Teitl Casgliad: Carmarthen weekly reporter

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 4 o 4
Full Screen
14 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
THE PASSING WEEK LH0111L

THE PASSING WEEK L'H )0 11. ,,¡ 1 L "Let there be titles; there are grsps* If old things, thfcre are new: Ten thousand broken lights and shapca Yet glimpse* of the true."—TENNYSON. The idea that the Germans can be "starved out" is now quite exploded. The harvest is already beginning in the Vaterland." and in another fortnight any difficulties which may have been encountered in regard to the supply of bread will have disappeared, It has been proved quite conclusively that Germany is able to keep herself in bread—or at any rate to get enough bread from the various countries under her influence. Poland and Belgium. Serbia and Austria may suffer hardship; but the German will look after himself! *«* We should be ashamed to act on any such principle, and if we did act so selfishly we should endeavour to conceal the fact. But the German makes no concealment of it at all. To love anybody as well as himself a German regards as sentimental weakness quite un- worthy of a man of the world. Belgium is a fertile country so is Poland. The German strips them of every ounce of food and supplies himself. He graciously allowed the British and the Americans to supply the Belgians and Poles with food. The British philanthropists who are subscribing to the relief of the Bei- gians in Belgium and to the relief of the suffer- ing Poles are really feeding the Germans. The food which belongs to Belgium and Poland is consumed by the Germans, and the British and the Americans make up the deficiency! It might be argued by those who don't know the Germans that if the British and the Americans did not feed the Belgians and the Poles, the Germans wowuld have to do so. But that idea is quite erroneous. This argument is based on the theory that the German is an ordinary human being. Such a theory is quite untena- ble. To compare the Kaiser or Von Bissing to Attila the Hun is a libel on Attila! If no food came from America for the Belgians and the Poles, the German would look on quite calmly at these people dying of hunger. And he would draw attention in a most high minded way to their deaths as a result of British barbarism as exemplified in the b!ookade. «#* The starving of British prisoners is another instance of the German idea of "cuteness." A nation which captures prisoners undertakes to feed them. The German prisoners in England axe better fed than the average of our work- ing classes. If we use up our provisions in feeding German prisoners, there is no hardship on the Germans in their having to use up their provisions in feeding British prisoners. But the German knows a trick worth two of that. 'He starves the British prisoners so that their friends at home shall send them ''parcels." We feed our Germans; the Germans do not feed their Britons. They have arranged matters so nicely that we keep our German prisoners in England and also feed our British prisoners in Germany! The German starves the Britons and takes care to let it be known —and then we send hundreds of tons of food every week into a country which wo are sup- posed to be blockading! German brutality pays! •*» It may argued that we might go in for re- prisals—that we might starve the German prisoners until our own receive proper treat- ment. This suggestion is founded on a com- plete ignoance of the German mind. Nobody in Berlin cares twopence what we may do to the thousands of German soldiers in our hands. The German leaders openly call their men "cannon fodder." A German officer cares no more for his men than an ironmonger or a draper cares for his stock-in-trade.. "J he i tradesmen of course values his stock in a com- mercial sense ;it enables him to carry on his business. The German officer rega-rds his men in the same way. He requires so many thousand men for a certain attack or a certain defence. Therefore he likes to have good men for the purpose. If the enemy captures any of the men he cares nothing as to their future; he wants more men to take their place-tliat is all. This argument, of course, only applies to the "common men." The Germans have a very high opinion of the class which they call "high-born." We know of no such feeling here; we entrust the Government to certain personages; but we know that if we lost them we have quite as good men to fill their places. This idea is quite foreign to the slavish German mind—even a German Socialist has not the sense to see that the Crown Prince is only a oàepraved loafer who ought to be in a convict prison. If we want to go in for "reprisals" it is no use trying it on common Germans—they are of no more account in German eyes than cast-off Army boots. But we have some of more account. The son of Admiral Von Tir- pitz for instance is a. prisoner in England. 11 the Germans thought that there was the least likelihood of this gentleman being hanged, there would be no outrages iike the murder of Capt. Fryatt. But they know that there is not. The German is a blackguard; he revolts in it; and he rejoices in the fact that nobody will try to rival him in that direction. **• The position of the soldiers who are employed at the Llanelly Steel Works has a. very ugly look. Steel workers join the Army—eitl.v voluntarily or by compulsion. Men are required at the steelworks. The Government does not release the men-which is the obvious thing to do. No; it sends the soldiers to work at the steel works. Ihe men are still soldiers; and they received Is a day! These men are en- gaged on work which in the ordinary way would be paid for at the rate of 7s to 12s a day. However they only get their Army pay and allowances. The firm employing them pays the regular rate of wages; but the men don't get the money. This is not even mill- j tarism. This is slavery. *»» ihere is a great danger that many emer- gency measures which have been adopted dur- ing the war will be found very handy as per- manent measures. For instance Parliament has ceased to represent the nation. It has re- elected itself, and will do so again doubtless. The Press Bureau controls the publication of news. The right of free speech at public meet- ings is reduced to a mere nulity. Many other emergency measures are obvious. The Govern- men can enrol any man in the Army, and when he is in uniform send him back to work at his former trade under martial law. These things may be inevitable; but it is right that the public should be assured that they are inevit- able. Personal liberty cannot stand in the way of the national safety. But at the same time we ought to be quite sure that such measures are necessary to the national safety before