Teitl Casgliad: Carmarthen journal and South Wales weekly advertiser

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 8 o 8
Full Screen
14 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
Progress of the War

Progress of the War. Friday. GOOD PROGRESS AT ST. MIHIEL. The Paris communique of yesterday afternoon was again chiefly concerned with the fighting between the Meuse »nd the Moselle. The French are Miking considerable efforts in this region, where the German dispositions seem particularly vulner- able, being a wedge driven into the country held by the Allies. The point of this wedge is at St. MiFnel on the Meuse. AH round this point French attacks, renewed day by day, have had constant success Further north, both west and east of the German lines, other attacks have had similar suc- cess:. Pane yesterday announced that all these gains have been held in spite of counter-attacks of extraordinary violence.. The German armed merhantman Prince Friedrich, which took refuge in the port of New- port News some time ago, has been interned by the United States administration. Saturday. THE ALLIES' OFFENSIVE. The French attacks on the German positions be- tween the Meuse and the Moselle and the Russian advance over the Carpathians constitute, says The Times" Military Correspondent, the opening the Allied offensive in the summer campaign of Sl5." The, must he considered ^not as isolated acts but as parts of a general plan. lhus co idered the opening ol^the the French attacks as night was very definite and defaced m its explana- tion of the progress made. Monday. FIGHTING IN THE WOEVRE. Paris amplified on Saturday and yesterday the m- formation as to the important ^'ance of French between the Meuse and Moselle furnisiiea ST FridS right, and added to it the news of further success in the same region. Les Eparges-the plateau dominating the plain of the Woevre, which was captured by the French on Thursdayt-had been turned by the enemy into ^S^^the^Fr^nch took Les Eparges the enemy, sa7s Paris has taken no action either with men 

WAR JOTTINGS j

WAR JOTTINGS The commission has been gazetted in the 12th Battalion Welsh Regiment of Temporary Captain C V. P. Morgan Griffiths (lieut. reserve of officers), from 10th Battalion, to be temporary capta-.n. Mr. Albert Lloyd Rees, of the 16th Regiment Lon- Mr. Albert Lloyd Rees, of the 16th Regiment Lon- don Welsh, the eldest son of the late Mr. John Rees, Y Fron, Llandovery, has been granted a com- mission as lieutenant. The Rev. D. A. Jenkins, vicar of Pembrey, has been appointed officiating clergyman to the Church of England troops at Pembrey. Mr. Jenkins was formerly chaplain to the Bishop of St. David's. Mr. Frank R. Smith, son of Mr. Thomas Smith, ex-head oontable of Carmarthen, has been granted a commission as seoond-lieutenant in the tloy^1 Field Artillery, under the command of Col. Paget, V "J at Portmadoc. Lieut. Smith, who was for- merly on the reportiAg staff of the CARMARTHEN J,OURNAL, joined the Royal Field Artillery as quarter-master-sergeant about three months ago. Mr. B. A. Lewis (manager of the Carmarthen Gas Co.- and Mrs. Lewis have four sons who have joined the Colours. They areMr. H. C. Lewis, 1st Lieutenant, 15th Battalion (Carmarthenshire) Welsh Army Corps; Mr. Alec Lewis, 2nd lieutenant, do.Mr. J. A. Lewis, corporal, Welsh Field Co., R.E.; C. Gwynne Lewis, in London to join Royal Naval Division training at Crystal Palace. Private W. H. Cheverton, of the 10th Battalion P.W.O., Wedt Yorks Regiment, eldest son of Mr. W. Cheverton. Highmead, Llanybyther, was home on Saturday on short leave previous to going to the front. He looked remarkably fit and well. He is stationed at Wareham. Scoutmaster F. G. Humphreys has received a letter from Lieut. Gray, R.F.A., thanking him in eulogistic terms on behalf of Col. Cartwright and the men of his brigade for the great services rendered by the Scouts during their stay in Carmarthen. The bugle band of the First Carmarthen Troop of B)7 Scouts escorted the 61st Brigade, R.F.A.. to St. Pete s Church on Sunday morning. The services at the church were conducted by the vicar, Rev. B. Parry Griffiths. The sermon was preached by the Rev. Canon Brown, chaplain to the National Re- serve.

