Teitl Casgliad: Carmarthen weekly reporter

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 4 o 4
Full Screen
10 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
Tal PASSING WEEK

Tal PASSING WEEK "Let there be isiaistlos; there are gr»pe«, If old things, there are new • Ten thousand broken lights and abape8 k'et glimpses of the true."—Tennyson. In the year 11)13, it celebrated German Gemval published a work in whirh he said that war was the most glorious tonic which human- ity could have, and that it was only the weak and effeminate nations which could possibly desire peace. This book we now know. was published for the the purpose of preparing the Gtirman and the Austrian mind for the great war of conquest which was to begin as soon as the Kiel Canal was completed. The Kiel Canal was completed in June. 1914, and the war started in August. 1914. Now the Germans are beginning to think that they have had quite enough of the tonic They have been using various tools to By peace kites for them. So long as the Germans were abe to advance, war was a glorious picnic. There is one fortnight which tho Germans called "Die Grosse Zeit"—that is to say the "Grand Time." This was the fortnight during which they captured Liege and Xamur. de- feated the British at Mons*. swept the French Army before them, and capturing Ma be u go rolled on triumphantly over the great northern plain of Prance until they wore within sight of Paris. • *» In those glorious times, the Germans could not talk enthuisiastieally enough about war. War was better sport than football or cricket; it was miles ahead, of golf j aud it was even more ex-jiting tliau,.f;ai;ds or roulette. It was such a glorious thing, to march over a peaceful country to carry off the plunder you wanted And to sot fire to ail you could not carry away. It was rare sport to have the whole population —men, women and children—at your mercy and to he able to givo full play to all your vilest instincts. It was better still to meet enemy soldiers who had not one gun for every German fifty and to annihiliate them. In those days war was the greatest fun possible. _.It Now things are quite different. The German Chancellor sends to the King of Spain, to the Pope, and to the President of the United States and asks them as friends of both parties to use their influence to try to put a stop to this terrible slaughter. There is not a word now about the fine tonic which war is. Things have changed completely. It is a fine tonic for a German to wallow in the gore of other people but it is quite another thing when these people are able to turn round and wallow in Gorman gore. When the German prophet pokeof war, he never for a moment contem- plated the possibility of anything but a suc- cession of German victories. This is going to be a tonic but the management of the case has been taken out of the hands of Germany. • The case now begins to remind one of the celebrated ballad The dog and man at first were friends But when the row began The dog to gain some private ends "Went mad and bit the man. The wound it looked both sore and sad To every Christian eye And while they swore the dog was mad They swore the man would die. But Boon a wonder came to light. Which showed the rogues they liod The man recovered of the õite. The dog it was that died. There is a certain amount of mystery con- nectea with the last line. We are not told exactly how the dog died. He may have been thrown into a pond with a stone round his neck. Or he may have been suspended from a tree with a rope. The German dog is going to have a similar experience. When the Ger- ma ndog went mad and bit Europe, the case certainly looked serious. It looked a very bad bite, and everybody said that the victim was going to die. But they were mistaken after all. Europe has recovered of tho bite, and it is the German dog which is going to die. First of all the Germans said that they were prepared to let bygones be bygones. If the Allies agreed quietly to let Germany keep alL she had grabbed, then Germany would not attempt to grab any more and would be will- ing to stop the war. This means that Ger- many wants five years rest m order to start a fresh war which will finish the job completely. "When that fresh war were completed, there would be only one country in Europe—that would be Greater Germany. Germany counted on finishing the war in six months. When she saw after the battle of the Mairne that