Teitl Casgliad: Carmarthen weekly reporter

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 4 o 4
Full Screen
14 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
THE PASSING WLEE

THE PASSING WLEE. "Let there lie thistles, theie are grapes, If old things, there are new Ten thousand broken lights and shapes Yet glimpses of the tuie.—IENNYSON. The Crice. There is no need for these people to 00k for four-legged pigs to ont their potatoes. They will find it difficlllt to find any animal will find it (Iiffi more piggish than themselves. When the war is over they will have their answer ready to the question "What did you do during the great war?" The truthful answer of a good many people to this question would be, "I stayed at home and fleeced the wives and children of the men who were out fighting for me." There is a very plausible reason for the in- crease in tho price of dairy produce. The price of cattle food has gone up. We all recognise that fact. But potatoes are not fed on barley meal or cotton cake. The far- mers do not go out into the fields in the early summer and give the young potatoes a daily ration of cake and condiments. There is no reason at all for the increase in the price of potatoes. The only cause of the high prices is that there is a scarcity and that the Huns think there chance has come to squeeze the last drop of blood out of the British nation. The whole situation is very much like a cer- tain chapter in "Monte Chnsto." One of the characters is a wealthy banker who gets cap- tured by Italian brigands. They know him very well. He has little ready money about him but the bandits are determined to get a good slice of his fortune. They use no violence; but they detain him. He is asked to sign a cheque. He refuses. Thev keep him without food a couple of days. When he is feeling palrtirularlv hungry he sees the guard eating a grilled chic-ken. He asks if he can have some. The guard says that he can but explains that chickens are very dear just now —about a hundred thousand francs each. The banker holds out a little longer, but he collapses in the end and signs the necessary cheque a.nd gets his chicken. A few more days follow, and in the end the brigands get nil the money they want out of him for a few good square meals. There is no difficulty about cashing cheques; the signatory is weil known end the Italian bandits have powerful con- nections who can present the cheques without raising suspicions. It is to be feared that some people who used to be upright God-fearing members of society have determined to model their conduct on that of the Italian brigands depicted in the sensational novo]. Many of the men who are trying to work this trick now profess to be Christians. Oh yes! There is no doubt about it. Many of them are loathsome hypocrites, who really delude themselves into the belief that they are pious and religious men—whilst as a matter of fact they are simply a pack of bandits prowling about for their prey. Xobody denies that every trader and every producer has a right to a reasonable profit. Any person who knows anything at all about agriculture knows that with a fair crop pota- toes "pay" at £-1 a ton. Fifteen cwt. of seed potatoes will sow an acre. Last spring good seed potatoes could be purchased for t8 a ton. We say "good seed1 potatoes"—not the worn-out rubbish with which so many potato fields in Carmar- thenshire are planted. This means that the seed would cost 1(5. The rent of agricultural 11 land in Carmarthenshire does not average f:2 an acro. It IS very few tibL 1116 thoco close to towns—which rent at £ 2 an acre. These farms are almost invariably used for pasture by milk sellers, so they don't count. In the majority of cases land which grows potatoes in Carmarthenshire is not rented at more than £ 1 5s to £ 1 10s an acre. Let us however sav that the rent of the acre is L2. £ 6 for seed and t2 for rent only amount to £ 8. t4 would be a generous allowance for manure for an acre of land—allowing that 40 loads of farm-yard manure are used a,nd that it is worth 2s a load in the heap. This brings the expenses up to {12. Nobody can suggest that the labour in cul- tivating an acre is worth £ 8. An acre may mean two days ploughing, and a few days planting and a few more days "moulding up" and weeding. If a farmer employs a man or two they do not spend the whole summer over an acre of potatoes. They do a couple of days work there and go 011 with something else. Even if we allow that a man is worth 5 s a day and a horse 10s a day, t8 would be an extreme limit for labour on the most elaborate system of potato cultivation including a second "moulding up" and spraying with Bordeaux mixture. 1:8 for labo,ur brings up the expense of the acre to £20. This is the cost of potatoes per acre in the year 1916, worked out on a most generous scale. This would give good seed, and good cultivation-not the miserable make shift methods of which we see too much on the backward farms. A farmer who adopted up-to-date methods would probably on the average have, a crop of 8 tons to the acre. Some will open their eyes when they hear such a figure suggested but that is only a fair crop. Twelve tons an acre was secured on one farm in Carmarthenshire last year at all events. If an expert can grow twelve tons per acre, surely any man who profasses to be a farmer ought to 1>e able to produce eight! If potatoes were only t4 a ton a, crop of eight tons would therefore give a return of £ 32 per acre. We have been treated to a lot of balderdash of late on this as on other eu beets. We hear of the "rates." If a far- mer has 100 acres of land there is no reason why all his "rates" should bo paid by his one acre of potatoes. Even if he pays t20 in rates and taxes on a farm of 100 acres, there is no reason in attributing ail that to the one acre that grows the potatoes. It only works out at 4s an acre! And the same thing applies to labour. If a farmer who has 100 acres of land grows one acre of potatoes, there is no sense in pretending that that one acre has to pay the whole years wages of a mail who per- haps