Teitl Casgliad: Carmarthen weekly reporter

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 4 o 4
Full Screen
11 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
1HE PASSING WEEK

1HE PASSING WEEK. Let thete lIe thistles, there are grapes, I If old things, there are new Ten thousand broken lights and shapes Yet glimpses of the tIUC. TENNYSO:-¡, School children have ofton to learn "tables," and they usually don't care for them. There is one "table" which ail I school-children have to iearn and which runs something like this: 12 inches make one foot 3 foot make one yard. And so on. T^here is another sort of table which we shall all have to learn before very long; the Food ControlLer has already learned it. We have not been able to got the exact figures; but it runs something iike this:— lib barley meal makes 24oz. bacon 6oz. barley men! makes one egg Ai,,cl so We have heard a good deal as to the high price of barley meal as an excuse for all sorts of famine prices of farm produce. Well, we are not likely to hear much more of that argument. Nobody wants the farmers to buy barley meal and to feed their stock with it. They are warned that there will be less barley m-cial imported during the coming year, and that it will be much better for them to get rid of a. large part of their stock. They have no business to feed farm stock on imported barley meal by so doing they are literally taking the bread out of the mouths of their fellow-men. '• We have come to this stage—that we must have food, and that we can't afford to give animals six tons of grain in order to get a ton of meat. In times of plenty and prosperity, we could afford to practise such arts. Our shortage of food is such that we may have to eat the barley ourselves and to get the most we can out of it. We little realise how ex- travagant is our present method of diet in many cases. There are tens of thousands of people in this country who daily eat two eggs and about 4 ounces of bacon to breakfast. To produce the two eggs and the four ounces of bacon about 211lbs of grain of some kind was probably used. Two and a quarter pounds of grain would produce about 31bs of bread. The cnosumption of a very moderate allow- ance of ham and eggs to breakfast is there- fore equivalent to the eating ofi211bs of bread per week. If the food production were traced up. it would- be found that many people in this country are consuming each week a quantity of beef, bacon, poultry and eggs which is equivalent to about half a hundred weight of bread! We hear a. good deal about the destruction of grain in brewing; but that is a mere detail to the profligate expenditure of grain in the feeding of stock and in poultry-keeping. We have heard a good deal about the "milk- supply of the country." All that has been said as to the necessity of maintaining the milk supply is quite true. But it is an un- doubted fact that on the farms of the country there is an immense accumulation of stock which never could and never would be of use in augmenting the milik supply. Our milk supply is really in- danger for the simple reason that beef pays better than milk. Beef is not a national asset; it is a national liability. A breeder who goes in strongly for feeding, imports six tons of feeding stuffs in order to produce about one ton of beef. This is a great waste of tonnage. When shipping is so scarce, it is a pity to waste space in that way. If we cut down the importation of "feed" by a million tons and imported an additional quarter of a million tons of foreign boof we should have a good deal more food at a great deal less trouble. Moreover we have to face the undoubted fact that a large part and the hardest-work- ing part of the population of this country eats very little meat. In many households the average does not work out at more than half a pound per head per week. If there are millions of people who can live almost with- out meat, then it is time that the "well-to- do" made up minds to adopt a, simular scale of living. There are many people who are now living too well and whose health would be immensely improved on a diet tf barley bread, plain boiled rice (cooked in water), and other cereal foods. They might as a treat bo allowed1 to have half a pound of meat on Sundays! Such a change in diet would at once Solve the food problem. Barley, maize, and most other grains used for feeding cattle, poultry, and pigs could very elasÏly be adapted for human food. Barley meal as bought by the poultry keepers is not fit for human food; but the millers can turn out barley so as to make it a most appetising food. Even if a man consumed 12 to 18lbs of flour and other cereal products, it would bo a great saving as com-! pared with a meat and egg diet which repre- sents 40 to oOlbs of grain every week! | A series of articles appeared in the "Times" a few weeks ago from a correspondent who had spent a couple of years in the "occupied districts" of Northern France. He. said that the diet of the German soldiers in the Lille district was: Breakfast, hiaok coffee and bread. Dinner, barley pudding. Supper, boiled beet-root. The German soldiers lived for months and did some hard fighting on this diet. The presumption is that the civil- ian population of Germany is not quite so well fed as the German soldiers are. If t,his is going to be a war of endurance, we must make up our minds to put up with a good deal of privations. *#• It is not for a moment suggested that there is any immediate likelihood that we shall all have to go in for such a diet as that which was ( said to have sufficed for the German soldiers. ) But it may be necessary fot; those who are at present living well to modify their diet a little if the supply of meat and poultry is re- duced. It would not do some of the "gorman- disers" a bit of harm if they had: to live for six months in war time on the diet which has had to satisfy* the agricultural labourer for years in normal times. When wo speak of "gormandisers." we do not necessarily mean weallthy people. There are working people gormandisers as well as ten-thousand a year gormandisers. There are families who used to live on 25s to 30s a week, and whose joint income of 1:4 to £7 a week is now spent- on "riotous cooking." Gluttony is a vice confined to no particular class of society. There is the millionaire glutton who will spend a sovereign on a single course, and there is the working-man who is revelling in an uwonted flush of money and whose only ambition is to buy something which is expensive in order to get rid of his money as fast as possible.. It is well to pon- wer one simple fact—that much of the scarcity is due to the increased demand for high living. It is true that our imports are restricted, and that our home crops are deficient. And on top of this all we have to contend with an extravagance and reckleness in food consump- tion which is positively profligate. It is well to consider what the great causes of the scarcity of food are. They are:- 1. Tho world's harvests are deficient so tha.t there is less corn available. 