Teitl Casgliad: Carmarthen journal and South Wales weekly advertiser

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 8 o 8
Full Screen
21 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
GERMAN SUBMARINE BLOCKADE

GERMAN SUBMARINE BLOCKADE. IRISH CHANNEL CLOSED. ZEPPELIN "OVER CALAIS. LETTERS FROM LOCAL SOLDIERS Friday. < MANY FRENCH SUCCESSES. AR flONOCRS LIST. -A The Allies in the west have been successful at many points on the battle-front. North of Arras a lucky coup de main" made them masters of two lines of German trenches north of Arras. Paris emphasized yesterday the severity of the enemy s losses in this engagement. In Champagne, near Perthes; in the Argonne, in the Bois de La Grurie; near Boureuilles on Hill No. 263; and at three points between the Argonne and the Meuse, the Allies xo.c.ed the enemy back. In each case the positions gained have been held and made good. The actual situation on the Eastern frontiers is still obscure. The German official news agam spoke yesterday of the pursuit of the Russian r forces which had invaded East Prussia and reckoned the number of men, guns, and supplies captured. Petrograd, however, has made the significant announcemtnt that on the Niemen line-where the last German advance from East Prussia was brought to a halt-there have so lar been only insignificant skirmishes. On the other hand, it is clear that near Plock, on the right bank of the Vistula, there has been most desperate fighting. The Germans south of the Vis- tula make no further effort to break the Russian line. The main threat to Warsaw is evidently now north of the Vistula. The Kaiser in a telegram to the Imperial Chan- cellor laments the plight of East Prussia. The Russians, he says, have destroyed almost the last house and the last barn. Our beautiful Masurian land has been laid waste." The Victoria Cross has been granted to live officers and six men serving with the Expeditionary Force. Lieutenant Arthur Martin LeaKe, Royal Army Medical Corps, who gained the Victoria Cross during the South African War, has been granted a clasp for conspicuous bravery in the present cam- paign. These announcements were made last night in a Supplement of the London Gazette," which also recorded many promotions and awards of the Distinguished Service Order, the Military Cross, the Distinguished Service Medal, the Indian Order of Merit, and the Indian Distinguished Medal-all -granted in recognition of services rendered in con- nexion with Operations in the Field. The text of the German Note to the United States, in reply to the representations of the United States Government, in connexion with the German decree of a "war-zone" round the British Isles, is now published. The Times Correspondent at Washington com- pares the reception of this Note in the United States with that given to the British Note in reply to representations by the United States concerning British interference with trade across the Atlantic. The comparison tells heavily in favour of Great Britain. „ A communication from the British Eye-witness at the front, published yesterday, covers operations from February 11 to 15. It also gives more details of the fighting in the La Bassee area on February 1 and 6. The British infantry in this quarter have gained ah ascendancy otver the enemy!. 'f Eye-witSMGS* states that among the spoils captured on February 6 was a large amount of dum-dum ammunition, and many cartridges in which the bullets had been reversed, with* their bases outwards.

MORE GERMAN ATROCITIES

MORE GERMAN ATROCITIES. The horrors of Louvain, Termonde, and Aerschot are surpassed by those of Dinant, Namur, and the neighbourhood, where nearly 2,000 unoffending people-men, women, and children—were massacred by German soldiers. These massacres, and the accompanying scenes of pillage, are described in the eleventh report of the official Belgian Commission of Inquiry, which was published yesterday. Namuf was systematically set on fire at five differ- ent points, and seventy-five civilians were shot or burned to death. Our witnesses have detailed to us several out. rages on women," the report says. "In one case we have evidence concerning the rape of a girl by l four soldiers. A Belgian quartermaster of gen- darmes saw the daughter of the proprietor of the hotel in which he was staying outraged by two Ger- man soldiers, without being able to intervene for her protection, at four o'clock in the morning."

TWO THOUSAND MURDERS

TWO THOUSAND MURDERS. The scene at Tamines, where a machine-gun was used to speed-up the process of killing a crowd of nearly 40U peasants in front of the church, is thus described:— Many of them were only wounded and, hoping to save their lives, got with difficulty on their feet again. They were immediately shot down. Many wounded still lay among the corpses. Groans of pain and cries for help were heard in the bleeding heap. "On several occasions soldiers walked up to such unhappy individuals and stopped their groans with a bayonet thrust. At night some who still sur- vived succeeded in crawling away. Others put an end to their own pain by rolling themselves into the neighbouring river." The victims were buried in the presence of the women of the village, who had been marched into the square. One of the supposed corpses was dis- covered to be alive, but a German doctor who examined the wounded man made a sign that he was to be buried with the rest. At Tamines more than 650 civilians were shot or burned to death in the fires. An Andenne many people were murdered by blows from axes. A tall, red-haired soldier, with a scar on his face, distinguished himself by the ferocity with which he used an axe, says the re- port. The burgomaster was despatched in this way, after being first wounded by a rifle shot.

