Teitl Casgliad: Carmarthen journal and South Wales weekly advertiser

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 3 o 8 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
11 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
Advertising

ff'Ma-lavaf |gg^ CREAM SEPARATOR, An ||lipi J-i EXTRA PROFIT ofls. \VEEKL Y on EACH COW i ?J| "AL|AN LAVAL f more ^ian CALVES THRlVB hetter on :m!l mneh time and labour i "aved. ONE AND A HALF MILLIONS SOLD. Fixed in any Dairy on One Month's Free Tript AGENTS— W. THOMAS & SON, Hall Street, Carmarthen. T. M. WILLIAMS, Ironmonger, Llandilo.

AGiUiibL lUfiAl ittffcS

AGiUiibL lUfiAl ittffcS [BY A PBACTICAL EARMEB.] WOMEN AND DAIRY WORK. Advice on all sorts of ogric-,illural problems has been offered with enlw- yrassaig III reccnt ss £ v g&j&srs&s ate is undoubtedly the most cnthcuk and most press- 3g of all farming problems at the present tone. TW lUge Of boy labour at the best only helps to a limited extent, and machinery, tnough it wul be more used than ever before, has its limitations, and is still very scarce in some districts. Female labour however, is very plentiful, and at fair wagess might be attracted to farm work more than many faunas "Trforder to see what can be done in this direction an experiment is being made in the six conles around Reading with the special object of the dairy industry. A committee has. been formed to try and provide efficient women milkers to those dairy farmers in the district who may be wil ng engage them. The cominlit-ee appeals for co-opera- tion In what they -believe to be a patriotic endeavour, encouraging the employment of wobm for dairy ourposes and for the lighter forms of farm work. Such^labour should be valuable not only durn^ the present war, but as a permanent assistance to agri- culturists in rural districts, where scarcity of men has been noticeable for some time before tne out- break of hostilities. The need of female assistance when lack of male labour seriously threatens our national supplj o milk must be apparent to everyone. The value of home production in food cannot be over-estimated, and a short;g in the supply of milk would be nothing less than a national calamity, disastrous not onlv to the present welfare of the community and especially of the children of the nation, but <;1;.0. to the health of future generations. There is aurinj the present crisis a large and constantly-increasing demand for milk in our military hospitals. The authorities of University College, Reading, have generously co-operated by offering training in milking to selected girl and women candidates; and the committee is asking for assistance in making- known their aims, especially by encouraging dairy farmers to train female milker-. The committee welcomes applications for the services cf those already trained or in the course of training. No expenses are incurred nor are fees charged. In xnanv instances farmers may prefer to tram the girls in their own dairies, in which ca^es the committee will be prepared to .give some assistance either by way of outfit or towards maintenance during the first fortnight. The committee is asking for further application? from suitable women or girls. Daughters of agri- cultural labourers are specially desired, as girls who are familiar with country life are more likely To be (successful farm workers than those used only to town conditions. THE CABBAGE-TCRNIP. Our thorough detestation of German methods ol warfare and diplomacy need not blind us to the excellence of many useful things which have been originated in the happier times of peace. Because kohl-rabi, or knolkohl, has a German name, and is best known and most extensively grown in Germany, there is no reason why it should not be better known in Britain. If the foreign name is objec- tionable. let it be called the cabbage-turnip, for that is exactly what it is, lying midway between the cabbage and the turnip, and having good qualities all its own. Where it has been grown in recent years it has attracted a good deal of