Teitl Casgliad: Denbighshire free press

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 3 o 4 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
26 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
Local War Incidents

Local War Incidents. Information of every description of out- brave men, whether from abroad or on Home Leave," its solicited by the Editor for insertion in this column. Their friends should forward same to the Fun PRESS Office

GROUP OF LOCAL MEN IN PALESTINE

GROUP OF LOCAL MEN IN PALESTINE. We have received with much pleasure a very interesting letter from one of our former printing staff —Pte D H Davies—now in the' Holy Land," from which' 'we make a few extracts of interest to oui readers. It was written in "a Dugj Out somewhere in Palestine Octo- ber 8th last. He says :—" I have, recently got over a bad attack of Malaria, but am pleased to tell you I am now quite alright again, thank God. I am at present "Somewhere in Palestine," and, strange to say, I have met quite a nice little crowd of boys from Denbigh, Ruthin, and St Asaph. The names in the group tire:-Pte G Evans (now of Newquay, Cardiff), Pte Wilfred Davies (Tyny- ffordd Fawr, Cefn, St Asaph), Pte W R Hughes (son of Mrs Hughes, Peny- bont Shop. Ruthin), Pte Owen Jones (School House, Henllan), who was employed at Messrs J & P Williams, grocers, Liverpool House, Ruthin Pte D H Davies (an old Free Press boy), eldest son of Mr and Mrs R Davies, 33, Beacon's-hill, Denbigh; and Corpl R J Shierson (son of Mr Shierson, a former warder at H.M. Prison, Ruthin). Both the latter and Pte W R Hughes were employed in the office of Messrs R Ellis & Son, Ruthin. Corpl Shierson served at Gallipoli. We all look forward to every mail, for we know that Reg Hughes," of Ruthin, will then receive the Free Press. The one copy does for the lot of us, and we all visit each "Dug-Out" in turn, singing out 0 zn. Who has got the Free Press ? I can honestly tell you, that to is in this distant, ancient Holy Land, it is just like a breath of home. We have little time to spare, for always it is work, work, and still more work; but, nevertheless, we are all" merry and bright," in spite of all the numerous discomforts we experience from day to day, for campaigning in this country is no Cooks' Tour it's all work, real hard honest work. It would be useless denying the fact that we all long to be at home again. I would give a great deal to be tak- ing a walk this moment along the Crest. Never mind, some day I hope to have that pleasure-for there's no place like "Dear Old Blighty," in my opinion anyway."— May all the brave boys have their desire, and in God's good time all come safely home.

PROMOTION FOR COLONEL MADOCKS

PROMOTION FOR COLONEL MADOCKS. We are very pleased to hear that Colonel Madocks, D.S.O., of Glany- wern, has been promoted Brigadier- General. The new General has been in France from the commencement of the war, and has therefore taken part in several important engage- ments, and has won his promotion by splendid service.

THRILLING EXPERIENCE

THRILLING EXPERIENCE. Most interesting letters are re- ceived from one of our brave soldiers now in Egypt, who is well known in the Llanarmon district, being the nephew cf Mr William Jones, Compton House, Llanarmon. His letters, which give an intelligent and interesting account of the land of Egypt, contain historical and scrip- tural explanations, and are a great help and encouragement to the re- cipients. He went through the most thrilling experiences on bis way out, for he was rescued when the Tran- sylvania went West," being in the water only 20 yards from her when she sank; and after being in the water for 4. hours, he was picked up and landed in Italy, and received great kindness from the Italians. A man got out of bed and placed him in it, an illustration of the kindness and desire to help our men in suffer- ing by the Italians. We hope to be m able to publish one of his letters soon.

PROMOTION

PROMOTION. We are pleased to note the pro- motion of Corpl Johnny Edgar, the son of Mr John bdgar, fishmonger, Vale-street He has been serving with the Royal Welsh Fusiliers on the Western Front for many months, and was recently home on a well- earned leave. On his return to France lie was made Sergeant. We heartily congratulate him and wish him the best of luck.

MILITARY MEDALIST GASSED

MILITARY MEDALIST GASSED. Information has been received that Gunner R Roberts, M.M., R.G.A., son of Mr John Roberts, Love-lane, is in hospital in Sheffield, suffering from the effects of gas poisoning. Formerly an attendant at the Asylum he lias been on active service for a long spell and distinguished himself early in the year, f,)r which he was awarded the Military Medal. Only a few weeks ago he was over on leave, looking remarkably well. We hope to hear soon that he is recover- ing.