ORGANISED MASSACRE

ORGANISED MASSACRE. Eighty-four corpses were found in a square at Dinant after an organised public massacre. The men were shot in the presence of their wives and children. A crowd of workmen were all shot when they appeared from a cellar where they had been hiding. A paralytic was shot in his armchair. A boy of fourteen was another victim. One thousand two hundred houses out of 1,400 were destroyed by fire at Dinant, and more than 700 of the people were killed. In the ancient church of Hastieres-par-dela, sacred relics—including relics of the Eleven Thou- sand Virgins of Cologne—which escaped the fury of the Huguenots in 1590 and th,e Revolution of 1790, were scattered about and trampled under foot. mpled under foot. A man of eighty-eight was shot as he came out of his door. The soldiers rolled his body in a blanket and set fire to it. The exploits of the mercenary bands of the seventeenth century," the report says. have been surpassed by those of the national army of a State which claims the first place among civilised nations!" Saturday. FOR CARGOES AND FLAGS. SUBMARINES IN THE CHANNEL The text of two important Notes to the United States was published by the Foreign Office last night. In one Sir Edward Grey replies to the repre- sentations of the United States Government as to the raising of the United States flag by the Lusi- tania. He points out that Great Britain, when neutral, has permitted the use of her flag by the vessels of other States at war as a means of protec- tion against capture.. United States vessels availed themselves of this facility during the American Civil War. Belligerent warships, the Note adds, are bound to ascertain definitely the nationality and character of a merchant vessel before capturing it, and still more before destroying it. This rule ob. served, the use of neutral flags by British ships involves no danger whatever to vessels of neutral States. Its breaoh by Germany is the sole source of danger. The other Note deals with the case of the Wilhel- mina. A bulletin from Sir John French issued yesterday dealt with operations up to the night of February 15-16 on the front held by the British Army. Yes- terday's Paris communique summarized the events of Thursday. The Times Correspondent at Petrograd, com- menting on the German advance in the north, says that to the lay mind the purpose of the enemy is clear enough. Having failed to reach Warsaw from the west, the Germans are trying to reach it by an advance on the north bank. of the Vistula. Ex- perts point out, however, that this route is protec- ted by the great Russian fortress of Novo Georgi- evsk—reputed the strongest in the world—and that farther north the Germans must deal with Oso- wiec, which stayed their first advance from East Prussia. The second of the two German airships wrecked on the Danish coast was the L.IV., a super-Zeppelin of the latest type. She succumbed to a snow-storm. The weight of the snow and the failure of two of her motors made her unmanageable. Her crew, except four, jumped as she came to earth, and are now interned in Denmark. Two merchant ships have been damaged by ex- plosions in the Channel. One, a French steamer, is said to have been torpedoed by a German sub- marine off Dieppe on Thursday. The other, a Norwegian vessel, was injured yesterday, either by a mine or by a torpedo, off Deal, but was got into the Downs. Monday. GERMAN AIR ii-ild OVER ESSEX LOSSES IN THE IRISH SEA. The Russian counter to the German advance from EM.st Prussia and Posen has begun. "The Times" Correspondent at Petrograd shows that the Russians arc- moving along a. irorit ot 1UU miles nortn of the Narew and the Bobr. Vigorous attacks are being made by our Allies on the roads trorrt Usowiec to Lyck, from Lomza to Johannesburg, from Ostroi- lcnka, to Reasog, from Prasnysz to Willenburg, and from Mlawa and Jflonsk towards Thorn. This movement is based on the Russian fortified line that follows the course 01 the Narew to Osowiec. "The Times" Correspondent adds that there has been another heavy fall of snow in Northern Poland, and discusses the effect of this upon the military situation. A fleet of British and French warships attacked the forts at the mouth of the Dardanelles on Fri- day. First battered by deliberate, long-range fire, the forts were afterwards engaged at moderate ranges by some of the battleships, while the Aga- memnon and the Inflexible still fired in support at long range. On the European side the forts appear to have been silenced. On the Asiatic side one fort was still firing when dusk came. On Saturday, after aeroplanes had made reconnaissances, the action was renewed. No ship of the Allied Fleet was hit. Paris on Saturday spoke of the heavy losses suffered by the enemy in recent attacks, particularly in the Ypres region., Yesterday it recorded the re-capture of a section of trenches near Ypres "which the enemy had for a moment occupied." The success cost the Allies little, but the Germane Again paid for failpre with a loss of several hun- dred dead. In Champagne they are still beating against the positions recently taken by the French, who hold them against all counter-attacks. In the Vosges an engagement of some importance is taking place on the banks of the La Fecht River. Saturday's Paris bulletin mentioned a successful German attack on the French positions south of the river. Yesterday's spoke of more fighting north and south of the river. The French made counter- attacks, and the engagement continues. Two British merchant ships, the Cambank and the Dounshire, have been sunk by a German sub- marine in the Irish Sea. The crews of both were saved. Representatives of the Scandinavian Governments met at Copenhagen on Saturday and yesterday to discuss the question of sea-borne' traffic, in the North Sea. The discussion is to be continued to-day. It is said that arrangements will be made for the convoying of merchantmen sailing under the Danish, Swedish, and Norwegian flags. "The Times" Correspondent at Washington in- forms us that developments in connexion with the German "blockade" are anxiously awaited in the Cnited States. It is not yet decided whether more representations will be made to Germany by the United States Government Tuesday. THE INVASION uF RUSSIA. ZEPPELIN OVER CALAIS. Paris yesterday afternoon reported that there was nothing important to add to the communique issued late on Sunday night. But this communique was itself unusually important. Speaking of the fight- ing in Champagne, and especially in the section from Souain to Massiges, it used language which seems to have special significance. An enemy counter-attack, we were told, was brilliantly re- pulsed, and followed up by a vigorous pursuit," which made the Allies masters of the whole Ger- man trenches" north and east of the wood cap- tured by them on