local attention, on account of having stood the drought so well in dry seasons, and also on account of its disease-resisting qualities. As a consequence, it can be cultivated in soils where it would be a matter of great difficulty to grow turnips, swedes, and cabbages, owing to the soarcity of lime or the prevalence of finger-and-toe. The cabbage-turnip thrives very well in soil that is suited #o mangolds, with which it is often grown, a good plan being to have a small seed-bed ready from which to fill up gaps in the mangolds. It will also do satisfactorily where swedes or turnips would fail from lack of moisture. Unlike mangolds, how- ever, it is very hardy, especially the big-topped sorts, and is not easily damaged by frost. The so-called root or bulb is not, strictly speaking, a root or bulb at all, but a swollen stem, which grows above the ground, and as a consequence is admirably suited for sheep-feeding. Seeing- that if fed to dairy cattle it does not taint the milk, it makes a valuable ;ocd in the autumn, when grass may be short and mangolds have still to mature. Probably not a dozr-n tons of the crop change hands in this country as market garden produce, though in Germany and other Continental countries its con- sumption at the table is quite common. Admittedly it has not the flavour of a well-grown turnip, but if pulled up before too great a size is attained it pro- vides a very passable substitute. The leaves issue freely from the enlarged stem, and make good gresn food for stock; while if kept till January they are delicious as a vegetable. CONTAGIOUS ABORTION. CattW in the district around Louth, Lincolnshire, are much troubled with contagious abortion; and the Lincolnshire Red Shorthorn Association are to be commended for their enterprise in enabling local farmers to hear a statement about the facts of the disease from the leading authority on the subject, Sir Stewart Stockman, of the Veterinary Depart- ment, Board of Agriculture. This gentleman said he did not suggest anything in the way of legislative measures, for such measures, he noticed, often greatly inoonvenienced. farmers, and he believed that the Board's researches during the last few years had resulted in the discovery of other and more practical remedies. The first thing that they must realise was that it was undoubtedly a -disease with which they had to deal, and that it was contagious. The oow, the ewe, and the mare were the principal species which suffered from the disease, and in each species there were distinctive types of it. If several cases of abortion occurred together or at short intervals, they might be perfectly sure, he said, in ninety-nine cases out of 100 that they were contagious. After fully describing the general characteristics of the disease, he recommended in case of doubt that the diagnoses should be confirmed by a veterinary surgeon's examination, or by refer- ence to the Board of Agriculture. It was important, he pointed out. to isolate the cow at an early stage, and all infected material and implements should be burnt, or mixeld with hot lime and buried. The stalls should be disinfected with chloride of lime. and the hands and boots of attendants should be washed in a 3 per cent. solution of carbolic acid. The animals themselves should be treated in the same way. If a herd was badly affected, the best thing to do was to resort to pre- ventive inoculation. The first attack of the disease usually made the animal immune, and by keeping such animals, after due precautions, an owner would be building up a bulwark against the disease; but preventive inocula tion aimed at producing immunity without producing the disease, and during the last two or three years the Board had made observation^ on several thou- hands of animals, with the results that the number of cases, which in some herds had been 38 por cent., could be reduced in about 5 per cent. The material for inoculation, prepared at the Board's laboratory, can be supplied to any farmer free, provided he give about a month's notice.