spent ten days on it at the most—and 355 da vs elsewhere All this is very elementary, of course but there are many townspeople who know next to nothing of agriculture and the true. facts are a revelation to them. Some of the stuff which one reads in print seems to bo written by people who fancy that it takes the whole of a 100 acre farm to grow a cart load of potatoes. The genuine farmer—the man who really understands Jiis I!,] now buy the best seed and go in for the most intense culti- vation. He may hope to get ten tons of gota-toes from an acre—or more. At the ept-ember prices this year he will pocket tliO an acre or his potatoes. He will have done a good thing for himself, and he will have done good service to humanity because he will have increased the food suppfly. He will try to grow as many potatoes as he can, and he will this year probably grow two acres where he grew one before. But the Agricultural Hun has other ideas. He is not strictly speaking a farmer at all. He knows nothing about farming in the real sense of the term. He will go pottering about with he same old potatoes which are worn- out. being the produce of tubers which his father bought twenty years ago. These are worth perhaps £ 8 a ton as food. If he uses 15cwt. of these for seed instead of buying tip- top Scotch seed at tl4 a ton lie wi! tpeihaps have effected a- net saving of £ 4 or £ 5. As a result of his incompetent- efforts he will get a crop of three or four tons to the acre. In the end lie loses six or seven tons of potatoes— say £ 40—in theyield. When he Frets in his miserable crop of three tons he thinks that he ought to get an enormous price to com- pensate him for his own incompetence! He feels that an acre of potatoes ought to bring him in £60, and as he has not the ability to grow more than three tons to the acre, ot course lie feels he ought to get t20 a ton. The poor silly old Hun has not the sense to increase the produce of his soil all ho can do is to keep the crop to its lowest level and howl for famine prices for the little he grows. The Hun wants sla-ve laobur to work his land. The mem who are now hoarding up potatoes and giving them to the pigs are the same men who made the very name of Wales a bye-word for iil-treating English industrial school boys. They used to get English boys at 2s 6d a week and make them do the work of men. The 2s 6d was never paid. In the end it always turned out that the boy owed the Hun money beoause the "master" bought the. dothes,and the clothes were very dear apparently a-cco-rding to the accounts which the "master" produced. These Huns have been very disappointed with the action of the Government in regard to agricultural labour. When they hoard of Class C. men being sent to work on the land and when they heard of National Service, they thought that they were going to be provided with a new set ot slaves in place of the English industrial school boys. They have been sadly disillusioned. Men who are send to work on the land are to be properly paid. 25s a week is to be the minimum wage! There is no reason at all why it should be the maximum. A man working on the land is not to get less than 25s a week. But there is no reason why he should not get L3! It is time the intelligent farmers of Car- marthenshire arose and disavowed the Agri- cultural Hun. He is bringing discredit on them, and people who don't know the real facts a,re apt to think that he is a fair type of the Welsh farmer. In order to enlighten any persons who are ignorant enough to think that a local ring can affect the market permanently, it will be well to quote the approximate figures of potato growing in different parts of the United Kingdom. The acreage usually under potatoes in the United Kingdom is Ireland 500,000 Scotland 320,000 England and Wales. 130,000 Ireland and Scotland are making efforts to increase their acreage. The price which the Irish farmer used to get for his potatoes was £ 2 10s a ton. Even at that price he grew 500.000 acres. Now that he has been guaranteed £ 6 for next year's crop he will probably double his acreage. The Irish crop works out at 8 tons to the acre. The Scotch growers are trying to extend, their potato area. The Scotch crop works out at over 10 tons to the acre. If we have a good year, Scotland and Ireland will produce between them twelve million tons of potatoes. This would mean 21 bs of potatoes a day for 365 days for every man, woman and child in the United Kingdom! We have only got to hold out until July at the latest—Scotch early potatoes are ready by the middle of June—and the Agricultural Huns wili find themselves a back number. The only effect of a shortage of supply in any part of England and Wales will be to put English and Welsh money in the pockets of Scotch and Irish farmers! There is, by the way, no earthly reason why everybody who has a bit of garden should not have early potatoes by the 15th of June m Carmarthen and district. It is almost in- conceivable; but there are really people who don't know what "early potatoes" are. They think that early potatoes mean small pota- toes dug before they are matured. Early potatoes are a distinct type of tubers which mature in eight or nine weeks after they are planted. Scotland is a much colder country than So-nth Wales yet by the 20th of June truck loads of early potatoes are beginning to arrive in Glasgow from Ayrshire and in Edin- burgh from the Dunbar district. By the last week in June the potato season is in full swing and railway sidings are full of trucks loaded, with barrels of potatoes. There is no earthly reason why if Scotch methods were adopted, the populous centres of South Wales should not be supplied with early potatoes from Pembrokeshire and Carmarthenshire by the middle of June. South Wales peopio have been deluded into the belief that the new crop does not come in until the beginning of August—or the end of July at the earliest. It is time the University Colleges tried to teach the people of South Wales a little about potatoes. "aJes Is about a hundred y-cars behind the times in the matter of potato- growing.