adopting them. The British public submits 110 anything that the Government decrees now. The danger is that if the war lasts for a few years longer these abnormal measures will become permanent, and that we shall have for- gotten the old traditions of British liberty. Trades Unionism must not stand in the way of our winning the war; but the war should not be used as a pretext for smashing Trades Unionism. «#* The Kaiser William has been indulging in some more of the blasphemous cant which seems to be a family failing. He has been declaring that he did not desire this war, and tlmt he w anted peace and this idiotic lie is mixed up with a lot of pious sentiment which sounds atrocious. It would be .nteresting to know whether this fellow is the bggest liar on record or whether he is simply a lunatic who suffers from hallucinations. He talks in this way so Jhcn that one is incined to fancy that after ill he really believes what he says. It would be interesting to hear his views as to who it was ho realiv started the war. Did anyone march into Germany to begin to play havoc with German villages and fanus P **» So far as v,e can see it wa.s all the other way about at the start. The war started by the Germans invading Belgium. That was the first act of war. Tlis oily hypocrisy of the Kaiser runs in the blood. His grandfather talked in exactly the same way in 1870 after lie had robbed and plundered France, although he had actually arranged with Bismarck to send a forged telegram in order to make war inevitable. The telegram was forged and sent, and war followed. The Prussian gang of cut-throats were so determined for the war for which they were ready that they would not run the risk of the negotiations ending peacefully. So they forged a. telegram from the French Ambassador to the French Government and thus made the war! It was afterwards found out that no such telegram had been sent by the French Ambassador but the war had then been started! And the man who concocted this diabolical plot actually at the close of the war turned up his eyes piously thanked the Almighty for victory, and called Heaven to witness that he had done all he could to avert this dreadful war! *«* "The truth will out" however—even in the case of a German sometimes! Bismarck in his "Reminiscences" tells the story of the 'faked' telegram. He tells it with the same air of vanity as a jockey would describe how he won the Derby. Lying is one of the fine arts in German diplomacy; and a German statesman is highly flattered when anybody calls him a first class liar. He takes it as a compliment that he understands his business. The present Kaiser t-co breaks out into truth by mistake at times. He wrote a letter of condolence a few weeks ago to Frau Von Mottke, the widow of the general who took such a prominent part in the preliminary stages of the present war. The Kaiser told Frau Von Moltke that her hus- band had rendered the Empire great services during a long period of years "in having so carefully prepared for this war" In his desire to pay a compliment to the deceased general. he forgot to keep up the pious attitude that he had never wanted war. but had been attacked by the Allies. tHie That ruffianly octogenarian the Kaiser Francis Joseph of Austria stands a good chance of losing his job before he dies—unless he dies very suddenly. The Italians have begun to make headway. They have captured Gorizia. The public notices in Gorizia are all in German the signs over the shops are in German; but the Italian flag floats over the town. The town ought never to have be- longed to anybody else but Italy. Italy was at one time under the heel of Austria. The Italian Nationalists expelled the Austrians step by step and at length got them out of Venire. The close of the war of Italian Inde- pendence however still left a good patch of territory which is known at "Italia Irri- denta"—that is to say unredeemed Italy in the hands of Austria. The people of Gorizia are very glad to see the Italian flag over their Town Hall. The Italian Army is advancing, and there is every chance that the great port of Irieste will be in Italian hands before long! **« On the other side, the Brown Bear is swallow ing up Austrian territory rapidly. The Aus- tians arc not being defeated; they are beng smply routed. The German Chancellor some months ago nvited the Allies "to look at the war map," and to negotiate for peace on that basis. It would be interesting to know whe- ther he likes the look of the war map quite so well now. When the German Chancellor made that speech he knew very weli that Germany had reached its limit and was not able to hold on much longer. The German Army had got hold of a very hot handful; and the handful is getting hotter every minute. When the German Chancellor finds that his hands are beginning to scorch and that he must drop his "catch." he says "What will you give me to let go?" We don't intend to give him any- thing. He'll drop it like a hot potato before very long. **» There is nothing more significant of the coming victory than the changed tone which has come over the German press. There is not a word now about German world-power. All that we read now is that Germany is so strong that she can't becrushed, and that she can ) "hold out" for five or ten years against the Allies. There is not a word of conquest now. It is all a boast about "holding out." This is a pretty come down! •* Then the Germans are beginning frankly to recognise the fact that they are cut off from the outside world. There is nothing which occupies so niuc space in the German Press j now as the new idea of a "Mittel Europa" that is Central Europe. The idea is to unite Germany, Austria, Bulgaria and Turkey by s railways and canals so that they can develope internal trade. The German Professors are busy explaining the advantages of the "Cen- tral Europe" scheme as against the benefits of on Overseas Empire. It is very much like the remark which the Fox made when he could not get the grapes. The civilsed natons of Europe have not much objection to the M itteleuropa idea. It is not a bad idea for the cut-throats of Berlin and Vienna and the "obscene in- effable lurk" (as the late Sir Lewis Morris called him) to herd together. Nobody else wants to have any dealings with. them. But Middle Europe wll be much smaller than these ruffians fancy, There must lie a straightening of boundaries. Austria wants pruning, and as for Turkey the only place for the Turk is some- where away beyond Mesopotamia. The Turk has no business in Europe at all and very little in the Holy Land and Asia Minor. The Allies have no particular objecton to the "Cen- tral Europe" idea; but the amount of Central Europe which will be left will be of precious littlo account.