KIDWELLY HBFEu

KIDWELLY HBFEu The good people of Water-street are deserving of the highest praise for their generous hospitality to the several parties of soldiers, who passed through the town during the past week. To watch them bringing out and handing round the welcome "cup that cheers, but not inebriates," with the equally welcome solid refreshments was a sight to gladden one's heart. The men greatly appreciated the kind- ness of the benefactors, who will be pleased to leari, that the officers are also sensible of the con- sideration shown their gallant charges. In the words of one of the commissioned officers, we say to the residents of Water-street—" Thank you very much." The Belgian Refugees' Committee met at the Town Hall on Monday evening, 12th inst., Mrs. H. E. Smart in the chair. A gift of 1 cwt. potatoes by Mr. Williams, Gletwyn Farm, was reported, and acknowledged with thanks. The treasurer, A'd. W. Wilkins, submitted his report. The weekly subscriptions were well maintained, and the funds were in a satisfactory condition. The amount re- ceived for last week included a cheque for JB2 from Dr. T. R. Griffiths. Reports re the prospects of Messieurs Sauvage and Brochard, who were seeking work as clerks in London, were received, and further enquiries were ordered to be made as to the conditions under which the former was em- ployed. It was also reported that Mr. Muller had secured work at Towy Castle, where Mr. Nizet had been engaged for some weeks. It was decided to advise the refugees at Glanymorfa to make their purchases at the shops of subscribers to the funds alternately. The mission, which is being conducted this week by the well-knwn evangelist, Rev. Seth Joshua, is meeting with a marked degree of success. The series of meetings opened on Saturday last when the missioner was welcomed by the ministers and officers of the local Free Churches at the Morfa C.M. Chapel. Sunday was devoted to mission ) meetings held in the morning at Capel Sul (Ind.), in the afternoon at Siloam (B.), and in the evening at Morfa (C.M.). There were large congregations at each service, and notably so at the evening ser- vice, when the commodious chayel was crowded. That tiie efforts of the Rev. Seth Joshua are meet- ing with tangible results is evidenced by the ier- vour which characterizes the meetings, and the num- ber of men nad women who have signified their in- tention of joining the Christian Churh. There is every reason for believing that one result 01 his visit will be a deepening of the spiritual life of the town and district. The wedding took place at Horeb (C.M.) Chapel, Mynyddygarreg, on Saturday last, of Miss Jenkins, Llwynybarcud, and Mr. John Beynon, son of Mr. W. Beynon, farmer, and a former town councillor. The Rev. D. Geler Owen (pastor) performed the ceremony, after which the bridal party adjourned to the bride's home to partake of the wedding breakfast. The death took place on Saturday last of Miss Mary Ann Williams, Alstred-street, aged 60 years. She was a. daughter of the late Mr. Henry Wil- liams, farmer, Lady-street, and was much respected. She was a member of, and regular attendant at, St. Mary's Parish Church, in the graveyard at- tached to which her mortal remains were laid to rest on Wednesday afternoon.