iRefused at CarmarthenExempted at Llandilo

Refused at Carmarthen- Exempted at Llandilo. LLWYXFORTUNE FARM SERVANT HANDED OVER. At the Carmarthap Couty Police Court on Saturday, Martin Thomas Evans, a farm ser- vant, engaged on Llwynfortune Farm. Llan- egwad, was charged with failing to report himself for military service. Caipt. W. J. Cremlyn (barrister-at-law) ap- Eeared for the military, and Mr T. Howell a vies defended. Mr T. Howell Davies applied for a remand for a fortnight. The defendant, he said, was in the employ of Mr .Thomas, of Llwynfortune Farm, which comprised 300 acres, 50 to 60 of which were undeir corn. There were about 80 head of catte, 13 horses, and 80 breeding ewes. Defendant was the only man Mr Thomas had on the farm, and the object of asking for a remand was to enable the employer to make a supreme effort in the meantime to get a man on the farm as a substitute. Captain Cremlyn said the circumstances of the employer had nothing whatever to do with the case. The only grounds on which the court could consider the application for a i remand were those that affected the defen-I j dant. The defendant had behaved in a most outrageous fashion. He was first of all exempted by the Carmarthen Rural Tribunal until June 1st he was then exempted until August 1st, and subsequently till October 1st. Defendant then appealed to the County Ap- peal Tribunal on October 27tli, when the appeal was dismissed. He was then liable for military service, but owing to an Army Coun- cil instruction not to call up agriculturists until January 1st defendant was not called up. In the. meantime he went to the Llan- diio Rural Tribunal and got exemption; he secured employment at LIwy 11 fortune, and did not inform the military authorities of the change of address. He was called up on 22nd January and 24th January, but he did not' respond, and on the 21st February he was arrested. The military had treated the man in a merciful way, and, in return, defendant had treated the authorities in a contumacious manner. Capt. Margrave, recruiting officer, gave evidence bearing out Capt. Cremlvn's state- ment, and pointed out that in defendant's application to the Llandilo Tribunal he should have that the application form was pro- perly filled Hp. Mr Howell Davies: Was there not a general impression amongst farmers at that time that the Army Council order practically amounted to exemption until January 1st. itness I cannot say that. Did not a large number of farmers come to tell you that they thought the Order was an exemption till January IstP-No; a great many came to ask me what it meant and I told them. Capt. Cremlyn Did this man ever come to ask you what it meant? Witness No. Mr Howell Davies said that in view of the facts he would plead guilty. A good deal of confusion existed over the Army Council Order which was dated October 4th; 1916, and defendant at the time thought it gave him exemption until January 1st. Acting on that opinion he went to his present employer at Llwvnfortune. His employer to the Llandilo Tribunal for exemption, and it was on.lv through inadvertence that it was not stated in the application form that the man had been before the Carmarthen Tribunal. The Chairman (Mr Dudley Drummond) I said that the Bench had no alternative but to hand over defendant to the- military, but they made a strong appeal to the mi itt,rv to provide this large farm with a substitute. Capt. Margrave said he would give defen- t dant a fortnight's leave if he promised to re- port himself at the end of that- time, and he j would ;\bo provide a, substitute. The Chairman said that would be a verv satisfactory termination to the case, and in- formed defendant that the military had been very generous to him.