things were going very slowly, she recognised that she had not fully prepared for a job of this dimension; So she was prepared to stop where she was—and to make peace. If our statesmen were criminal enough to agree to this, it would me-an that every factory in Ger- many would be kept on "munition work" for the next fire years, that every dockyard would build submarines and cruisers, and that in a few years time another war would f-tart in which Germany would make no mistakes and no miscalculations. Germany did not want peace; Germany merely wanted to call "half- time." At the present time Germany is very anxious probably to arrange an arnistice. This is a very old dodge. The object of an armstice is to enable all parties to hold a conference. If any such proposal were agreed to. the war would be stopped for a month or so. Then if ngotiations failed, it would begin a.gain. An armstice would be very useful to the Germans just now it would enable them to extricate thenvseUe from a very difficul position. The Germans probably can't hold on to Belgium and to Northern France much longer. They are weakening, and the Allies are grow- ing more powerful every day. They can't hold on, and they dare not let go. They are in much the position of the man who caught hold of a tiger by the tail. He could not make up his mind whether it was more dangerous to hold on or to let go. The tiger doubtless settled the question in the end whilst the man was trying to make up his mind. • If the Germans are too weak to hold the ground, they are also too weak to retreat. Suppose the German Army were to evacuate its present positions and to fall back .some- where else! What would happen? As soon as they cleared out of their present positions, the Allies would be after them like hounds after a fox. The Gorma.ns can't retreat in a body; they would only be courting destruc- tion if they attempted it. There is a com- plicated method by which an army in such a position, can extricate itself without absolute disaster. It means heavy loss in any event, and if the retereat is not skilfully carried out it means a complete rout. The German Army 110 doubt could fight well on other positions ihirty or forty miles further back—more or ess—but the question for them i.s how ore hey going to get there without being cut into titeoes in the process? This problem possibly is the real cause of the 'rerman peace-kites..Let there be on arristice-. et the war be stopped for a month or a fort- ight. Then the Germans can get out of the nches. fetch out their artillery and baggage, ick all their equipment into goods trains and v-e,- into passenger trains and rush off foil speed to the next line which has been ilfully prepared for defence.. Jf we had an 1 armstice the British and the French soldiers ¡ would have to look on quietly at this process instead of turning the guns on the retreating enemies and converting-them into a fleeing rabble. fffl x The Germans know that tlicy are beaten, j It is now a case of haggling for terms. Holl- weg fancies that when Germany is at its last gasp he wiil be ah10 by means of bluff and taU talk to make a favourable peace. He will tell us that Germany can fight on for years, but is quite willing to arrange terms. He hoped that by this kind of talk he would be able to make terms with Europe in the same way that a solicitor who has a good case makes terms with the solicitor on the other side who has no case at all. The terms are usually in such cases in favour of one side. It is a case of saying. "There are my terms: If you don't accept them. the case goes on." Von Ho 11 weg fancies himself talking like that when the German Armies are at the last gasp. Von Hollweg. like many Germans, is a dunderhead who fancies that he is very clever. This is Germany's loss to-day. She has not a statesman of any ability. Germany has produced some great statesmen in the past. At the present time, there is not a German statesman who possesses any talent other than an enormous stock of low cunning **» There is nothing to be gained by any arm- istice with Germany. German's strength is all on the outside. Von Hollweg some time ago said that the German Army was like a ring of steel. So it is. It is a ring—it lias nothing inside it. Germany's strength is all on the outside. "When the German Army is smashed in Belgium and France that will be an end of it. It is quite as easy to annihilate Germany on the Somme as on the Rhine.