MARKETS

MARKETS GRAIN, &c. NEWPORT, Wed., April 7.-There was only a email attendance to-day, and quite a holiday tone prevailed. Prices remained unchanged from last week, except in the case of maize, in which a de- cidedly better tone prevailed. HEREFORD, Wed., April 7.-Quiet market and few samples showing. Wheat firm at 7s to 7s 3d. Barley in good demand. Oats unchanged on the week. Maize slow, without change. Millers' offals occasionally in favour of buyers. CATTLE. NEWPORT, Wed., April 7.-There was a fair supply of oattle, sheep, and pigs and a moderate supply of calves and lambs to-day. Prices were firm, as follows:—Beet beef, 9id to d per lb.; seconds, 8Jd to 9d; bulls and cows, 8d; best wether mutton, Is; ewe6, 9d; lamb, Is Id to Is 2d; calves, lOd to Is; porker pigs, 14s 

Advertising

lr When Your Chicks mope it's a sign that they are not t- digesting their food-the fore- runner of Roup, Gapes, Indiges- tion, Chill, or Bowel Troubles. TO COMBAT THIS foods must be given which pro- duce greater warmth of body, strengthen the digestive organs f and fortify them against the evil effects of cold and wet. SPRATT'S Chicken Meal & Chikko are the best foodsiprocumble for this result. Samples of Foods and book on /ma* "Poultry Culture" will be sent on receipt of three penny JKfj stamps to cover the cost of fM, packing and postage. ft SPRATT'S PATENT LTD. 24-25 Fenchurch St, London, E.C. j COVERDALES CHICKEN TONIC AN INDISPENSABLE NOURISHER AND STRENGTHENER I Prevents all CHICKEN Ailments, economical B in use for it. saves the lives of the sickly, ■ builds big frames, and makes STRONG, ■ HEALTHY BIRDS. ■ 1,1- PACKET IS ENOUGH FOR 40 CHICKENS I FOR 18 WEEKS. ■ 8 Packages: 3d., 6d., I/ and 2/6; or post free, 4d., Set., 1/3, and 3/ b A useful booklet How to Rear Every Chick Wi enclosed with each packet. ORDER TO-DAY FiiOM j £ GOVERDAIE'S POULTRY POWDER, Ltd., | YORK. i Agents—D. H. & T. Evans, The Stores, Pontshaen; \V. Thornton,. Chemist, Blaenavon; Saunders & Co., 9 Abergavenny; T. H. Pritchard. Bj Medical Hall, Abertillery; Hibbert IS nd Son, Ca- St., Cardiff; J. B Nicholas. Central Dru:: Stores, Llan- H I !oT#rT; T. Roberts and Son, Grooars. B .Iandrn-en F. E. Thomas, George B Sfrr^et. illaiidilo; E. Evans, Chemist, M Ammanford. H !'t!='="

CARMARTHENSHIRE AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION COMMITTEE

CARMARTHENSHIRE AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION COMMITTEE A meeting of the Carmarthenshire Agricultural Education Committee was held at the County Council Offices on Thursday, Mr. Ben Evans, Pen- eader, presiding. The Committee discussed a report and the out- line of a scheme of agricultural education submitted by the county agricultural organiser (Mr. Daniel John, B.Sc.). The committee have already made a atart and last year spent the sum of L921 on this branch of education. Mr. Johns first of all quoted from a return from the Board of Agriculture giving the number and size of the present holdings in Carmarthenshire, showing that there are 8,746 with an acreage of 437,143. There are 5,565 holdings varying in size, but not exceeding 50 acres and tho occupiers in the aggrogate have 104,448 acres under their charge. The number of holdings of 50 acres and under com- prises about 64 per cent. of the total holdings in the county, and there are also 3,163 holdings returned as being over 50 but under 30 acres, and these embrace an area of 322,152 acres, which give an average of 102 acres per holding. Carmarthen may therefore be described as a county composed of comparatively small farms. Nearly two-thirds of the holdings were under 50 acres, and it naturally followed that there must be a considerable number of children attend- ing elementary schools whose future would be closely identified in one way or another with these numerous farms. It was also obvious that an elementary education, especially in rural schools, should provide instruction possessing a distinctly agricultural bias in order to foster a more intelli- gent interest in the rural pursuits around them. In most cases when the scholars left the rural elemen- tary schools they were urgently needed at home to assist in the work of the farm. There were many parents also who were disposed to think that further education was quite unnecessary, and any appeal to them in the interest of their children was of no avail. It was clear that some means should be devised whereby