Teitl Casgliad: Carmarthen weekly reporter

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Llun 1 o 4 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
3 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
Advertising

PLEASE CALL TO SEE OUK STOCK OF AGRICULTURAL MACHINERY. t Ike ilfeCO-RXICK-Latest.Intproved 2-HORSE BINDER _fty "4, TEE LIGHTEST BINDER EVER MADE. SOME POINTS- RIGID MAIN FRAME. STRONG DRIVE CHAIN. STEEL PLATFORM. WIDE RANGE OF ADJUSTMENT FLOATING ELEVATOR, SIMPLE KNOTTER. THE ^00^10^ or, Made to pass through ordinary gatewavs. Easy in Action. 'to Light in Draught. w. TliusT soi IKOmiOVDEBS, HOUSE PWSISMES. AM IKE AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERS, C-A-ZRIVII-A-IRTIEIEIT. fronmongery-to Hall Street and 9 Priory Street. Bedstead Showrooms-5, St Mary Street. Furniture Showrooms-I St Mary Street. Farm Implements—Market Place, Carmarthen, Llanelly, Llandyssul, and Llanybyther. r' Telegrams—" Thomas, Ironmongers, Carmarthen." Telephone—No. 19. I EORGE PILL A MARVELLOUS REMEDY. For upwards of Forty Years these Pills have held the first place in the World as a Remedy for Piles and GRAVEL, and all the common disorders of the Bowels, Stomach, Liver, and Kidneys; and there is no civilized Nation under the Sun that has not experienced their Healing Virtues. THE THBJRJE JbUPvMS OF THIS REMEDY No. I -George's Pile and Gravel Pills. No. 2-George's Gravel Pills. No. 3-. George's Pills for the Piles, $old everywhere in Boxes, 1/3 & 3/- each. By Post, 1/4 & 3/2. PHOPRIEIOR"*J« IS. GIEORGE9 M#R»P«S«f H IB WAIN, ABERDARE. PRINTINGMWING! GOOD CHEAP AND EXPEDITIOUS | PRINTING | I EXECUTED AT THE "REPORTER" PRINTING It PUBLISHINGJOFFIUES o 13 LU E-STJREET OARMARTREN ORDERS BY POST receive prompt and careful attention. p R ICE S ON PLICATION. The Carmarthen Weekly Reporter PUBLISHED EVERY THURSDAY SVBNINO, Circulates througlicut South Wales generally, and has the LARGEST IRCULATION IN THE COUNTY OF CARMARTHEN PBICEONK PENNY; POST FRBE 1¡9 PER QOABTBB THE BEST ADVERTISING MEDIUM FOR ALL CC A3SFS OF ADVERTISEMENTS. NOTICES TO QUIT FROM LANDLORD TO TENANT AND TENANT TO LANDLORD, MAY he obtained at the "REPORTER OFFICE," Blue-street, Carmarthen. IPRIOE:ONE PENNY. X STOP ONE MOMENT Y Oh Dear Doctor MUST My Darling die? There is very little hope, But try TUDOR WILLIAMS' PATENT BALSAM OF HONEY. WHAT IT IS Tudor Williams' Patent Balsam of Honey Is an essence of the purest and most effica- cious herbs, gathered on the Welsh Hills and Valleys in their proper season, when their virtues are in full perfection, and combined with the purest Welsh Honey. All the in- gredients are perfectly pure. WHAT IT DOES 1 Tudor Williams' Patent Balsam of Honey I Cures Coughs, Colds, Bronchitis, Asthma, Whooping Cough, Croup, and all disorders of the Throat, Chest and Lungs. Wonderful Cure for Children's Coughs after Measles. it is invaluable to weak-chested men, delicate women and children. It succeeds where all other remedies fail. Sold by all Chemists and Stores in Is 3d, 3s Od, and 5s 6d bottles. Great saving in purchasing larger size Bottles. WHAT IT HAS DONE FOR OTHERS. What the Editor of the "Gentlewoman's Court Journal" says:— Sir,—The result of the bottle of your splendid Tudor Williams' Balsam of Honey is simply marvellous. My mother, who is over seventy, although very active, every winter has a bronchial cough which is not only distressing, but pulls her down a lot. Its gone now. With best wishes for your extraordinary preparation. W. Browning Hearden. i YOU NEED NOT SUFFER! i Disease is a sin, inasmuch that if you act ) rightly, at the right time, it can, to a great extent, be avoided. Here is the preventative The first moment you start with Sore Throat tae a dose of TUPOR WILLIAMS' -P-A-TEHSTa' BALSAM OF HONEY. It has saved thousandsl It will save youl It is prepared by a fully qualified chemist, and is, by virtue of its composition, eminent- ly adapted for all oases of Coughs, Colds, Bronchitis, Esthma, etc., it exercises a dis- dinct influence upon the mucous lining of the throat, windpipe, and small air vessels, so that nothing but warmed pure air passes into the lungs. It's the product of the Honeycomb, chemically treated to get the best results. The Children like it. THEY ASK FOR IT So different from most medicines. Nice to Take Cuies Quickly For vocalists and pablic speakeri it )-.as no equal, it makes the voicc as clear as a bell. Manufacturer Tudor Williams, MEDICAL HALL, ABERDARE. TO POOR RATE COLLECTORS, ASSISTANT OVERSEERS, &c. FORMS of Notice of Audit, Collector a Monthly Statement, Sec., Poor Rate Receipt Books, witn Name of Parish, Particulars of Rate.