Carmaitheusiiiro Appeal Tribunal

Carmaitheusiiiro Appeal Tribunal The Carmarthenshre Appeal Tribunal sat at teh Carmarthen Guildhall on Friday. Mr W. Griffiths presided, and there were also present. Mr Dudley illianis-Drummond, Mr T. Morris, Mr H. E. Blagdon-Richards, Mr John Lloyd, Mr Joseph Roberts, and Mr V. Evans. Capt. Cremlyn represented the military and Mr H. Jones-Da vies the agricultural interest. WHICH MEDICAL BOARD. The case of Mr D. Rees, the Llangad butter merchant, who went to be examined bv the Swansea Medical Board,, who passed turn for Class C3 again came up. The case had been adjourned in order that Capt. Cremlyn might produce his instructions to support his contention that the man must go before tho medical board in his own area. which was at Carmarthen. Capt. Cremlyn produced a new regulation issued on the 20th inst., which, he explained, stated that anyone applying for medical exam- ination was to get a card from the recruiting officer in the area in which he lived, and must go before the medical board in that area. The reason for that regulation was that people who were examined by the medical board :n their own area and wore not satisfied with tho decision went and got re-examined by another medical board outside their area. The regu- lation was issued to put a stop to that. The Tribunal adjourned the case for a week in order that the man should be examined by the medical board in his own area. YOUNG INDISPENSABLE^. I Capt. Edwards appealed against exemptions I granted to Ycrwrrth Williams, Brinlev Francis Henry Davies. young men between 18 and 24, employed at the Tinworks a.t Ammanford. The two former were allowed until the 1st of January. In the last named case, the appeal was allowed bv consent. THREE MONTHS ALLOWED LULOH. I Gapt. Margrave appealed against the esemp tion granted to Benj. Henry Davies. tailor. M aesglas. Pencader. Exemption until 1st January, POSTMAN EXEMPTED. Capt. Margrave also appealed against the exemption granted to David John Jones, London House. Pencader, a rural postman, aged 37. The appeal was dismissed. SCHOOLMASTER EXEMPTED. Capt. Margrave appealed against the ex- emption granted to Evan David Jones, Well Villas. Saron, Llaugeler. a schoolmaster, The local tribunal said that the average attendance was only 44, and the work could be done by women. The appeal was dismissed TEN SACKS A WEEK. Mr J. 31. James, Central Stores, Clyn- derwen, appealed against the decision of the Whitland Rural Tribunal, who had refused an exemption to S. E. James. Appellant said that he had a steam bakery and baked 10 sacs of flour a week; the bread had to be de- livered by motor van daily. Mr Howell Davies appeared for appellant. The appellant stated that he could not bake; the doctor forbade him to do so. He could not carry on business without his bro- ther. He said that he had discharged another man because his manner was unbearable. Capt. Cremlyn: How long has this man been in your employment before you dis- charged him? Appellant: Two and a half years. Capt. Cremlyn You tolerafced his discour- teys for two and a half years, but when you saw that there was a chance of your brother going into the Army you discharged him. The appeal was dismissed. IvIDWELLY TINPLATER. D. A. Lewis. 3. Croft terrace, Kidwelly, tin plater, applied for exemption on personal grounds.—The appeal was dismissed. ST. CLEARS BUILDER. James Howells, White Hart, St. Clears, coal and lime merchant, appealed against the deci- sion of the Carmarthen Rural Tribunal which refused him time to complete a building con- tract he had in hand. The appeal was dis- missed but it was suggested that the military should allow the appellant five weeks before calling him up. TEN DAUGHTERS AND ONE SON. David Owen, Cwmduad Post Office, appealed for temporary exemption for his son. This was the only son. Capt Cremlyn: How many daughters have you Mrs Owen Ten.—The mother added that sh ehad taken temporary charge of the Cwm- duad School. Exemption until 1st January was allowed. WARP DRESSER MUST GO. Thomas Lewis, Glanyrynys Factory, Llan- pumpsaint. appealed for John James Lewis (18).—(Mr Wallis Jones appeared for appell- ant-—Appellant said that it was impossible to replace this man who was a warp dresser. The appeal was dismissed. C A R M AR THEN I RO N MON G ER, Messrs Harries, Towy Works, Carmarthen, appealed for exemption for David Cleaver (19) LlanUwch Mill. Mr Harries said that women could not handle the heavy goods. The appeal was dismissed, but the military agreed not to call up the man for a month. CARMARTHEN PAINTER'S APPEAL. Mr W. L. Jones. 10. St. Catherine street, Carmarthen, appealed for his son, Lewis Jones Mr Wallis-Jones asked that the ease should be adjourned for fivfS months, as the man was not liable to be called up until then. This was agreed to.

Advertising

I FOR THE BLOOD IS THE LIFE.-Clarke's Blood Mixture is warranted to cleanse the blood of all impurities, from whatever cause arising. For Scrofula, Scurvy, Eczea.a, Bad Legs. Abscesses, Ulcers, Glandular Swellings, Skin and Blood diseases Pimples and Sores of all kinds. Its effects are I marvellous. Over ~>0 years success. Thousands of testimonials. In bottles, 2s 9d each, of all chemists and Btores. Ask for Clarke's Blood Mixture and do not be persuaded to take an imitation.