Saturday. The Times Paris Correspondent remarks to- ray on the meaning of these words. Pursuits and trench-warfare, he points out, do not go together. The Allies, it seems, are at last making something more than a mere dent in the German line. The value of the results attained may, as the Corres. pondent suggests, be guaged by the violence of the enemy's counter-attacks and the size of the forces that he has concentrated to make them. Men be- longing to five German army oorps are known to have been engaged in this region. At Les Eparges, south of Verdun, and in Alsace, on the banks of the La. Fecht River, there has also been violent fighting. At both places the enemy has taken the offensive and on both banks of the La Fecht River the French advance posts have been withdrawn to their main line, which is strongly held. Here the enemy attacked in serried and deep formations," which, as always, entailed heavy- losses. At Les Eparges the Allies have won some ground^ at one point, but at another have fallen back slightly. The Times Correspondent at Pentrograd' oom- ments to-day on the official account of the Russian retreat from East Prussia issued in Petrograd Sunday. Difficulties of transport, caused" by the snow, hampered the Russian retirement before a great concentration of German troops, facilitated by the strategic railways at the enemy's disposal. A Zeppelin flew over Calais early vesterday morn- ing and dropped five bombs. Three did no damage. The other two wrecked houses and killed five persons. Yesterday was a barren day for the Germa.n blockaders. The sinking of the American ship Evelyn off Bor. kum has been taken in the United States as a grave object-lesson of the tremendous dangers to life and property, and hence to the neutrality of the United States, involved in German ruthlessness. Wednesday. IRISH CHANNEL CLOSED. CHANNEL BOAT ATTACKED. The Admiralty issued last night an order closing the Irish Channel to all ships ajid vessels of every nationality, and entirely prohibiting the navigation and use of this area. The order takes effect from yesterday. The closed area is a parallelogram cover- ing almost the whole of the channel between Ireland and the coast of Ayreshire. A narrow passage is left open to sea-borne traffic off the Irish coast, but this may not be used between sunset and sunrise. From the Western front a report by Sir John I French was received yesterday. The enemy, he savs, is still showing considerable activity in the neigh- bourhood of Ypres. Several attacks and counter- I attacks have taken place. Near Givenchy our in- fantry have eaptured and blown up an enemy's trench. Paiis reported on Monday night still more progress on the front Souain-Beausejour. The French here captured a line of trenches and two woods, repulsed completely two particularly violent counter attacks took numerous prisoners, and inilioted heavy loss on the enemy. The progress made by the French in this quarter is thus continued, and the advance of the Allies at this point is worthy, as we pointed out I yesterday, of close attention. Reims hag again been subjected to a severe bom- bardment. Fifteen hundred shells were rained upon it. The Cathedral was made a special mark and I suffered severely. The interior of the vaulted roof was burst. The Admiralty announced last night that un- favourable weather and strong gales have inter- rupted operations at the Dardanelles. The outer forts were seriously damaged by the bombardment of February 19. The Press Bureau published last night the news of rioting by a portion of an Indian regiment at Singa- pore, the 5th Light Infantry. The cause was "some jealousy and dissatisfaction concerning recent pro- motions." The riot was suppressed with the help of the local and neighbouring forces and a detach- ment of the 36th Sikhs. Landing parties from British and Allied ships also rendered assistance. There was a regrettable loss of life among officers and men of the regular forces and volunteer corps. The Colonial Office issued last night the text of a letter addressed by the Sultan of Zanzibar to Mahom- edans residing in the East Africa Protectorate ad- juring them to let no consideration or promises from Germany prevail upon them to change their allegI- ance from the mighty Empire of England." The Press Bureau published last night a letter from Sir Edward Grey to the Chairman of the Com- mission for Relief in Belgium, in which he reviewed the negotiations that have passed between the corn-, mission and the British Government. In the House of Commons yesterday Mr. Lloyd George spoke on the financial relations between Great Britain and her Allies. Our resources." he said, were enormous, and in this struggle that was what primarily mattered. This was a war, not merely of men but also of equipment." Thursday. VICIIMS OF THE "BLOCKADE. LOSS OF AN ARMED LINER. —— & More victims of the German blockade are noti- fied to-day. The Oakby, a Cardiff ship, was tor- pedoed in the Channel on Tuesday, but did not sink till this morning. The Branksome Chine has also been torpedoed. The Carib, an American ship, has gone down off the German coast. Apparently she was struck by a mine. It is now known that one life was lost in the sinking of the American ship Evelyn off Borkum. The Admiralty announced last night that H.M.S. Clan McNaughton, armed merchant cruiser (Com- mander Robert Jeffreys, R.N.) has been missing since February 3, and that it is feared that she has been lost. Unsuccessful search has been made. Wreck- age, supposed to be portions of the hip, has since been discovered. The last signal from the Clan McNaughton was made in the early morning of February 3. The Admiralty fear that she was lost during the bad weather which prevailed at that time. The losses are 20 officers, 191 petty-officers, non- commissioned officers, and men, and 69 belonging to the "specially entered mercantile crew "-stewards, firemen, &c. Three of the British airmen who made the raid on Ostend and the German posts on the Belgian coast on February 16 are missing. No news has been obtained of them since the day of the raid. They are Flight-Lieutenants E. G. Rigall and the Hon. D. O'Brien and Flight Sub-Lieutenant T. Spencer. It will be remembered that 40 British airmen took part in the raid. Another, Flight-Lieu- tenant D. Murray, was also reported missing, but is now known to be interned at Groningen, having been rescued from the open sea by a Dutch torpedo-boat. The Times Correspondent at Petrograd states that reliable personal information shows the German reports of the Russian losses during the retreat to the Niemen to have been grossly exaggerated. The retirement of the Russian right wing was made in perfect order, and the strength of the Russian Corpi which suffered most was far below that which might be concluded from the German statements. -opp.