2: War prervents us getting our share even of such grain as is available. 3. Soldiers eat more on active service than I they would have eaten in peace time. A man living in the open air in France requires twice as much food as he would have required when he was a shop assistant or an artisan. 4. Millions of people at home are earning huge wages which they are spending on extra- vagant and gluttonous living such as they never before enjoyed. They are having a "Sunday dinner" every day of the week in short. If our present rule of living is not curtailed, we shall have a very serious situation to face before we reach August. It is very hard of course to expect evelrybody to use one lb less of bread per week. but it is better to do that than to have no bread at all in the month of July. • Our forefathers coined the phrase that "half a loaf is better than no bread." They knew. For centuries the people of this coun- try carried on houso keeping through the early summer with an eye to the chance of famine before the harvest. We have been so accustomed for the last seventy years to a plentiful supply of cheap food, that we can no more, imagine a shortage of bread than we can imagine a shortage of daylight. Famines have however occurred from time to time in the history of this country. There is no danger of famine now. There is "enough to go round" but there is not enough to allow for senseless and sinful waste. #*# One of the curious effects of the war is that we have quietly gone in for Protection. The system of agricultural protection has been adopted by a Government which is headed by Mr Lloyd George. This is no time to talk about political inconsistency. We are face to face with a new situation such as none of I us ever dreamt of. Amidst all the discussions on the merits and demerits of Free Trade nobody ever content plated the submarine. One of the greatest errors which statesmen and political parties can commit is stubborn- ness. We should all be prepared to admiit quiite candidly that certain principles of Gov- ernment which may be eminently suitable for one set of circumstances may be unsuitable for another. There are various reasons why more corn should be grown in this country, and the Government is prepared to introduce a system of protection in order to attain that end! The Government proposees to encourage corn-growing by a system of "guaranteed" prices. Thus for wheat the Government guar- antees 60s per quarterfor the 1917 harvest, the guaranteed price falls gradually until 1922 when 4os is reached. The price of wheat before the war was about 30s per quarter. 35s was thought a very high price. We heard pathetic wails against I foreign competition, and we were told that if the price of British wheat could only be kept up to 40s, our own farmers would grow all we required or nearly so! During the war, the price of wheat soared up to 90s. Even when 60s to 70s was reached the farmers declined to grow more because they said that the war might come to an end any day, and that they would suffer a severe loss if the price fell. They demanded a guar- antee. They have had it. They have had a guarantee of double the Peace price this year and a descending scale which allows fifty per cent increase after years. With a price guaranteed for five years, it will certainly pay to alter the present system of cultivation. It is quite possible that a few of the stick-in-the-mud type of farmers will not be able to make up their minds to face the altered circumstances. It will now pay to grow corn at home, and it will not pay to buy imported corn; in fact, imported feeding stuffs will be as hard to get as sugar! The energetic and the enlightened farmer will probably make money under the new system as he never was able to do under the old. 444 n n But what about the bogus "farmer" whose idea of agriculture is to bring a cart into town and to fetch home half a ton of Argentine produce to feed hs stock? If he can't adapt himself to the new state of affairs he will be gradually elbowed out of the country. It is not at all likely that there will ever be a wholesale eviction of farmers because they won't farm as the Government desires them. But a certain, proportion of farms become vacant every year, and it is only men of modern ideas who will be able to take them under modern conditions. Most farmers will adapt themselves to the altered circumstances; some few will be too stubborn to do so. These I latter will find themselves in financial diffi- culties, and will be compelled by circum- stances to vaacte their holdings. There will be plenty of ambitious young men in the country anxious to get farms, and the whole question will solve itself. The old style, farmer will not be pushed out by the new style far- mer as rapidly as the taxi-driver pushed out the "cabby" but the process will be equally as certain and equally as relentless. It is not to be supposed that the "guaran- teed prices" are "fixed prices." All that the Government says is that the farmer shall not get less than 60s for the wheat crop in 1917. If he can get 75s in the open market, well and good. On the other hand, suppose there is a slump,, and wheat falls in price. If the farmer sells at 57s, he can claim the differ- ence from the Government. The price of oats is guaranteed in the sae way at 38s 6d to 24s for the year 1917-22. The price before the war was 22s to 23s. And most important, the agricultural la- bourer is guaranteed 25s a week. If farm produce is to be sold at double the former price, naturally the worker is to be propelrly paid. The days when agricultural labour verged on Chinese slavery are gone. If farming pays well and labour is expen- sive, the system may bring about a very rapid development, fl the farmer won't employ the labourer, then the labourer will have his appetite sharpened for small holdings, and the present legal machinery may be oiled and speeded up. Of one thing we may be quite certain—if there is land fit to cultivate and men able to cultivate it, no vested interests will prevent the land being worked.