HOME ON LEAVE

HOME ON LEAVE, Amongst the local soldiers home on leave this week is Lieut Evans, son of Police-Sergeant and inlis Evans, Denbigh, who arrived home from France for a short stay early on Sunday morning. Another is Corpl J Lloyd Kearns, nephew cf Mr and Mrs Lloyd, of Leicester-terrace, Denbigh, who up to joining the army was on the staff of the II Free Press." He joined early in the war, and has been OUt 1 with his regiment (R.W.F.) in France over two years, and this is only his second visit home in that time. He was lucky now to be amongst one of the first drafts having leave under the new regulation which extends, to 14 days, a period "long enough to 9 give them a good rest and change and buck them up." considerably. He is looking very well. All his home friends were delighted to see him after his trying experiences. I Pte Francis Jones, the youngest of the six sons of the late Mr William Jcnes (Aston's), who joined the army, is home on leave from France. He is in a battalion of the Welsh Regi- ment, and has been out for sixteen .months. Two of his brothers have made the supreme sacrifice, namely, Ptes Robert and Thomas B Jones, while the others are still on active service. Prior to joining the army Francis was employed by Mr Stephen Davies, butcher. Another Denbigh boy who has been home on leave is Air Mechanic ) George Gordon Davies, Royal Flying Corps, the youngest son of Mr and Mrs R Davies, 33, Beacon's-hill, Den- bigh, and a brother to Pte D H Davies, whose letter is priced above. He has been over in France since the spring of last year, has developed very much whilst serving with the air forces, and looks remarkably well. Pte W Argent, A.S.C., and son of Mr Albert Argent, chaffeur to Capt Wakin Davies, Plas yn Green, ar- rived home from France on leave yesterday after serving a consider- able time abroad.

DENBIGH MAN DIES OF WOUNDS

DENBIGH MAN DIES OF WOUNDS. Last week we recorded in this column that Gunner John Edward Hughes, son of the late Mr and Mrs J Hughes, and brother of the Misses Hughes, Postoffice-lane, was lying I seriously ill in one of the surgical I hospitals in France, suffering from wounds, necessitating the amputa- tion of his left leg. The Ward Sister wrote to his sisters, that though l seriously, they hoped he was not I dangerously, ill. We are sorry to learn that he made "the supreme sacrifice" for his country on Friday last, a letter to his sisters from the I War Office officially recording his death as taking place on that day. Accompanying it was a sympathetic message from the King and Queen I to his sisters in their sorrow, land with them de?p sympathy is felt by their friends and townspeople. Deceased was well known locally and thoroughly esteemed. He was a grocer by trade, and had been ap- prentice and assistant at Messrs Price Jones & Co., High-street, Den- bigh, after which he occupied a good t m position as grocer's essistant in Bangor. Then he went to Man- chester, where he had an excellent position as manager of one of I z;1 Lipton's establishments. Whilst there he bravely offered himself in his country's cause and joined the Royal Garrison Artillery. He had been in France for a long period and had seen much service and fighting, in the end giving his life for his country. Miss Hughes has since received the following letter from the Sister in charge of the ward :— Dear Miss Hughes,—I am sorry to write you the sad news of your brother's death. He died yesterday afternoon. We did everything pos- sible to try to save him. I am deeply grieved, as he was such a splendid patient, and all the orderlies and nurses were very fond of him. Please accept our sincere sympathy. —Yours, H. R. HEMPHILL." We may mention that deceased's other sister is now married (Mrs Charles Douglas) and resident, in America, to whom the sad news of her brother's death will be a great sorrow.

FREE PRESS NEAR THE FIGHTING LINE

"FREE PRESS" NEAR THE FIGHTING LINE. It is an interesting incident that one of the above mentioned deceased soldier's last letters to his sisters mentioned that as he was marching with his draft up to the front and was near the fighting line, he picked up a match box, and with it a portion of a copy of his native town's local newspaper, the Denbighshire Free Press," which carried his thoughts at once to the old town and to his dear ones at home, and these thoughts heartened him for the con- flict in which he was to bear a valiant part.