BURRY PORT AND PEMBREY NOTES

BURRY PORT AND PEMBREY NOTES The annual meeting of the Pembrey Parish Coun- cil was held at Trimsaran, when Mr. Hayton Wil- liams, solicitor, the newly-appointed clerk, was heartily received by the members, who expressed the hope that he would be able to promote many de- sirable improvements for which the district had long been yearning. A Ladies' Choir has been established in Burry Port, and another meeting of the members has been held. Mr. Wm. John, A.C., is more than satisfied with the combination of voices at his disposal. With a little training by such an able musician, Burry Port may again boast of having an excellent Ladies' Choir. The G.W.R. Station is daily crowded with soldiers, coming and going. Pembrey Common is a recog- nised training ground for long distance firing. The booming of the huge guns is heard day and night. There was exceptional heavy traffic at the railway station on Sunday. It is a credit to the station officials and staff for the way in which this arduous work is carried out daily, and Mr. R. J. Fortune, the popular stationmaster, and his staff, give every satisfaction to the Military Authorities. Mr. W. W. Brodie conducted an inquest at Pwll on Thursday in last week on the body of Robert Llew. Jones (the three-year-old son of Mr. Sidney Jones, Llwyncelyn, Pwll), who, while playing with three other children, was drowned on Easter Mon- day in a pond known as Pwllyquar. The jury re- turned a verdict of Accidental drowning," and recommended that the pond be filled up, because of its danger and for sanitary reasons. Burry Port and Pembrey in general will be proud to learn that the Rev. Philip Rogers, B.A., now of Bournemouth, the second son of the Rev. John Rogers, has accepted a unanimous call to Charles-street Chapel, Cardiff. Mr. Rogers will soon be a great figure in the spiritual life of the Welsh Metropolis. Not a day too soon has the police force been strengthened at Burry Port. Sergt. Mitchelmore has now an adequate staff to cope with any emer- 'n gency. Burry Port is now the centre of a large floating population in which are some undesirable elements. The ordinary monthly meeting of the Burry Port Urban District Council was held at Somerset House on Thursday in last week, Mr. F. J. Morgan, J.P., presiding. There were also present: Messrs. S. L. Gravelle (vice-chairman), Jas. McDowall, Dl. Davies, John Evans, John Davies, John Leyshon, Thos. Davies, and the officials. The joint isolation hospital scheme was considered. It transpired that the L.G.B. enquiry would be held at Llanelly on Friday (to-day). The Chairman said he would like to have the instructions of the Council as to the attitude they were going to take up at the enquiry. Assuming that the Rural Council intended backing out of the scheme, what were they as Council going to do?—Mr. John Davies: Force them to join if possible.—Mr. S. L. Gravelle: The L.G.B. cannot compel us to come into this scheme. In my opinion, it will be cheaper for us to make our own arrange- ments than to be one of three Councils in this joint scheme.—The Chairman: We have agreed to be one of three.—Mr. John Davies: If the Rural Council are withdrawing, we better do likewise. We cannot afford to be one of two Councils.—Mr. McDowall: When I was chairman of this Council, we asked Llanelly to allow us to join them. There was no mention of the Rural Council then. If Burry Port now backed out of it, they would have their own letter staring them in the face.—Mr. Daniel Davies: This is a big thing, and it will be on our shoulders for ever. We must be very careful what we do.- Mr. S. L. Gravelle: It would be far cheaper for us not to take part in this scheme.—It was decided that the Burry Port representatives should state at the enquiry that- they were not authorised to go further into the matter without instructions from the Council.—A letter was read from Mr. Phillips, postmaster of Llanelly, asking if the Council would r agree to the suspension of the delivery of letters on- Tuesday evenings, so that the postal staff should have a weekly half-holiday.—Mr. D. Davies: If we decided in favour of Mr. Phillips' application, any business man can have his letters by calling for them, and I do not see why we should be different to Llanelly and other towns.—Mr. Dl. Davies: No doubt some people would be very anxious to get their letters on Tuesdays—perhaps they might con- tain "big" cheques, or perhaps they would be love- letters (laughter).—It was decided to reply to Mr. Phillips that the Council offered no objection to the proposal. It was decided, upon the recommenda- tion of the Finance Committee, that a war bonus be paid to the employees.—It is understood that the drastic action of the Military Authorities in declar- ing the place "out of bounds" for the troops now camping in the district has been taken on account of a case of scarlet fever having been reported in the town.—The Chairman said it was a very seri- ous hardship on the tradesmen that the soldiers were not allowed to come into the urban district. It was a great shame that the idea should be en- couraged, that Burry Port was a fever stricken place. Mr. Dl. Davies: Who is the man responsible for this? We should protest,—The Clerk was in- structed to communicate with the authorities.

NANTGAREDIG

NANTGAREDIG On Easter Monday, a gloom was cast over the neighbourhood by the news of the sudden death of Mr. Evans, coachman, Glancothi Lodge. He was on his way to Nantgaredig station, and when near Y stradwrallt, was noticed to fall, and almost before aid had reached him he had passed away. An in- quest was held on Wednesday, when a verdict of "Death from heart disease" was passed. On Thurs- day morning a funeral service was held at Siloam Chapel (where deceased was a faithful member), and his mortal remains were then conveyed to Mydrim, where members of his family repose. Several wishing to show their respect, accompanied the hearse all the way. His pastor, the Rev. Cur- wen Davies, officiated. There were many wreaths from the family and friends, among them being one from Lieut.-Gen. Sir James Hills-Johnes, V.C., G.C.B., and Lady Hills-Johnes; Colonel and Mrs. Gwynne-Hughes; and the Glancothi staff. Almost the whole of his long and faithful services had been spent in the employ of two masters, one being the late Mr. Powell, Maesgwyn (Liberal M.P. for the county), and the other (29 years) Col. W. Gwynne- Hughes, Glancothi. Seldom a Sunday passed with- out his attending his chapel and Sunday School, and it may be said of him, that his religion was of the practical order. He leaves a widow and two grown-up sons (both of whom joined the colours on the outbreak of the war), and a younger son and daughter, the latter (Llinos Cothi) being a well- known singer. Great sympathy is felt with Mrs. Evans and family.