ICounty of Carmarthen VTC

] County of Carmarthen V.T.C. LORD LIEUTENANT'S APPEAL. In pursuance of a request made to me from many quarters, I desire to make an appeal to all interested in the above movement in the county. It is generally felt that a Volunteer Battalion should be raised in the County of Carmarthen, both as mark of the patriotism of the inhabitants, and in view of the fact that so many other Counties in Wales and England have raised simila,r Battalions. For the purpose it is necessary that a mini- mum number of 600 men should be enrolled, and I desire to appeal to all men, who are in support of the movement, and who are over 17 years of age, to enrol themselves imme- diately and thus enable a battalion to be formed. As soon as this is done I shall be in a posi- tion to apply to His Majesty the King for its recognition, and I sincerely trust that this my first appeal as Lord Lieutenant will meet wtih a. response worthy of the inhabitants of the ancient and loyal County of Carmarthen to which we all belong. JOHN HINDS, H..M Lieutenant for Carmarthenshire.

I I CARMARTHEN1 UMKUTHR SKA I Oil LIGHT 1

I CARMARTHEN 1 UM)KUTHR SKA I {Oil LIGHT. 1 Come, come, and sit y-ni down; you shall not budge, You shall not go, till set you up a glass Where you may see ',he inmost part of you. SHAKESPEARE. We have now meatless and potatoless days and we are: threatened with a beer less day. A proposal for an occasional flag less day would meet with general approval in Carmarthen. **« Pairs of chickens are stated to have been sold in Carmarthen market recently at prices ranging from 14s to 16s. I have been asked to denounce- this as an instance of the "greed of farmers." I decline to do anything of the kind. It is tho people who buy them at that .n.a u..1H\ nomht. fn be nilloried. Thev ought r-- to get 14 days in prison on a diet of mango I d- wurzel to curei them of their appetite for high living. If the farmers meet people greedy enough to give such prices, they would be fools to refuse the money! There is no need to get excited over the lateness of the season. A local farmer tells me that he owed a. field with corn one year "nine days after June fair" and got a fairiy good crop. This would be June 12th. This is not recommended as a suitable date for sowing corn but it shows that there is no need to get unduly depressed yet. •*» Allottment holders who have their pota^ toes "sprouting" in boxes are not much wor- ried over the backwardness of the season. If planted carefully at the first suitable oppor- tunity, the time in the boxes is not lost. #*» As for the main crop potatoes they have often been planted as late as June with satis- factory results, and good crops from June plantings have been dug in October. The seasons are a good deal more elastic than we are wont to believe. A little boy was seen the other day in rather a poor neighbourhood in Carmarthen carrying out a, tray laden with broken bread. There must have been two or three pounds of bread on the tray. It all consisted of half slices of bread which had been partly eaten and then thrown aside. The lot—as investigation proved-was sent out to be thrown to the birds! It is useless making desperate efforts to in- crease our food supply if we waste the food we have. It is in poor households that the waste occurs—or rather in the houses of people who were poor before the war. This kind of thing is worse than the German sub- marine. -The waste of bread may have to be made punishable under the Defence of the Realm Act before,, we are through the summer. ft** Two years afgo a ton of swedes could be bought in Carmarthenshire for 25s. You might be lucky enough to get them for PI, audion the other hand you might have to pay 30s for them-in which case you felt that you had been done. Now they are sold at lid a lb-wbich it equal to tl4 a ton. And the crowning joke is that the fixing of the legal price is felt to be a hardship. The holders of stocks of swedes feel that they ought to get 2d a lb-that is £ 18 13s 4d. What a beautiful thing is the law of supply and demand if left untouched! According to some people this sacred law ought not to be violated, even if it led to hunger-riots and murder. We are a commercial nation, and the opinion of