Advertising

OOAGFLIXI" Trans!l.rp:1t Cement for Glas China, &c. lid. and 1. rust free. j

CARMARTHENj UNDKH li1 HEARCH LIGHT

CARMARTHEN j U.NDKH li HEARCH LIGHT, Come, come, and sit yeu down; you shall not budge, You shall not go, till set you up a glass Where you may soe he inmost part of you. SHAKESPEAEE. There is still 110 gieat- shoi-tiige., of man power in Carmarthen. One day this week in Carmarthen Park, one m,an could be seen ploughing and about twenty looking on! A grower in this neighbourhood has been "hoklino- up" four tons of potatoes. He re- fused 1;14 5s a ton for them during tho last week in January and said that he was quite sure he would get £ 50 a ton for them by March. He is now so violent that it takes three men to hold him down. It would have done the Kaiser good if he had been in Carmarthen on Monday and had seen the recruits coming in from Llanelly to "join up." They had a foot race to see who would be at the office first, and some very good records were made. The dispute between the Electric Light Co. and the Camarthen Corporation is still a sub- ject of discussion at the Town Council. The dispute arises out of certain arrangements due to the war. In well informed circles it is confidently believed that long after a treaty of peace has been signed between the Allies wd Germany, this dispute will still be goin, on. It is a curio,its fact that despite the rigid enforcement of the law at Carmarthen, there has not been a single prosecution for a breach of the "No Treating Order." It would seem as if Carmarthen people were successful in their endeavours to restrain their generous instincts for the period, of the war. The Carmarthen magistrates have passed a resolution stating that in their opinion the fine of 10s for the first offence in convictions for drunkenness is insufficient. Of course M. is. The price of everything has gone up, and people who get drunk ought to be required to pay a war bonus of 25 per cent. on their fines. **1t Those who cant grow potatoes are advised to grow parsnips. An ounce of parsnip seed will sow a row 50 yards long and can be pur- chased at prices varying from 3d to Is per ounce. For those who want parsnips to eat and not to. show. seed at 4d to 6d an ounce is the best as it usually produces thick useful roots and not a useless long tailed crop. Parsnips should not have fresh manure. '1 hoy grow best on good old garden soil which has not been recently manured. They can't supersede potatoes, of course;-but those who have plenty of parsnips will obviously not re- quire so many potatoes, Wo are entering on 'a new era in the matter olfbusine-ss. A good many traders have jointed the New League of No This Without That. For instance, you may be told that you can't have a pound of potatoes except you buy a couple of pounds of onions and "three pounds of carrots. This is a brilliant idea,, the oniv thing which the genius who in- vented this little dodge can't see is that he may have the trick played on himself. The man who won't sell a pound of pota- 0- toes except in accordance with those condi- tions may want to buy a mutton chop or a piece of .steak. It would elo him a world of if the butcher told him that lie could not have a chop except he bought a pound of sausages at the same time, and that it was quite out of the question to have a bit of beef- steak except a leg of mutton wont along with it. Really I en n't see why the principle can't be more widely adopted. Many men have been in the habit of dropping into their barbers and in the most matter of fact way asking for a "shave." This ought no longer to Iw, tolerate:! in view of the brilliant dis- covery which has been made. The barber ought to refuse to shave any man who docs not have a shampoo, a hair-cut. and a singe at the same time. It is useless to plead that his hair does not want cutting. The poor woman who tries to buy potatoes may not want the onions or the carrots. It does not mntw whether you want them or not. That argument is quite beside the point. The great point is that you have to "shell ou.t." ■ And then some people have actually gone into a shoe shop and asked for a tin of polish. In my ignorant unenlightened days I have committed that offence mys-df. I sincerely hope that that state of affairs will be amen- ded. It is clearly the duty of the boot sales- man if he knows his business to inform me that if I want a tin of polish I must buy a pair of boots. Perhaps by the time I have three or four dozen pairs ho will compromise and let me have a twonenn-y tin w ith a pair of slippers or a pair of dancing pumps. ■# Then the gentlemen's outfitters have a i clear duty in the matter. They can't possibly be out of the fashion. I remember the time when you could go into a shop and purchase a tie at any price from 6^d to 2s 6d, put down the money and walk off without feeling under any obligation to anybody. It is high time this state of affairs were put a stop to. If you buy a tie you ought to be required to buy a suit of clothes at the same time. I really ean't see why one section of the community should have a monopoly of the "Try-on." The licensed victuallers who are so much harassed by restrictions at the present time might do very well by adopting a s,imila,r sane policy. People are actually coming in and asking for a "glass of bitter." The rules which are applied to the sa!e of food might very well be applied to the sale of drink a customer might be told that he could not possibly be supplied with a gliass of beelT except he bought a bottle of whiskey. Then professional men might adopt a simi- lar policy. You might go to doctor and ask him to give yon some-thing for your liver com- plaint. But if the doctor is to be up-to-date lie will refuse to entertain any such applica- tions. He will tell you that he' can't prescribe for your liver eeept voxu agree to have a leg off or to be operated on for appendicitis. It is nothing to the point that there is nothing the matter with your, leg or your vermiform appendix. If such arguments are tolerated, the whole present day structure of business falls to the ground. If you require to bo treated, for influenza or chilblains, you clearly ought to have to .undergo a major operation, and if you have been doing the doctor down over his food supply I am quite sure that he would enjoy the proceedings. • on may be so sick of the whole business that you feel that life is not worth living. You may ask the chemist for two penn'orth of prussic at id, but he won't supply you except you buy a 3s 6d bottle of hair restorer at the same time. If you do succeed in shuffling off the mortal coil, you won't be able to get a coffin. The carpenter will refuse the order except your relatives at the siame time order a new wardrobe! We have left the real world bheind. and we are off with "Alice in Won- derland," and so the more idiotic the idea appears, the more suitable it is. A LETHEI A.

Stitch in Time

Stitch in Time. There is an old saying "A stitch h. tim4 save«j nine" and if v

j WEST WALES LICENSES

WEST WALES LICENSES. All the licenses were renewed at the annual lie en-sing petty sessions for LTanfiha-ngei-ar- Arth Petty Sessional Division held at LIan- dyssuil. An application madei by W. J. Wallis- Jones, solicitor, Carmarthen, for an abate- ment in the compensation levy i,n respect of the Great Western Railway Refreshment Rooms, Pencader, on the ground that the premises were chiefly used for the sale of non- intoxicants and food, was granted.