the teaching in the rural schools may be- come of real service in the training of children who will eventually become the workers of the land and 'ns a the mainstay of the rural industries. The teaching of agriculture would be quite impossible owing to lack of suitably trained teachers, but effort should be made to develop all instruction relative to rural occupations. It was also desirable to give more attention to school gardens where experiments on the .growth of plants and the elementary principles of the manuring of crops, etc., should be introduced. The development and extension of this work is a pressing necessity. A sound elementary education supplemented by school gardening, rough carpentry. and nature study would undoubtedly create a new interest in rural affairs. He hoped to be able in the near future to arrange a Saturday morning class for rural school teachers and others interested in agri- culture. He advocated the organisation of day classes in agriculture to meet the requirements of young farmer.5 or farmers' sons who could be spared from their farms some part of the week; of tutorial classes at suitable centres for the study of rural subjects with a syllabus to suit local requirements. Dealing with dairy work, be stated that the number of cows and heifers in 1914 was 55,311, which showed that the milk industry was very considerable and consequently it was desirable to provide special in- struction for this important section of farming. It was advisable to give milk-testing demonstrations and a considerable amount of useful advisory work could be done in testing milk for farmers resident in .the county. He also referred to the need of in- struction in horticulture and bee-keeping and field experimenting. The yield of all their crops in the county was below the average for England and Wales, and an effort should, be made to demonstrate by suitably conducted trials how they could be in" creased by the generous use of manures as well as producing such increase at less cost. The area of grass land in the county was also below the average. Tht improvement of such grazing land was a matter of considerable economic importance, and he was convinoed that much improvement could be effected in this direction. On consideration of the estimates which provided for an expenditure of 21,000 on agricultural education in the county, the Clerk re- ported that last year they only received a grant of £ 186 because they spent E&21. If they had spent £ 1,000 a grant of L326 would have come. The Rer. Wm. Thomas, LIanboidy, said they ought to obtain the full grant this year by spending the money. They could do a great deal for farming, which was the staple industry of the county. The report was adopted. It was decided to increase the number of short course scholars in agriculture at the University College from 14 to 30. The Chairman in the course of a discussion on the organiser's report, said that the great difference was with re.gard to getting school teachers interested in agriculture. Mr. Thomas Thomas. Llangennech, said it was far more important that children should know about the growth of plants than something of geometry, tfor instance. When he was at school farmers' sons there were made to feel ashamed that they were connected with the land. The other boys called them clod hoppers," and so on—(laughter)—and that sort of thing was not discouraged by the teachers, who felt the same. That was more or less true to-day. It ought, however, to be instilled into the minds of the children that agriculture was the most honour- able and noble of occupations. He did not think any sacrifice the -committee might make would be too great ,in order to foster among the children a greater love for nature and agriculture. The Chairman said there was a false pride in the country. Many farmers' sons and daughters were ashamed to be known as farmers, and they much preferred to be taken for teachers or shop assistants (laughter). They in that county had to change the whole atmosphere regarding the attitude to agriculture and had to start in the elementary schools. Mr. Davies, Rhyblid, said ohildren must be taught that agriculture was a respectable avocation, a science, and a good living in the bargain (laughter). A resolution was passed asking the County Educa- tion Authority to instruct the teachers in the schools to endeavour to foster a love of agriculture among the children.

