Teitl Casgliad: Carmarthen weekly reporter

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Llun 1 o 4 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
2 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
Advertising

We have a LARGE SELECTION of 'Almot- t,' !I- tft- t i &9- OIL EKIKS IN STOCK. f k FAIRBANKS-MORSE. Bragg WORTHINGTON, ■ < -I v|8IBB^8lBsiii^fl^B8^8l^ x^^apSfes^gar ilB^IHfiH!lli9QBflB9iB2^Kifr^9^S>5^ iwS^HHfilk. ■HHnn^i^nH^#^ «»& ^hhkh&. HHHl^H^Hr i^eQ^sHBB^BBB^ js9r ^OBfelk j^^HMB|MMBBBBBBp^^HSM^^fP^^PPP^y;% oilBflHHr ■H||| HI ~TO«§g^B^il9Si^^HSHgH|H|HHB" Ji&fi /BBrWffiT7F"F?i^: A't^KBtfaSMSiSB^ d Au ddml jiMBffliMB^i^«p^s^ TlftmMriiffBiillrBm^ à 0 w nion \s &,OI1 UOKTM BOUSE FUnNISHEnS ADD ACIIICULTURAL ENGINEERS, CABMAKTHiai. Irot,mongery-io Hall Street and 9 Priory Street. Bedstead Showrooms—5, St Mary Street. Furniture Showrooms-I St Mary Street. Farm Implements—Market Place, Carmarthen, Llanelly, Llandyssul, and Llanybyther. Telegrams-O Thomas, Ironmongers, Carmarthen." Telephoiie- No. ig, EORGE H PILLS Bi A MARVELLOUS REMEDY, J For upwards oj Forty Years these Pills havej held the first place in the World as a Remedy for PILES AND G RAVFi,, and flll the common disorders of the Bowels, Stomach Liver, and Kidneys; and there is no civilized Nation under the Sun that has not experienced their Healing Virtues. THE THREE EOUMS OF THIS IIEMEDY: No. 1—George's. Pile and Gravel Pills. No. 2—George's Gravel Pills. No. 3—George's Pills for the Piles, Sold everywhere in Boxes, Ij1 & 3/- each. By Post, i/4 & 3/2. PROI'BlfcTQll—J, f, EOBGE, Rl.R.l'.Sj ABHiM-iS. "zr-=.=- r. PRINTING! PRINTING!! (jOOD. CHEAP AND EXPEDITIOUS j PRINTING EXECUTED AT THE "REPORTER" PRINTING k PUBLISHING OFFICES, 3 BLUE STREET OARMARTHElT ORDERS BY POST receive prompt and careful attention. p R ICE S ON AP P LIe A T ION. FhcOarmartlien Weekly Reporter PUBLISHED ZVJlaH THURSDAY EVENING, Circulates throughout South Wales generally, and has the LARGEST CIRCULATION IN THE COUNTY OF CARMARTHEN PRICJK ONE PINNT POST FKKK 1/9 ran QUAUTKB THE BEST ADVERTISING MEDIUM FOR ALL CLASSES OF ADVERTISEMENTS. NOTICES TO UHIT FROM LANDLORD TO TENANT AND TENANT TO LANVLOlll May he obtained at the RKFOHIKR Ofvlnpt; Blue-street, Carma: thels. I PRICE—ONE.PEN NY. J X STOP ONE MOMENT Y Oh Dear Doctor MUST My Darling die? There is very little hope. But try TUDOR WILLIAMS' PATENT liALSAM OF HONEY. WHAT IT IS Tudor Williams' Patent Balsaiii of Honey Is an essence of the purest and most effica- cious herbs, gathered on the Welsh Hills and Valleys in their proper season, when their virtues an in full perfection, and combined with the purest Welsh Honey. All the in- gredients are perfectly pure. WHAT IT DOES I Tudor Williams' Patent Balsam of Honey Cures Coughs, Colds, Bronchitis, Asthma, Whooping Cough, Croup, and all disorders of the Throat, Chest and Lungs. Wonderful Cure for Children's Coughs after Measles. it is invaluable to weak-chested men, delicate women and children. It succeeds where ali other remedies fail. Sold by all Oliemists and Stores in Is 3d, 3s Od. and 5s 6d bottles. Great saving in purchasing larger size Bottles. WHAT IT HAS DONE FOR OTHERS. What the Editor of the "Gentlewoman's Court journal" says:— Sir,—The result of the bottle of your splendid Tudor Williams' Balsam of Honey is simply marvellous. My mother, who is over seventy, although very active, every winter has a bronchial cough which is not dnly distressing but pulls her down a lot. Its gone now. With best wishes for your extraordinary preparation. W. Browning Hearden. YOU NEED NOT SUFFER! Disease is a sin, inasmuch that if you act rightly, at the right time, it can, to a great extent, be avoided. Here is the preventative The first moment you start with Sore Throat tae a dose of TUMOR WILLIAMS' 1 i'\ If .4.J. 1 FA TEN8J:1 BALSAM OF HONEY, It has saved thousands! It will save youl It is prepared by a fully qualified chemist, and is, by virtue of its oomposition, eminent- ly adapted for all cases of Coughs, Colds, Bronchitis, Esthma, etc., it exercises a dis- dinct influence upon the mucous lining of the throat, windpipe, and small air vessels. so that nothing but warmed pure air passes into the lungs. It's the product of the Honeycomb, chemically treated to get the best results. The Children lifte it7 THEY ASK FOR IT So different from most medicines. Nice to Take Cuies Quickly For vocalists and pablic speakers it has no enual, it makes the voice as clear as a bell. Manufacturer Tudor Williams, MEDICAL HALL, ABERDARE. TO POOR RATE COLLECTORS, ASSISTANT OVERSEERS, &c. FORMS of Notice of Audit, Collector B Monthly Statement, &cM Poor Rate Receipt Books, with Name of Parish, Particulsn of Ratp.