Teitl Casgliad: Carmarthen weekly reporter

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 2 o 4 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
11 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
Advertising

f. BOOKBINDING. I i.* v Established Over Fifty Years. 6- 1 D. TITUS WILLIAMS BOOKBHSTDER, Etc, I PPEL STREET, CARMARTHEN. The Best and Cheapest House in South Wales for all Classes of Binding. Those who are taking any Histories of the War in t- ■ parts, should get them put into cases or bound before they become torn and worthless. -0 Books bound in Publishers Cases at Publisher's Prices. _r- BOOKBINDING TO THE TRADE. BOOKBINDING. [ GENUINE CLEARANCE SALE OF THE ENTIRE STOCK OF WATCHES, CLOCKS, JEWELLERY, SILVER AND ELECTRO PLATE, ETC, j .,0 —- 20 PER CENT. REDUCTIONS. -— L- 4/- in the £ Allowed Off the Plain Marked prices on every Article, j — ————————————————————————————— j E. REEVES, Jeweller, i 54A, KING STREET, CARMARTHEN. QAI C Mi^\A/ /^M AND WILL CONTINUE UNUL FURTHER OALL. INUW UN NOTICE. TERMS-CASH. SUMMER, 197- MISSES LEWIS & CLARE, have pleasure in announcing the their SHOW- RooMS are NOW OPEN with a large Selection of HIGH-CLASS MILLINERY for SUMMER WEAR. Ostrich & Marabout Stoles, Veilings A VISIT OF INSPECTION IS CORDIALLY INVITED Cavendish House, 41 King-st. Carmarthen DEFENCE OF THE REALM REGULATIONS. • I NOTICE TO ALL EMPLOYERS. The following Extract from the above Regulations is inserted by the Recruiting Officer, Carmarthen, for the information of ALL concerned It shall be the duty of every person who under this regulation is required to make such list as aforesaid or who keeps such record as aforesaid to deliver forthwith to the Recruiting Officer for the locality in which the premises, at which the persons, included in the list, or record, are employed, or if such persons are not em- ployed at, or about any premises, the employers premises, are situated, a true copy of such list and record, and thereafter to deliver to such Recruiting Officer during the first week in each calender month, a written report showing any alterations and additions to the said list and record on to the last day of the preceding month, and if he fails to do so, he shall be guilty of a summary offence against these regulations." NOW IS THE TIME TO SELL j OLD GOLD AND SILVER Cash sent or offers made by return for articles sent by post. Best Prices Paid. John Williams, WATCHMAKER, LAMMAS-ST. CARMARTHEN. Established lS36. WEDDING CARDS. Anyone requiring the above should, before placing their orders, send for our NEW SPECIMEN BOOK CONTAINING THE CHOICEST DESIGNS TO ADVERTISERS. PREPAID SCAjjR OF CHARGES FOR ADVERTISING IN THE REPORTER. -n_- No. of One Three Six Wordw, Insertion. Insertions, Insertions. | « d s d a d 20 1 a 2 3 3 6 28 1 6 3 8 4 6 28 1fj I 3 8 46 36 2 0 4 0 5 6 « 2 6 4 6 6 6 The above scale only applios to tbe "Situations" To Lets," Stud" To be Sold by Private Treaty" clases of Advertisements, and must be paid for in advance, oi the ordinary credit rate will be charged. HALEPENN Y STAMPS, or Postal or Post Office Orders, payable to M. LA WHENCE, at Carmarthen, Replies may be made addressod to the Rcportci Office, and will be fot warded to advertisers when scaiiipfcd envelopes are sent. JAMES JONES, liillpobter and Advertising Agent fur Kidwelly and neighbouring Villages. All work duly executed. Address Station Road, Kidwelly. VISITING CARDS frotn Is 6d for 50 Printed on Ivory Cards. —Jicporter Office, Carmarthen WEDDING CAUI)S-P,ices and styles to suit I W all Classes. Speciment liook, containing the I Latest and Choicest Designs, sent on application.— Rtpurter Office, Carmarthen. I L | IN MEMORY OF OUR FALLEN BRAVE. REGIMENTAL MEMORIAM CARDS Can now be Supplied Stamped with any Regimental Crest. PLEASE ASK TO SEE OUR SPECIAL BOOK. Heportcr 11 Office, 3 Blue Street, Carmarthen. I I