CARMARTHEN I UNDElt THE SKAltCHLIGBT

CARMARTHEN I UNDElt THE SKAltCHLIGBT, Goroe, come, ami a.I& rou down you shall nof budge, shall not go, till I act you cp a ulass Where you may lee the inmost part of yos. SKAKBirKAItB. There is a great revival in the "clogging trade" in Carmarthen and district, Uttte j children are again to he seen clattering to school in clogs in districts in which boots had been the fashion for the last thirty years. This is the result of the disappearance of the cheap boot. Here is a connundrum. Suppose every member of a congregation put the household clock back an hour on Saturday night (accord- ing to law) and those in charge of the church did not. Would the congregation find^ them at the church an hour too late or an hour too early ? Several people have been driven to the verge of distraction grappling with this problem. It is said quite seriously that the farmeis entitled to charge more for their produce now because they have to pay income tax. This is a wrong headed argument altogether as it implies that the customers ought to pay their own taxes and pay the farmers taxes as well. It would be quite as sensible to say that the customers who have to pay income tax ought to get the goods cheaper beoause they have loss money to spend. «*• "My husband doe snot work, said n lady at the Tribunal the other day "he is only fit to be a commander." "That is your idea of a commander" said the military representative. "Yes, sure," replied the appellant. It was rather crudely expressed; but this lady seems to have hit upon a great truth. There is a highly successful and prosperous man alive at the present day who is said to have started in business on his own account because he was such a duffer that nobody would give him a job as an assistant. Evi- dently he was only fit to be a "commander." • There are people who think that the same principle—well recognised in civil life—holds good in military circles. There is a storj of a little fellow who went to enlist in the early days of Kitchener's Army. "What do you want?" asked the sergeant. "1 want to join" said the little chap. "Oet out; you're too small" was the reply. "I'm quite as big as that fellow over there." "But he's an officer." "Oh. never mind; I don't care; make me an officer all the same to me." «** One fact which the Tribunals have disclosed is that there are tens of thousands of people who-a mission in life is to "superintend." They call it "supprintendmg" other people very often call it "fussing." lliere is such a II thing as real essential superintending. For instance a mason could never put up a house | except there were an architect. The plans would have to be drawn, and the architect has to see that they aro carried out. This is an absolute necessity. At the same time, the architect docs not stand over the workmen worrying them and pestering them. A man who really can superintend can do it without much fuss. Men have known to get elected on public bodies for the sole purpose of having an excuse for fussing and interfering with work- men. The spirit of fussiness is highly devel- oped in some people. They are always inter- j fering in things -which are not really their busi- ness. It i a curious thing that the men who can always fuss and point out what other ought to do are never much of a success in their own spheres. The bigger duffer a man is in his own line, the more eloquent ho can be- come in pointing out what other people ought to do. It is true what Dooley says "For every man you can get to dig a street drain for two dollars a day, you can get ten men to look on nothing." [ The "superintendent" or the "commander" j is likely toriisappoar as a result of the short- age of labour. The fact of the matter is that he is not likely to have anybody to superin- tend or to command. If he can't do some work himself, there is probably nothing to do but to put up the shutters. In town and country you get able bodied men coming forward to say that they can't do without a certain man— and the whole appeal is based on the theory that the able bodied appellant is not to be ex- pected to do any work himself. We are* in the habit of talking of the "bloated aristocrats" as if they were dukes, and earls and million- aries. This war has revealed the fact that t there are people who have not an income of £200 a year, and yet who are complete bloated aristocrats in their ideas. No man has a right to ay that he is hard- worked merely because he gets up at 6 a.m. and works until G p.m. Our forefathers not only did that, but they had their supper at 6 p.m. and then wont on working until 10 p.m., when they went to bed. We are coming to that. Before this war is over, many "com- manders" will have to get up at 6 a.m. and work like an ordinary workman until 6 p.m.. and then devote three or four hours to corres- pondence and other work which used to be their sole employment. This is very hard of course; but even their lot will not be half as hard as that of the poor fellows in the trenches There are still people who think that this war is going on to its finish without causing them to get up an hour earlier or to break in on their evenings. It is a curious fact that the Government is holding up more men of military ago than any other employer. It is suggested by Gov- ernment representatives at Tribunals that women can do work which involves heavy manual labour. Will it be believed that there are 50.000 young men of nr'itary age in the Civil Service? ««* The number of men which the Government employs to do clerical work would make a fine Army corps. The Government tells banks and Hiercantilo houses that wopien can do the work of their clerks; but the Government keeps 50.000 men of military age doing such work in its own offices. We are told that women can manage grocery shops and bootshops; but it takes a man apparently to fill up printed forms in Government offices. It is true that the work of the Civil Service requires several years ex- perience; but the same argument applies to commercial houses. I fancy an educated ) girl would learn to fill up printed forms and to make the calculations quicker than she would learn the grocerj' trade, and tainly quite as fast as she would learn bank- ing. The Government however whilst taking up the attitude that its own work requires careful training talks to other people as if there were armies of iully trained women to take the place of their employees when called up: «t« Several questions have been asked of appell- ants at recent tribunals as to how much income tax they pay. It is quite evident that the Chancellor of the Exchequer has his eye on the Tribunals., for the questions are being asked in the most widely separated areas. Of course- appellants have it both ways. They can't tell the Tribunals that they are doing a big trade, and tell the Income Tax Commis- sioners that they are doing very little. There 1 is something to be said favour of the theory that it is had policy f close up a big business I which pays plenty or vaxes to keep tho war going. It is bad p olicy to take away p heavy ratepayer and to make h'm a burden on the remaining taxpayers. But then he must pay the taxes. Tho Government is believed to be taking steps to prevent appellant "ringing the changes." It is quite consistent to require everybody either to serve or to pay a good srlice of the expenses. «#* It is an undoubted fact that many people don't know what "income" is. One ma.n said recently "When 1 keep my wife and family and pay for my boys at school and have a holi- day, I have not much income left." Many people conscientiously tell the Tribunals when questioned that they malie very little profit- simply because they don't know what "profit means. • There is going shortly to he a meeting of the Women's Agricultural Labour Committee at Carmarthen. It would be interesting to know how many women have been recruited from Carmarthen. My information is that the number is nil. I am not surprised. Most women in Carmarthen have quite enough to do, and they oan't see the fun of abandon- ing their present work to "plough and sow and reap and mow." As for women who have t nothing to (lo-if there are any-tiiey are like the men who have nothing to do. People who have nothing to do never take these appeals to th em solve s. Alsthiia.