the commercial classes is that ¡' business principles ought to be sacred even thought human life is no longer sacred. The Carmarthen Town Council has voiced popular opinion in protesting against the pro- posal to abolish the "Carmarthen Boroughs" as a Parliamentary constituency and to make it part of a new constituency which will in- clude the surrounding agricultural district. We sliill no doubt hear a goori deal by and bye as to the antiquity of Carmarthen as a Parlia- mentary Borough. All this is very interest- ing but it. is nothing at ali to the point. Carmarthen has ceased to have a member since the year 1832. This is a matter of 85 years ago. For 85 years Carmaj-then has been without the member to which it was entitled under the various old charters of which we boast. We are very fond of these old char- ters but they are as much out of date for all practical purposes as the Doomesday Book would be in the hands of the Land Valuation Department. I maintain that Carmarthen as a Parliamentary Borough was wiped out in the year 1832. In the year 1832 Parliament passed a Reform Bill. There was a dead set made agaiinst the "rotten Boroughs" at that time. Many Boroughs were simply wiped out of existence. Carmarthen was spared—with a proviso. Carmarthen and Llanelly w-ore linked together. They were allowed to have a member between them, and the constituency was called the "Carmarthen Boroughs." That was the end of Carmarthen as a Par- liamentary Borough. So far as its ancient priveleges went, Camarthen might that day haive written "Ichabod" over the portals of its political existence. Carmarthen has not had an M.P. since the year 1832. We have simply shared an M.P. with Llanelly. In those days, Llanelly was a comparatively smali place. But it has grown vigorously. Out of every 100 voters in the constituency about 78 reside in Llanelly and 22 in Carmar- then. What should we really lose by being detached from Llanelly and being linked up with Ferryside and Abergwili and St. Clears and the surrounding district. It is clear that we are not to have a member of our own in any event. Is there any particular advan- tage to us in sharing an M.P. with Llanelly rather than sharing a member with Kidwelly and Llanpumpsaint P I learn that the Llanelly people are making vigorous efforts to drag in a population of 50,000 so as to retain the present state of affairs. A population of 50,000 is required for a Borough constituency. Llanelly has 35,000 and Carmarthen has 10,000. Vigorous efforts are being made to haul in Felinfoel or Burry Port or any other area, which can be found to provide 5,000 ersidents. Whatever happens 70 per cent. of the voters will be at Llanelly. It may be good policy on our part to make a vigorous effort to keep alive a con- stituency which is dominated by Llanelly. 1 have not a word to say against Llanelly. All the Llanelly people I have corne; across have been most charming folks, and I should be very sorry to be parted from them. But I would point out that there is no question at all of retaining Carmarthen as a Parliament- I ary Borough. That status has long ago dis- appeared. It is difficult to have the matter discussed in the abstract because it is complicated by questions of political expediency. The halance betewen Liberal and Conservative in Carmar- then is believed to be fairly even; Llanelly has been regarded as prepoonderatingly Radical. The Llahdlly Conservative's want to be united to Carmarthen because thev feel it gives them a sporting chance of winning the seat by a fluke. For fear of such a possibility some Carmarthen Liberals are attached perhaps to the present grouping. The rise of the Labour party has altered things a good deal in the political arrangements; and 1 fancy the Labour men here anef n Llanelly would favour the re- tention of the present system. Labour natur- ally strives after urban constituencies, and resents being coupled with rural areas. ft** I am afraid that the whole problem is as insoluble as lrilsh Home Rule. To leave it alone is unsatisfactory; and every proposed solution is objectionable from some point of view. We sometimes have to face contingen- cies with the knowledge that "whatever you do you'll be sorry for it afterwards." ALICTHRIA.