Carmarthenshire War1 Problem

Carmarthenshire War 1\ Problem. DISCUSSION AT COUNTY COMMITTEE. A meeting of the Carmarthenshire War ricuitural Committee was held [I t the County Offices, Carmarthen, on Saturday. Mr Benj. Evans, Gwastod Abbott, presided. There were also present: Lieut.-General Sir James Hills-Johnes, V.C., G.C.B., Mr Dudley Wil liams-Drummoncl, Mr B. John, Mr J. Davies (Newcastle gmlyn), Mr D. L. Bowen (Lia-nelly), Mr T. Davies (Cilwaunydd), Mr J. Lloyd Thomas (Ferryside), Mr John Griffiths, Mr Pryse Rice, Mr S. H. Anthony, Mr G. Barret Evans, Mr John Lloyd, Mr H. J. Thomas, Mr T. R. Jones, Mr Herbert Evans, Mr H. Jones-avies, Mr D. John, B.Sc. and -Mr John Roberts, an officeir of the Board of Agriculture. HUSBAND TO LEAVE ROAD. A letter was read from Mrs Elizabeth Richards, of Penybank, Llanddowror. She asked the Committee to help her to get her son out of the Army. She stated that she had a- farm of 101 acres and that her -son, who is 20 years of age, had now been taken away. Mr Herbert Edflls said that he thought there was a little wa-te land on the farm. The wo-man was loft with 0,11! v a son 16 years of age to work the farm. Sir James Hilis-Johnes The Tribunal went thoroughly into the case, no doubt. Air J. Lloyd Is she a widow ? Mr Herbert Evans Her husband is a road labourer. Sir James Hills-Johnes: He can work on the land. Mr Drummond: The County Tribunal thought he would be better employed on the farm than on the road. It was decided to let the application !ie on the table. SUBSTITUTION DIFFICULTIES. Mr D. Davies, Brynhyfryd. Red Roses, wrote asking the Committee to support his application to get his --on back from the Army. Mr H. Jones-Da,vies said that this man was a smallholder and a tenant of the County Council. His holding was about 50 acres. The1 Chairman I think there should be one skilled workman on e erv farm. Beyond that they should try to rub along. Mr H. Jones-Davies said that apart from the son the whole work devolved on the father. Mr James Phillips said that he knew of a case in which a skilled farm labourer had ap- plied to three or four different farms. They refused to employ him at each place. The man is ow working as a wood cutter. His name is Owen Williams, Fforest, Llanddow- ror. POTATOES COMING. Mr D. John said he had a cornniuuncation from the Board of Agriculture stating that they would forward the 176 tons of seed pota- toes ordered by the Committee for small growers. The Chairman: I hope they will arrive in time. Mr Drummond I hope they will be put in the ground and not e(ten. PLOUGHING BY PETROL, A letter was read from Mr Bryner Jones stating that the distribution of steam tractors in the Principality was in the hands of the Welsh Agricultural Council. One- had been a.llotted to Carmarthenshire. The number available was so smail. that he could not hold out any hope of three being placed at tho dis- posal of the Carmarthenshire Committee in the. near future. The Chairmanooaid that he understood that the tractor would when ready be sent to St. Clears Station, where it won id be in a very suitable district. Mr H. Joncs-Davies, in answer to questions, said that the price of the steam tractors was £ 325, and they were 20 h.p. The Chairman said, that if there were two or three in different districts there would be no difficulty in getting the farmers to hire theim. They had been under the impression that they were to have three at the least. They did not know what the terms were; they thought in the first instance to give prefer- ence to the farmers who wanted to hire them, and to use them for themselves. Mr Herbert Evans said that a good many farmers had been depending on getting th.-m. It was important to them to know that they were to get them this spring or not. Mr B. John: They will 'bo good for next year. Mr T. R. Jones Would it not be better for us to plough our own land first. Mr B. John How much would they plough in a day? Mr H. Jones-Davies: Five to eight acres a day according to the quality of the land. A discussion followed in th' course of which it transpired that there, were motor tractors which coui'd be procured from private firms, a.nd it was decided to ask the Board of Agri- cultrue to approve of an arrangement by which thc«e could be procured by the Com- mittee and let out to farmers. NOTHING DOING. Mr -Herbert Evans said that some Parish Councils had according to instructions given appointed sub-committees to go round and to make enquiries what the needs of the farmers were in the way of implements, fertilisers, etc. He would like to know on what condi- tions the Committee could help them. The Chairman We can only promise to do our best. You can see our experience with the Board. Mr Herbert Evans said that a good many farmers felt the want of a corn drill. The Chairman &aid that nothing was more satisfactory than a seed box attached to the harrow. It sowed the grain very evenly. Mr Herbert Evans: A -good many farmers cannot buy binders for themselves. It would be a very good thing if the Committee couid assist them in that day. The \Jliairman I don't know that wo can hold out any liopt, of buying them. Mr Herbert Evans: What is the good of going round the farmers asking them what they require, if you can do nothing for them. COMMANDEERING GARDENS. Mr Herbert Evans referred to the fact that there were several gardens unused at St. Clears, and a .sped what steps the Committee would take in regard to gardens which were not cultivated for the la.st two or three years. Mr D. John said that in a rural district a society might be fotrmed, amd they could apply to the Board. Were the houses vacant P Mr H. Evans: Yes. Mr D. John: Therv could apply to the Board and get a scheme and cultivate* the gardens. A GREAT WAVE OF PATRIOTISM. The Chairman said that the work of the agricultural censu.-u had been taken in hand. From what he had seen he was inclined to think that ten per cent. more land would bo cultivated in the county this year than last year. A great wave of patriotism was pass- ing over the country and he believed every- one was in^ the mood to do the best he could, and that the farmers were going to accom- phsh something substantial in spite of the drawbacks in regard- to labour.

j Question of Health

——-—— Question of Health. The question of health is a matter which lure to concern us at one time or another when Influenza is so prevalent as it if just uow, 80 it is wotl to know what to tiae tc ward off an attack of this nuat weakoning disease, this epidemic catarrh or cold of an aggravating kind, to combat ic whilst under its baneful influence, and particularly alter on attack, for then the system is so lowered as to bo liable to the most dangerous of com pllaints. Gwilym Evj-ns' Quinine Bitters It acknowledged by all Rho have given it a fair trial to be the best specific remedy deàân with füfiuenr:3 in all its various stages, being a ^Preparation akilfdly prepared with Quinine and accompanied with other blood purifying and enriching agents, suitable for the liver, digestion, and all those ailments require tonic strengthening and nerve increa* propoitiee. It is invaluable for those cutter- ing from colds, pneumcnia, or any serious ill new, or prostration caused by sleeplessness, or worry of any kind, when the body has a general feeling of weakness or lassitude Send for a copy of the pamphlet of testi- monia.If. which carefully read and consider well, then buy a bottle (sold in two sizes, 2s 9<1 and 4s 6d) at yout nearest Chemiiit or Storea, but when purchasing see that thf nam* "Gwilym Evans" is on the label, stamp ,%nd bottle, for without which sitne arc genuine. Sole Proprietors: Quinin Hiit Manufacturing Company, Limited. iaaellj; South Waioe.