&C., printed in, can be obtained at the RPPORTUTT OFKICK at Cheap Rates. Send for fricf" THE CARMARTHEN RILLPOSTING COMPANY, NOTT SQUARE, CARMARTHEN. BILLPOSTINGand ADVERTISINGS all its Branches, throughout the Counties of Garir> then, Pembroke. anc Cardigan R. M JAMES. Manager. Carmarthen County Schools. THE GRAMMAR SCHOOL. liCADMASTER; E. S. ALLEN, M.A (CANTAB). COUNTY GIRLS- SCHOOL HEADMISTRESS Miss B. A. HOLME, M.A., Late Open Scholar of Girton College, Cambridge. 9s. per Term (inclusive). Rod notion when there are more than one from the same family. The mxt Term begins Thursday, April 26th. The Headmistress (at the Girl's School) and the Headmaster (at the Boy's School) will Le pleased to see the parents of new pupils ou Wednesday, April 2-jth, from 2.30 to 5 p.m. 1/1! WE CLAIM THAT 2/9 DR. U2 -Y 3EI E3 DROPSY, LIVER, AND WIND PILLS ovns Constipation, Backache, Indigestion, HeartWeak- ncss, Headache, and Nervous Complaints Mr. John Parkin, 8, Edm Crescent, West Auckland, writes, dated March 12th. 1912 "I must say that they are all that you represent them to be, they are splendid, indeed 1 wish I had known about them sooner. I shall make their worth known to all who suffer from Dropsy." Pole Maker— S. J. COLEY & CO. 5 HiGH ST, STROUD,BIOS. WEDDING CAUIJS. NEW SPECIMEN BOOK CONTAINING LATEST & EXQUISITE DESIGNS Sent to intending Patrons at any add reM on receipt ot an intimation to that effect. PRICES TO SUIT ALL CLASSES. • REPORTER OFFICE," 3 BLUE ST

Mr Lloyd George on the Submarine Menace

Mr Lloyd George on the Sub- marine Menace. The freedom of the City of London was con- ferred upon Mr Lloyd George on Friday. The Premier, in the course of a speech in reply, said:—I believe I am not the first Welshman who has received, this honour. There was a Welshman in the 18th century, a distinguished divine, named Dr Richard Price, upon whom the city of London conferred the dignity of citizenship for the part he took in protesting against the oppression of the American Colonies. I thank the City of Lon- don, not merely for its great personal distinc- tion which it has conferred upon me, but as the head of the Government, I thank the City of London for its services to the nation during 1 this period. He paid a great tribute to the first British forces in the field. Our gratitude ought to go out also, he said, to that brave little man who led them through all those trying months under very grave disabilities, and was never beaten, and never lost heart—Lord French (applause). Our men now, thank God, had got a real chance. Times had changed, thanks to the efforts put forth by the manufacturers of the country, by the workmen of the coun- Taking the first 18 days of the battle of the Somme and the first 18 days of this battle, and just consider these figures. In the first 18 days of the battle of the Somme we cap- tured 11,000 prisoners and 54 guns. During the first 18 days of the battle of Arras we captured 18,000 prisoners ad 230 guns (cheers) M e have gained four times as much ground and our losses are exactly half. I tell you what that means. It means not ultimate victory, but it means that our victory is going to be won at less loss and that the chances are growing as our equipment is im- proving. And the Germans know it (cheers). And that is the explanation of the despair which has driven them to black piracy on the high seas. Xow that is the next job we have got to meet (cheers). We mean to do it. They mean to make the seas absoiutely impassable. It is essential to victory that they should do it. It is equally essential to victory for us that they should fail. That is the proposition with which we are confronted. What is our minimum problem? To feed a population of 45,000,000 which is not self-supporting. to pro- vide the necessary raw material and food. and. to equip our Fleet and Army and to keep the seas for the transport of troops and more equipment for ourselves and our Allies. This has to be done against a swarm of pirates moving unseen in the trackless seas. Don't let us minimise it (cheers). Unless we thoroughly appreciate its gravity we will not put out our strength to deai with it-and that would be the greatest blow ever struck against our resources. Judging by some of the criticisms I have read—and I have very little time to read them (laughter)—you might have imagined that submarines were something that appeared in the sea for the first time when Sir Edward Carson became First Lord of the Admiralty. I can assure my critical friends that it has been a problem which has worried us for 21, years at least, and is growing more and more. At first I do not believe that the Germans themselves realised what a potent weapon it was. Since the Germans determined to sink ali craft indiscriminately without any warn- ing. there is no doubt that they have sunk more ships, but they have brought America in and I am