&c., printed in, can be obtained at the REPORTER OFFICE at Cheap Rates. Send for Prices. THE CARMARTHEN BILLrOST1140 COMPANY, NOTT SQUARE, CARMARTHEN. BILLPOSTINGand ADVERTISINGS all its Branches, throughout the Counties of Canr> then, Pembroke. and Oardigan R. M JAMES, Manager. Carmarthen County Schools. THE GRAMMAR SCHOOL. HEADMASTER: E. S. ALLEN, M.A, (CANTAB). COUNTY GIRLS' SCHOOL HEADMISTRESS: Miss B. A. HOLME, M.A., Late Open Scholar of Girton College, Cambridge. FEES:— £ 1 9s. per Term (inclusive). Reduction when there are more than one from the same family. The next Term begins Wednesday, September 13th The Headmistress (at the Girls' School) and the Head master (at the Boys' School) will be p!eased to see the parents of new pupils on Saturday, September 9th, from 11 to t, and on Tuesday, September 12tb, from 2.30 to 5. Boarders can be received at the Grammar School. = 1/lj WE CLAIM THAT 2/9 11)356- TTHTS DROPSY, LIVER, AND WIND 'i PILLS cvss Constipation, Backache, Indigestion, Heart W eak- ness, Headache, and Nervous Complaints. Mr. John Parkin, 8, Eden Crescent, West Auckland, writes, dated March 12th. 1912 "I must say that they are all bhat you represent them to be, they are splendid, indeed I wish I had known about them sooner. I shall make their worth known to all who suffer from Dropsy." Sole Maker- S. J. COLEY & CO. 5 HIGH ST, STROUD,GLOS. WEDDING CARDS. NEW SPECIMEN BOOK CONTAINING LATEST & EXQUISITE DESIGNS Sent to intending Patrons at any address on receipt of an intimation to that effect. PRICES TO SUIT ALL CLASSES. • REPORTER OFFICE," 3 BLUE SI

Raid by 13 Zeppelins

Raid by 13 Zeppelins. ONE BROUGHT DOWN NEAR LONDON. A SECOND IN DIFFICULTIES. The following communiques have been issued by the Press Bureau :— PRESS BUREAU, Sunday, fi.10 p.m. The following communique was issued by the Field Marshall in Command of the Home Forces at 1.45 p.m.:— (1) Last night's air raid was carried out by 13 airships, and was thus the most formidable attack which has been made T>n this country. (2) The principal theatre of operations was the Eastern Counties, and the objective seemed to have been certain industrial centres in the Midlands. (3) The new mea.sures taken for the reduc- tion and obscuration of lights proved most efficacious, for the raiding squadron instead of steering for the cities, as in the raids of last spring and last autumn, groped about in the darkness, looking for a safe avenue of ap- proach to thei,r objective. (4) Three airships only were able to ap- proach the outskirts of London. (5) One of them appeared over the northern districts at about 2.15 a.m., where she was at onoepioked up by searchlights, and heavily engaged by anti-airoraft guns and aeroplanes. After a few minutes the airship was seen to burst into flames and to fall rapidly towards the earth. Tho slrp was destroyed, the wreck- ago, engine, and the half-burned bodies of the crew being found at Ouffley, near Enfield. (6) Our experts hope to be able to recon- struct certain part;ans of the framework. The large amount of wood employed in the frame- work of the Zeppolin is startling, and would seem to point to the shortage of aluminiur in Germany. (7) The two other ships which approached London were driven off by the defence with- out being able to approach the centre of the city. (8) A great number of bombs were dropped promiscuously over the East Anglican and the South-Eastern Counties, but complete returns of casual-ties and damage have not yet been received. Indications are that the damage and loss of life are not heavy, con- sidoring the large number of ships engaged, a great number of bombs dropped having fallen either in the sea or remote country dis- tricts. (9) It is hoped that any persons who have picked up fragments of the wrecked airship will submit them to General Headquarters, Home Forces, Horse Guards, Whitehall, Lon- don, without delay. If of no value in the re- construction of the airship they will be re- turned to the owners. It should be remem- bered that the detention of such articles con- stitutes a contraventiioin of the Defence of the Realm Regulations (Section 35 B.). The following communique was issued by the Field-Marshall Comtnandi ng-i n-Chief Home Forces, at 6 p.m., September 3rd:- Careful inquiries show that the casualties and damage caused by the air raid last night were quite disproportionate to the number of ships employed. The number of casualties which have been reported is as follows:- Ki,llc,d: One man. one woman. Injured: Eleven men and women and two children. No casualties occurred in the Metropolitan Police District. The