Dont Blame the Weather

Don't Blame the Weather. Don't put all the blame on the weather if during this summer season you feel limp snd listless, jaded and depressed, Jaekiig the vigour that would enable you to enjoy in. T;n to one you are just a trifle below par, and need a tonic to brace you up. This is to hand in the best form in Mother Seigel's Syrup. Thou- sands have proved by personal experience that a short course of this popular stomach and liver tonic and regulator has a wonderfully beneficial effect on the. organs of digestion. helping them to do efficiently the work that is imposed upon them. Mother Seigel's Syrup assists digestion, invigorate-s the liver, an stimulates the bowels to natural activitv. By no doing, it enables you to digest your food thoroughly, and thus every part of your body receives the nourishment it requires. With health renewed and energy restored, lassitude, even on the most oppressive days will become for you a thing of the past. Put it to the tost 1 and try to-day.

LOCAL FAIRS FOR AUGUST

LOCAL FAIRS FOR AUGUST. 2. Llandovery. 3-4. Kidwelly. 6. Llanboidy. 7. Llanybyther. 12-14. Carmarthen. 15. Lampeter, Haverfordwest. 16. Narberth. 21.Newcastle Emlyn and Adpar. Cayo, and Lr»t tors ton. 22. Cayo, Letterston. 23. Llandilo. 28. Whitland. 29. Pontardulais. j -C_