WAR JOTTINGS

WAR JOTTINGS Private Dd. Evans, 1st Dorset Regiment, son. 01 Mr. Dd. Evans, saddler, Carmarthen, is now lying in hospital at Belfast suffering from myalgia. Private Albert Richards, of the Grenadier Guards, a native or Kidwelly, now lies in hospital, having been severely wounded at Ypres. Sergt.-Major Alfred Goble, King-street, Carmar- then, is now sergeant-instructor with the Carmar- thenshire Battalion at RhyL Mr. D. Brynmor Anthony, of Kidwelly, has been appointed to a first lieutenancy in the 6th (Pals') Battalion Royal Welsh Fusiliers at Llandudno. Mr. Ian Walters, son of Mr. Thomas Walters, solicitor, Carmarthen, has been granted a commis- sion as lieutenant in the Welsh Field Co. R.E., now stationed at Cowbridge. Two Carmarthen brothers, Privates Willie Hamlin and T. Hamlin, of the 1st Welsh Regiment, have been wounded, and both are at the British General Hospital at Versailles. They are the sons of Mrs. A. Davies, Cambrian-place, Carmarthen. Lan-ce-Corpl. George Olive, son of Mrs. Olive, Boar's Head, Carmarthen, who is out in the trenches with the Queen's Westminster Rifles, writes to say that he is still keeping fit and well, and sends his kindest regards to all the "boys" at home. The usual Sunday service was held at the Soldiers Club last Sunday, when an excellent address was given by the Chaplain on Temptation," a con- tinuation of that given on the previous Sunday. There was a good attendance. Captain R. G. Ford, of the 2nd Battalion Worcester Regiment, whose name has been men- tioned in dispatches, and who has been awarded the Military Cross, is a son of the late Mr. Thomas Ford, of Messrs.,nomas Ford and Co., Swansea Docks. A private soldiers in training in Rhyl was was charged the other day before the Prestatyn magistrates with stealing an overcoat. He was defended in court by Mr J. W. Cremlyn, barrister. at-law, who is now Captain Cremlyn, and the charge against him was dismissed. Lieutenant R. Burgess, 15th (Service) Battalion Welsh Regiment, which is the Carmarthenshire Battalion, has been on a recruiting tour in the Nar- berth district, and secured twenty recruits, all of them farmers' sons or farm workers. Master Evan G. Roberts, of Tynyporth, Llan- wenog, left on Tuesday last to join the R.F.A. at Pwllheli. This young man, like many others, was anxious to go to defend his country. His friends admire his pluck, and wish him every success and luck. Our correspondent at Llanllwni has received a letter and the promise of another shortly from PteL Jack Dudley, of the 2nd Battalion of the Welsh Regiment. The hero of the parish of Llanllwni, and the one and only parishioner on active service A copy of the letter will be found in another column. Private Hugh Maurice Herbert, of tke End Dragoon Guards (Queen's Bays), the only son of the Rev. J. Herbert, vicar of Llanllawddog, Carmarthen- shire, has just received a commission. Lieutenant Herbert is an old Llandovery College boy, and when he joined the Dragoon Guards in October last was a medical student at Cardiff University College. He is 19 years of age. One more Henllanite has joined the colours. Mr. J. Williams, Railway-terrace, Henllan (son of the late Mr. J. Williams, of Rhydfach) has left for Cardiff to join the R.F.A. Mr. Williams is a well- known horse dealer, and a good motor driver. His brother, Mr. Dai Williams, is at present at the front. The battalion recruiting car of the 15th Carmar- thenshire Battalion of the Welsh Regiment was touring Llannon parish on Friday and Saturday last. There are many young men still available, both among the farming class and the collieries' workmen, and it is hoped that the efforts of the officers will be rewarded by more joining the colours. The 4tih Reserve Battalion Welsh Regiment, stationed at Carmarthen, under the command of Colonel W. J. Jones, were on Tuesday inspected at the Carmarthen Barracks by Lieutenant-general Sir James Hills-Johnes, V.C., G.C.B. The gallant general congratulated the men on their smart ap- pearance and the progress made by them, which. he said, reflected credit on their officers. Trooper Tom Jones, Glnnwern, Maesyerugiau, of the Pembroke Yeomanry, is home on !eavc for a few days. The pure and bracing air of the East Coast, in conjunction with plenty of exercise and the substantial necessities of life, have made our Trooper appear in the pink of condition. It is understood the day is not far distaht, when he, with thousands more, will take the briny in a transport to do hononur for King .and Home. May we see him back well and strong again. Mr. Evan Davies, of Railway-terrace, Henllan, who is with the Royal Engineers, has been promoted to the rank of sergeant. Congrats. Evan! Pte. Mark Anthony, 3rd Company, 2nd Middle- sex Regiment, who was recently in the Base Hospi- tal, France, suffering from a slight wound and frost-bite, has now recovered, and expects to be in the firing line soon. Pte. P. R. Bowen, Remount Depot, Expeditionary Force (son of Mr. and Mrs. Bowen, Pantglien, Abergwili), who has been home suffering from frost bitten feet and legs, has now recovered, and will rethrn to France next week. I Recruiting at Ammanford has received a fillip by the advent of a squad of the 15th Service (Carmar- thenshire) Battalion Welsh Regiment, who daily parade the town and individually solicit the help of young men to bring the battalion up to strength. Recruiting meetings are being held up and down the Amman Valley. Since the beginning of the year 130 recruits have been enlisted at Ammanford Drill Hall for service in various regiments. Private T. D. Williams, of the Queen's R.W.S., son of Mr. and Mrs. Roger Williams, Irfon-road, Builth W ells, has just received a commission. Lieutenant Williams is an old Llandovery College boy and an all- round athlete. During his school career at Llan- dovery he played full-back for the college. Subse- quently he played .for St. David's College, Lampeter, and in the beginning of the 1913-14 season he was full-back for Llanelly. He left, however, to take up the post of assist an t-master at Godalming Grammar School, Surrey, which he held till he joined the Queen's in December. I Mr. R. H. Watson, younger son of Mrs. Watson, Lammas-street, Carmarthen, has qualified and has been aocepted by the Royal Mail Air Service as a wireless operator. He has been for nearly 12 months a a udcnt at the Bristol School of Wireless Telegraphy, London, and probably he is the first Carmarthenite to take up this branch of the King's service. His brother, Mr. Arthur Watson, who was at Cardiff University, recently joined the Public School Bat- talion of the Royal Fusiliers at Epsom. Both are old Carmarthen Grammar School boys and for several seasons past played for the Harlequins Foot- ball Club. In the first list of those awarded the Military Cross, thi new decoration authorised by the King for dis- tinguished service in war, was the name of Lieut. Rhys Ivor Thomas, of the Connaught Rangers, who was killed in action in September at Soupir on tne Aisne. Lieut. Thomas was the only son of Lieut.- Col. G. T. Thomas, Indian Medical Service (retired), and Mrs. S. M. Thomas, and was a descendant of an old Carmarthenshire family. His grandfather, the Rev. John Thomas (born in Trelech in 18071 was the first Welsh missionary of the Church of England to South India. Very sad news reached Capel-y-Wig, New Quay from the camp on Salisbury Plain, stating that Mr. W. Tudor Rees, of Erwan.fach, had met with an acci- dent. While he and others of the same regiment were erecting a bridge, a part of the wall gave way and fell on the men, causing many aocidents and a fracture in the thigh of Private Rees. Mr. Rees had joined the Colours since November, and a letter from one of the officers to his mother stated that he was one of the most promising men in the battalion, both for obedience and skill. All hope that Mr. Rees will, recover Boon, and will be again able to join his tegiment. nifti