Carmarthen School of Art

Carmarthen School of Art. ANNUAL PRIZE~DISmiBUTTON The annual prize distribution in connexion with the Carmarthen School of Science Illd Art was held on Thursday the 28th ult. Th Rev A. Fuller Mills presided. The Chairman said that they were all H'ad to see the annual meeting come round; i* might have been different considering the state of the country aind of other countries at present time. They had been been able 'o keep the door open thanks to their energetic headmaster (Mr W. Jones), and the indefatig- able secretaries (Mr J. Howell Dtwics an i Mr D. Maurice Jones). The filllanci.al position of the school was bettor now than it had boon this time last year, and so was the numo,r o. pupils. Such schools were very impo :t they were a beginning in a child's life to some thing different. We hear a good deal of t!-o commercial struggle which we as a natio l would have to face after the war and it miz-it bo that this school would play its part in the progress and continuance of this great Empire. Why should Carmarthen not send forth its geniuses to startle the world of art. Tho Headmaster presented his annual re- port as follows:— Mr Manse I Lewis, Mr Chairman, Ladles and Gentlemen,—I have much pleasure in sub- mitt.ing to you the report of the School work for tho past session 1915-16. The total number of students attending the .school for the past session was 128, being an increase on the previous year of 34 students. 118 students were from the county area. The total number eligible for the Government grant was 79, who made attendance totalling 5,483 hours and 45 students from the element- ary and secondary schools made an attendance of 2.722 hours. Of the total 16 attended courses for teachers j of elementary and secondary schools. 16 i attended the machine drawing class, 12 the embroidery class, 6 the building construction, and 6 attended courses for other crafts. The following a.re the results of the exam- inations in May last. Stanley Evans passed in the lower examination in building construction iiof the Board of Education. At the examination of the National Society of Art Masters for the gchodl certificate for ) teachers, Fanny H. Lewis pas-ed 1st class in plant and nature drawing, 2nd class in object drawing in colours, and 1st class in theory; Lucy B. Watson. 2nd class in plant and nature drawing. 2nd class in object drawing in colours 2nd class in memory drawing on the black- board and 2nd class in illustration. Edith M. Harries 2nd class in object drawing in colour ) and 2nd class in theory. The school works for the session were ad- judicated for prizes by Mr Grant Murray, the director of the Swansea School of Art, and 20 awards were made to successful pupils in draw- I ing, painting and craft work. i iMr Manuel Lewi- then distributed the prizes as follows :— Still life painting: 1. Taffina Rees; 2, Prisilla Jienkins 3, Enid Williams. Painting from copies: Enid Williams. ( Painting still life in sepia: 1, James Davies j 2, Fanny Lewis; commended, Florence M. | Davies. Painting from the cast in ecpia 1, Maggie Davies; 2, James Davies. Shading from cast: 1, B. Trivett; F. Al. Davies, Fanny Lewis. Architectural drawing: David J. Pryce. Machine drawing: Phillip Walker. Embroidery Marie Williams. Embroidery, preparatory class: Bessie Nicholas. Teachers class Lucy Watson. Test examination in freehandTudor Lewis. Test examination, model drawing: Elwyn Richards, Test examination, geometry: George Twigg. Preparatory class: Bleddyn Waters, AJcwyn Waters, Emrys Lewis. The Chairman said that they would be glad to hear Mr Mansel Lewis.\who was a repre- sentative of one of the oldest families in Car- marthenshire he felt sure that Art ran in Mr Mansel Lewis's blood. Mr C. W. Mansel Lewis at the outset said that this was the first time he had been there, but he had at the Eisteddfod in Llanelly seen some excellent work by the pupils of this school He continued: The course of studies pursued here embraces a large variety of subjects of the greatest interest, with a leaning to the decora- tirve more than the pictorial side of art. Pro- ficiency in the art of design has now become a matter of exceptional importance in view of conditions that will arise before long. Nowa- days you can hardly take up a paper without seeing something about the war after the war, and it is in this war of commercial competition that decorative art is destined to play a very important part. Though now suffering greatly under the conditions prevailing throughout the world. Art will again take her proper place as being one of the nation's greatest assets in making for success in commerce, and as being of vital importance to a great variety of manu- factu-red articles, and determining the values of those products. The people who can design best will take the prizes of fortune as surely as you take the prizes from my hands because you were the beet in your circle of competitors. From the commercial point of view to nqgiect art and to make it a mere side issue in national life is a suicidal policy, for the prosperous nations in history have been those who have developed to the utmost their artistic possi- bilities, and the period of their greatest power has been that in which their art has been most pr.oductiv,e and intelligently encouraged. The educational values of drawing and its import- ance as a discipline in accuracy of observation is now well recognised. The eye, the mind and the judgment are trained, and there is the great increase in the sense of beauty arising from well directed art study. Through art we learn the distinction between beauty and ugliness. Among sentient creatures you find an evolution of faculties and emotions in an asconding scale, from