OARMARTOEN li lK ii THE I I 8 hjA i i I ii L10 iiTA

OARMARTOEN li >'l)K ii THE I 8 hjA i i I; ii L10 iiTA couit;, and rou duwu yjvi shail no* budge, î. shall not ¿o, till I set you sp a glass rioi-a you may the inmost part of son SstisBgrBAsa. Attention has been called—none too soon— to the nuisance caused by the "bathing" in the Towy right in front of the Bridge. If the offenders merely bathed there would not be kio much objection to it. But when they go out of their way to make themselves offensive to spectators, one is driven to the conclusion that the bathing is a more pretext for a display of unmitigated blackguardism. •«* There has been a good deal of balderdash written from time to time as to the meaning of the term "Lammas street" as applied to one of the princpal streets of the town. The reason was evdent for everybody to see on Saturday. It is called "Lammas street" be- cause the Lammas fair is held there. **• One has to make several adjustments in order to focus this fact in proper perspective. To begin with the fair was held in a field orig- inally. The "Dark Gate" really was a gate once; what is now Lammas street was merely a straggling country lane outside the town walls. It was then a very suitable place for a fair. To continue the fair there when the place has become one of the busiest streets of the town is an evidence of the triumph of tra- dition over common sense. • *» The fair was held on "Lammas Day"—the first of August. It is now held on the 12th of August. That of course is easily explained. In the eighteenth century they had a juggle with the almanac just as we have had one with the clock. We put the clock on an hour, but the good people in the days of George II. put the almanac on eleven days. In many cases public events are still held on old days. Thus the 12th of August is the old first-so that the fair is still held on the original day. The street was cailed "Heol Awst" when it was named because it was the site of the fair which was called "Ffair Calan Awst." In English the site of the Lammas fair became Lammas street—really Lammas fair ground. Anybody who knows anything of agriculture knows that it would be a practical impossi- bility to hold Lammas—the festival of the new corn—on the modern first of August. But on the first day of August (old style) there would be quite enough "good samples" to warrant the success of the ceremony. So a field in which a fair was held on the 1st of August has become a street in which the fair was held on the 12th of August—and it is the same day and place all the time. At the meeting of the Chamber of Agricul- ture last week a reference was made to the market gardener. The general opinion seemed to be that there was too much fuss made about the market gardener. One speaker said that the market gardener seemed to be everybody and the farmer nobody. Is it not a fact that the farmer himself is to blame for this. # 1 was told a story early this spring which illustrates what I mean. A farmer twelve or fourteen miles from Carmarthen was telling a visitor that lie had had a very plentiful crop of potatoes. He had been giving good potatoes to the pigs, and even then in the spring he had two or three tons that he did not know what to do with. "Why," asked the visitor "don't you take them into Carmarthen and sell them? They are selling at five or six pounds a ton." "No." said the old farmer indignantly, "I have not come to that yet." *#* This story would be incredible of any farmer within three or four miles of Carmarthen but that is because these farmers are to some ex- tent market gardeners. The real aboriginal farmer out in the purely agricultural districts will sell cattle, pigs, sheep and horses; he will sell butter and eggs; he does not mind selling corn. But if you suggest to him that he should sell potatoes, onions, carrots, turnips, cabbages or parsnips, lie feels that he can't stoop as low as that! There are farms within a dozen miles of GaJrmarthell on which immense quantities of potatoes could be grown and are not grown. There are many farms on which in favourable seasons tons of potatoes are wasted because there is a heavy crop. And fit the same time, our British destroyers are "convoying" cargo ships bringing Irish potatoes and Channel Island potatoes to port in order to supply the Carmarthen people with food. There is a touch of "Alice in Wonderland" about this; but it is perfectly true. It s a. case of truth being stranger than fiction. There is a good deal of humbug about eti- quette in all trades. We are all hide-bound I more or less, and are afraid to do things be- cause these things were never done by our predecessors. One can see this everywhere. And the bulk of the farmers are quite willing to allow the British public to starve rather than develope a new line of business. If the farmers don't wake up, they will find all this come home to roost. f It will be all right if the farmers at the close of the war can tell us "You would have starved but for us." But suppose we are ablo to tell the farmer "Thank goodness we were not dependent on you. We were able to get food from Canada, Ireland, Denmark, and the Channel Islands thanks to our Navy, whilst the local farmers did not produce an extra ton of food." If it comes to that, some politician will argue that British agriculture is not worth troubling about and the effect in the future of legislation will be very serious. Farmers like a good many others would do well to keep an eye on the period after the war. if.- I find on looking the matter up that I did not do Cologne full justice. Coleridge counted there not 24. but 72 distinct odours. The stanza is as follows:- In Kohln a town of monks and bones And pavements fanged with murderous stones And rags and hags and hideous wenches I counted two and seventy stenches. AM well defined and several stinks! The river Rhine it is well known Doth wash your city of Cologne; But tell, me Nymphs; what power divine Shall henceforth wash the river Rhine. They had 72 in Cologne—so that they were 71 ahead of us. Since I referred to the matter last week, the rain has come, and matters have improved. The suggestion that "Eau de Cobogne" was evolved in an effort on the part of some people there to rise above their sur- roundings—has been made quite seriously. Alaii always invents and creates under the sti- mulus of a want. The flattest and dullest parts of England-the Fens, contains the finest decorated cathedrals, Lincoln Ely, and Peter- borough. If there had been a mountain like Snow down or Ben Nevis in Egypt the Pyramids would never have been built. So far the bad smell so prevalent at times in Carmarthen has

OARMARTOEN li lK ii THE I I 8 hjA i i I ii L10 iiTA

produced no aesthetic effort to counteract it; I but there'is still hope. »** Llanstephan and in fact a!i the holiday resorts of Carmarthenshire are crowded—more crowded than usual. The reason is obvious. It is practically impossible to go on the Con- tinent it is not easy to get to Ireland and the East Coast is obviously open to Zeppelin raids. Obviously therefore Wales and the Wost of England are the safest spots! ALETHEIA.

No title

FOR THE BLOOD IS THE LIFE.-Clarke's Blood Mixture is warranted to cleanse the blood of all impurities, from whatever cause arising For Fcrofula, Scurvy, Eczema, Bad Leg'.i, Abscesses, Ulcers, Glandular Swellings, Skin and Blood diseases Pimples aud Sores of all kinds, its effects are marvellous. Over 50 years success. Thousands of testimonials. In bottles, 2s 9d, each of all chemists & stores Ask for Clarke's Blood Mixture aud do not be persuaded to take an imitation