St Peters Easter Vestry

St. Peter's Easter Vestry. The Rev Parry Griffiths (Vicar) presided at the anuial Easter Vestry of St. Peters, Car- marthen, on the 12th inst. The Chairman said that whilst the war was proceeding favourably the bitter reflection for Churchpoople still continued that its cessa- tion meant disendowment. Personally, he could not for a moment think that any large body of British subjects could possibly favour such treatment of the Church as the Church Act decreed. Not only were there hunderds —he might say thousands—of leading Church- men fighting our battles, but even Churchmen at home were so preoccupied with warlike matters that they could not possibly give the time and thought to the immense work of the re-orga nidation of the Welsh Church under altered circumstances, and the very least they could a>k—and demand as far as they could --of the Government was that the operation of the Act should be suspended for at least one year after the termination of the war. so that the Church might have some quiet time to look around and re-arrange matters. That all the expenses had to come out of the re- venue of the poor Welsh Church was a great scandal. The accounts of the Burial Board were pre- sented by Mr H. Brunei White, and were passed subject to audit by Mr Beynon Jones and Mr T. B. Arthur. Mr J. B. Arthur presented the Church- warden's accounts, and these were passed on the motion of Mr H. Brunei White, seconded by Mr Andrew Thomas. Mr T. E. Brigstocke called attention to the need of certain repairs to the fabric of the church. He did not know whether they should not maike application for a share of the proceeds of the Christmas Tree. The Vicar said tfiat it would not be worthy of St. Peiters to fall back on the Christmas Tree for repairs. A ohurch with the tradi- tions of St. Peters should be able to provide funds to kepe itself in order. The Church House, the schools, and various other paro- chial organi-ations were dependent on the Christmas Tree, and he did not, thlink it, could boar any further strain. Mr W. Spurre! 1 was appontedi vicar's war- tten and Mr J. B. Arthur people's warden. Mr Dunn Davies was appointed sidesman in the place of the late Mr Middleton, and Mr Nicole in the place of Mr Henry Thomas, Mr E. J. Andrews initiated a. discussion on the advisability of having a new system of electing sidesmen, and it was decided that should be carried' out next year. The Vicar expressed his thanks to the choir, choirmaster, sidesmen, district visitors, the Sunday School teachers, the secretaries of the various Church organisations, and other Church workers. Proposing a. resolution protesting against the Weilsh Church Act being put into force until 12 months after the war, Alderman W. Spurrell pointed out that the whole of the capitalised value of the endowments of the Welsh Church would not amount to the ex- penses of the war for une day.

Question of Health

Question of Health. Tho question of health is a matter which 4 rare to ooncern us at one time or another when Influenza is so prevalent as it if just 1 now, so it is well to know wbat to tsuse tc ward off an attack of this most weakening disease, this epidemic catarrh or cold of an aggravating kind, to oombat it whilst under its baneful influence, and particularly atta an attack, for then the system is so lowered as to be liable to the most dangerous of oom. plaints. Gwilym Evens' Quinine Bitten it acknowledged by all who have fpren it a fair trial to be the best specific remedy dealing with Influensa in all its varioue stages, being a Preparation skilfully prepared with Quinine and accompanied with other blood purifying and enriching agenta, suitable for the liver, digestion, and all those ailments requirt tonic strengthening and nerve increas propel ties. It is invaluable for those ouffer. ing from colds, pneumonia, or any serious ill nees, or prostration caused by sleeplessness, or worry of any kind, when the body has a general feeling of weakness or lassitude. Send for a copy of the pamphlet of testi. monial&, which carefully read and consider well, then buy a bottle (sold in two sices, 2a 9.:1 and 4s 6d) at yout nearest Chemist o Stores, but when purchasing see that the name "Gwilym Evans" is on the label, stamp and bottle, for without which r-one are genuine. Sole Proprietor* c Qninin Bitten Manufacturing Company, Limited, rianeUx South Wales.