DENBIGH BOY WOUNDED

DENBIGH BOY WOUNDED. Bombardier W Ellis, R.G.A., son of Mr J Ellis, 24, Maesycoed-terrace, Denbigh, is lying in hospital in Nottingham, suffering from wounds in the left hand and right leg, but has been able to write home a short note. Previous to enlisting he was employed at Messrs Gee & Son, and this was his second visit to the front. He had served in France for some months with the heavy guns, when he was invalided to England suffer- ing from shell shock, and had only lately returned to the fighting line. In his letter he states that two others who were with him at the time were killed by his side, so he seems to have bad a very providential' escape. He had just been promoted to Bom- bardier. His brother, Lieut J Ellis,. a former master at the Denbigh County School, is also attached to I the R.G.A.

DENBIGHITES MEET INI FRANCE

DENBIGHITES MEET IN I FRANCE. The Rev Edward Hughes (Bron- allt, Denbigh), who is attached to the Canadians, has returned to his 1 duties up the line in France." On his arrival he had the pleasure of meeting with two Denbighites, one I being MissEnid Humphreys Roberts, who holds an important post in one of the Red Cross hospitals, and the I other was Corporal Jones, Denbigh. It is not often that those who come from the same town meet each other out there. J

VOLUNTARY AID ORGANIZATION

( VOLUNTARY AID ORGANIZATION. The Denbigh War Hospital Supply Depot has now been in existence for three months, and during that period it has sent to the Parent Depot at Norwich (under the scheme of Sir Edward Ward, D.G.V.O.), 4G08 swabs 15 pneumonia jackets and 104 band- ages, making a total of 4727 articles. The Hon Secretary at Norwich writes :—" Thank you so very much for your splendid lot of work and how thankful we are to have it. We are going through one of our worst times of rush." The Depot is open on Tuesdays and Thursdays, at the Church Institute from 10 till 1, and more workers would be very welcome. As the demand for hospital re- quisites is so very great, and always growing, it is hoped that the privilage of helping in this good work will Pl z, appeal to everyone, and that the meetings will be well attended dur- ing the winter months. Any friends who cannot come for the whole day will be very welcome for as many hours as they can spare.

DENBIGHSHIRE TERRITORIAL FORCE ASSOCIATION

DENBIGHSHIRE TERRITORIAL FORCE ASSOCIATION. At a recent meeting of this Association under the chairmanship of Colonel Mellor, it was reported that Denbighshire Regiment was now 928 strong i.e. practically up to the authorised strength. Lord Trevor introduced the question of a conference in North Wales of Territonial Associations and Commandants and Commanding Officers of Volunteer Regiments. He consideifed that such a conference would be a considerable help in many questions on which joint action would be desirable. It was decided to approach the other authorities on the question. Captain Evans, of Bronwylfa, Wrexham, commanding the Motor Volunteer Corps, reported that he had a considerable number of car owners ready to join the Corps, but they were waiting to hear whether petrol was to be furnished by the authorities. The Chairman and Captain Evans were requested by the Association to urge upon the Authorities the necessity of a supply of petrol. I CADET CORPS. It was reported that the War Office had placed upon the Volunteer authorities the duty of raising further Cadet Corps, and it was pointed out there were already Cadet Corps at intermediate schools in the County and at Rydal Mount School, Colwyn Bay. Major Piiddle of Plas Madoe, Llanrwst, was in command, and the whole .organization was in a very satisfactory state. It is hoped shortly to see Cadet Corps growing up every- where in conjunction with the Volunteers. The Association were informed that the Colwyn Bay Urban District Council had made a grant of £ 50 to- wards the Volunteer Fund, and a resolution was passed thanking the Council for their munificent gift. DENBIGHSHIRE HUSSARS BEHAVE SHLE'NDIDLY. The Chairman asked the Associa- tion to agree to Cables being sent to the County Territorial Regiments, viz., the 1 1th R.W.F. and Denbigh- shire (Hussars) Yeomanry, now the 24th R.W.F., for Christmas. He reminded the Association that the 4th Battalion R.W.F. went to France on the 5th November, 1914, being one of the first Territorial Battalions to proceed on active service, and how splendidly they had behaved. He had heard that the Battalion were never more efficient than at the pre- sent moment. He heard frequently from the Denbighshire (Hussars) Yeomanry through his son who was in the Regiment, and on all hands he informed they had given a magni- ficent account of themselves and were highly thought of by the authorities. He felt that the County had reason to be proud of its Hegi- ments. It was decided to ask Mayoresses and Chairmen cf District Councils to raise a county fund to furnish these two line units with funds for Christmas entertainments, THE TERRITORIAL ASSOCIATIONS. The Chairman informed the Association that the Council of Territorial Associations has resumed their meetings which had been abeyance during the war owing to extreme pressure of urgent work. He and the S2cretary had attended the last meeting in London, and gave a resume of what had transpired amongst other things being the formation of an Executive Com- mittee. He believed that the North Wales Associations ought, impossible be represented on it. It was resolved to ask the Execu- tive Committee to agree to such a representative being appointed, and in addition they recommended tha*. one of the secretaries of the North! Wales Associations should be appointed to represent them. Colonel Mellor and Colonel Mesham were re- appointed chairman and vice- chairman respectively,