Llandilo Board of Guardians

Llandilo Board of Guardians. The fortnghtly meeting of this body was held on Saturday, when there were present: Mr R. Matthews (chairman), Mrs E. Roberts, Revs Edred Jones, J. Morgan, Messrs Arthur Wil- liams, E. Hughes, W. Griffiths, W7 Stephens, J. Jones, Glyn Jenkins, J. L. Williams, D. Davies L. N. Powell, W. Hopkin, Caleb Thomas, Evan Morris, Hy Herbert, W\ Harris, J. Richards, J. Humphreys D. Jones. THE MASTER'S REPORT stated that the number of inmates in the house was 53 against 54 in the corresponding period last year. The vagrants who visited the house in the fortnight numbered 42 against 57 in the corresponding period last vcar. "'A BLACK SHEEP." The Clerk informed the Board that there were calls due to the extent of £ 1,1(59. Am- manvord was one of the parishes that had not paid up.—Mr L. N. Powell: Ammanford is the black sheep this time.—The Clerk said lie had precepts for signature at 9d in the £ -.Nir Arthur Williams: What was the last precept? Th-N Clerk: Seven pence.—Mr J. Kid ardg asked what accounted for the increase of two- pence, but there was no reply.—A Member: What was the corresponding half last year?— Clerk Eight pence.—It was agreed to issue the j precepts. LEGAL DIFFICULTIES. Mr Evan Davies had given notice of motion with regard to the financial rearrangements of the parishes, and Mr L. N. Powell, as a mem- ber of the County Council, said that with re- gard to the motion he had brought the matter before the County Finance Committee with a view to have something definite done with re- gard to ths boundaries, and the Clerk (Mr R. Shipley Lewis) agreed with the Clork of the County Council that there were legal difficulties in the way of carrying the alteration of the boundaries out. Eventually at the Finance Committee it was arranged to go into the whole affair and it was necessary to take counsel's opinion. There would be nothing gained in further discussion. In addition to that the question of the inequality of the rating of Quarter Bach was to come before the same committee.—'Mr J. L. Williams: Would it not be better to defer them until after the war. They are so complicated and such expense, H proposed the matter be deferred, and Mr J. Richards seconded.—Agreed. WOMAN CAN DO NOTHING. The widow of the late rak-cullector for Llan- gathen wrote that her hu-band bad filled the post for over 40 years. He died last month. wore absolutely necessary to the success of the the accounts for the current half year. She had been appointed clerk to the Parish Coun- cil and assistant overseer for the parish.—The Chairman: Are you willing?—Mr W. Griffiths: Yes, as far as we as a. parish are c-inccrned if it is legal.—The reply was that it was legal.—A Member: A lady can do anything to-day.—It was agreed to grant her request.—Clerk You better consider the appointment of a successor. The sooner the better.—Mr Arthur Williams: She is willing to carry it on.—Chairman: You better put it on the agenda for the next meet- ing.—Mr W. Griffiths gave notice of motion. A NURSE FOR TALLEY AND LLANSAWEL Miss D avies, Froodvale, wrote to state that it was proposed to have a nurse in the parishes of Llansawel and Talley. Public meetings were being called. The district was a very one and purely agricultural. The £ 80 required for the annual maintenance of the nurse would not be easily colllected. Public grants were absoluteyl necessary to the success of the undertaking. She expressed the hope that the Llandilo Board of uardians would assist to the extent of t;3 for each parish. At present there was no midwife in those extensve diericts and ni medical man within a radius of nine or ten miles. It was terrible to think that the inha- bitants would have to face the winter months under such condtions. She felt sure the Board would grant the request.—Clerk The Board never subscribes more than £ 5 eo each associa- tion.—Mr L. N. Powell did not think they could give anything like t5 to each parish. Then they did not subscribe-unless the thing was on a satisfactory basis, but he did not know if it would not be well to vary in this case to help a purely agricultural district. They might say they would subscribe £ 5 when the thing was in a satisfactory condition.—Mr J. Ilchards said the L.5 they subscribed to Llangathen was only equivalent to tIO for the Llansawel and Talley districts. Each of them was as large as L-langathen He would propose £ 10..Llangathen was much more conveniently situated and close to a railway station, and medical men wore within a reasonable distance. They did not know the moment they might lose the temporary man they had at Llansawel. The distance the people had to travel to get medical assistance should be considered.—Mr omer Harris: Don't you think we should put it on the agenda.— Mr A. Williams: I propose it be on the agenda this day fortnight.—Mr W. Hopkin: How is the Clerk to answer that letter?—Clerk I can say it will be on the agenda.—Mr Harries (Llansawel) said that he thought they should get an understanding before the public meeting whether the applica- tion will have the support of the Guardians.— Mr A. Williams The only difference is between £ 5 and £10. You can convey that message Mr J. Humphreys Wre should get L10 anvhow. r THE ADVANCE IN PRICE OF COAL. Mr Edwards. Ffairfach. the contractor for coal, for the current quarter for the work- house, wrote to state that the price of coal would be increased by 2s 6d.—Mr A. Williams: Are we liable for the increase.—The Chairman held that they were as the advance in price of coal had been agreed to by the Board of Tride.-Afer some discussion, Mr J. Richards said he did not object to the application, but they had treated another contractor differently and they knew he had lost £ 200.—Mr L. N. Powell said the point was worth considering.— Mr J. Richards sad ths man had not lost any- thing. and he lost 2s 6d a ton he (Mr Richards) objected on principle.—Mr J. L. Williams 1 move it be left to our Clerk.—Several mem- bers No. no decide it now.—Mr J. L. Wil- liams: I believe we are liable, and the man is quite correct in asking for it.—On a division only three voted for granting the increase asked for.—The application was therefore lost.