Advertising

"LINSEED COMPOUND with warm water is, an excellent gargle for Sore Throat, Colds, Coughs, &c

Carmarthenshire Appeal 11 Tribunal

Carmarthenshire Appeal 11 Tribunal. The Carmarthenshire County Appeal Tri- bunal Slat at the Llandilo Shire all on Friday the 23rd ult. The members present were Mr Dudley Williams-Drumniond (in the chair), Mr H. E. Blagdon-Riiehards, Mr W. W. Brodie, Mr T. Morris, and Mr Capt. Cremlyn acted as military repesen- tative, and Mr H. Jomes-Davies as agricul- tural representative. BREAKING UP 50 YEAR OLD PASTURE Mr T. Howell Davies appeared in the case of an appeal by Mr Rees Jones, Maesllvdan, Llandovery, for exemption for his son, David Richard Jones. The case had been adjourned from a previous hearing in order to ascertain what wo-uid be done in reference to a shep- herd employed on the farm. It was stated that the father wa.s paralysed. The shepherd had been granted conditional exemption until the 1st May. John Re.es Jones, a. son of the appellant, said that his father was 73 years of age. His father had other land, besides Maosllydan he had also two other farms —there was 14 miles 2 between the two nearest and five irills be- tween the furthest. Witness had been gran- ted exemption on condition that he ploughed 15 acres of iand. Witness was 2(5 of age, and there was ai.so a brother passed in Class Cl. There were also two sisters at home. One of them had partly lost the use of her right hand. There used to be two labourers on the farm. One had gone to another farm and another was working on muni tions. Capt. Cremlyn: You are big cattle dealers Witness: Not big. Capt. Cremlyn: That is what you do with this farm-tise it to fatten cattle. Does'nt your father attend cattle sales? Witness: Not unless lie has one of us with him. Witness said that he was going to break up some land which had not been ploughed for 30 years. Ih", Chairman What do you intend to grow on it. Witness: Potatoes and oats. Do you expect to grown corn on a fifty year old Jav?- Yes. The appeal was dismissed. A IMG POTATO DEALER. Mr John William Harper, Wind street, Ammanford, potato merchant, appealed for exemption for himself. Appellant was 35 years of age, single, and pas-ed in Class A. The iocal tribunal had granted him exemption until tho 1st February. He delivered pota- toes by motor lorry to the district around. His father and mother were over 60; he had a sister at home, and he had to maintain an invalid brother, aged 40. Mr Wm. Davies said that the brother had been struck by lightning and had been an in- valid ev.er since. Appellant confirmed this statement. He had another brother who helped him in the business, but who was not strong. He had an order fo.r 27 tons of seed potatoes. They did a big business in garden seeds. They were the only wholesale people in their tine in the Amman Valley. They had an optIOn. from the Board of Agriculture for the supply of seed potatoes in the district. Capt. Cremlyn Have you some sisters who are fairly well ec'ueated ? Appellant: They have the ordinary educa- tion. they keep books?—They have not been u/rd to keeping books. iMr H. J ones-Da vies: Can you givo me approximately the quantity of potatoes you handle during the year? Witncvs: About 300 to 4CO tons. What quantity of that would be seed?— About 030 tons. The Tribunal dismissed the appeal, but re- quested the military not to call up the man for a month. CASE FOR SUBSTITUTE. Col. Lloyd Harries appealed against the extniption granted to Thoma" Davies, Hafody- gigddau, Llanwrda. The man is aged 20 and had passed in Class A. He is a- farm worker, and the local tribunal granted temporary exemption. Iva's one fo.r ,,ii,bst'ttit:oii; the that the ease wa.s one for substitution; the employer him- self was of military age. Caipt. Cremlyn: You would be perfectly satisfied if voii had another man to do the work. He is not related to you. Respondent: He is my brother. The military appeal was allowed. APPELLANT 77 YEARS OF AGE. Mr Thomas Rces, Glanyrafonddu, Talley, applied for exemption for William Williams. Thiet farm was 250 acres. Mr T. C. Hurley, solicitor, appeared for the appellant. This was the only man whom the appellant had living on the premises. Appellant was 77 years of age and in feeble health. His only son was serving in the Army in Egypt. The local tribunal said that this was a case for substitution. Appellant said that since his cisc, was be- fore the tribunal another employee had got married, and had left the farm every evening at (j o'clock. There yas a good deal of agri- cultural machinery, and these required a com- petent man to look after them. I Capt. Cremlyn: If you get a suitable sub- stitute you would be satisfied. Appellant: 1 would have no trust in him. Capt. Cremlyn: A B3 man might do this man's work. Appellant: Where am I to get