Magistrates Thank the Retiring Mayor

Magistrates Thank the Retiring Mayor Councillor Robert Owen, J.P., pre- sided at the Court this morning, being hi3 last appearance as chief magistrae, Messrs A Lloyd Jones, C Cottom, W Parry, W James were also on the Bench. '1 Mr A Lloyd Jones proposed thanks to the retiring Mayor and regretted n greatly that he had come to the end of his term, for lie had ably presided over the Court, given great attention to his duties, and had given them all helpful guidance in carrying out the business of the Court.. Mr W Parry, in seconding, alluded to the excellent way in which the retiring Mayor had discharged hie duties, adding that to have a gentle- man filling the office of chief magis- trate so conscientiously and faithfully deserved that they should mark theii full appreciation of his services. The Clerk (Mr R Davies) and Supt Woollam, on behalf of the officials and of the police, bore testimony to the fair and conscientious way in which the Mayor had discharged liic duties and his courtesy and help to them at all times. The Mayor in thanking all the speakers for their kind words, said that he had received great kindness from his fellow-magistrates, from all connected with the court, and from the towns-people generally It had been a hard but htppy time of office The Mayor alluded to the loss their brother magistrate (Mr W Parry) had sustained in the death of his only brother, and proposed a vote of condolence with him, which was passed. -=-

THE RETIRIG MAYOR AND MAYORESS COUNCILLOR AND MRS ROBERT OWEN

THE RETIRIG MAYOR AND MAYORESS, COUNCILLOR AND MRS. ROBERT OWEN. By the time this issue of the Free Presö" reaches our Denbigh readers, z;1 Councillor Robert Owen, J.P., and Mrs Owen, will have retired from the position of Mayor and Mayoress of the borough, though the Council had made a strong effort to induce them to retain office another j'ear, although they felt it was expecting too much for them to do so. The retiring Mayor and Mayoress have indeed had two strenuous and exacting years of office, and they have laid the townspeople under great obligation to them for the way in which they have discharged the duties during two years of the country's crisis and when the de- mands from all quarters have been so great. The Mayor has certainly had a laborious and anxious term of office, not so much from the ordinary work of the Council or Magisterial Court, which, thanks to his tact, have worked smoothly and efficiently in all departments, but to the Council work have been added' many extra duties connected with the war which have fallen to his share, such as Chairman of the Tribunal, War Savings work, Coal and Food Control, Flag Days committee work, and many kindred schemes have brought demands upon time and entailed much personal labour. During the two years the Mayor has been present at every meeting of the Council; and during this year alone at Council and Council Com- mittee meetings, he made 71 at.. tendances for purely Council work alone. To a busy man immersed in the cares of a large business, such a sacrifice of time is very serious, and is a big contribution to the interests and well being of the town. The Council work has, under the Mayor's tactful and conciliatory guidance, been performed most har- moniously and successfully, and Borough affairs are in a prosperous condition, and the rates at the lowest point they can be expected, whilst the one outstanding special work- the new markets and public hall- have been opened during the year by the Mayor at a most notable and appropriate gathering. In offering our congratulations to. the retiring Mayor on his successful term of two years' mayoralty, we can testify that it is the opinion not only of the members of the Council, but of the ratepayers generally, that he has filled the office with efficiency, dignity and conscientiousness, and has handed down that office to his successor unsullied having in every way maintained the best traditions of the office and done houour alike to himself and the ancient borough he has so well served. In all hi 3 mayoral work he has had splendid support from the retiring Mayoress, and especially so, in those many spheres of war work and philanthrophic effort relating to our Ailiea and to, our own sailors and soldiers, which now engage the at- tention of our women, Mrs Owen, as Mayoress, has laboured incessantly. She has presided with conspicuous tact and success over the different committees and brought about the most splendid results. As Mayoress she has been strikingly successful and carried out all her duties in a benign, graceful, and dignified man- ner, for all of which the sincere and hearty thanks of the Council and the townspeople are due and arc readily tendered. The good work done by the retiring Mayoress during two eventful years will be long remem- bered and appreciated.