perfectly satisfied with the balance (loud cheers). America, with great patience, has come to the conclusion that it is no use waving a neutral flag in the teeth of a shark (laughter and cheers). There are two ways of dealing with it. One is by destroying or rendering innocuous the submarines. The best brains available in this country and in America, and to a more limited extent in Franco, are applying their energies to that problem. For the moment it would not be wise for me, to say mere than that; but, believe me, they are concentrating on that problem, and I have never seen a human problem which is not soluble. and I do not believe that this is any exception to that rule. But we must proceed on the assumption that you cannot sol ve it. If you want to b3 absolutely safe you must make your problem as if you cannot discover anything to put down the submarine, and this is where the public come in. Our first difficulty, as I pointed out, is to feed the population, because if we die of starvation there is an end of the war. We have b?come every year, unfortun- ately, iess and less self-contained in the matter of food. But what have we done as a Govern- ment to meet this condition? 1 am bound to give the facts, and criticism which has been directed against the Government- has made it all the more necessary that I really should say what has been don3. When we. came in in December of last year the wheat cultivation of this country had been allowed to go down by 15 per cent. There were 250,000 feww acres cultivated of wheat than in any previous year. So we began with a deficiency. A Ye took the mater in hand immediately. We had. of eourso, the same shortage of labour in January as we had in November. and we had the very worst weather. We organised the Board of Agriculture; we have organised ail the war agricultural com- mittees throghout the kingdom. We gave per cent. of their land, and they have done it. The winter wheat has gone. We have a labour shortage, which is getting worse every month. 'Mr Prothero and those with him are working in a continous rattle of mocking laughter and gibes. We bought under culti- vation in that three or four months of rather feverish anxiety one million acres of fresh land. What does it mean? It wiP be an addition of two million tons of food. We are doing mere than that. I do not say that the war is going to con- tinue through 1918, but we are taking no chances. We have taken far too many (hear, hear). If the German knows that by holding out until the end of 1917 he can win by starv- ing us, he will hold out (hear. hear). But if he also knows that the iongeir he holds out the worse it will be for him. peace wiil come much earlier (applause). We are taking steps row for the harvest ot 1918, and not a minute too soon. We have already got our pbn. and if these plans are carried out there will be 3,000.000 fresh acres of land put un-eer cultivation, and we can guarantee that without a ton of food stuff from abroad, no one enn starve us out (prolonged cheers). --> But that is not all. We want to save our ships, and we have got to do it in time. If these steps for cultivation had been taken a year or 18 months aD)-(eries of "Ahl")—we should have absolutely no anxiety about food now. r do not say we would have got wheat, but I am talking of cereals-oats, barley-and very good stuff they are. I was half brought up on them, and I have survived to tell the tale (laughter and applause). You would have had plenty of good food there, and it would be a very good thing to have a little of that variety introduced. Now we come to the imports-the cutting down wof unnecessary imports. 1 would itet have said that except for the fact that it has been suggested that there was something left undone. The imports last year we cut down by a million and a half tons. It was a mere trifle. It was not in the feast adequate to the real needs of the case. "Ye have made arrangements by which we are cutting down imports to this country from abroad, without interfering with any essentia] industry, by between ten million and elflrren million tons. Arrangements are already working which will save six millions. That six millions is in addition to the one and a halt millions last year. These are working af- ready. What is more, we are going to save all the timber imports. We are making arrange- ments by which we can get most of our minerals worked in the mines of Great Britain We shall be getting four millions tons a yftr in addition to what we are getting now fey August next, and our blast furnaces will be adapted for that purpose. You know what 11 million tons of imports mean. If those 11 million tons of importe had been saved a year ago you would have had 12 months' store of wheat in this country now (applause). Why do I say that? In