MYDDFAI

MYDDFAI. The annual vestry meeting for the parish of Myd(1- fai was held at the Schoolroom on Thursday evening in last week, the Rev. D. J. Evans, vicar, presiding. Major D. Gwynne, of Cilgwyn, was re-elected people's warden; Mr. Wm. Jones, of Blaendynnch. being appointed to act as the Major's deputy during the time he was at the front. The Vicar re-ap- pointed Mr. John Price, senior, of Cwmydw, as his warden, and thanked the parishioners for their loyal support during the past year. All the sidesmen were re-appointed. The churchwarden's account showed a credit balanoe.

WEST CARMARTHENSHIRE LIBERALS

WEST CARMARTHENSHIRE LIBERALS MR. JOHN HINDS AND MR. TOWYN JONES, M.P.'s, DEFEND THEIR POSITION. Mr. John Hinds, M.P., and Mr. Towyn Jones, M.P., were the principal speakers at the annual meeting of the West Carmarthenshire Liberal Asso- ciation held at Lammas-street Chapel Scholoroom, Carmarthen, and defended the attitude of the Welsh Members. Mr. John Hinds, who presided, said that having been such a party man all his life he was much pained in now having to oppose the Government. Mr. Llewelyn Williams, at Carmarthen on Wednes- day in last week, said the desire of some of the Welsh members was to humiliate the Government, and especially Mr. Lloyd George. He (Mr. Hinds) said there deliberately that Mr. Llewelyn Williams had no business to make a statement of that kind. He had no desire to humiliate the Government-far from it, and he had too much respect for the man who had done glorious -work during this war to bring about his downfall. He opposed the Post- ponement Bill simply because there was a principle involved. I am not going to sell that birthright for 20 Lloyd Georges or 20 Governments," he said. Mr. Llewelyn Williams further said he would not be a party of no "sordid tactics." He (the speaker) knew of no "sordid tactics." Their hands were perfectly clean, and he was not afraid to accept any challenge in regard to this matter. Now, what had been the history of this latest ecclesiastical scheme— for it was nothing but that—carried on for the last few days? It was time for them to speak straight on this matter, whatever might be the consequences. The Welsh party, when they came to know that the clericals were coming continually to the Lobby of the House of Commons to get interviews with the principal members of the Government, passed re- solution after resolution warning the Government not to tamper with the Welsh Church Act. They were then told to trust the Government, and they did so. The Welsh party accepted the political truce like men, although they knew they were going to lose financially by it. Their surprise might be imagined when they heard for the first time a Minis- ter of the Crown propounding in the House of Lords a Bill of which they (the Welsh members) knew nothing. (Shame.) They could imagine the feelings of the Welsh party when the Government broke the truce. They had no business to break it. The Welsh Church Act, lie held, was extravagantly generous to the Church, and he was there to tell them that he stood by the resolution passed at Llandrindod—(applause)—and for this reason, that the Postponement Bill was introduced by the Government as a result of a bargain with the Op- position. The Welsh members did not want to have anything to do with that Bill. It was for the Government themselves to bring any amendments to them, and they would consider them. His view was that it was the duty of the Welsh party to oppose the Bill right up to the second reading, and divide the House if they were only six (applause). They could not table amendments until the second read- ing, but once that time had come it would be their duty, now that the Government had flouted their wishes, to move amendments to omit clauses and fight the Bill line by line. He hated such talk as that the Welsh members were "sulking in their tents and that they f(.t piqued" because they had not been consulted. ic was nothing of the kind. They only felt that Wales had been insulted in not being consulted. They were not crying about their "wounded dignity." Since he had entered Parlia- ment lie always viewed everything from the stand- f point of Wales, and lie had come to the conclusion l that it would be far better for them to start a I Welsh National party (applause). Although the Chancellor of the Exchequer and Mr. MoKenna said the