No title

At to-day's Bo ongh Police Conrt, Wit liam Jones, farmer. Nant-y.gsrieg, Bylcbau, admitted not having two latrps hawing white lfgho on the front of bis trap CD October 21th, saying that he had not ex- peoted to be out after the lighting time. a Sapt Woollam said that the police bad repeatedly foamed drivers to comply with fcfee regulation*—Fined 10i.

ur Denbigh Council Meeting

-u- r_ [ Denbigh Council Meeting V ELECTION OF MAYOR. The annual meeting of the Denbigh Town Council took place at noon to-day, when the retiring Mayor (Councillor Robert Owen, J.P) presided, and there was a good attendance of members and of the ¡: public. In accordance with the previous decision of the Council acting as a General Purposes Committee, Councillor II Dryhurst Roberts was unanimously elected, ATayor and chief magistrate of the J;borollgh on the proposition of Alderman J Morris Davies, seconded by Councillor C Cottom, and His Worsliip took the chair amid hearty applause and was invested with the robe and gold chain of office by the retiring Mayor, who offered his hearty congratula- tions. The Mayor having returned thanks, v A most cordial vote of thanks was given to the retiring Mayor and 1 C5 Mayoress for their efficient services during the last two years on the proposition of Councillors D E; Jenkins and Llewelyn Jones. CouLcillor C Cottom was unani- i mously elected Alderman to fill the vacancy occasioned by the retire- ment of Captain Clough, on the pro- position of Councillor Llewelyn Jones, seconded by Alderman Hughes. Business of the Council is pro seeding as we go to Press our full report is therefore necessarily held, over till next week. The Flag flew on the Town Hali in recognition of the Mayor's election. o

The New Mayor and Mayoress of Oenbigh

The New Mayor* and Mayoress of Oenbigh. We offer our hearty congratulations I to Councillor II Dryhurst Roberts on having at noon to-day been unani- mously elected to the important position of Mayor and Chief Magis- trate of his native borough, and trust that he and the new Mayoress (Mrs Dryhurst Roberts) will have a very successful and happy year of office. We have every confidence they will have the loyal support of the Council and officials, and though the duties will be onerous, we are sure they will devote themselves un- reservedly thereto and will carry them out efficiently to the satis faction of the townspeople and to the credit of the town.

PROGRESS AND PROBLEMS OF THE BRITISH EMPIRE

PROGRESS AND PROBLEMS OF THE BRITISH EMPIRE. The Rev. W. K. Stride, in com- mencing the fourth lecture of the series at Howell's School on Tuesday afternoon, said that since the pre- sent war had burst upon them federation had become vorv im- portant, and they might hope that the Imperial War Conference in the beginning of that year would help to give an answer. The true Imperialist proposed to awaken in the Dominions as well as in the mother country the J feeling of common responsibility for the dependencies. The old Colonial theory included mainly self-govern- ment and trade restrictions for the idea of self-governing communities in an Empire was as old as the expansion of England. The mother country enjoyed the monopoly of the Colonial trade, as was to be expected, and it was a very different thing when she tried to tax the Colonies. In 1783 she had lost practically all her colonies except Canada and the West Indian islands, but about that time she began to acquire more. The Colonial trade, in 1841, was entirely controlled by the Imperial Parliament, which ever disposed of the land. Within 25 years Canada 1 and the Australian colonies had gained representative government, and Great Britain then only enjoyed the most favoured nation treatment. The dominions were in- dependent, but protected, states. The dominions did not get full nationhood as regarded foreign policy and responsibility for their own defence and it was disappoint- ing that by the present time they had not become self-protecting states. Sir R Borden said it was not true to say that the Canadians had come to the aid of the mother country in the war,' for they were figting their own battle, but Canada could not be expected to do so always if never consulted on foreign policy. The reluctance to make sacrifices was shown in 181) I by the dissolution of the Imperial Federa- tion League, because the United Kingdom would not surrender free trade and the power of Parliament, while in the dominions the Nationalists were jealous for their nationalism.