CARMARTHENSHIRE

CARMARTHENSHIRE. TOWNSHIP OF LAUGHARNE. MR TOM JOHN has been instructed to SELL by PUBLIC AUCTION at Brown's Hotel, Laugharne, on Friday, May 25th, 1917, at 2.30 p.m.. the undermentioned properties in the following tots LOT 1.—Two excellent fields called North- wadden, containing 2 acres 1 rood and 20 perches or thereabouts, now let with Horse- pool Farm. in the occupation of Mr Howell Harries. LOT 2. — An excellent field called Shipping Pairk, containing 5 acres 1 rood and 22 perches or thereabouts, adjoining the main road from St. Clears to Laugharne in the occupation of Mr Robert Bowen. I/OT 3.—Corsehays House, garden and field adjoining; the house and gardien in the occu- pation of ,11iss Alice Howells, and the field in the occupation of Mr James Isaac. For further particulars apply to Mr Tom John, Autioneer, Avon Bank, St. Clears, or to MORGAN GRIFFITHS. SON & PROSSrEllt. Solicitor, Carmarthen.

Advertising

HORSES FOR SALE. F. WALTERS, Removal and Cartage Agent, wishes to SELL by PRIVATE TREATY, through labour difficulties, 15 heavy and light CART and VAN HORSES; also TWO very useful, active (in foal) CART MARES, all in good condition. Prices £ 18 to £ 50. Warranted in all harness, trial allowed, Also Vans, Trollies, Pantechnicons, harness, &c.- Apply 167 Ossulston-street, St. Pancras, London (two minutes from King's Cross and Euston Station Heavy and light trotting. Cart Van Horses, including 2 weighty t^ire mares (in foal) 15 to 17 hands, 5 to 8 years, from 20 guineas. Trial and warranty given. NOTE.No money need be paid before trial. These horses have been working on Coal and Manure tnn- tracts. Foreii-an, 350a Goswell Road, London (four minutes from King's Cross and St. Pancras Stations).

I The Disappearing Tramp

The Disappearing Tramp STRIKING FIGURES'! X WEST WALES. The llev A. F. Mills presided at a meeting of the West Wales Vagrancy Committee on Saturday at Carmarthen. The report showed that the number of tramps accommodated during the hal year was 1,718, a reduction of 1,275 as compared with the corresponding half of last year. Co!. Hughes asked if it were possible to secure uniformity of tasks. The reply showed that the task varied from 14cwt. of stone to light gardening. It was decided to make a call equal to one- seventysixth of a penny rate for expenses— that is about a farthing on 1:19 assessable value. It was decided to reduce the bread ration at the midday meal rom 8oz to 6oz.