LETTERS FROM OUR DEFENDERS

LETTERS FROM OUR DEFENDERS TROOPER FRED DA VIES, LAMPETER. Writing to Mr. J. B. Williams, hairdresser, Lam- peter, Trooper Fred Dayies says: Thanks so much for your kind letter. I was very pleased to have all the news you gave me. We are in the trench at pre- sent. It is four days in and one out. The weather is much botter than it has been, but it is still very cold and muddy. There is some heavy fighting about hero these days, and we were expecting an attack last night. They shelled us something awful for over an hour. We were all ready for them to come, but we got a bit disappointed. The Lord help them if they do come. I think that they smashed all the transport up: they were at the back of us. I am still on the bomb-throwing; I am getting quift; used to it now, so look out when I come home; I shall blow up every fish out of the Teify. Well, Joe, you were asking me about curios. I had a bag full when I first came out here. I put them on the transport with the other men, but I have not seen them since. I am afraid the transport has gone west, but as soon as I get anything worth having I shall send them to you. I had a German rifle some time back, but I had to throw it away; it was too heavy to carry. We make ourselves as light as possible when we are on the march, as these roads are so bad for marching. Well, Joe, I have no more news at present. Give my best love to all. Write soon.-From your old pal, FRED. PTE. JACK EVANS. Private Jack Evans, 1st Batt. The Welch Regiment (ion of Mr. John Evans, Ystrad House, Pencader), writes home from the front as follows:— Dear Parents, Brother and Sister,—Received the parcels and letters safely, also one Weekly Mail yesterday. I could not have written sooner as I have been in the trenches for the past nine days, and only came out yesterday for a few days' rest. I am pleased to say that I have come through the first lot without. a scratch, I suppose you have been anxiously waiting a lotter from me, but never mind, it is better lata than never. I hope you are all well as I am at present. When I wrote to you last it was from France, but this one comes from Belgium. The Germans have made a terrible mess of the towns and villages here. I can assure you it is a ¡' terrible experience for the first time, as the bullets whistle over your head and the shells burst close by; but you soon get used to it. You have to keep your head mighty low, as these snipors are very hot stuff. They will put bullet aft-er bullet through a small port-hole. I had a parcel from Auntie Anne and letters from Willie and W. D. Evans. I had about twenty letters and parcels yesterday, so you see everybody thinks of me a little. I can assure you it is very nice to have a few lines from home. I hope you are not worrying about me. There is no need to worry as I am, feeling as fit as a brick." Couldn't be happier. I must now come to a closo as I have a lot of letters to write. Will write again in a couple of dafs. I forgot to mention I received the parcel of cigs." and matches in the trenches and, by gum. they came just in time, as I had just smoked my last cigarette. Hoping to bear soon. This with fondest love, from your son and brother, JACK. PTE. DUDLEY, 2ND WELSH. The following letter has been received by our N,M aesycrugiau Correspondent from Pte. John Dud- ley, No. 7080, C Company, 2nd Battalion Welsh Regiment, 1st Division, 3rd Infantry Brigade, British Expeditionary Force:— Dear Mr. Evans—I was very much surprised to hear that I am the only one from Llanllwni serving at the front. Well, Evans bach, I never thought that you were a correspondent for the CARMARTHEN JOURNAL, an old paper I used to buy every week when I was at home in Caerau, and I would be very glad if you would send me a copy of it now and again, for I was very fond of reading Llithiau Twm 'Barels, the old critic., and a JOURNAL would pass many a. weary hour away. Dear Mr. Evans, you was asking for some of my experience since I am out here. Well, I am very twry that I can't tell you what part of the battlefield I am at present, for it is against my order to do so, and another thing the Censor would not pass my letter. But I have been in many a tight corner since I am out here, and if the young folk of my old parish had seen a few things that I have seen since I am out here, they would not hesitate what to do, but would rush to the Colours, and serve their King and Country with the Regular Army. Tell the voung men of my old parish that it is no disgrace to he a soldier. Well, Mr. Evan; here are a few things that I have seen. Fancy the Germans shelling houses with women and little children in them, hut I don't WHP.t to troll you that for you have experienced the same thing at home in England, and I eould tell you a score more of their barbarous methods., but writing paper is very scarce at present. WTell, Mr. Evans, I must draw my letter to a close this time, hoping it will find you all right, and srive my best respects to the parish at large, personal names too many to mention; and if I can pull through this v, ar ail right and como homo safo, I will surely pay a visit to the old neighbourhood of mv birth; and believe me, I will not shyin Llanllwni's nnme out here whatever obstacles will come my wav. Another thing I want to tell VOU,-just tell- the young mpn of the old parish, if they are enlisting, to join the 2nd Battalion Welsh Regiment., for it has proved itself one of the best fighting regiments out here, and I am proud that I belongs to it. Tell my mother that I am all right, and that I hope to get through this war safe to come home and see you all. PTE. FRED DAVIES. The following is another interesting letter from Pte. Fred Davies (son of Mr. and Mrs. Grithth Davies, Albion House, EIUIIILIYSSLII)" who is at present in German New Guinea with the Australian expeditionary All the islands in the liis- marck Archipelago have to be scoured, the mam object is to see II any more Germans are in hiding, and it more arms or ammunition indden away. Tiio place has to be cleared. Small parties of soldiers nave been sent to the Caroline islands, New Ireland, Yap, Naru, New Mecklenburg, and the Mainland of New Guinea, while to-morrow morning (Nov. 7th), at 3 a.m., a party of 200 Off us are to move out of Rabaul and march to Bita Haka. This is a distance of 65 miles. All men will carry 150 rounds of ammunition. Some of our scouts who have been out in that direction report that there are miles of dense jungle to go through, and high and steep ridges to climb over. Very likely in some of tho districts we will be the first white men to go through, so the natives have a treat in store to see us, and we are sure to get an interesting time, and will be away about seven days. We expect no trouble, but plenty of walking, which is hard work in this country. The first few miles will probably be through plantations, so we will lay in a. small store of fruit if we can possibly manage it. The German money is still current. All the clerks and officials, of course, are soldiers. Among this Aus- tralian Expeditionary Force are a few Welsh (about eight, a few Scotch, Irish, English, Canadians, Americans, New Zealanders, two Frenchmen (one from Alsace Lorraine), two Boers; while over 800 of them have never seen England; were born in Australasai, South Africa, Pacific Islands, or India. Yet although from all parts of the world, we are a happy crowd, all fighting for a right and just cause. All of the one mind as if all had been brought up together in an English village. At last we are able to get a few postage stamps. They were issued yesterday after a delay in printing the super-charge on them. I was unable to procure stamps for previous letters. You should keep the stamps as a curio. They will be very rare, only a small quantity found and were only issued to the soldiers on duty. No more will be printed, there- fore to a stamp collector they are valuable. We are looking forward to hard work on these clearing matches. We will have to make the best of things, sleep under trees, and the only rations we get provided is bully beef and four ships' biscuits per day. However, we may pass plantations and add to the fare. We are going to have our share of a soldier s life, which, while on the march, only a soldier knows what it is. especially in this climate. Nadolig 11awen a blwyddyn newydcl dda i chi gyd."

