarthenshire. While playing on the road a piece of timber from a pile fell qp his head and he died within a few minutes.

11flmrrr Whitland Rural District Council

"flmrrr Whitland Rural District Council. The monthly meeting of the Whitland Rural District Council was held at the Hotel Gros- v:-ne. 011 Friday. Mr Morgan Phillips, Eglwy.- fai: adieirig. prtsided, in the absence of tho chairman. 9S 9D FOR DYN AMITE. The bills passed by the Finance Committee included one for 9s 9d due to Mr Levi Harries for dynamite! SURVEYOR'S REPORT. Hie Surveyor (Mr Roes Davies) in his report stated:— "For various reasons most of the contractors are slow in delivering their supply of stones and quite possibly a few (especially those who have not signed their contract bonds) will not carry out their contracts. In these cases men- tion will be made in my next report. Cliandy and Ponthowell Roads A consider- able improvement has been carried out on these roads recently by blasting large boulders from the middle and sides, and removing the same to large depots suitable for the reception of a steam crusher for the purpose of breaking to pass through a two-inch guage. These stones can be utilised for metalling the road surface which will be much cheaper than any other mode of supplying the necessary mater- ials; when this work is completed these roads will be greatly improved. Rhyd Culvert: This double culvert is situa- ted between Llanboidy and Eglwysfairacherfjg parishes and is constructed with flag covering stones. Last years a few of these flags gave way under the traction engine and althought it was repaired it is far from being safe under further traction traffic, it is now arranged to remove some of the strong flags from Cwmfelin Mynacli old bridge to this place in order to make a good and strong culvert there. This can be done at a small cost and all likely dan- ger removed. Road Widening near New Inn; The road at the junction of the highway going in the direc- tion of St. Clears is rather narrow for the pre- present mode of travelling and can be easily widened by placing eight or nine 9in. pipes to lengthen the present water gutters. There are old pipes in the store which will answer this purpose and therefore there will be no extra cost. The improvement of this important spot will be much appreciated. Whitland Curb and Channel: I have been asked to construct a curb and channel near the Station House, the length of which is about 18 yards, but it is almost impossible to get the material and a mason to carry out the work at the present time. Ddol Footbridge This bridge requires atten- tion. The bottom planks are rotten and are beyond repair. There is no suitable timber in Whitland for replacing the same as there is none in stock. The bridge is 18ft. 6in. long; 2ft. 6in. wide, and 8 to 10 inches thick. (Some of the handrails can be repaired, or the old handrails now at Owmfelin Mynach bridge can be removed and fixed t6 the bridge. W hitland Roads: At Whitland and within a radius of a mile or so there are. several deep ruts in the road, and I suggest that 10 or 12 tons of Llandebie (1in.) limestone be ordered, and the stone contract of this part can be re- duced to that extent, thus saving an extra cost, and the upkeep of the roads will be main- tained. I therefore strongly recommend that this course be adopted. Hal 1-year's Audit: The audit of my accounts for the half-year ending March 31st last took place at the Court House, Narberth, on the 1st inst. when the auditor found everything Jtll order and to his satisfaction in every detail. I hanks Many of the farmers and others wish me to thank the District Council for their kindness in allowing the roadmen to assist them in the hay harvest, most of which is now- secured and in good condition. They look for- ward to similar assistance for the corn har- vest." Mr D. Davies: You have improved the roads there is no doubt about that. Mr H. Morris called attention to the tact that the stones had not been cartod out on some of the roads in his district. The present contractor had not signed the bond. Slu i d they ask him to do the work, and if he did i, i do 't in afew days had they better not adver- tise for a new contractor ? It was agreed unanimously that tha Cle4', should write to all the contractors who are in arrears of their work a letter on the terms suggested by Mr Morris. A TRIBUTE TO THE PRESS! The Sanitary Inspector ('Mr D. Jenkins) in his report stated that the inhabitants of the village of Llanboidy had a habit of depositing rubbish in Lrumb Inn-lane which is prejudicial to the health of the school children. It was suggested in the course of the, discus- sion that proceedings be taken against those found committing a nuisance. The Sanitary Inspector said that in these j cases he had found that great improvement f°ll°wed when the matter was reported in the press. Mr Peter Howell: The Press does good some- times. A BAD SMELL. The Sanitary Inspector also reported that the drain which drained ten houses in North street and emptied itself into an open ditch in the Farmers Arms field causes a, foul smell dur- ing dry weather. The matter had been pre- viously reported to the Council. The nuisance could be abated by diverting the course and carrying it to the Council's, drain by a 9in. pipe in North street, where the is a manhole in a suitable place. The matter was referred to the Health Com- mittee. TAR WANTED. Mr E. Butler wrote calling attention to the dust nuisance in Whitland and suggested that the roads should be tar-sprayed. The Surveyor: If you get the roads tar- sprayed all the girJs will be against you. Mr D. Davies: He suggests a watering cat or tar-spraying. The Surveyor eaid that the streets were al- ways swept once a week and sometimes twice. Mr Peter Howells: They had better go in for a, Town Council of their own. Mr T. L. Phillips said that tar-spraying is very dangerous. It made the horses fail itnd Weak their legs. STEAM ROLLING. A discussion arose on tho question of having the roads steam rolled this year. The Surveyor said that he was very dissatis- fied with the way the stones from GarnweU quarry are broken. It is a good quality stone which can be broken very small. They got long thin pieces whirh pased through the machio0 and which ought to be put back. He thought he had better have a iuan there to see that the stone was properly broken. When he was iii hoy the traffic on the roads was quite different- He used to see 20 loads of lime pass Maefl' gw;nne every day. Now the weight is not /tutti" cient to enable the stones to set It was decided to have the matter of istean" rolling discussed at the next meeting. HOLIDAYS FOR THE SURVEYOR. The Surveyor asked the Council to grolut JiiP5 a week's holiday. Mr D. Davies moved that the holiday bo granted. He believed that the Surveyor i^' tended to get married in the meantime The motion of Mr D. Davies was carril-j unanimously. CAPMARTHEN-Printed and Published by the 4 Proprietress, M. LAWRENCE, at her Offices, 3 Blull JStreet, FRIDAY, AuguBt lltb, 1910. -n v4