la,test reports show that in the Metro- politan Police district 25 houses and some out- buildings were slightly damaged, two water mains were cut. and three horses killed. Elsewhere the damage was very slight, a certain number of cottages being damaged as well as a church, while a fire occurred at some gasworks. No military damage of any sort was caused. A resident in a suburb of London, who ob- tained a near view of the destroyed Zeppelin when she was first sighted, said that it was shortly after 2 a.m. he noticed an airship in the air amidst a maze of searchlights. She rema-in,ed. stationary in full view, lit up by the heoims of light, and then began to turn. At that moment she was hit square under the nose by a shot from one of our anti-aircraft guns, and the shock caused her to shiver. he immediately ascended above the clouds, and was lost to sight for a quarter of an hour. Then she reappeared showing a small but brilliant red glow, which continued to extend until the whole airship burst into flames. Tra- velling rapidly she continued to fall stern first and finally disappeared in a blaze of light which lit up the sky for some time. Cheer after cheer went up from the crowded streets. The Royal Flying Corps contin-gent resumed operations on the destroyed Zeppelin on the Monday, when the body of the Zeppelin's commander was the first to be recovered. His left hand was aim resting on the steering wheel, but his right hand been torn away. Close by the charred remains of other mem- bers of the crew were with difficulty extri- cated from the wire entanglments to which the skeleton of the fabric had been rduced. The remains were removed and placed in plain coffins. these being carried into a little corrugated churoh only twenty yards away from where the crumpled airship fell. Four engines were taken from the wreckage, toge- ther with a clock, which was intact, the hands stopping at ten minutes past three—half nn hour after the ship was n'' t seen to be falling. The airship came to earth with such force that much machinery, including the engines, I each weighing quarter of a ton. was deeply embedded in the earth. Many fragments of the wrecked airship were brought into the General Haedquarters of the Home Forces at the Horse Guards. Whitehall. Most of the e were pronounced quite valuless. There were portions, how- over, particularly of the engines and frame- work. which, in the opinion of the experts, will furnish information of considerable value, and may be expected to be turned to good account in the future construction of a.ir craft. A Note issued by the Press Bureau on Mon- day night states in addition to the Zeppelin brought down another was seriously damaged. INQUEST AND VERDICT. An inquest on the IxKJi.es of the crew re- covered from the ruins Of the Zeppelin brought down in the early hours of Sunday morning at Cufflev took place on Monday afternoon at tho Plough Inn. within a hundred yards of the spot where the airship fell. At the outset the coroner took the jury to inspect the Ifodies, or all that was left of them. Fifteen charred and broken bodies lay in coffins inside a little chapel at the edge of the field where the crowd stood around the wreckage. The jury had a gruesome task, and took no more time over it than was absolutely necessary. On resuming, a young flying officer came forward and btated that he was on duty at his headquarters on Saturday night. He Was not on flying duty. He saw a ZeppeIi, oomiBg over and one of the flying officers in his- squadron went up. Witness added that AS the officers in his squadron who hadi machines went up. He had not a machine, lie saw th# anti-aircraft guns firing shrapnel at Zeppe- lin, which came in the direction of Ouffley. He heard bombs drop and anti-aircfeft. gum firing. There was a lull in the firing for three or four minutes. The airabip then and- denly burst into flames and dived down. lift commanding officer and I came out in the squadron car. The journey took about 5(1 minutes, and he arrived about a quarter past. J three. We found in a field at the back of the Plough Inn the wreckage of a burning Zeppe- lin. Police and special constables were arriv- ing and they threw buckets of water on it. The commanding officer then went away and left me in charge. When it got sufficiently light we picked out the bodies of the airmen. The Coroner: Were there any means by which you could identify the bodies r Witness: None whatever. They had no identification disks. Was there any clothing left beside that which we have seen?