Election of Mayer1 of Ruthin

Election of Mayer1 of Ruthin. ( By Telephone, j The retiring Mayor, Alderman R II Williams, presided over a full attendance. Councillor W Godfrey Lecomber was unanimously elected Mayor, on the proposition of Alderman T II Roberts, seconded by Councillor R James Jones. Having been invested with the robe and chain of office, the new Mayor returned thanks. A hearty vote of thanks to the retiring Mayor was carried on the proposition of Councillor Joseph Roberts, seconded by Councillor W II Williams. Thanks to the retiring Deputy Mayor (Alderman T J Roberts) were given on the proposition of the re- tiring Mayor (Alderman II H Williams), seconded by Councillor Thomas Roberts. The Mayor announced that he appointed Alderman T.H Roberts as deputy mayor, and he had consented to act. Report of the meeting will appear next week. The newly-elected Mayor enter- tained the Council to luncheon after the meeting.

RUTRIN

RUTRIN. MABKET PRICES. TUESDAY.—Fowls, Cs Gd to 7s 6d per couple butter, 2i 2d per lb. egg?, 3 for is rabbits 2a 6d to 3s Od per conple fat) piga, ll^d per lb. RUTHIN SOLDIERS AT HOME Among those who are hcme on leave this week are Pte Robert Davies, Welsh Regi- ment, who has been in France for eighteen months and is now incapacitated from further service after being wounded. Pte Peter Jones, Labour Battalion, Boribyn, who has been in France for fifteen months. Pte John Hugh Jonee, R G A., son of Mr John Jones, Borthyn, after being fcr some mcntbs in hospital, is now discharged and has returned home. MESSRS CLOUGH & GO'S MART. ) There was a capital show ot stock at the above Mart on Tuesday, which wai also well attended by farmers, butchers, &3„ tome of the latter coming from many large centres in England. We are informed that nearly every lot in all sections found a quick market at very high prices- Captain F B Cloogh, who is home cn leave frcm lis military duties, was in attendance at the Mart and received a hearty welcome from the firm's clientele. CONCERT. A very erjoyable and successful concert was held in Tabernacle Caapal on Thars- i ay last, presided over by Dr J Medwyn Hughes. The proceeds were to provide j Christmas gifts and comforts for Ruthin jcldiers. The various items were splendidly rendered and were greatly appreciated by the large audience. An extremely good } programme was admirably rendered by the following artistes :—Miss Minnie Williams, I Miss Madge Jones, Miss Gwladys Williams, Professor Richard Evans, Mr Evan Lewiø. DEATH OF PRIVATE ROBERT WILLIAMS. The death in action of Pte Robert Wil- liams, which was briefly reported in our jolatnns on the 27ch October, is now con- firmed and has caused deep regret to all ho were acquainted with him, and much sympathy is felt (or his widow and child. j Pte Williams lived in 40, Rhos street, and previous to joining the coloure he was em pJoyed by Mr Thomas Edwards, at Wynn -lay stables, and Mr Tegid Oxeo, at the Castle Hote\ as driver. He joined tee army twelve months ago and was soon at the ttront in France where he had since servad. LOCAL TRIBUNAL. A meeting of the Local Tribunal was held on Wednesday evening, presided over by the Mayor (Alderman R H Williams) Two applications for exemption from mili- tary gervica were considered, one appli- cant being granted temporary exsmpt 02 for six months and the other two months, final. The Military Representative brought forward ten applications for review of certi- ficates of men previously granted exemption and who are not serving in the V.T.C. The previous decisions of the Tribunal were reaffirmed in five cases without the con- dition of service in the V.T C., and the remaining five cases were adjourned for lurtber consideration. THE LATE MRS ELIZA. WILLIAMS, PENTRENEWYDD. The death of Mrs Eliza Williams, Pentre Newydd, Llanfwrog. occurred on Saturday, i the 27th Ostober, at the ripe age of 82 years. She was the widow of the latd Mr WiUiams, coal merchant. Ruthin, who pre- deseased her some five years ago, Th% funerali which took place on Wednesday, the 3ht 03tober, at Gyffylliog, was attended by a large number of xelativea and friends. The service at the bailie was conducted by the Rev R Ernest Jones, minister of the English Presbyterian Church and the Rav H Jones, minister of the Bontuchel C.M. Chapel; and at the graveside by the Rev Jenkyn Jones, rector of G> £ fylliog. < COMFORTS FOR SOLDIERS, The excellent work done by the Comforts for Soldiers Work Party at Rutbin is dis- closed by the annual report and balance sheet recsntly published. The party Is presided over by Mrs Tate, Pool Park, with the ex-Mayoress (Mrs R H Williams) as treasurer, and Mra Pinsent as secretary, and those ladies are to be congratulated on the valuable wcrk accomplished by the organization. The following articles have been completed and dispatched to the (rent during the twelve months ended 13th October. lU17 :—44 pairs of seeks, 508 mufflers, 1112 mittecs, 22 pairs of operation stockings, 3 sleeveiess j arfieys, 3 helmets, and one cap, making a total of 2056 articles. Oat of this number Bantachel Work Parfy have contributed 18G and Ciocaenog 113 articles. The subscriptions and fends from eniertaicments during the year and the balance in hand from the previous year amounted to X120 8s 4d. £ 78 10i lid has been spent in materials, and after paying sundry small expenses there was at the end of the year a balance of £ 39 9J It in hand. a ——