Llandilo Rural District Council

Llandilo Rural District Council. Mr R. Matthews occupied the chair. TYClltOES WATER SUPPLY. Attention was called by Mr John Bevan to matters connected wth the water supply of Tycroes. He said that only three taps they had there, but to-dav they were supplying the whole village. They had fixed their pipes ready for the main supply. Pipes had neen laid down from Pengarn to Pantyffynon road, and 150 houses were being supplied for nerely a sJUall sum and in oontravention of the condi- tions. Their original application was only for a supply to the centre.— Mr L. N. Powell sug- gested that the Council request their Surveyor to look into the matter and report.—Mr Bevan said they made their connections on Thursday morning.—The Chairman AVi-ll anyone pro- pose that the Sanitary Inspector visit the plac,o and report whether this is correct.-The Clerk said that if they had connected without the Council's consent they could cut it off. They would soon come to terms then.—Messrs L. N. Powell and J. Bevan were aga.inst taking that step ais tliev had no source of supply. They suggested that they should ask them to recon- sider the matter and that they be supplied according to value.—It was decided that tho Inspector should report.—Mr Bevan said they wero wasting a tremendous lot of water there. The. children from the two schools were playing wwith the taps all day.—The Chairman The only was is to double the amount of payment. WATER- FOR TROEDRHIW FARM. TENANT BLAMES THE REPORTERS. Mr Lewis, tenant of Troedrhiw Farm, again appeared before the Council on the question of a water supply for his holding. He said that Mr Jones, the Inspector, and Mr Davies, of Froodvale, had vsited his farm, and lie showed Mr Jones two places where water could be got. Still he saw a report in the papers that Mr Jones had told them as a Council that there was no water to be had on the farm. Last Wednesday night he dug a. hole in the very place where he had told Mr Jones water could be got, and Mr Jones told him two years ago' that he was going to get water from that very place. Last Thursday morning there was half a yard of water in the pool lie had dug al- though it was only a yard' deep. It was very wrong on the part of the reporters to report there was no water thee. People were writing to him "from all over the place, and saying there was no water at Troedyrhiw." He had lived at Troedrhiw for 35 years and therefore ought to know more than the Inspector as to whether there was water there. He had in- formed M'r Jones on several occasions that there was plenty of water there. He had dug i a hole there and had asked him to go and see the place before the rain came. lie came and examined it and measured the flow. The water he had on the roadside W[1; not fit to diink and Mr Jones himself had told him so.—Mr Caleb Thomas, who had visited the place, said there were 18 inches of water at the place mentioned that morning. There was water to I)o had there. There was another matter to which he wished to refer. The Council passed two or three years ago that Mr Jones should have nothing to do in getting water to persons out- side the Council, The general custom was that should there be any dispute in respect to a matter that the local councillors should be given notice so that they could meet at the place bu in their district when there was any- thing on they went when they liked and un- known to anybody. Caleb Thomas was a work- ing man, and he looked upon Mr Gwynne- Hughes as one of the most respected gentle- men in the country, and Mr Davies, Froodvale, as well, but why should they ask the Council's Surveyor to do things they ought to get people from outside to do. The local members ought .to visit the place. There was only about 100 yards to go to get plenty of water to supply this house and better than the reservoir which wa.s more or less stagnant unless he got the water from Llandyfan direct. Whenever they visited a locality the local Councillors, should be there.—The inspector (Mr Evan Jones) said he had simply been asked by Mr Gwynne- Hughes, and Mr Davies, Froodvale, to give his opinion as to whether the water was suitable for drnking purposes, and in his report to the Sanitary Committee some three or four months ago he simply stated that if the water was drawn from land belonging to Lord Dynevor it would be from pollution, otherwise it would be no good for Mr Gwynne Hughes to draw it at all, and Mr Davies, Froodvale, came down to meet him there simply to have his (the In- spector's) vews as to wnether it was free from pollution. Mr Lewis was asked by Mr Darvies to point out any spring where he could draw water to supply Troedrhiw. Mr Lewis took them through a very nasty -over and on until they came to the well that supplied Pensyl- vania. When he put the question to Mr Lewis "Is it constant?" he said "Yes." He told him that his son had said that morning that it was not, and asked which of them was he to be- lieve. "The little water we found there." said Mr Jones "could be run through a quill." He put the question to the tenant of Pensylvania and his reply was "It dries up every summer Asked by Mr Jones where he had water, he said, "Well, we have to go all the way round to Tirbaeh." The spring Mr Lewis mentioned now he had told him that he had opened it and closed it up again as e could find no water there. The water he did find was running from a. spout at the roadside. To his (Mr Jones's) mind, and Mr Davies, Froodvale, the tenant absolutely failed to point out anywhere where water could be got. It was all very well to say that if they went down 25ft. they may ge it- Mr Caleb Thomas They haven't gone down three feet now.—Proceeding Mr Jones said sur face well were condemned by the L.G.B.. They must go down so many feet to get water for drinking purposes He was understood to add that if they went down 20 to 25 feet the water would not run to Troedyrhiw. He said that if Mr Lewis had found a supply why did he not write to Mr Davies, Froodvale, and why did he not take him there on the day of the visit?- Mr Lewis, the tenant, interposed with the remark that Mr Davies never asked him to go where they could have water. Mr Jones him- self went to it and told hm "It is no use to go there." Mr Jones said there that "there was no water to be seen. Not a drop coming out anywhere. He walked the field..—Mr Lewis (the tenant) You told me two years ago you were going to get water from there. We took him to the wood where there was water runn- ing and he said it was surface water. We went to Pensylania- to the well. Beneath the well there was water running over.—The In- spector said it was dropping over. Sweating nothing else. There was no water there.—The Chairman sa.id they did not know the place.— The Tenant: I ought to know.—,The Chairman asked if there was water there why didn't he bring it to the house. Could he not complain to the owner?—A member He has complained here.—A commttee consisting of Messrs L. N. Powell, Dd. Morris, and John Richards was appointed to visit the place.—On the sugges- tion of Mr Evan Jones, Lord Dynevor, who he said was interested, was added to the com- mittee, and it was decided to ask Mr Davies, Froodvale, also to meet them on the spot. The tender of Mr W. Herbert, Ammanford, for a footbridge to be constructed on the Maerdy to Pantyffynon footpath, was accepted at a cost of £ 20.