fear and pugnacity in the iowor animals to affoction and a sense of humour in the higher, but it is only ma.n that has the sense of distinguishing beauty from ugliness and the ability to touch what we call art. This little word of throe letters is not only priceless in quality but ever varying in its manifestations, and in this respect has been compared to tho lady in the legend of the haunted castlo. All who visited the castle saw the vision of its once beautiful mistress, but everyone gave a different account of what was seen. The children saw her and said she was a child with blue oyes and golden hair like one of us. The young women who saw her said she was dressed as a bride. The. old men thought she had silver hair and was like wlt-it tho Madonna must have been when she was old. Another saw her and recognised the friend, the sweetheart, the wife the companion of his life. It is the same with a.rt, for beauty is no fixed quantity always and everywhere the same. From ago to ago we find manifes- tations of the beautiful in different forms. Homer was blind, but the spirit of beauty must have stood beside him and whispered in his ear, and after three thousand years her whispers have not ceased to echo through the world. Phidias must have seen her face to I face and expressed his ideals in the perfect beauty of abstract form. You who are stud-ents at this School of Art must have caught some passing glance from the spirit of Beauty as she one day crossed your path, giving you the im- pulse to devote your energies and spare time I to acquiring the rudiments of art's expression, In proportion as you love your work and con- I centrate your efforts in doing what your hands find to do will your hands and eyes and mind become trained and your faculties of percep- tion increased, and you will understand more and more the meaning of the opening line of Keat's Endyniioii--A thing of beauty is a joy for evor. The Rev Geo. Eyr Evans, secretary of the Carmarthenshire Antiuarian Society, im pro-. posing a vote of thanks to Mr Mansel Lewis, referred to the fact that his fellow-secretary, Capt. Rowland .Davies, is now serving at the front E. 0. Jono-, an assistant master of this school, whose drawing, of the tomb of Rhys ap Thomas was preserved in the antiquarian-room, j had given his life on the field of battle. it was said that thore was no Art in Walts; but he referred those who said so the magnificently carved gargoyle which had been discovered in j the ground of R-hydygor.se. The artistic spirit of some people had been shown by putting up the ticket lahPl "Garage" in front of the statue of General Nott, so that it was im- possibe to photograph the monument without taking in the label. We bad nix public monu- ments in Carmarthen. We had Picton's monument which was not the original monu- ment and which was likl) a needle sticking up. The Fusiliers monument was a graceful memorial; it had been washed for the National Eisteddfod of 1911 and had not, he thought, been washed since. The Fallen Heroes mom- orial in Guiildhall-suare was the sort of thing which is f-old by the dozen; it requires scrubb- ing every now and then; and in Nott square there was a statue of General Nott in a Roman toga, which lie never wore, looking at a }pb?:1 which he never saw. (There was also the tablet to the martyred Bishop Ferrar which was usually covered with dust; and there was the tablet to Brinley Richards, which had been put up by the Corporation. We had no monu- ment to Bishop Thirlwall; none to John Ross, the printer; none to Peter Williams, the Bible commentator; and none to (Madame Bevan— if we except tho &tpono with the letters "Z.B." now in the possession of the Corporation. He suggested that we misiit have a monument on the sward in front of Christ Church to Bishop Thirlwall; one in front of Lamina*, street to John Ross; and one in front of Parkyvelvet Chapol to D:r Vance Smith, one of the New Testament revisers. The Castle Green on which Wesley had preached was no longer open to the public; but we had bad removed from the walls which Giraldus saw the advertising hoardings which defaced thorn. The time would come when every church and chapel would have to put up monuments to those who had fallen in the war. He suggested that they should not go to a stone mason and select from a catilogtile, of stock articles. He hoped not. He referrod them for beauty to the exquisitq memorial in St. Peter's Church which Mr Thorn a. shad put up to his son. Mr D. Maurice Jones, in seconding, said that they were greatly indebted to Mr Mansel Lewis for having interested Professor Ker- komer in Welsh Art. Mr Mansel Lewis, in responding. said that as one interested in landscape painting, he considered Carmarthen a beauty spot. He had not noticed the public monuments of Carmar- then but lie understood that they left some- thing to be desired. Professor Herkomer had been a friend of his for 40 years, and his con- nection with the Eisteddfod began when he (Mr Mansel Lewis) brought him down to Llan- elly to judge for the prizes in the Art School. Profeesor Herkomer waa immensely taken with the Eisteddfod. One thing they managed to do was to clothe the Archdruid in the insipuia of his office. iHe remembered the illte.rest which Professor Herkomer took in designing the Sword of State. All that was most interesting to Professor Herkomer and I to himself. Mr T. E. Brigstocke in moving a vote cf thanks to the chairman said that it was largely owing to his efforts that they had got a- grant from the- County Council. Mr Crossman seconded, and the motion was carried unanimously. j- The Chairman in responding said that ih? Rev George Eyre Evans had given them a pro- gramme whiich it would take 500 years to carry out.