him. Capt. Cremlyn: You'll get him from the National Service. The Chairman asked the appellant if he had any other man. Appellant: I have a tramp there now. 1 don't know whether he will be there to- morrow. He has been there for three weeks. In answer to another question, appellant said that he had an industrial school bov who had come there lately. He added that there used to be plenty of tramps but now there were, none about the country. Temporary exemption for three months was allowed. FIVE THOUSAND TOMATO PLAN TS. Capt. Edwards appealed against the exemp- tion granted to John Edwards, Grasmere, Talbot road, Ammanford. Respondent said that lie and his brother had 21 glass houses, and they had 50,000 f-qnaro feet of glass. The houses were 60 to 140 feet long. He grew 5,000 tomato plants, and 1,000 cucumbers. He was 40 years of age and the brother was 41. Exemption until the 1st June was granted. SAWMILL EMPLOYEES. The Llandilo Sawmills appealed for an ex- emption for David Thomas Davies. Mr Porter appeared for the respondent. .Mr Davies, the manager of the Sawmills, said that there was an increase in the sale of English timber of late. He had. only two hauliers, of whom this man was one. He had been aJsked by the Ministry of Munitions if he could po-sibly increase his output of tim- ber. He said.that he could if ho had the men. They had outstanding contracts for 2,500 tons of timber. Large quantities were supplied for ship-building, but the bulk was for collieries. The supply depended on the two teams of hauliers. The timber had to be felled in different places, and the work of haulage was more difficult even than feling timber, Capt. Cremlyn: Aire you going to appeal for the boy of 18 ? Appellant: Not if we can get a substitute. In answer to another question, appellant sld that they had 22 men employed alto- gether. There were about 14 of those men in the Sawmills. Very few of these men were of military age. The man himself was called and said that he had a small holding. He grew potatoes iMost]Y. Ilio appeil was dismissed. FATHER OR SON? William Williams, Oalltyberan, Rhandir- mwyn, appealed for himself. He said that he had 150 acres of land and was a farmer. The farm would become vacant if he left it. The local tribunal suggested tha.t the farm could be carried ou by the appellant's father and younger son. Mr T. C. Hurley, Llandilo, appeared for the appellant. I Capt. Cremlyn asked how it was tha.t in the :1ppea,i before the local tribunal, the farm was said to be the fathers, and that his father for hi-ni. Appellant said that that was a mistake. The Chairman said that he saw the farm was only assessed at £10 2s 6d. The appeal was dismissed. THE ONLY SLAUGHTERER IN LLAN- GADOCK. David Francis Morgan, Smithfield, Llanga- doek, appealed for himself. Mr T. C. Hur- ley appeared for the appellant. Appellant who is single, 23, land Class A., I said that he supplied a large area with meat. He was the only male of military age who had anything to do with the business. He was the only slaughterman in L'angado-ck. He killed for :1frs Morgan, who carried on her husband's* business. He also slaughtered for Mrs Jones, of Llandovery, a.s her onlv son had been called up. He had 18 acres of grazing land. His turnover was between £ 2,500 and £2,800.. Capt. Cremlyn: Do you mean to say that you are the only person in Llangadock who can slaughter ? Don't some of the farmers kill, themselves? --No. The Tribunal adjourned the appeal for a month in ord-r to ascertain if the brother who had been caiied up for Apiil went on service. COLLIERS AS Il AlUDi: lOSSiOUS. Capt. Edwards appealed against the ex- emption granted by the Ammanford Tribunal to Abraham Hughes, hairdre-ser. The re- spondemt is aged 33, Class Bl, married, with five children, the eldest being 'IOJ years old. The contention of the, Military was that the hair-dressing business was of no national im- portoanoe,. The Ammanford Tribunal stated: "We arc of opinion that married men conducting their own business should not be disturbed until all single unskilled men and semi-skilled men should he combed-out of munition factories or called up for military service unless and until the exigencies of the war require it." Appellant said that lie sold tobacco and fancy goods and also a little grocery. He said that he was prepared to undertake work of national importance if he could do so and I' his business together. The bulk of the hair' dressing was done in the evening. Caipt. Cremlyn: How many other hair- dressers are there in Ammanford? Appelant: There, ar? three or four, but they are carried on by colliers who work in the pits all day and cp:n in the evening. Mr Brodie: What work of nation",i im- portance do you say you could do? Respondent: I could take a job in tho pit in the day-time. The Tribunal dismissed the military appeal.