Obscene Language in Tabernacle Row

Obscene Language in Tabernacle! Row. SCHOOL ATTENDANCE OFFICER AS PROSECUTOR. At the Carmarthen Borough Police Court on Monday. Mr Sidney Cairns, school attendance officer, Carmarthen, charged Mrs Vera Randell, of Tabernacle-row, with using abscene language. Mr T. Walters, Clerk to the Education Committee, appeared on behalf of the com- plainant. Mr Cairns said that on Tuesday the 24th ult. about noon he had occasion to call at Tabernacle-row. where the defendant lives. He had occasion to speak to her and asked her not to insult him on the public street as she had done on the previous Sunday. Mrs Randell then got into a desperate rage and used some of the most filthy language he had ever heard from a woman's mouth. Complainant handed up to the Bench a book in which he had written a specimen of the "language." He added that there were children present. He told Mrs Randell that he would report her for using such language. Mr Cairns then explained the statement that the defendant had insulted him on the previous Sunday. He said that he was going with a, friend in a motor car when he passed Mrs Randell, her husband and her mother. Mrs Randell shouted out something co about taking her husband to school. Defendant said that Mr Cairns had accused her of being out walking on Sunday with a Salvation Army officer. She was out with her husband. He was a member of the Salvation Army, but not an officer. Mrs Layer, a neighbour, gave evidence on behalf of the defendant. A good deal of cross-examination arose over the statement that the defendant had been ,ilkin(,,out with a Salva,tion Army officer. The witness said that Mr Randell was a Salvationist, but not an officer. Mr Walters suggested that at this time he was wearing some uniform. Witness: I don't understand much about the Salvation Army. I am a Baptist myself. Mr W. Spurrell: It would not be very dis- reputable to be seen talking to a Baptist officer or a Salvation Army officer. Mrs Poll." Harries, a neighbour, gave evi- dence on behalf of the defendant. In answer to a question, the witness said: I was too much interested in my washing to hear it all, but I could not shut my ears. In answer to a further question, the witness said that she could not say whether Mr Ran- dell wore uniform or not on Sunday. Didn't he-have a red jersey?—I don't look at my neighbours. I don't know what they wear. Mr Walters asked the witness if Mrs Ran- dell had used the language written down in the book. Witness: I can read writing: if you wanted me to write you a letter I could no do it. The Bench fined the defendant 10s.

Stitch in Time

Stitch in Time. There is an old saying "A stitch iu tini-a safM nine" and if !I¡()n t:o first tvniptoms of anything being wrong with our "health we were to resort to sotni simple but proper means of correcting the. mioc!iia? r,ine-tentha of the suffering that invades our homes would be avoided. A da.1e of G ri/ym Evans' Quinine Bitters taken wSien y ji feal tht least bit out of sorts is jrst th, t, "stitch in time. You can -et Gwiifm I 'ønR' Qiunine Bitters at any Chemists or Stoi to in bottlee, 2s Ud and 4s 6d each, but i-Tmert,ber that the only guarantee of genuine %8 is the name "GwiJym Evans" oa the la el, stamp aw1, bottlo, without which none; Ie get,lline. 8olf Ceusp&ny, Limit**], LUucllv, South Wale

No title

A number of policeinent belonging to the Carmarthenshire Constabulary joined the Colours on Monday.