Horse Show at Carmarthen

Horse Show at Carmarthen. As usual, the onnuafentire horse show was held at Carmarthen Monday the 16th, being John Brown's Fair Day. There was a good attendance. The jud, was Mr John Blun- delil, Lancashire., a.nd Mr David Francis, of Mount Hill, acted as (secretary. The following were the prize winners:— Carters, registered shire stallion, 16 hands 2in. and over: 1, Amport Stark, Carmarthen- shiire Stud Co.; 2, Ivy Forest Chief, Llanste- pha.n and District Shire Horse Society; 3, Admiral Boscoe, Carmarthenshire Stud Co. Stallion, under 16 hands 2in. high: 1, Souldern Koyal Duike, Mr Tom James, Myrtle Hill, Llechryd; 2, Biallemoch, Mr David Jones, Tyreithyn, Pontyberem; also special prizes; 3, Gogerddan Regent, Messrs D. Davies and Son, Brynceir, Rhydargaieau road, Carmar- then. Thoroughbred stallion: 1, Ambrol, Messrs J. F. Reee and W. V. Howell Thomas, Car- marthen. marthen. Hackney or carriage stallion: 1, Gordon Sensation, Mr John Williams, Llwynyrhaf Stud Farm. Glanamman; 2, Tyssul Danegelt, Mr Thomas Jones, Troedrhilwhwch, Llandys- sul; 3, St. Swithin, Mr C. Yoomans, Cily- graig, Henllan. Welsh cob or pony stallion: 1, High Stepp- ing Gambler, Mr David Rees, Blaenwaun, Penuwch, Llangeithio; 2, Pride of Briton, Messrs D. Davies and Son, Blaenpistyll, Car- diigan. Welsh mountain pony stallion: 1, Towy 31odel Starlight, Mr Hugh Thomas, C'wm Mill Hotel, Plerrvside;2, Hawddgar Bright Light, Mr W. E. Davies, Croesyceilogfawr, Carmar- then; 3, Matchlight, Mr WIn. Lewis, Ffrwdy- drain, Lhuidilo.

Advertising

I YOU CAN RELY ON Clarke's B41 Pills as a Safe and Sure Remedy in either Sex, for all Acquirod or Constitutional Discharges from Urinary Organs, Gravel, Pains in the Back and kindred complaints. Over 50 years Success. Of all Chemists, 4s 6d per box, or sent direct, post free, tLAnll L 3 for Sixty Penny Stamps by the B41 PILLS Prourietors-Tbe Lincoln and ™ Midland Drug Co, Ltd.Linooln. (Free from Mercury.