Memorial Service to Welsh Heroes

Memorial Service to Welsh Heroes. Thursday was the first anniversary of the 4th Battalion Welsh Regiment in the Suvla Bay operations, and a special commemoration service was held at St. David's Cathedral, Pembrokeshire. About 700 soldiers, under the command of Colonel Bramwell Jones, arrived about 11 a.m. at the city, which had been bedecked with banners, and were given a rousing and patriotic reception, being met by several hundreds of people. The service at the cathedral, which was in every respect a most solemn and memorable one, commenced at two o'clock, when it was estimated that over 2,000 people were present. The middle of the cathedral had been reserved for officers and soldiers, and front rows were specially set apart for relations and friends of those who had fallen at Suvla Bay. Preceding the service a short organ recital was given by Mr Herbert C. Morris, M.A., the cathedral organist, after which the National Anthem was sung. The Rev D. W. Jones, B.A. (vicar), Canon W. Williams, Jeffrevston, and the Rev R. Will iams (chaplain to the forces) took the first part of the service, and several Welsh and English hymns were reverently sung. The Lord Bishop of St. David's then addressed the meeting in Welsh, taking as his text the words, "Believe on the Lord Jesus Christ and thou shalt be saved." His lordship said they had come there that day to the mothei- church of the Welsh patron saint, David, to make solemn remembrance before God of those brave brothers of theirs who had given their lives for their King and Country at the operatons of Suvla Bay a year ago. Al- though there had been a fearful slaughter of j lives, yet there were over a hundred saved, j and he understood a, large number were pre- sent there that day to give thanks unto the Lord for Hs mercy. "Greater love hath no man than this, that a man layeth down his life for his brother." Throug suffering and sacri- fice every great and heroic act had been accom- plished, and he was proud to know that the men before. him that day were ready to sacri- fice their lives and all in order that the great name of our Empire should not be tarnished. His lordship asked them all to be brave and to remember the glorious traditions of those who had fallen. Whenever the call came to them to go forwards to battle let them go with the firm resolve that Right was Might and with an unflinchng faith in the Lord of Hosts. The Dean of St. David's delivered an elo- quent address in English, in the course oi lie said no doubt their thoughts were chiefly in the future—as to what might happen say in the next twelve months. He bade them to follow Cromwell's advice to his men, "Put your trust in God, and keep your powder dry." Their presence there that day showed they did the first; then- disciplne and smart- ness proved that they dd the second. But faith without works was dead, so he gave them six words out of the old Book as a motto for life "Fight the good fight of faith." Let them remember there were worse enemies than Germany and those joined with her. They were sin, the inclinaton a.nd temptation to do wrong, and the indulgence of bad Justs and passions, so he hoped they were all determined in God's strength to conquer those subtle foes, the world, the Besh--which was their own evil heart—and the devil. He said, fight the evil of drink, which destroyed vigour, courage, steadiness, and self-respect.

Advertising

YOU CAN RELY ON Clarke's B41 Pills as a „ 1, a Safe and Sure Remedy in either Sex, for all Acquired or Constitutional Discharges from Urinary Organs, Gravel, Pains in the Back and kindred complaints. Over 50 years Success. Of all Chemists. 4s Gd f f -c per box, or sent direct, post free, KI* L S for Sixty Penny Stamps fcy the B41 PIIXS Proprietors—The Lincoln and /T, Midland Drug Co, Ltd.Linoolu, (Free from Mercury