WELSH FIELD CO RE I

WELSH FIELD CO., R.E. Recruiting is still progressing in our midst on a 11 hands. On Saturday last eighteen more men were enlisted to the Welsh Field Co., Roval En- gmeers, and returned with Major J. Francis to Cambridge. This branch of the service remains popular still, possibly the pay being double that of most corps forms an attraction, and, too, the good reports one gets of the progress and attention given helps to popularise it. The men are billetted in superior houses, and two only in each house,-thus the comfort is increased. Another twenty-five men will, it is stated, be wanted in about a fortnight, and in a few weeks probably fifty more. Good tradesmen are at all times sought after, and care is taken to select high quality men. Some of the sappers recruited at Llanelly ill October have now taken up commissions. Saddlers, wheelwrights, and shoeing smiths are particularly wanted, and well paid. Corporal Bowser attends at the headquarters, Hall Streec, Llanelly, and at The Mount, Spilman Street, Carmarthen, and is available to supply information.

THE ANILINE DYE INDUSTRY

THE ANILINE DYE INDUSTRY The following letter dealing with the debate in the House of Commons on the above subject ap- peared in the "Morning Post" on Wednesday:— Sir,—In t £ e debate last evening in the House of Commons Sir Alfred Mond uttered a truth go preg- nant as to deserve remembrance equal to that given to a former utterance of his, in which he disre- garded Free Trade principle when in conflict with Ic the interests of the shareholders in Brunner, Mond, and Co. (Limited. He said last night: A tariff [on dyes] might lead German manufac- turers to establish works here. This opens to me not only a delightful prospect, but is in itself a most frank and refreshing confes- sion, for of all the arguments used for years past by myself and others in favour of a general tariff (because it would lead to more opportunities of em- ployment for our own people) none has been more strenuously combatted by the school of which Sir Alfred Mond is a leading spokesman. Joy at the one sinner who repenteth, etc., is too deliciously keen to profane Sir Alfred Mond s latest confession by firther comment. All will be content for the moment to note the confession, and chew it over as a delectable morsel until the war is over. But, Mr. Editor, I have a further object in writing to you. In your own excellent leading article yesterday you say; Before the war it had not been perceived by the British nation that a small industry like dyes was the master key of the several very large and important industries which depended on these dyes. Whilst agreeing with every proposition in the article from which the above sentence is quoted, I am reluctantly constrained to say that it is not historically acourate to imply that the impending "ruin" of our old colour industry had not been foreseen by anybody till the war began. It had, on the contrary, been the subject of widespread dis- cussion and warning over a period of 34. years before the war. It began in 1881, when Mr. Lcvinstein predicted Germany's efforts to control the trade at a meeting of the Chemical Society. It was prominently brought before the textile trades and commercial world at varying periods subsequently, by Chambers of Commerce through- out Great Britain—especially the Manchester Cham- ber-and ventilated by powerful deputations of traders to Ministers, debates in Parliament, etc. Two Acts of Parliament (1902 and 1907) were passed, designed to help our industries, dyes amongst them. In an article which appeared under my name in the "National Review" of October, 1906 (entitled British Patent Laws "), I told the story at length of the transference, to our lasting loss. of the colour industry to Germany and the Continent, con- cluding with the words: Yet English brains created the colour industry, English enterprise developed it, and English folly -legislative and judicial-has been the principal and initial cause of its decline. Some 50,000 reprints of this article were distributed amongst Chambers of Commerce, members of Parliament, and business associations of all kinds. The following month Mr. Lloyd George (November, 1906), having read the article, invited myself and Mr. Levinstein, on behalf of the Chambers of Com- merce, to confer with him and help him in the preparation and passing of the Patents Act of 1907 —the germs of a. good but mild protectionist policy. So you see there were some who loked ahead before the war arose, just as there were many in other fields who warned us to prepare for the war itself; but they belonged not to the House of Mond —Yours, etc. JOSEPH LAWRENCE. Oaklands, Kenley, Surrey, Feb. 23.