Carmarthenshire Appeal Tribunal

Carmarthenshire Appeal Tribunal The Carmarthenshire County Appeal Tri- bunal sat at the Shire Hall, Llandiio, on Fri- day the 13th inst. Tho numbers present were: Mr W. Griffiths (chairman), Mr Joseph Roberts, Mr T. Morris, Mr H. E. Blagdon- Richards. TWO MONTHS ALLOWED. Captain Edwa-rds appealed against the exemption granted to Evan Thomas, Taicyd. Brechfa. The man was aged 20, single, and classed as 02. Conditional exemption ha.d been granted by the Liandilo Tribunal. The rent of the farm is £ 35; it was stated that the father had also a son aged 17 and a daughter aged 18. Capt. Cremlyn: How many children have you ? » The Father: Eight. How many are in the Army? In answer to other questions, it appeared that two of the family were in service at ether farms. The Tribunal dismissed the appeal, but suggested that the man be allowed two months before being called up. A WIFE'S ATTEMPTED SUICIDE. An artisan residing at Quay st., Amman- ford applied for exemption for himself. Tho appjllant was married, aged: 27, and Class A. He had one child, aged three. He said that he had an action pending against the Amman- ford Gas Co. by whom he had been dismissed. He said that, his wife had attempted suicide as a result of her fear that he would be called up. She had since been detained in an asylum. Capt. Cremlyn point,erd out that appellant had been allowed six weeks to make his arrangements. The time had expired and the appellant had done nothing. Appellant: I can't do anything. Capt. Cremlyn: You ought to he in the Army. Appellant: Then you wish my wife to be detained in the Asylum for life. The Tribunal dismissed the a p. e si. but suggested that the Military do not call the man up for 14 days. PREFERRED SHOOTING TO SUBSTITU- TION. Col. 'Harries appealed against the exemp- tioln granted to J. T. Davies, Tynypyllan, Crugybair, Llanwrda. The man was 26 years of age and Class A. The farm was 65 acres. The local tribunal had granted him exemption on condition that he grew a certain quantity of crops which included one acre of potatoes. The father gave details of the character of the land which showed it to be a difficult farm to work, but one which was well tilled. He produced a letter written to him by Mr W. W. James, auctioneer, complimenting him on the amount of stock he sent to market. Cla.pt. Cremlyn: You have plenty of time. Respondent: No. Capt. Cremlyn: How do you find time to write all that stuff out? (laughter). What is the size of the farm ? Respondent: 65-1 acres. How many sons have you?—Only this one. How many daiughters have you?—Only one. You have one?—Yes; but she has left me. Can't you get her to come back?—No; she is married (laughter). This son has passed Class A ? Y.s he passed Class A at Carmarthen; but two other doctors said that he was not fit. The work that your son does could be done by a substitute?—I could not trust a substi- tute. I would rather be shot than have a sub- stitute. A neighbour who appeared to give evidence said that the statement made by the respon- dent was quite true. The respondent got quite as much out of his farm as many a far- mer did out of 150 acres. Capt. Cremlyn: This work could be done by a substitute. Witness: It woulld take a very good substi- tute to do the work that the son does. Capt. Cremlyn: If a substitute can't be found he can keep the son. Mr H. Jones-Davies: Do you think any sub- stituto will work the long hours that the son is working. Witness: No. The Tribunal allowed the appeal subject to a satisfactory subst-itutei being found. WANTED A SWIMMER AS SUBSTITUTE. Col. Lloyd Harries appealed against the exemption granted to Evan Jones, Aber- crymlyn, Grugybar, Llanwrda, aged 25, Class A. It was contended that only 15 acres were 'ploughed and that the brother was an able- bodied man who could plough the land. It was stated on behalf of the respondent that the River Cbthi ran through the land and out the farm in two. It was therefore a difficult farm to work, especially when the river is in flood. The mother said that there used to be two able bodied men on the farm. She would not be able to pay a substitute if one were required. The same neighbour who had given evidence in the previous case said that it was difficult to get the cattle through the river. The river was very dangea-oue. Capt. Cremlyn: You want a life-boat to I cross this river. It would be no more diffi- cult for the substitute to fetch the cattle than for this man to do it. Witness: He would have to be an experi- enced man. The son of Dolaugleision, which is the next farm, was drowned in the river. Capt. Cremlyn: You want a substitute who can swim. The military appeal was allowed. SUBSTITUTE NOT TO BE SUBSTITUTED. Mr Morgan Jones, Cefn, Cynghordy, ap- plied for exemption for his servant man, Row- land Lewis. The medical card showed the man to be Class 02. Oapt. Cremlyn said that he did not ask for this man. He would only be useful as a sub- stitute, and he did not intend to provide a substitute for a substitute. SCHOOLMASTER AS FARMER. Mr David Owen Davies, Olyntywrch, Babell Llandovery, appealed for exemption for his brother, Trevor Idris Davies. The appellant who si a schoolmaster carried on a small farm. Capt. Cremlyn: How much holidays do you get in the summer? Appellant: A month. It wild be six weeks this year Educa- tion Committee granted us six or eight weeks last year. What is your ag!e ?—33. You say that this place is 52 acres and the rent £ 20?—Yes. Who is ITrevor Davies?—My brother. Have you another brother?—Yes. Where is he?—At the munition works. Is he married?—Yes; he got married the day that Servia started hostilities with Austria. Have you ploughed any of this land?—Yes; I have ploughed five acres. Can you plough yourseilf?—Yes. What is the average attendance at school ? 5 —Eighteen. Capt. Cremlyn: It is time that school was 1 dlosed up these times. The appeal was dismissed. ARE LICENSED PREMISES OF NATIONAL IMPORTANCE. f The Recruiting Officer appealed against the 1 decision of the local tribunal whidl had t granted exemption to Mr T. G. Rees, of the j Raven Inn, Garnant. The man was aged 36, 1 and Class Cl. The case gave rise to- some conflicting views between, the local tribunal and the Rcruiting Officer as to whether the keeping of an inn ( was work of national importance. (Continued at foot of next column).