Theft from Munition Worker

Theft, from Munition Worker: YOUNG caRL CHARGED AT CARMAR- THEN. At the weekly BoroughPojce Court held at Carmarthen OnlGllday before Mr Waiter Lloyd (in the chair) Mr Rees Davies, Mr T. Bland Davies, and Mr Daniel Lewis. Lizzie Ann Humphreys, a young girl about 18. was charged with stealing £2 10s from Amos Butters, a munition worker. Amos Butters said that he lived in a tent at Burry Port He come to Carmarthen on Sat- urday. He went to Mrs Hawkers lodging house. He there met defendant. He there met defendant. He pulled out £ to send for drinks. In so doing he showed JE7 10s which he had. They both went together to a publio hou- e on the corner. He did not know the name of the house. He there called for two bottles of beer. He drank the two bottles himself, and the girl ran out She ran as if running for her life. She left her shawl and jug behind her. He found the J61 and another £1 10s gone. Butters added "1 don't wish to press the charge against her; I only want my rights." He repeated this several times Defendant said she did not take the £1 10s She only took JE1. P.S. Jones said he arrested the defendant at her home 19 Mill street He charged her with stealing £2 10s in notes. In reply she said "I only stole JE1 note. I have hidden it in the wall upstairs. If you come there with me." He took her down home. He took her up- stairs, occupied by her mother and P.C. Walters accompanied us. She pointed to a spot under the plaster. P.C. Walters found it there. Defendant on being chaaiged eaid "Guilty that I have taken the £1, and I give it back." Head Constable May all said that the defend ant was the eldest of seven children. Her father was an ex-soldier who had served his country well. The defendant was inclined to go the wrong way. Possibly the Bench would consider it a case for lenient treatment. The Bench placed the defendant in charge of the Probation Officer for six months, and ordered her to pay the costs of the case—15s Her father became surety for her and agreed to pay the costs.

Alleged Theft by Soldier

Alleged Theft by Soldier. TWO RINGS MISSINC AT OARMARTHilliN. A special Borough Police Court was held at the Carmarthen Guildhall on Friday the 11th iiist. before Mr T. Thomas (chairman), Mr W. Spurrell, Mr T. Bla.nd Davies, and Mr Daniel Lewis. Augustus Samuel, a soldier in uniform, was charged with the theft of two rings-a. wedd- ing ring and a keeper—the property of Mrs Elizabeth Anne Davies, the wife of Mr James Davies, GG. Water street. Mrs Davies said that the defendant and a civilian friend called at her home and asked for lodgings. They stayed there a couple of J days. She took off her rings, and one of them j passed the lemark, "Mrs Davies is taking off her rings to pass as a single woman." Bhfl afterwards missed the rings. The prisoner was remandod for a week as the police desired to mako certain enquiries.

ITwo Ladies Drowned at SaundersfootI

Two Ladies Drowned at Saundersfoot. DOUBLE BATHING TRAGEDY. A double tragedy occurred on Saturday morning.at the seaside village of Saundersfoot I near Tenby. The victims were two elderly I ladies, who had residfed there for many years— iMvss Mary Einment and Miss Alice Springs- It was their custom to bathe every day, aDd they had a tent on the beach at St. Bride's Bay, close to the harbour, and not far from t.be house, Ashcroft, where they lived together. On Saturday morning they went to the beach shortly before nine o'clock. A few minutes after ten o'ciook Mr Davies, a visitor to tbØ village, who was walking along the shore, found the bodies of the two ladies. One. th" of Miss Spriggs, was lying on the sends, aOd Miss Emment's was found a short distant away on the rocks. The poliQe were at once communicated with, and Dr Evans was sent fot but lie found that life was extinct in case. No on besides the two ladies appears to been bathing at the time, and it is impossible to say what happened. The morning v>'&i rather rough, and there was a ground swell oj) the beach. It is surmised that one of may have got into difficulties and the going to her assistance, both were swept aøf and drowned. The tide was fairly high at ø time, and as it receded it left the two on the shore. Both ladies, it is understo" were able to swim. The bodies were remo*^ to Ashcroft. The ladies belonged to old Pembroke5b families, Miss Eminent being a native °, Haverfordwest. They were close friends B had lived together at Saundersfoot for ft period. They were highly respected, and sad occurrence has cast a gloom over village. The inquest was held on Monday by Mr J. E. Price, the coroner for South Pembr

LiLANFYNYDD

LiLANFYNYDD~ The hay harvest has finished here now- a one farm three girls, not yet out of their can feel perfectly satisfied with their « The eldest handled the mowing machine, the others pitched and loaded as wel las cOtl be wished. Many other young ladies in J parish have done work they never thottgP in pre-war days. The churchwardens and many of the bers of the Parish Church turned up jp 1 evenings to mow and clear away the the graveyard and tidy the paths up. e l saved the previous annual expense and tb | was done quicker.. i f The Vicar and Mrs Daren Jones inri^J those who have taken part in the nation9 If collection for our wounded to spend 3.n 6 noon at the Vicarage. The weather bei tea was taken on the lawn. Games and 'f' ments of all kinds helped them to enjoy pleasant time. ø There were very few visitors on Bank V day, only old folks and young childre solitary soldier on furlough to help harvest was the only splash of colour place. V" 1- CARMARTHEN—Printed and Published b 5 Proprietress^ M. LAWRENCE, at her Office!, Street, FRIDAY, August 18tb, 1916.