ST CLEARS NOTES

ST. CLEARS NOTES In the report of the Capel Mair concert held on Easter Monday, one important and interesting item was omitted. Lady Djnevor addressed the Belgian guests of the town, in French, expressing her deep sympathy with them over the harsii treatment of Belgium by the Germans, and hoping that they would soon be able to return to cheir own country. The few words of her ladyship were highly appio- ciateu by the Belgians present, and evoked sym- pathetic cheers from the audience. The last meeting- of the Town Trust was held on Thursday evening, April 6th, in the Town Hall, under the chairmanship of Mr. S. J. Evans. Evidently the labour of the last five years had quite exhausted the energies of the members, for out of the nine members of the Trust only four, a bare quorum, put in an appearance to wind up the duties of the "local parliament." In addition to the chairman there were present the Rev. D. C. Davies, Messrs. James Phillips, C.C., and M. W. Jenkins, with the clerk, Mr. D. C. Evans. The Rev. D. C. Davies spoke strongly on recent comments made in the local press on the Town Trust doings. He objected to any members of the public being pre- sent at their deliberations. The Town Trust was a private charity, and so the public had no right to be present. This seems a very strange pronouncement, seeing that five members of the Trust are elected by the ratepayers every five years. How are the rate- payers to know, if not through the local press, how their representatives are carrying out their trust? If everything is carried out above board, why hide the sayings and doings of the Trust from the public? All business was postponed for the new body to tackle. As the term of office of the present five representatives expires on April 23rd, no publio meeting for the election of new representatives can take place until after that date. It will be fixed by the clerk, Mr. D. C. Evans, who is the sole autho- rity until the new body assumes office. OIL Monday evening in the National School a very enthusiastio committee meeting was held to promote a variety entertainment for the purpose of raising funds for the Serbian Distress Fund and the Societies for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children and Animals. There were present Mrs. R. H. Harries. The Croft; Mrs. J. M. James, The Vicar- age; Mrs. M. W. Jenkins. The Pharmacy; Mrs. Ben Salmon, Llaindelyn; Mies Williams, Brynawel; and Miss Lewis, Troedybryn. Mr. Lyons acted as secre- tary. It was decided to hold a variety entertainment with tea, farmer's and fancy stalls, on April 28th, in the Gwalia Hall. The objects are worthy of every support. The friends of Mrs. Dedoucker, the Belgian guest of Capel Mair, will be pleased to hear that Mr. Dedoucker in safe and at liberty in Brussels. Some weeks ago Mr. Dedoucker went over to Holland to try and make arrangements to secure his property in Brussels, where he had a very flourishing chemist's business. He failed to do anything, and was on his way back to this country from Holland, when the ship he was in was captured by a German submarine and taken to Zeebrugge. It was feared he and the other Belgians and British aboard were sent to Germany as prisoner! but within the last few days Mrs. Dedoucker heard from some friends in Brussels that her husband was free and in that town. Whether he will be allowed to leave the oonntry is a very moot point, but at any rate his friends in St. Clears and his family will be happy to know he ig not suffering the rigoars of imprisonment in Germany. During the past week a very familiar personage in St. Clears has left the town. We refer to Inspector Henry Evans, who has retired from the police force on a very well-earned pension. Inspector Evans was the oldest member of the Carmarthenshire Constabulary, having served for nearly 45 years, of which 19 were spent as inspector in St. Clears. All wish Inspector Evans a happy time in his well- earned retirement in Bishop Court Villa, just out- side of St. Clears, where ho has gone to reside with his daughter, Miss Maggie! Evans.