LLWYNHENDY

LLWYNHENDY Mr. R. W. L], who is at present a student at the Theological College, Aberystwyth, has accepted a call to the Calvinistic Methodist Church at Llwyn- hendy, Llanelly. He leaves college in June and will take up pastoral duties in September. Mr. Bell is a native of Penderyn, near Aberdarp, and a cousin of Mr. Rjchard Bell who at one time represented the Derby Boroughs in Parliament. He was for some time at the Old College School, Carmarthen, whence e proceeded to Treveoca College and then to the -biological College at Aberystwyth. Our knowledge of him as a student justifies us, we think, in antici- pating that he will make a very successful pastor.

HAVERFORDWEST RELIEF INCREASED

HAVERFORDWEST RELIEF INCREASED. The Haverfordwest Guardians decided on Wednes- day to give an increase of 6d. per head to all in receipt of outdoor relief to meet the increased cost ot living.-The rural district council considered a petition from seven madmen for an increase of wages to meet the high cost of living. One road. man, whom the surveyor described as a first-class workman, was said to be earning 16s. a week. The matter was referred to a committee.

CAPEL IWAH

CAPEL IWAH MR. GOLYGYDD,— A fyddwch mor garedig a chan- iatai ychydig ofod yn eich newyddiadur poblogaidd, am fy mod yn ddorbyniwr cyson o'r JOURNAL, ac yr wyf yn cael pleser mawr i ddarllen liith yr onwog Twm 'Barels." Mae hon bob amseréwedi ei tharo yn y cyweirnod iawn, end am glywedigion Capel Iwan yr wythnos ddiweddaf, yr wyf am ddweyd gair bach wrth yr Hen Lane," os hen hefyd. Beth yn enw pobpeth ges di feddwl fod "good pluck" vn y gwyr aeth i'r District Council i Castellnewydd i dda-l;Hi eu pWllC. Dyma bet-h wyf fi yn ei alw ef,— tip-top impudence. Yr oedd siwr o fod wedi meddwl galhi.-ai gael gan y Council i wneyd fel oedd ef yn moiyn, a dadwneyd both oeddynt wedi basio er's misoedd. Neu beth arall oedd wneyd yno? os gwyr ei hunan hefyd. Eto mae yr hen lane yn gofyn, "Ai nid oes digon o ddwr yn y peutref heb stop taps." Os mae Pentreisaf, Capel Iwan, a olygir ganddo, dywedaf, Oes digon, heb na tap na peipen, a digon dros ben. Ond os rhan uchaf Capel Iwan olygir, mae lie i ofni pe tne hi yn myned yn sych iawn buasai yn rhaid i'r boys a'r ceirts dwr fyned a'u ciniaw ganddynt neu letya cyn llanw eu ystenau a pe tae pobl y Pentreisaf a'u taps yn rhedeg yn wastraff trwy y dydd fel oeddynt, ao fel bo i'r "Hen Lane" gael eglurhad, hyny oedd gan y Council" mown golwg i'r gwyr uchaf gael yr un tegwch a gwyr y Pentreisaf, ao felly bydd yn eglur i chwi. Fo ddichon, mae gwell yw cto defnyddio yr arian at yr hyn mae y "Council" wedi drefnu, na u gwario ar glorian. Hofyd, nid wyf yn cyd- fyned a "Lusi Ann" yn ei chlywedigion am yr wythnos ddiweddaf. Sut ydych chwi wedi myned mor ddirwestol a hyn. Odi'ch cariad wedi d'od i wybod eich bod yn yfed ambell i Iased o "throt oil" (chwcrfdl^ "Twm 'Barels"), ao wedi.. bod yn cadw stwr, neu beth sydd wedi cynhyrfu tybed? Ni ddv- wedaf ragor yn awr, gan os bydcl digwydd i chwi, "Lusi Ann," i golli eich cariad, byddaf yn ceisio am danoch ar unwaith.—Ydwyf, KBTXGER.