—There was a com- mander's coat and badge, but no name on it. There was a lot of debris like purses and watches and personal articles. all charred and burnt. The officer produced a blackened watch, which was handed round among the jury. The Coroner: Were there any metal -buttons P Witness Yes, there were bits, but there was nothing distinctive. I cannot tell you any- thing else in connection with the bodies. They were burned and charred. Acting-Sergeant Jesse Whats, Metropolitan Polite, stationed at Cheshunt, said that about 3 a.m. he arrived at the place where the Zeppelin fell. The Coroner: Was it in flames ? Witness: Yes, and wrecked. Witness added that he saw three bodies near the propeller. They were all burning and bound down by wire. Ho threw buckets of water over them, and then extricated them. The first had Iris head towards the propeller. His legs wens burned off and his arms also up to the elbow. The other two were lying on their stomachs, facing the other way. He laid the bodies by the hedge. The first man was recognisable, but the other two were not. The Foreman of the Jury: Is there any doubt that the Zeppelin was brought down by an aeroplane? The Flying Officer: There is no shadow -of doubt about it. THE VEIRDIOT. The jury then returned a verdict ae fOiiows: That on the 3rd day of September, 1916, un- known German airmen were found dead in a wrecked Zeppeplin airship in a field dear the Plough Inn, Cuffley; secondly, that the Zeppe. lin was brought down down by the firse of & British aeroplane manned by Lieut. Robinson, of the Royal Flying Corps the cause of their death was injuries, the result of the destruc- tion of the Zeppelin. The Coroner said he had been in communi- cation with the authorities, and the deceased would receive a military funeral at the nearest cemetery. Our Strong Fleet. ADDRESS BY MR BALFOUR. Mr Balfour, First Lord of the Admiralty, after inspecting the Clyde shipyards on Tues- day addressed a meeting of the local represen- tatives of Trades Unions at the City Chamberig GJasgow. Mr Malfour. who had a greet reception on rising to speak, said splendid and magnificent though their work was, the Admiralty called yet for more. "We started the war," he said with a Fleet more powerful than any of our enemies—indeed, more powerful than all our enemies combined. Since the war broke out that Fleet has not only increased absolutely in numbers, in power, and efficiency, but to the best of my belief, as compared with the capi- tal ships of our opponents, it has increased relatively also (cheers). If we were strong in capital ships at the beginning of the war, we are yet stronger. and in regard to cruisers and destroyers there is absolutely no comparison between our strength at that time and our strength now (cheers). So far as my know- ledge goes there is no part of our Nary's strength in which we have not got at this moment a greater supply, and in some, depart- ments an incomparably greater supply, thaa we had on the 4th August, 1914" (cheers). The First Lord dwelt upon the immense and important labour which was thrown not only upon our warships but upon the mercantile marine in supplying our armies and those of our Allies in the widespread theatre of way. It was a prodigious task, and if those engaged in building were to relax their e4forts the con- sequences to the Allied would be incalculable in their magnitude and disastrous in their results. It was not merely fighting &hips which we had to consider, but also the mer- cantile marine. It was the fact that whilst we owned1, roughly speaking, about half tho mercantile tonnage of the world, half of that was now earmarked either for the purposes of war or the supply of our Allies. He thought 42 per cent. of our tonnage was now required for carrying on military operations. The war had not developed very long before it became clar that we should have to come to the assist- a nee of our Allies, and some ten per cent. of our tonnage was handed over to them abeo- lutely. That meant that more than half of our mercantile tonnage was used either for military purposes by ourselves or by our Allies for what were proctically military purpfcfces. When the war broke out the number of vestsos calculated to deal effectively with the t submarine menace could be counted by hun- dreds from the destroyers downwards to the I paddle mine swpper. They" could now be counted by thousands (cheers).

FAIRS FOR SEPTEMBER

FAIRS FOR. SEPTEMBER. 8. Llandovery. 9. Carmarthen. 10.-11 Ammanford. 12. Tregaron. ( 14. Llangadock. 16. Lampeter. 18. Llanboidy. 19. Whitland. Haverfordwest. 20. Newca-stle Emlyn and Adpar, -Narberth. 21. Llandyssul. I 25. Pontardulais. 28. Llandilo. Narberth, Pontardulaig. I 29. Whitland.