LLANSTEPHAN NOTES

LLANSTEPHAN NOTES Three lady refugees arrived at The Plas on Wednesday in last week, being the mother and sisters of Madame Fret, already resident here since last December. Their home was at Antwerp, but for the last six months they stayed in Holland, from which country they arrived in London last week. The joy of once again embracing and greeting each other was very affecting, and their happiness a far as is possible under the circumstances, is now com- plete The mother is Madame Van Limbergen, and the daughters Miles. Celline and Alice Van Lim- bergen. Some people are inclined to look upon the present existence of these helpless refugees as something to be envied. It is a narrow and obtuse view on the pa--t of anyone who can see anything luxurious in their experience. Some of them had to travel on foot, laden with as much personal belongings as they could carry, a distance of forty-eight miles in two days, with their children, ranging from four to twelve years of age, wearily trudging along after them. They had to contend with a night's rest in the open air, with nothing but the star-lit heavens for a shelter, and at the end of the journey they were glad to accept the dry crust and glass of water from the hand of the friendly soldiers who were only too ready to give their all to the unfortunate victims of barbarous enemies. Fortunately, no in- habitant of this neighbourhood can count suoh ex- periences to his credit, however much he may make believe that he is suffering more than these helpless fellow-beings. The bounden duty of every profess- ing Christian is to succour our unfortunate guests. A most suitable and efficient gentleman has been recommended as a local recruiting agent in the person of Mr. J. C. W. Bruce (late L.F.B.), whoso connection with the service and knowledge of the exact requirements of both land and sea' forces, make his prospective appointment most appropriate, —the right man in the right place—energetic and ta-ctful. The appointment will soon justify the re- commendation. The new military order reducing the lighting on the sea coast has been anticipated here. The public lamps have already been safely stored, and though the past few nights have been abysmally dark, the inconvenience has to be borne ungrudg- ingly by all true patriots. Better darkness than the presence of the Germans though some persons cowardly boast they would welcome them. It is full time that all philosophers declaring this view should be rigidly interned, or packed carriage forward to Berlin, whose tyranny tney so traitorously aid and abet. An old soldier who belonged to the Volunteers forty years ago, states that after a hard day's sham fight at Dynevor Park he was regaled with BBB- bread, beef and beer. If prohibition comes it will be a drop of Nantjack," with a dash of Pwll-y- cawsau." ———

PENCADER

PENCADER AFTERMATH OF EISTFDDFOD.-Tliere seems to be a ,good deal of bad feeling shown by certain mem- bers of the "Married" Ladies' Choir and their supporters, who do not seem to have taken their defeat at the eisteddfod on Easter Monday in the proper spirit. This is very bad form on the part of those who should know better, but evidently they are so accusfbmed to ordering "poor hubby" about, that they wish to extend their dominion and dictate to the adjudicator. It is useless having an adjudicator if the competitors are not prepared to abide by his decision. RF.KEABSAL.—A rehearsal for the annual c'g-ym. manfa ganu," to be held at Alltywalis on Whit- Monday, under the auspices of the local Congrega. til, was held at Canel Nonnni on Sundav last. Mr. Tom Thomas. L.V.C.M.. Pencader, was the conductor, and the singing certainlv showed that he had. spared lie, effort to secure a high standard of efficiency.

LLANYBRI

LLANYBRI On Wednesday in last week the death of Mrs. Jane Lewis, wife of Mr. John Lewis, Cwmllanwybr, t6ok place after many months of suffering, patiently borne. Deceased was a native of the village, being a descendant of one of the. oldest families' in the district, in which -she had spent the whole of her seventy-four year-. The interment took place at Cupel Newvdd graveyard on Saturday afternoon. The chief mourners were Mr. John Lewis (husband* and Miss Catherine Rees (niece).