Parliament and Naval Affairs j

Parliament and Naval Affairs, In the House of Commons on Tuesday, Sir Henry Dalziel asked the Prime Minister whether he was yet in a position to inform the House when it was proposed to make a statement on the result of the Government's efforts to effect an Iri h settlement. Mr Bonar Law: 1 am sorry I must again make a claim on the indulgence of the House on this matter owing to circumstances which could not have been foreseen. The Prime Minister is obliged to go to the Continent again this week, aind therefore it is impossible for him to make the statement, but I hope before the end of the week to name a day next week on which the statement will be made. SIR E. CARSON AND CHANNEL RAIDS. I Sir Henry Dalzrcl asked the First Lord of the Admiralty whether he could give any fur- ther information to the House in respect to the recent naal attack on Ramsgate, and could he explain why so many enemy attacks are possible on the Kent coast while British naval attacks are apparently impossible on Zee- brugge. Sir E. Oarson said what information was in his possession had already been made public. Although the loss of life occasioned by the raid was most regrettable, it must be remem- bered they possessed no military value. He could assure his hon. friend that the First Sea Lord (Admiral Jellieoe) and himself, in con- junction with the Vice-Admiral Commanding at Dover, had been giving continuous atten- tion to our defences in order as far as possible to meet these attacks. Sir H. Dalziel asked if German officers who had been continuously" killing women and children during the past year were entitled to be described as "a brave and gallant enemy," as they had been described by the Vice- Admiral at Dover. Sir E. Carson said with reference to the description of the men who were dead he would rather leave the matter to the feelings 'of the hon. members (hear, hear). Mr Houston: How is it that dstroyers pass through our defensive mine fields with im- punity? Sir E. Carson: I am afraid I can explain that. Mr Hogge If my right hon. friend's in- formation is all the information that has been made public will he get some more which is of some use? (hear, hear). No reply was made. Mr Billing: Is is not a fact that the third German destroyer was attacked and bombed by one of the Royal Naval Air Service sea- planes ? Sir E. Carson Not on the night of this raid. ADMIRALTY VOTE NOT TO BE DIS- CUSSED IN PUBLIC. Mr Bonar I/aw, replying to Commander Bel lairs, said that as at present advised he did not think it would be desirable to have a discussion on the Admiralty Vote. The House would be in a better position to judge after the private Sessions. Mr Churchill: Will the private Session be confined to one particular topic or all topics? Mr Bonar Law: It must be possible to raise any topic. Mr Churchill: Can that be any substitute for a discussion on a definite question or branch of the Government? A general dis- 1ciission roaming over the wliolle field of the war could not be a substitute for a definite discussion on some particlar war vote. Sir Bonar Law: It does not follow, though all subjects may be discussed, there will not be a discussion on a particular subject. 1 still adliere to the view that it would be un- desirable to have the Admiralty Vote dis- cussed in public. Mr Churchill: I am not pressing for that at all. ALLOTMENT HOLDERS. Sir R. Winfrey informed Major Newman that an order had been made providing for the payment of compensation to holders of allottments if disturbed before 1st January, 1919. Major N ewman What will happen to small- holders after that dote? Sir R. Winfrey: I undietrstand that as long as the war iasts we hope to extend the order. GRATUITIES AND PENSIONS. Sir A. Griffith Boscawen informed Mr Hogge that the Pensions Minister proposed that a tribunal should be set up to which disabled soldiers who had been awarded gratuities on account of disablement could appeal if they considered pensions should be granted to them IRISH POTATOES. Captain Bathursf, answering Mr George Terrell, said there was no reason to doubt that the stock of potatoes per head of the population in Ireland was in excess of that m Great Britain. This, however, was a normal state of affairs, as the normal consumption of potatoes in Ireland was more than five times that in this country. The question of the* removal of export restrictions had been fully discussed with the Irish Office. Mr Terrell: Are the restrictions likely to be removed ? Captain Bathurst: On so delicate a matter I don't venture to be prophetic (laughter). WALES AND AGRICULTURE. Sir Herbert Roberts asked the President of the Board of Agriculture whether the exerciso of the powers given to the Agricultural Wages Board in the Corn Production Biil to set up District Wages Boards regard would be paid to the special conditions of agriculture in Wales, and whether Welsh opinion would be consulted before the regulations governing the constitution of the District Wages Boards in Wales were framed, and as to the areas for wliNch they should be established. Sir Richard Winfrey: I should prefer to await the further progress of the Bill before answering questions as to its administration, but I may say that I am in genera,1 sympathy with the views indicated in the hon. baronet's question. MALI AS FOOD. In reply to Mr Aneurin Williams, Captain Bathurst said regarding the question of add- ing malt flour to ordinary flour, the only in- foi mation available was obtained from a few baikers who manufactured a special kind of bread with a substantial amount of malt flour mixed with ordinary flour. These bilkers said they were selling a 21b loaf at 9d and Is. A slight mixture, of malt would probably render tho bread more nutritious, but so large a mix- ture of 10 per cent, of malt flour would be un- adisable, because it would make the bread sticky and unpalatable. The availlable stock of malt, if converted into flour and used, with TO per cent. addition to the present standard flour, would last nearly eleven weeks. Sticli a use of it would be equivalent approximately to one additional week's supply of flour for all purposes.