Messrs Leathes Sales

Messrs Leathes' Sales. Messrs T & W Loathes had a most successful sale on Tuesday (Fair day), there being a large show of stock. A splendid clearance was effected at very good prices. Hardly a single lot remained unsold. Mr T Leathes was assisted by Mr Bradburne Price, Mold. There were upwards of 70 head of cattle on offer, both fat and store. Mr Robert Jones. Panygralg, Lionelidsn, tent in a bunch of ten, which made up to X29 03 top price a couple from Mr Jonei, Penymaes, went up to -133 lUj from Mr Jmes, Fron Segur, to L25 15s Mr Robert Jcndst Tyddyn Chambers, to 938 Mr Joseph JOi ee, Pentrooelyn Shop, to X29 10 j Mr T 0 Jon a, Penyparcf to A;31 and Mr Edward Williams, Tyddyn, to X35 2s 0 i. A young bull from Mr Holland, PHiS Bennett, made £:38, and ball calves ranged from X20 10J to X33. A lot of serviceable store cattle found a ready market, aDd exceptionally good prices were realisod for pigs, In the sheep section excellent prices were obtained for I lambs and fat ewes. Welsh anl Border Leicester ram lambs were up to and j itS 10J respectively. THE GLANUESPIN SALE. Oa Thursday of iabt week, Messrs T & W Leathes, disposed by auction of aU the farming stock, implements, &0., at GIAU- hespin Farm, Llanfair, the tenants of which, I Mr and Mrs Lloyf3 Jones are retiring. The sate was well attended) and the auctioneers had no difficulty in clearing the whole lots at good prices, the competition being very keen. A (j year-old cart mare J fetched 91 guineas, a "7 year-old mare of) the Welsh type 73 guineas, a cart filly, 2, year-old, 48 guineas. On Thursday (yasterday) Messrs T & W Leathes conducted a sale cf furniture and v household effects at the same place.