repeal of the Welsh Act had been made a matter of impossibility by the acceptance of the Postponement Bill by the leaders of the Opposi- tion, the Church party openly declared that their objective was the repeal of the Welsh Act at the first -opportunity. Mr. Hinds said the bargain was absolutely one-sided, and every day's delay in the coming into operation of the Act was a further en- dowment of the Church out of what they regarded as the money of the nation. For every year's delay £ 58,000 would be paid for the life interests of the clergy, more than they were worth. Wales and that constituency had been all along loyal to principles which some people in high quarters had forgotten and he asked his constituents to say again that. the attitude he had taken in this matter was a right one (applause). Mr. Towyn Jones, M.P., said the Nonconformists and Liberals of Wales had loyally kept the truce, but the leaders of the Church party had refused to "bury the hatchet" of domestic affairs. They availed themselves of every opportunity granted them to exploit the patriotism of the people for the further enrichment of an alien church and for the further postponement of Disestablishment to a date which might enable the Tory party to repeal the original Act. "The Downing-street latchkey of the Archbishop of Canterbury," he declared, "proved to be the periscope of the hostile submarine that had been stealthily constructed for the pur- poses of torpedoeing the Welsh Church Act" (laughter). Dealing with the Welsh Church Act, he said that the Church stood to gain in the two years between January 1st, 1913, and January 1st, 1915, at least £454,840, and yet they were told that the war had imposed a severe financial strain on the Church The Postponement Bill would give them another £ 100,000. The feeling of the Welsh people was dead against the Postponement Bill, root and branch, and the united cry of the country to the Government was: "Either withdraw or modify it He resented with indignation any suggestion that they were aotuated by sordid motives in taking the course they had mapped out. He was in entire accord with the Llandrindod resolution. If the Government would not withdraw the Postponement Bill and start afresh with a new one, then the Welsh Party would have to decide how best to fight 'or substantial modifications of the Bill, that would ensure the safety of the original Act. To withdraw the Bill would be, in his opinion, the far more honourable course for the Government, than to stand by a bargain that was made in haste and bo hind the back of the representatives of Wales. The Welsh members were not sulking in their tents." They were out in the face of the sun" (laughter). They stood for principles and not personalities, end no one should stand between them and the rights of Wales. May God defend the r'ght" (applause). If Lloyd George ancl Asquith are cbanirin? their coats," shouted a member at the back of the room, "I am going to vote Tory. Mr. Llovi Mo-gan did not agree with the attitude of Mr. Lloyd George in connection with the E i-joalion Eill, and he was criticised very much, but it was Mr. Morgan who was right. I stand for principles." Mr. David Evans, Whitland, moved a resolution endorsing that already passed by the Executive Committee some time ago, calling upon the Welsh Parliamentary representatives to continue their strenuous opposition to the Postponement Bill as it now stands in all its stages. Mr. Evans said too many concessions bad already been granted. Mr. John Lewis, Meiros Hall, seconding, said he would prefer to see Mr. Lloyd George turn his coat than that he should wear his present one, and associate himself with the Cecils. The Rev. D. G. Williams, St. Clears, said that rather than see the Welsh Church Act nullified he would see the Government thrown out head over heels. The Rev. D. E. Williams, Henllan; Rev. Morgan Jones, Whitland, and Mr. H. Jones-Thomas, Llan- fynydd, also spoke. Mr. John Hinds, M.P., was elected president of the association for the ensuing year, and the fol- lowing were electcd vice-presidents, viz.:—Mr. David Evans, Whitland; Sir Courtenay Mansel, Bart.; Messrs. H. Jones-Davies, Glyneiddan; John Lewis, Meiros Hall; J. W. Gwynne-Hughes, Tre- geyb. and H. Jones-Thomas, Llanfynydd. Mr. John Lloyd. Penvbank. was re-elected chairman, and Mr. W. J. Wallis-Jones, solicitor, Carmarthen, secretary.