Advertising

j NOTICE I &VD/bg to depletion of Staff we 61 to draw the attention of the Public to I the fact that we give no goods out on Approbation. ØJtll goods must he bought I aJui paid for at the time. fyfe guarantee the ShMio the very best value obtainable on these eonditims. Evan Morris Sf Co., Clothiers, LAMMAS STREET, CARMARTHEN.

KIDWELLY NOTES

KIDWELLY NOTES, The mining classes held at the Castle School since the beginning of October closed last week with a "social" held on Friday evening. Those present in addition to the students were the Rev W. C. Jenkins, Mr J. G. Anthony, and Mr 11. H. Isaac (school managers), Mrs It. H. Isaac, Mrs A. James. Mr W. H. Bellin, County Mining rganiser, Mr A. P. Mansell, clerk to the Managers, fÆd Mr John Davies. Castle School, together with Mr D. 0. Jones and Mr E. T. Davies, the teachers of the mining classes The schoolroom had been nicely decorated, and tea was served on daintily liaid tables, the arrangements being supervised by Mrs D. o. Jones, who was assisted by Mrs D. J. Hughes, Miss Lily Anthony, Miss Gladys James. Miss Doreen Jones and Miss Zeniah Edwards. The refreshments were supplied by Mr Frank Sheppard, The Bakery. After tea, a miscellaneous programme was rendered, and interspersed were interesting addresses by those present. The Rev W. C. Jenkins occupied the chair, and in his introductory remarks spolke of his School. During that long period there had been changes in the teaching Sitaff and he was glad to state that they had not had a better headmaster than the present one (applause). He was pleased to meet so many young men who had taken advantage of the facilities for self-improvement provided by the mining classes. He hoped not one of them would be required for the Army. He had two sons fight- ing for King and Country. One, who had gone through the Boer war, was with the forces in Africa. and the other in France (hear, hear). Ho trusted that the evening would be pleasantly spent, and that God's blessing would rest on them (applause). Mr Clarence Williams, A.V.C.M., opened the musical programme with a pianoforte solo which was followed by a song, "The Moun- tains of Morne," contributed by Mr D. O. Jones. Mr W. H. Bellin expressed' his pleasure at meeting the school managers whom he was pleased to find taking an interest in the classes. He would be glad if the managers in other ditricts would follow their example, as it was a source of encouragement to young men to persevere with their studies when they knew that gentlemen of their position had their welfare at heart (hear. hear). Young men would be well advised to go in for study. There were great developments in sight in the educational yorld, and he promised that, in the extended privileges provided, he would endeavour to set a due share for the mining students (hear, hear). Criticisms had been levelled against the Carmarthen hire Educa- tion Committee, which had been described as "tight-fisted." He wouid like to say that he had only to show that the money applied for would be advantageously expended and he got what was required (hear, hear). He trusted that ere long a ladder extending from the elementary school to the university would be set up. Evening classes had been improving year by year, both from the point of view of the number of stud nets and the efficiency of the teaching staffs. When he took over the organisation there were in the county 10 mining classes, meeting once a week. Last session there were 34 centres (some with two classes) meeting twice a week. Kidwelly had done well this year. He had been told by pessimists that it would be hopeless to try and establish classes there. Well. the reply was the successful session just closing (hear, hear) Nine of the students had passed the examina- tion for colliery fireman, and it was hoped to have distributed the certificates that night, but the supply had become exhausted. The distribution would, therefore, be postponed. He trusted that these successes would stimu- late others to join. CoJliery owners were more and more inclined to appoint practical men as officials. Having paid a complifent to the teachers for their diligent and efficient in- struction. Mr Bellin closed with the remark that that function was a fitting ending to a successful session (applause). The duett, "Larboard Watch." was next given by Messrs Evan GraveH and Silas Fisher Mr J. G. Anthony spoke of the interest with which he had listened to Mr Bellin's address. He was proud to, learn of the successes which had been achieved and would offer his congra- tulations to students and teachers. Having referred to the good reputation of the school frof early times down to the present, Mr J. G. Anthony confessed he was not much of a miner but he had often wondered what would be the condition of the country without coal. It was a credit to Kidwelly that so many of the stu- dents had continued faithful to the end, but there were still too many young men who made no effort to improve themselves. He was very pleased to be present and to take part in the proceedings (applause). Mr W. Beynon Jones contributed two songs and reached a high level in his rendering of "Yr Hen Gerddor." Mr Isaac Jenkins having briefly expressed his appreciation of the classes, recited some specially composed verses which were heartily applauded. Mr A. P. Manse,I said that he was glad to hear of the successful session and hoped the classes were firmly established in their midst. He had some connection with the Miners Federation, and it was therefore natural that he should feel interest in the mining classes, which afforded young men au opportunity to learn more of the important science of mining (applause). Mr Wesley Reynolds sang a solo at this stage and Mr Grisdell Davies also contributed an item. Mr D. 0. Jones referred to the death in action of Pte. Willie Hughes, 9th Welsh Regt. whose home is in Water street, where his widow and six little children reside, and the pompany showed ther sympathy with the be- reaved relatives by upstanding. Mr Griff Evans proposed a vote of thanks to the teachers of the classes, to the chairman. school managers, and the ladies for their assistance. He was sorry that so many mem- bers of the eltss, failed to turn up after the Christmas holidays. It was their loss. He was glad he had persevered, and he had been rewarded by the knowledge he had acquired (hacr. hear). He was sure that no better teachers could be foitnd in this country, and he appreciated the cane they had taken with the students. He trusted the classes would do still better in the future (applause). Mr D. J. Hughes seconded. He had derived great benefit by attending the classes. He had gained! his fireman's certificate in Dccem- l>er (hear, hear). He endorsed what had heen said with regard to their teachers, and paid a J bribute to Mr Bellin for the interest he had taken in the students (applause). He hoped they would ha.ve a "rattling" good class next year (applause). Mr Evan Gravell, in supporting, said that although the wind had been taken out of his sails by the previous speakers, he must testify to the benefit he had derived from the classes. Not only had a good deal of rust been rubbed off. but he had acquired a lot of useful infor- mation (applause). Mr E. T. Davies, in responding, spoke of the pleasure he had derived in teaching the class. He expected some of the younger and more irresponsible members of the class "to d-i-op away, and that had been the crisenow. ever, they had had a successful session (hear, hear). Next year if they turned up again, they would go deeper into the important sub- ject of mining (applause). Mr W. H. Bellin thanked the speakers for the kind things sa,id about him. He was especially pleased to hear the tribute paid to the teachers by the students. Nothing was more encouraging to teachers than to have their services appreciated. Mr D. 0. Jones referred to the hearty co- operation of Mr Bellin and Mr Davie j with himself in carrying on the classes, which had ben an 'undoubted success (applaU.se). The Rev W. C. Jenkins also responded, and wished those present Divine blessings. Mr J. G. Anthony sang the solo of "HeU Wliad fy Nhtadau," which with the singing of "God save the King" concluded a very plea- ing evening. *#» The Free Churches of KidweUy held ft united singing festival at Siloam Baptist Chrupûl on Sunday last. Mr John Reynolds precentor of Siloam, was the day's oonductor, and it is no exaggeration to state that no one could have carried out the arduous duties with greater ability and success. Included in