ICarmarthen County Police Conrt

Carmarthen County Police Conrt. The Carmarthen County Police Court was held on Saturday before Mr J. Lloyd Thomas, Gilfach (in the chair), Air John Lewis (Mayor of Carmarthen), Mr Thomas Lewis, Brynglas; and Mr H. E. Blagdon-Richards, Carmarthen. 25 MILES AX HOUR. Johnny Jones, Foelgastell, a. collier, was charged with driving a motor car at a epe^d dangerous to the public on Llangunnor road on the 5th ult. Inspector Williams said that at 7.48 p.m. on the 5th ult. he saw defendant driving a motor car, BX735, between the railway station and the town at a speed which witness estimated at 25 miles an hour. Before aproaching the bridge lie sounded the horn of the car, but lie did not slacken speed. Defendant refused to stop when witness asked him t* do so. Defendant was fined t5. NO LIGHTS AT ALL. Edward Lewis, collier, Llwynwiwor. Pont- yates, Llangendeirne, was charged with dry- ing a horse and carriage without a front or rear light at 8.45 p.m. on the 9th ult. in the parish of Llangendeirne and also with having used obscehe language. Evidence was given by P.C. Jenkins, and defendant did not appear. Supt. J. E. Jones said that defendant was new to the court. There were six previous convictions against him for various offences. Defendant was fined £ 3 for driving without lights, and £ 1 for using obscene language. ALLEGED "G ANG" AT GORSLAS. David Lewis, collier, Grove Hills, Govslas. Llanarthney, charged Frederick Rondall, of Hawthorn Villa, Gorslas and Thomas Thomas, Penybank. Cross Hands, with assault, alleged to have been committed on September 4th opposite the Union Tavern. Gorslas. There was also a charge of assaulting Ebenezer Griffiths. Mr H. Brunei Wh ite, solicitor, appeared for F. Randall and pleaded not guilty T. Thomas pleaded guilty. Mr W;;iiis-Jones, who appeared for the pro- secution, said that he was informed that the defendants were members of a gang who terrorised people after dark. Ebenezer Griffiths, Norman House. Gorslas charged Thomas Griffiths., Green Grove Uchaf, Cross Hands, Fred Randall, and T. Thomas for assault alleged to have been committed on the same night. Evidence was given by David Lew's and Ebenezer Griffiths in support of the charge. J. P. Morgan, Highfield. Cross Hands, painter anti grocer, deposed to seeing a dis- turbance on September 4th. David Lewis was being assaulted, and Ebenezer Griffiths tried to act as peacemaker. Ben Davies, Crosway House. Gorslas, a collier, said he recognised Fred Randall on the night in question, he struck a match by the Union Tavern to look for something. Frederick Randall said he was not near the I nion Tavern on the night of September 4th. He was at the Black Lion on the evening in question, when he was with Will. Lynch and Vincent Gough until 9.45. Evidence was given by William Lynch, of Troedybryn, and Vincent Gough. Llwyn Onn, Cross Hands, two colliers, who said that tho defendant Randall was in their company from 8.30 to 9.30 p.m. Thomas Thomas sa.id that Randall was not in the company of Griffiths and himself when the alleged assault was committed. Thomas Griffiths, a discharged soldier, said that Randall was not in their company. Wit- ness denied having touched Ebenezer Griffiths. The Chairman said that the Bench had round that as there was a doubt in the case against Randall, the charge against him would be dis- missed. Thomas Thomas would be fined 1;2 in each case, and Thomas Griffiths would be fined £2..