4w FELINGWM

4w FELINGWM. SUCCESS.—Mr. David Davies. of Cwrt, Felingwm, has successf 1.. pa SSe J all the examinations qualify- in.g him for the degree of A.T.S.C. This is the more .gratifying and praiseworthy inasmuch as this promising young musician is labouring under dis- advantages. He has already passed some further examinations necessary for the L.T.S.C. May he succeed!

Advertising

f"PKRFFPT" cream 1 SEPARATORS LATEST. CHEA PEST. BEST. "The Fram."Capacpe? w311003 Price £ 4 15s. Od. Delivered and fixed in your Dairy. Every Machine Guaranteed. We can refer you to 3,000 Farmers who are BES^the "FRAM," and say it is THE STOCKED AND SOLD SY DAVID LEWIS, Aeron Villa, Pencader. OWNewcEa^eN|ml^-S" Smithy' J. W. DAVIES, Implement Agent, Lampeter

AMMANFORD URBAN COUNCIL

AMMANFORD URBAN COUNCIL FALSE REPORTS RE PARLIAMENTARY BILL. Ammanford Council met on Wednesday night at the Y.M.C.A. Buildings, Mr. B. R. Evans presiding. Those present were: Messrs. J. Harr; s, Evan Lewis, D. G. Davies. Evan Evans, Thos Fle^oSer, J. Davies, W. N. Jones, J. Morgan, Wm. Evans, J. C .Shaw, and David Jones; also the Clerk Mr. T. M. Evans), and the Surveyor (Mr. David Thomas. FLOODING OF PANYFFYNON. In reference to the flooding of Pantyffynon from the River Amman, the members of the Counci'. on the 6th inst. visited and inspected the river from the Maerdy footbridge up as far as the point wh..re the rivor overflowed its banks. It was resolved that the Maerdy Bridge Joint Committee when discus- sing the amended scheme for the consf,icrijn of the Maerdy bridge be asked to take into oonsidera- tion the advisability of clearing, and thereby deepen- ing the bed of the river, with a view 10 its flowing into its original course, and that that work be con- sidered as part of the original scheme for bridging the river. It was also agreed that Lord DvTn'Tor re approached with a view to his taking the no^e.«;«ry steps to protect Pantyffynon from river Moods in future. MAERDY BRIDGE. The minutes of the Maerdy Bridge Joint Com- mittee showed that the following tenders had been received for the construction of a stone bridge across the River Amman at the Maerdy ford near Panty- ffynon station:—James Evans, Ammanford, £ 4,500; Wm. Jones, St. Mary-street, Cardiff. £ 8,899 lis. Id.; George Mercer and Sons, Llanelly, £ 6,434; D. Howells and Son, Llandebie, £ 4,663. It was considered that tho tenders were all too high, and the committee chairman (Aid. W. N. Jones) suggested that the question of the stone bridge be deferred, and that steps be taken to see whether a bridge of a different nature could be erected for a price as near as possible to the one originally resolved upon,— £ 3,500. This was agreed to. ERRONEOUS REPORTS CIRCULATED." A recommendation was received from the Finance Committee to the effect that JB490 be paid to Messrs. Bircham, parliamentary agents, for their work in connection with the promotion -of the Parliamentary Bill. Mr. D. G. Davies—I suppose we shall have an occasion to consider the whole of these accounts at some future meeting so that the ratepayers might know what we went to London for, and what we secured, and what it cost us. The Chairman replied in the affirmative, and the Clerk said the Parliamentary Taxing Master would go through the bills. Mr. J. Morgan inquired if the Clerk could give a summary of what had transpired. The rate- payers should know what had been lost and what had been gained. Ald. W. N. Jones-We gained everything we asked for. Mr. D. G. Davies-I question that. He quite agreed with Mr. Morgan that a full account should be given. The Chairman observed that the opportunity for doing so would com,e again. It would take too long that night. Aid. W. N. Jones said it seemed to him very un- fair to ask the Clerk at a moment's notice to give the whole of the particulars. If it were desirable that a report should be given—he did not think that anybody wanted to hide anything from the ratepayers-it should be put on the agenda so as to give the Clerk time to get the information to- gether. The Clerk said he was prepared at any moment to give the information required. The earlier that information was given the better, he thought, be- cause very erroneous reports had been circulated. Mr. D. G. Davies-I quite agree with the Clerk that there are quite false reports given, but the question is on which side. The Chairman—We are not talking about sides now. We are all one in the Council. The Clerk said he had ordered some copies of the minutes of evidence for distribution amount the members. There could be no gainsaying those minutes. Mr. J. Morgan said so far as he was concerned he was pleased. It was understood that the Clerk would repo-t fully at the next meeting. RATES EXCUSALS. The list of rates excusals was for an amount ,r j682 17s. 5d.. and Mr. David Jones said it was very much higher than usual, but it included the arre--i for the last half-year as well. A grait of R,62 1fs. Id. had been received from the Soldiers and Sa 'ors' Fund. it was stated that eighty ratepayers with his Majesty's Forces had been excused. FIREMEN'S SPOILT CLOTHING. The Health Committee forwarded to the Finance Committee a detailed account of the 

Advertising

WHY WASTE MONEY, bJ ir an >b«nrdly hieh yio for cream stramtor ■ Has proved Itself to be eoual to others at doublo price. One Montb's 1ml Free. Awarded Silver Hedal E.A.S.K., 1900, biid the German Agricultural Society's Medal, 1911. Medal, 1911. THE HIGHEST^ A^TJLBDS aI; It It COARANTEED for 10 yesra, L JHP "nd to skini as clean, turn «aglcr, and be simpler to manage than many of the ijHH hitfcer-priced machines, &ud superior in every respect to the lowcr-priced onoe Sales over 120.CM la 4 Yean. P^ll I c Galls. Qc IJM I Capacity oL/W WOa IB 27S5S5- £ 5 Bu bo Capacity £ 9 7s. I M| R. j. FULLWOOD & BLAK3, 31 to 35 Beveoden Street. B 31 to 35 Beveoden Street. B LONDON. II.