the admirably selected programme was an anthem "Trugharha wrthyf Arglwydd," com. posed by Mr Reynolds in memory of two young friends and members of Siloam Church, who were called to rest some years ago—Mr Geo- T. Davies, Corner Shop and Mr Tom Williatnf;p Garden Cottage. The anthem was exception' ally well rendered, the parts being well balanced and in perfect tune. Another an* them, which was also splendily sung w "Torrwyd y Tant," by Mr E. T. Davies, of Merthyr. The hymn-tune, "Lily," composed by Mr W. J. Rogers, Kidwelly, was a favour ite at the festival, as also was the hymn '\VneJ di ago iddo 'nawr" siing at the children meeting. The Rev W. C. Jenkins, Capel Sul (Ind.) was the morning's president. Mr J. G. Anthony (Alaw Gwendraeth) presided in the afternoon, and the Rev H. R. Jones, Siloam* in the evening. All three displayed aptitudo for the position, and their addresses were \\&' tened to with attention. Addresses were delivered by others mt WzU of the meetings. The singing of the juvenilo choirs was considered about the best heard since the festival was instituted, and the whole festival was certainly up to the level of former "cymanfaoedd." Mr Tom W. Thomas, organist of Oapel sui, presided at the organ with his usual efficiency The festival committee, of which t'foHo'l\" ing aire the officials, deserves felicitations ot the care bestowed on the arrangement of the programme:—Charman, Mr Arthur )forJ19, Croft terrace; treasurer, Air EdwardS, Phoenix, and secretary, Mr E. J. Go we*' Water street. The latter worked very haf^ to bring about the success ol the festival, is entitled; to a special word of commendatio^' All wish him a speedy recovery from the iØI disposition from which he is suffering. News of the death in action of Pte. W itliB Hughes, 9th Welsli Regiment, was receive4 last week, the widow receiving a letter frolo Second-Lieut. Nixon, 5th Machine Gun CoØ11 pany, intimating the sad intelligence and reø latng the circumstances tinder which deceased met his death, as follows:- 5th Machine Gun Co., B.E.F., April 20, 1917. ø It is with the dieepest sympathy that I lislo to inform you of the death of your husbau killed in action on tho 16th inst. During bo turn of sentry duty a shell dropped besi^ him killing him instantly. During the &hof time he was with this Company he earned hi#*1 opinions as to his nne soldierly charscteJ" For my own part I had formed the opiflioo that lie would prove one of the best'men If the section. His comrades feel the Ios dee{' and join with me in the expression of 51-# paithy. On ground just won from the mons only a tried man could be entrus 1. with a duty which he was performinn so w-eø Your husband has been buried in new cemetery here behind the lines, and wooden cross with inscription has been ereC" ted over the grave. At this moment I not permitted to state the' exact locality, you will no doubt hear from the Graves' gistration Department.—With deepest øY pathv, believe me, yours very sincerely, Dixon, 2nd Lieut." (J' Pte. Hughes is the second son of two brlr theirs who have made the supreme (sacrifice the present war, his brother, Pte. Dafl Hughes, having been killed a few months Another brother. Pte. Sam Hughes, has in Notley Hospital for two years as the res^ of injuries received in action, and, it is p babie he will be an invalid for the rest of days. tØ' Their parents. Mr and Mrs Hughes. Gwo, draieth terrace, have the universal oviiipo of the community in the terrible trials have been called upon to endure. ft A well attended meeting in connection the food economy campaign was held at Town Hall on Friday evening lust, the (Conn. W. J. Loosniore) presiding. A 00 mittee was appointed1 to carry out the sary propaganda work. An opportunity will be given on SuHVj next to hear, once again, the eminent di^ and great preacher, the Rev Dr Cvntfdy ,t Jones, who is one of the special preaclier-4 the Moi-fa C.M. anniversary services.

CARMARTHEN VTU t00

CARMARTHEN V.T.U. t 00 Company and recruit drill in the mørke Sunday afternoon at 2.30 prompt. (JCø Company amd recruit drill in the W.-ilroll on Wednesday evening at 7.30 prompt..p The rifle range is open for practice on day at 7.30. fP Recruits wanted. Exempted men ougb join. u rI ø, Lieut.Col. F. D. WILLIAMB-DRUMM^ Officer Oomm«idiJ»*J