ST CL EARS

ST. CL EARS PLOUGHING^ MATCH.—At Plasygwere Farm, St. Clears, on Wednesday, the annual ploughing match and hedging competition took place. The principal awards were :-PIoughing-Champion class: 1, John Protheroe, Llwyndrissi; 2, J. N. Williams, Parc-yr- Abbot. Second championship class: 1 Trevor Davies, Blaenanthir; 2, T. Davies, Llechvclawdd General class: 1 W. J. Philips, Tarfelyrych. Boys' class: 1, Owen Willioms, Pentre Howell. Hedging- First class: 1, Samuel Howell, Llanboidy; 2 D Williams, Llwynygwyr, and D. Rovnolds,' Sarnaiu Mydrim (equal. Best hedge or field': S. Howell. Mydrim (equal. Best hedge or field; S. Howell.

ST DAVIDS DAY AT CARMARTHEN

ST. DAVID'S DAY AT CARMARTHEN. The Mayor (Aid. John Lewis) hopes the towns- people will decorate their houses on St. David's Day.

LLANELLY ENGINE SHED ON FIRE

LLANELLY ENGINE SHED ON FIRE. An outbreak of fire was discovered early on Wed- nesday at an engine shed belonging to Mr T. Hughes, box maker, Llanelly. The alarm was given by employees of the Great W7estern Railway, and the Llanelly Fire Brigade, under the command of Captain Evan Rees, were able to extinguish the fire. The damage is estimated at JE300.

EMPLOYMENT OF REFUGEES

EMPLOYMENT OF REFUGEES. At the request of Sir Ernest Hatch, chairman of the Government Commission on the matter, the Lord Mayor of Cardiff (Alderman J. T. Richards) has convened a conference, to be held on Fridav, March 5th, at Cardiff, to discuss the question of the employment of Belgian refugees. Sir Ernest Hatch has signified his intention to attend the conference. At a conference held on the 12th January last, it was deoided. in view of the figures as to the em- ployable and unemployed Belgian workers in the city in the special trades enumerated in a Govern- ment communication, that it would be unwise to endeavour to sot up the establishment of workshops and plant as suggested.

WHITLAND MILK CASE

WHITLAND MILK CASE. Thomas Phillips, farmer. Whitland, was sum- moned before the Cardiff Stipendiary yesterday for selling milk, consigned to Mr. John Evans, dairy- man, City-road, Cardiff, which was certified to be deficient in milk fat to the extent of 13.7 per cent. Mr. T. H. Woosey appeared on behalf of the Cor- poration, and Mr. G. F. Forsdike defended. The defence set up was that the milk was despatched in the same state as it came from the oow, and that it Wit.) not tampered with in any way. His Worship imposed a fine of 25 and costs or a month.

MILITARY FUNERAL AT NARBERTH

MILITARY FUNERAL AT NARBERTH. The remains of Private Frederick O. Evans, 4th Battalion Welsh Regiment, who was killed on the railway near Penally Station on Wednesday night in last week, were interred ab Narberth with mili. tary honours on Saturday afternoon. Ninety men of the 4th Battalion Welsh Regiment were present, under the command of Captain D. Rees, Captain Roderick, Captain Bowling, Captain J. L. H. Wil- liams, Captain D. J. Lewis, and Lieut. Jones.

CYCLISTS PLEASE NOTE

CYCLISTS, PLEASE NOTE. Cyclists would do well to write to the Raleigh Cycle Co., 41, Holborn Viaduct, London, E.C., for a copy of their "Book of the Raleigh," which tells all about their all-steel cycles. The firm's guarantee is a most honest and advantageous one.

HUNTING APPOINTMENTS

HUNTING APPOINTMENTS. The Carmarthenshire Foxhounds will meet on Tuesday, March 2nd, at Penycoed Upper Gate, and on Friday, March 5th, at Carpenters' Arms; each day at 11 a.m. The Ncuaddfawr Foxhounds will meet on Tues- day, March 2nd, at Nowoourt, and on Friday, March 5th, at Ystrad; each day at 10.30 a.m. L.

No title

General Pole Carow, Inspector-General of the Territorial Forces, visited Aberystwyth on Wednes- day and inspected some of the units. The day was fine and sunny. The inspection was continued on Thursday. P^CES.—At a meeting of the London x1 lour Millers Association on Wednesday the official price of town households was unchanged, and now stands at 53s. NATIONAL EISTEDDFOD OF WALES.-The Financo Committee on Tuesday resolved to recom- mend tho Executive Committee to proceed with the National Eisteddfod of Wales at Bangor, postponed last year on account of the war, in the first week in August next. This decision was arrived at after discussion of information gathered by the general secretary, from which it appeared that 25 choirs were anxious to compete. RECRUITING. Tho Parliamentary Recruiting Committee held a conference at Cardiff on Friday last of all the Party Agents in Wales in order, to discuss and arrange a new recruiting campaign throughout the country. Messrs. Harries and Lewis (East Carmarthen), Hanks and Wallis-Jones (West Carmarthen), and Woolley and Jennings (Carmarthen Boroughs) were amongst the delegates present, whilst the conference was presided over by Mr. Arthur Peters, of the Labour Party who was ZT-W ^pMr; J" R/nwick ^er, on behalf of p^Capbin ""»■»

Advertising

CARMARTHEN RURAL DISTRICT COUNCIL. I GORSLAS WATER WORKS EXTENSIONS. I TENDERS are invited for providing and laying i 668 yarlis 4-inch, and 214 yards 3-inch WATER t MAINS, with necessary FITTINGS and FOUN- F TAINS. Plans and specification may be seen at my tr,r.e and further particulars obtained from the Surveyor, Mr. W. E. Jones, Rock Hill, Llanartbney. 7 Tenders marked Gorslas Wrater Wort=» + U I itrcTLt Frid^ k next. The lowest or any Tender nof -i ■>* ceptefj J r not necessarily ac- B. JOHN SAER, J| 7. Hal] Street, C.rmarthe ""k '0 C°'