Canada there wa.s a surplus of wheat; that is so, isn't it? (Mr Lloyd George appealed to Sir R. Borden on the platform for his assent to the question and continued): I am very glad to hear you say so. We have got 85 million bushels of wheat there now, I cannot say for the asking, but for the fetching (laughter and "hear, hear."). It ought to be here. I be- 20 or 30 millions of it had to go to the United States of America for want of a market. If you are cutting down your imports it means increasing shipping until we have dis- covered our method of destroying this ocean baciius. We are building ships we have a very shrewd, able and experienced shipowner who is at the head of our shipping concerna- Sir Joseph Maclay (applause). With all the canniness of his race he has already made arrangements by which we shall get three times as many new ships this vear as we had last year (hear. hear). 1 am "not sure that, with the arrangements we are making, we shall not get four times aa many. He has also brought practically the whole shipping of this country for the first time under complete control for requisition. What does this mean? It means that the ships of this country are going to lie concentrated heenceforth upon the essential and vital trade of the country (hear, hear). There was a good deal of trade done by this country in times of peace, very useful, and very profitable trades-very profitable. But it is important now that you should consider what is vital to the life of the nation. What is the result of the arrangement he has made? He has so concentrated his traffic and so arranged it that, although we are losing heavily in ships and assuming we still continue to lose at the same rate, in July we can bring more cargo tonage into our markets than in March. The Germans thought we were done. but they did not know the race they were dealing with (loud applause). We looked very indifferent, dbut when pres- sure is brought to bear on the Old Country it somhow or other rings true, and it is going to do that this time. 8.000 IiOCOMOTIVES LAID UP. In the Prize Court on Monday, when ap- i. cat ion was made for the condemnation of several shiploads of lubricating oils and fats as enemy property, counsel read an affidavit by Mr Fuller Smith, of the War Trade Intelli- donee Department, who stated the lastest re- ports in the hands of the Government showed 8,COO locomotives were laid up at Essen alona last March through wear ;,nd tear caused by the scarcity of lubricating oils or by the em- ployment of bad lubricants. MEAL TIME SIGNALS. At a special sitting of tile South-West j Wales Munitions Tribunal at Swansea on Monday, two process men at a controlled works were summoned for not attending regu- larly to their work during the ordinaly work- ill, hours. asd hindering the output of muni- tions. It was said that the end of a meal t time was indicated by the switching off of a light, and, if the hint were not taken, by the ( door latch being rattied and the door thrown open. Defendants were found playing cards twenty minutes after the expiration of the meal time. The defence was that the men were unaware of the Mgbt signal, and were waiting for the rattling of the latch, which they did not hear. The summonses were dis- missed with a caution. PUGI\A 0"nC OBJ ECTOR. William Bacon, a Bristol baker, recently obtained freedom from military service- as a conscientious objector. Subsequently, in a dispute with another employee in the bake- house, Bacon grew so "arm that lie gave the other workman a blow with his fist. The re- cruiting authorities consequently re-opened the ease at the Tribual on edm^day. the military representative stating iluat if Bacon could strike a colleague he could fight the Gel- mans. Bacon, however, st 11 professed con- scientious scruples, and said. "to are a'\ in the flesh, ana we are apt to fall." He was ordered to join up for non-combatant eerrice. THE (HOPS IN PICARDY. Sugar beet, beans, peas. and c reals for- merly constituted the chief crops of the area of France which is now being recovered by British and French troops, an area which is now a war-ravaged desert. Yet the elderiy peasants-, as they return to what remains of their holdings, display the most remarkable eagerness to resume cultivation of them in order to strengthen th? food position of France and her Allies. They wiil be helped by the English farmers, through the medium of the Agricultural R l ei of Ailies Fund, which will furnish the facilities most required, such as slock, etc., as the military situation permits. The French peasantry, who before the war grew almost enough cun to clwb!e Fiance to f;ed herscif, now farm (50 per cent, of the Army of our Ally and their holdings are being worked almost exclusively by their women and elderly men folk.