The Question of Health

The Question of Health The question of health is a matter which 1f tare to concern us at one time or another when Influenza is go prevalent as it if just now, so it is woU to know what to tiUe to ward off an attack of this nnet weakening disease, this epidemic catarrh or cold of an aggravating kind, to combat it whilst under its baneful influence, and particularly site? nn attack, for then the system i» 90 lowered as to be liable to the most dangerous of com. pJainta. Gwilym EvW Quinine Bitten ia acknowledged by all nho have given it m fair trial to be the best specific remedy dealing with influenza in all its various stages, beinfl a Preparation skilfully prepared with Quinine and accompanied with other blood purifyma and enriching agents, suitable for the lirer digestion, and all those ailments requiri- tonic strengthening and nerve inere" propel ties. It is invaluabSe for those enffgN ing from colds, pneumonia, or any serious ill. new, or prostration caused by sleeplessness, jor worry of any kind, when the body has a IgenenU feeling of weakness or lassitude. Send for a copy of the pamphlet of testi. moniali;, which carefully read and consider well, then buy a bottle (sold in two sizes 2s 9<1 and 4s 6d) at your nearest Chemist or Stores, but when purchasing see that the naina "Gwilym Evans" is on the label, stamp and bottle, for without which rane a genuine. Sole Proprietors* Quinin. Bittem Manufacturing Company, Limited. I laneUx South Wales.

j raimarilien Board of GaardiaHS

raimarilien Board of GaardiaHS. HALF YEARLY CONTRACTS, The fslllowing tenders have been accepted by the Carmarthen Guardians Mr G. J. Lewis, King street; Beef Sid; mutton. 8id pork. Is 2d veal. 9d sut, &1; oxheads, 2s. Mr Geo. James, Crown Stores: Potatoes, (h 3d bread. 8id: butter, cask. Is 7Jd do., fresh. Is Sid cheese, English. Ilid flour, £2 Is; oatmeal, 22s; baron, Is 2d; peas, ti 4s fid rice. 2d sago, 3fd tea. Is 10ld coffee, 4 4 Ls 2N cocoa. Is 8jd sugar, lump, ojd sugar, Pemerara, 5id; pepper. Is lid; vinegar, la OJd; mustard, llid; eggs, Is lid dozen; lard, Did; onions, lid; Monkey Brand, 2s 6d and lOd per doz. Hndsons soap, £ 1 6s 4d eirt. soda. 4s; starch, hl; blue, GJd; Brasso, 4" 41(1 doz. candles. 5s 8id doz, lbs. Mr Rowland Phillips. Xorth British Stores: Riee, £1 0s 6d cwt. salt, 3s 2d; currants, 6Jd treacle, 5d; jam. Is Gd per 31hs; soap, tj 18s 6d per cwt.; blacking, us: matches, 6s 4d per gross; soap. lid per 2Jlb bar. Mr J. 0. Morgan, Carmarthen: Borril, 4S 8d stove polish. Is 7d; tobacco. 7s 2d. Mr D. Jones: Coal, £1 12s 3d and R I I I s 3d. Mr T. Bland Davies: Coal, RI 9s.

Advertising

FOR OLD AND YOUNG MORTIMER'S COUGH MIXTURE FOR COUGHS, COLDS, WHOOPING COUGH ETC., ETC. 5 ON l,R 70 YEARS DEPUTATION IN THIS DISTRICT. THIS CELtBRATED WELSII REMEDY la now put up in cartons securely packed for transmission to all parts of the world and contains a Pamphlet, written by an eminent Medical Authority, dealing with the various beneficial uses of this specific Price Is 1 d and 2s 9d per bottle. n. arger bottle i8 by far the cheapest.

I Carmarthen Rural Tribunal

I Carmarthen Rural Tribunal The Carmarthen Rural Tribunal &a.t at the Carmarthen Guildhall on Saturday. Mr John J ones (iPlas) presided. There were also pre- sent: Mr M. J. Evans, Mr D. T. Gibert, Mr Llewelyn Morgan, Mr W. Willilanis, ftnd lUr T. (Davies. Conditional1 exemption was granted to Ben Diavies. cowman. Coomb, Llangunnock; Do.vjd Jones, Coomb, carter; EJ!gaJI' Thomas, L.lan- meilo, gardener; and T. Bliuzard, J'antvr- athro, gardener. David Arthur, a. gardenor to the Rev '1' mnia s, Abergvvili, was granted exemption conditional on taking up munition work. Conditional exemption was granted to Fred Powell, gardener at Alltygfog. Exemptions were refused to John Thoma«, 32, labourer, employed by Mr James Wis,' Laugharne, and to John Davies, fisherman JAanst.ephan. HOW TO SAVE TIME. The Chairman pointed out that a good deal of time would he saved if appellants would go before the Medieval Board first. The finding of the Medical Ifoard might assist the Tobunnt a good deal* in coming to a decision Capt. Margrave said that they wasted a good deal of time over people who in the end might be rejected. CARA[ %P.TTIE.Pt inted and Ptiblisited by tb& Proprietress, M Lawrence, at her Offices, i Bluer Streee, i hidai, October 6th, 11ti..