GERjLNY PAjIPHLEry AR

GERjL\NY) PAjIPHLEr,y AR Germany is a great believer in pamphlets, bho drops them from aeroplanes among the armies of her opponents, circulates t I' them liy oiirrepiitious agents among their civilian populations, and distributes them; by the million among her own people. The; 'pamphlets for home consumption are natu- rally different from those to be sent abroad. The latter seem to have played at least a' helpful part in the reverse that lias just nverbikevi Italy. Her .airmen had distri- buted showers of literature over the Italian' I lines, the drift of which was that France and England were making Italy do their bloody work against her will by all sorts of high-handed methods. "They have seized.' your trade and swagger as masters in your 11 cl cities," ran one of these productions, kill- ing pitilessly those who ask for bread andi peace." Another was adorned with t I)IC. ture of an English soldier bayoneting & poor ragged -woman in the midst of ber ter? rilied children. POISONING THE WELLS. '4 It may seem incredible that anyone should be influenced by such preposterous inventions, and we need not suppose that it was more than a minority that gave any heed to them. But many Italian soldiers have little or no education, and the Ger- man lablts were shaped so as to fit in with some facts of common knowledge among them. The food position is not all easy one in Italy, and there have been disturbances) in some districts (not unhelped by German conspiracy), of which they had heai^i more or Jess ivuthful reports. To the weaker- minded these lying pamphlets would seem to complete and explain the story, and iti would not serve to improve their fighting spirit. And even if depression of this kind affects only a small section oi an army's front, the collapse of its resisting power may easily involve the retirement of the whole line. The consequences in this case are an impressive warning of the harm that may be wrought by an enemy voice per- milted to spread falsehood and undermine courage and loyalty. Germany is busy poisoning the wells" in this way in every country with which she is at war. A heavy responsibility must rest upon. any, Allied Government which allows her under-, hand work to be carried 011 without inters ferenco. j FOR HOME CONSUMPTION But there is another kind of German pamphlet which (though not intended for Fnglish eyes) we should be glad to see studied in this country, because it reminds •us-why Germany began the war, and what she still hopes to gain from it. A good example of this class is entitled ii Ger- many's Future as the Hesult of a Good or u Bad Peace." and, besides being written by four Prussian it has been widely circulated in the army within the past six months by order of the War Office and the Commander-in-Chief. It is not, therefore, the production of an erratic fire-eater, but expresses the views which Uermans in re- sponsible positions are anxious to iustil into their countrymen's minds. The most interesting seciion. written by Herr K. A. Fischer, deals with how Germany is to meet the cost and damage of the war. The writer takes for his text the fact that if she has to settle her own War Debt, and make good all the losses to her life and industry, her prospects will be of the gloomiest descrip- í ion. It does not seem to occur to him that his Government should have thought of that before it began. He boldly announces that, although Germany lias made her bed of bankruptcy, it is her enemies who must; be made to lie in it. They must bear the cost of their unreasonable behaviour in putting Germany to such prodigious ex- pensc in lighting them, and their obstina^jg in not letting her score a victory I £ 10.000,000.000 FROM THE ALLIES.. 1 Herr Fischer calculates that, between, war expenditure and public and private losses, Germany will be £10,000.000)000 to the bad if she is to make peace without re- ceiving any compensation for having broken it. Accordingly, lie up a bud- get for the making good of this deiicif out I 1 11 of the Allies' poekeis and property. The seizure of Belgium's railways, coal mines, State land. and so forth is to provide £ 1.200,000,000. French railways, coal mines, iron fields, &c.) are to be appro* priated to the tune of £ 1,100,000,000.- The Rumanian oilfields are valued at E300,000,000, and Polish and Russian: "pickings" at £ 375,000,000. The Suex Canal and the portion of ''enemy merchant navies ceded to us are allowed to count: for something and, for the rest, itwdstuffs. and raw materials to the extent of £ 6.400.000.000 are to bo either supplied! gratis by the Allies or "procured froml other countries and paid for with enemy- money." Finally, to show that Germany- does not forget her friends in thinking of herself, the war bills and losses of her con- federates-Austria, Bulgaria, and Turkey; —are also to be "met by the enemy."

Mayors Sundaye

Mayor's Sundaye The newly elected Mayor (Councillor W Godfrey Lecomber) has decided to observe Mayor's Sunday, and has issued the follow- ing invitation respecting the same .1 I have pleasure in requesting the honour of your presence and support on the occasion of my official visits to b Peter's Church and Tabernacle (C.M.) Chapel, Ruthin, at 3 and (j o'clock p.m. respectively on Sunday, the 11th day of November, 1U17. The Mayoral procession will leave the Town Hall at 2 15 p.m. for St Peter's Church, where a termon will be preached by the Rev A LI Davies, M.A., warden of Ruthin and at 5.15 p.m.. for Tabernacle Chapel, where the sermon will be preached by the Rev W Wynn Davies, Rhos.

Ruthln Red Cross Hospitals

Ruthln Red Cross Hospitals sThe following gifts have bee a most gratefully received during the week Potatoea-Mr R W Davies. Towatoes-Mrs Jones, The Elms. Plume-Afro Eyton. Apples-Mr Stanley Weyman. Gyff/lliog Church Harvest Festival. Bggs-Mrs H H Springman, Mrs Tsteb Gyfiylliog Church Harvest Festival. Pears-Mra Eyton. Vegetablel-Llanarmon Church Harvest Festival, Gyfiylliog Church Harvest Festival. Butter-Gjffylllog Church Harvest Festival. Papers-Mrs Alston Jones. Mineral Waters-Meaer. Elligo

ABERGELE

ABERGELE. UAIU* SMITUIIKLD.—Messrs F Lloyd and Sons report a large entry ot stock for their sale on Monday, the trade and olearanoe was quite up to the usual standard. Fat sheep from 3411 to 71s. Fat lambs from 20j 6d to 50J 63. Cart pigs from 63. to 68s. Porketa up to £ 8 3S. Sales every Monday The auctioneers reqnir large supplies to meet the great demand of the coast and other large towns. Offices, Lyndhurst, Abergele. PhoDe H.