How to Grow Grass Green

How to Grow Grass Green. [By oC.tCUtL] "I wvl turn in if you won't mind, Melinda. I have- had nightmare for three nights in succession and I feel tired." "Do, dear," she responded, rising from the piano. "What time is it?" "Ten o'clock." "But it's only nine by the right time then, so I'll read a little." It seemed to me that I hadn't been in bed ten minutes before I heard the electric bell from the front c'oor ringing. and then the voice of my friend the Director-General of Everything. "Very well," I heard him say. "tell him I'll SØ21 him at the Station in the morning on his way to town." As a matter of fact, Melinda forgot to tell me; but it didn't matter, I saw him. He was in a great hurry and more or less breathless. "Look here, old chap. I want you to take on the Dictatorship of Grass. Come at once." "Where to?" I said. "Oil, yes," he s^id. "Anyhow we'll com- mandeer an office for you somewhere." and off he rushed. "One moment," I said, rushing after him and catching him by the arm, "1 don't know anything about grass except that you play golf on a grass course, more or less." "My dear fellow." he said, "what on earth do you want to know anything about 'grass' for? Surely your training and experience as an engineer and roa.Jmaker will ? You haven't got to do anything with grass only 'control' irfc. Good bye." And so I found myself wondering what I was to do. I 'phoned Melinda and told her not to expect me home to dinner ar-d called at the Director General's office as soon as I got to town. I am not clear as to how it was done. but, I had offices and staff and began to feel import- ant. "But," thought 1 "it is necessary to 'do' something first so as to let the people know that I am the Die-Later." So I thinking how it is that the grass grows and why it is always greener and ranker on the roadside (until motor cars come and whiten it) than it, is in the fields. First, it seemed to me, the weather conditions must be spitahlesinee' grass is more or less brown in midwinter and midsummer: So I called round at the Weather Controller's and asked him to let me have some favourable weather. To my surprise, he was quite unconcerned about my object and rat In- r laughed (quietly as it were) at my anxiety about grsas. "You owe me sixty-thousand minutes of winter," he said "and I tiierm to h<>VI> t,hc!m" J "&0. I gasped. "But." I sai, "if you insist on forty days of winter, all the iambs and cows will be starved, lhcjc w; 11 bo 110 milk and babies will die through want of proper nour- ishmcnt." "Send some health visitors round," lie said. "But, my dear sir, It have nothing to do with health -x-is,itor.ni v department is '.Grass' pure and simple." "Go and see the Sunshine Controller," said he. "Here's a pickle." I thought. On the way round to the Sunshine Con- trollers, I met Meiinda. She was going shopping. "So glad," she said, "take me to lunch at Frasoa.ti's. Why, Gilbert dear, YOICre looking positively itH! What's the matter?" Whilst we were having lunch, I told her all about it, and she seemed to think it quite easy. "Well, said I, 'what am I to do if the Sun- shine Controller won't help me?" "Now you little goose," said bho. "what's the good of running about aimlessly? What yo#u want to know first is how much sunshine and so on is required, then yon can go and tell the Sunshine Controller that you 'must' have that amount." "But, how am I to know how much sunshine is required by all the grass?" said 1. "Goose!" said she again. "Simply send a Form around and get ft filled up—say, as re- I gards each plant. I 1. How many blades it support*? 2. How many days rain is finds necessary on its particular soil? 3 .How many hours sunshine? 4. What soil it lilves on? 5. Any other information. Then you, could get your clerks to work out the average and the trick would be done." So I had lots of Forms printed, and then other Forms to explain the first, and I en- gaged a lot of females to sort the Forms when they were returned. Then Melinda insisted on coming down to supervise the feminine staff. And she revelled in the Forms that kept coming in hy every post. She came running in every few minutes to tell me "there are six," "there are twenty," "there are fifty" mail sacks full of Forms. And now I began to get alarmed at all those masses of paper, so I thought I would go out and see if the. grass looked any greener in the Park— I stepped on the heel of my slipper and awoke. Melinda was still reading down- stairs.

Advertising

THE REAL WELSH CURE M,n BALSAM I I CURES K COUGHS &COLDS I Invaluable in the Nursery hBm I OF ALL CHEMISTS AND STORES. HIV J BOTTLES Is. 3d. and 3s

LLANGADOCKS ONLY SLAUGHTERMAN

Evidence was given as to the extent of the posting business and the accommodation for travellers. The mathelr of the respondent is aged 78 and lirves on the premises. The Tribunal allowed conditional exemp- tion. LLANGADOCK'S ONLY SLAUGHTERMAN Mr D. F. Smithfield, Llangadock appealed for exemption for himself. He was said to lie the only slaughterman in the parish I'he ease had been adjourned in order to ascer tain whether a brother of tho appellant had joined up. ft was stated that this brother had joined' up. Ihe appeal way allowed. DAKMARTHKN—Printed aid Published by the j Proprietress, M. Lawrence, at her Offices, 3 Blue Street, FRIDAY, April 2oth, 1917.