Carmarthen Board of Guardians j

Carmarthen Board of Guardians. j The meeting of the Carmarthen Board of Guardians was hel I at the Guildhall on Satur- day. }Jr John Jones, Phis, presided and there were also present: Messrs J. Williams, Abcrgw:li T. Davies, Aberrant; J. Jones, C wr.vil; D. W. 'Stephens, L'anarthney J. W. Lewis, Lla.nddi.rog; W. Bowcu, Llandefeilog; T. Thomas, T.langeiideirne; J. J. Bowen, Llangimnock Jo-eiph Phillips, Llanddowror; D. Thomas, Llangain R. How el? s, Lianpump- saint; W. Williams, Lbnwinio; T. Davies, Merthyr R. Jeremy. Ncwehurch B. Sa.'mon, St. Clears.; J. S. Williams, TrrLx-h; Miss M. A; Thomas, Rev A. Fuller Miils, Messrs T. illias. J. P. Lewis, and the Rev J. Dvfnallt Owen, St. Peter. VOTE OF -SYMPATHY. A letter was read from the Rev J. Herbert (chairman of the Board). He said that he had just heard from the ar Office that his son had wounded in the recent Tigris battle on the 15th inst., and was waiting for further information in regard to him. A vote of sympathy was passed with the the Rev J. Herbert. INCREASES OF SALARY. A letter was read from i,nd Mrs -Tone1- the par-tor and portress, asking for an in- i' creased salary. At present their combined salaries amount to t40 with rations and quar- ters. Mr Jones Ic.aks after the heating a.p- piratuH. Mrs Jones it was also ftated was receiving t5 temporarily for acting as nurse. Mr T. i,Iiams moved that they urant an increase of £ 5. Air D. Tnomas, in seconding, said that the man had a lot of work to do. Rev A. Fuller Mills proposed that tho in- cic'jse be £ 10. £ 5 a year was not much be- tween two people. It was decided to give an increase of £ 10 to Mr and Mrs Jones. ,A-tr B. grant a war bonus of to to Mr W. Rupert Evans the only one of flw four relieving officers who had not received a war bonus. This was unani- mously agreed to. It was stated that Mr Evans got C70 his -predecessor used to gct tlo(). MASTER'S REPORT The Master in his report stated "Divine dn7}rTonaHCiTfl,"twl at the on SUlI- day the 11th I ebinary by the Rev E. Und lliomas, iabernacie ^Baptist Church, and oil ounday, 18th Feiiruary, by the Rev Joseph Jenkins, e!sh Wesleyan Church. The num- ber of inmates in the House on the last day of the week was 60 akainst 72 for the corres- ponding period last year. The number of casual paupers relieved during th, fortnight 11 agauist 14 for the same period last vear. Prriodieals were kindly given bv Miss W lute, Lady Guardian."

Womens War Committee

Women's War Committee. A meeting of the Carmarthenshire Wonieiis War Agricultural Committee was heid at the Gmldhall. Carmarthen, on Saturday, Mr B. Evans, Gwastod Abbot, presiding. A letter from Cardiff College stated that the Board of Agriculture had selected the College as an institution for providing short courses on farm work for women. There were vacancies for candidates wishing to undergo those courses. The Secretary (Mr Daniel John) said he had received no applications, and the Chair- man remarked that if there- were a.ny candi- 11 dates the committee, would be glad to recom- mend them for these courses. A letter was read from the Board of Agri- culture referring to the urgency of the food question and the shortage of woman .labour on farms. The Board hoped to issue shortly the details of a scheme for the better employ ment of women 011 tho land, and honed that in the meantime the committee would continue de- veilopient work. They ashed the committee to appoint an executive committee with full powers for the purpose of dealing quickly with particular branches of the wor £ Mr F. Dudley Williams-Drummond said what struck him in going over the recent agri- cultural census returns was the extraordinary excess of women on farms in Carmarthenshire. The executive committee might induce these women to go to work on other farms, where there was a shortage of female labour. Mrs Pr yse-Rice, Llwynybrain, said the women referred to were the wives and daugh- ters of farmers, and they were already doing the work of husbands and brothers who had gone to the. Army. Mr Drummond said he agreed with that up to a. certain point. He instanced a farm of 150 acrecs where there were the farmer and his wife, two boys, and five girls. The girls were; put down as doing domestic work, but that could be clone by the mother and two daughters. An executive committee was formed com- pris,ing thel following:—Mrs Jones-Davies, Glyneiddan Miss Jones. Dyffryii, Amman- ™ -I'I'. Phillips, Green Hill; Mrs James Inil.ips, St-. Clears; Mrs Ellis, Carmarthen; -Vlr Roes Davies, Whitland; and Mr Ben. John, Ciynderwein. The Board of Agrichlture said they would appoint a paid officer a.s organiser of women labour on farms. It was announced that Mi-ssHar-nes. dafughter of county Councillor W. Harris, Drysllwyn, had been appointed to tne post, but owing to an illness she was un- able to accept the duties. The Cbmmittee recommended to the Board of Agriculture the appointment of Miss Jones daughter of Aid. AN N. Jones, Dyffryn, Ammanford, and passed a vote of sympathy with Miss Harris.

LOCAL FAIRS FOR MARCH

LOCAL FAIRS FOR MARCH. 5. Llanybyther, LJandilo. 6. Tregaron. 12. Llangadock, Talgarth. C 13. Llangadock. 14. Lampeter. 15. Carmarthen, Tregaron. IC.Tregaron. 19. Llandilo, Letterston. 20. Haverfordwest, Maenclockog. 21. Narberth, Haverfordwest (pig). 22. Newcastle Emlyn, Narberth "pig). 24. Llandovery. 27. Pontardulais.

Advertising

IOU CAN REilY ON Clarke's B41 Pills as a r, and Sure Remedy in either Sex, for all Acquired or Constitutional Ih-'char-pes from Urinary Orsrans, Gravel, Pains in the Lack and kindred complaints. Over 50 years Success. Of all Chemists, 4s (id rt nr r)c, per box, or sent direct, post free, ft a for Sixty Penny Stamps by tho R4-1 r-Itts Proprietors—The Lincoln and ,T, Midland Ditig Co, Ltd,Lit:j,jln. (Free from Mercury. CARMARTHEN—Printed ani Published by the Proprietress, M. Lawrence, at ho- Offices, 3 Blue btreet, j UIDAY, March 2nd, 1917.