EASTER VESTRIES

EASTER VESTRIES ST. PETER'S (CARMARTHEN). The annual vestry in connection with St. Peter s, Carmarthen, was held on Thursday evening, the vicar, the Rev. B. Parry Griffiths, presiding. The Vicar, in his statement, said the year through which they had passed would always be memorable in the history oi our country, both as regards the Church and State. It had witnessed the outbreak of a war, the most terrible and far-reaching in the history of the world. The issues might yet be far from decision, but they were all looking forward with much confidence to the result, whenever that might be. The spirit and self-sacrifice which tne war had called forth on every hand was bound to re- act beneficially upon the nation at large. An un- interrupted peace within our shores for some one hundred years had lulled us all to a sense of false security from which we were not aroused a moment too soon. He did not believe that the average Britisher had any conception of the cunning and sustained and consistent preparation that had been carried out on the Continent for the subjugation of our beloved country. The year would be equally memorable as regards the Church. The middle of a European war was regarded as a proper moment in which to force through Parliament an Act to d;ses- tablish the four most ancient dioceses in the Pro- vince- of Canterbury, and confiscate to secular uses their ancient endowments, regardless of the fact that those endowments were already far too small to cope with the great work the Church had to do. The Postponement Bill was designed to mitigate somewhat the injury caused by that Act, but even that tardy mea.sure of partial readiness had been bitterly opposed by the Welsh members, much, he thought, to the regret, not only of Churchmen, but tens of thousands of conscientious Nonconformists throughout the length and breadth of the land. it would really seem almost inoredible that such oppo- sition could be even proposed in a Christian country, and if those who opposed this minor act of justice towards the Church thought they were doing them- selves any good by their opposition, he for one thought they must indeed be very much greatly mistaken. At the last vestry he referred to the fact that No. 1, Nott's-square, had been purchased as a Church House for JE700, and that something like half the amount of the purchase money had been raised in subscriptions. He was pleased to be able to an- nounce that since then over £300 had been added to the fund. No sooner had the work been taken in hand than the war broke out, and it was impossible to raise any further sums, and the work of proceed- ing with the Church House was practically at a standstill. By happy inspiration he went up to Liverpool about three weeks ago to interview the trustees of the late Sir Alfred Jones (a native of Carmarthen), and he was delighted to announce that after a great deal of hard pleading he had received a promise of 21,000 towards the building of the Church House (applause). He wished to express cordial thanks to the vestry for the Easter offering to him. In spite of the heavy calls entailed by the war, the amount was £ 17, a little over £ 1 more than last year. Although he could make much excellent personal use of it, he felt constrained this year again to hand over the money to the Church House fund (applause). Reviewing the year, he said it had been one of the very encouraging progress. The number of Easter communicant, was considerably over 800 and considering that some 200 of their men-many of whom were communicants last year-were with the colours, he thought it could be regarded as encouraging. They had been handicapped during the past year through a vacancy on the staff owing to the promotion of the Rev. Aldred Williams to the living of Golden Grove. Repeated advertisemente had not elicited any applications from men exactly suited to that parish. He was afraid that they would have to face the question of a higher stipend, and that it was of no use offering less than JBlM per annum. He wished to thank the congregation fpr their welcome to the large number of soldiers who attended the church every Sunday and for the readi- ness with which they had given up their seats. Alderman Walter Spurrell moved a resolution calling upon the Government to pass the Welsh Claurch Act Postponement Bill inasmuoh as the Welsh Church Act was put on the Statute Book in direct violation of the solemn promise made by the Prime Minister on July 30th that the business they would take would not 'be of a controversial character." Mr. Spurrell said that when the Suspen- sory Bill was suggested, the object to postpone all matters connected with the Home Rule and Welsh Church Acts until after the war. When the ,iill was laid before the House and passed, it was found that whereas the Home Rule Act was held up as sug- gested, the same thing did not apply to the Welsh urch Act. It was true that in accordance with the Suspensory Act the disestablishment of the Welsh Church was delayed until the war was over, but such was not the case as far as the disendow- ment was concerned. That was done by means of a trick. Disendowment was being made operative and 1('n Commissioners appointed were drawing their salaries and had been engaged for some time in dismember- ing the Church contrary to the pledge of Mr. Asquith. They had done this in the absence of a large number of the Church supporters in the House of Commons who were with the colours. Out of 250 Unionist members, about 150 had joined the Army and out of 350 Radicals no more than 45 had the patriotism to do The same. The one, thing the Radicals wanted was to secure that disestablishment and disendowment would become an accomplished fact in Wales before the next general election. One thing they feared was—and there was good ground for their fear-that the people should have -in opportunity of expressing their views upon the matter. The border parishes between England and Walr.s had decided by a proportion of two and a half to one against, going under the provisions of the Welsh Church Act, nnd there was every reason to believe- that if the test were applied to Wales, they would get the same result. Masses of the ncople did not wnnt the Church to be destroyed. The Welsh members were now charging Churchmen with intro- ducing contentious matter but the boot was on the other foot. The contentious matter was the unjust distinction made in the Suspensory Bill between the Irish and Welsh Acts contrary to the pledge of the Prime Minister. Mr. D. J. Lloyd, in seconding, said he was a Radical, but the Church question had disassociated him entirely from the Radical party. He had voted against Mr. Llewelyn Williams and would do so again. He really abhorred both disestablishment and disendowment, and had no hesitation in spying that if the people of Wales were given a ohane.. to express their views on the question like the border parishes, the majority of Wales would be on the side of the Church. The resolution was carried unanimously. Mr. J. B. Arthur submitted the churchwarden's accounts, which showed that the offertories for the year amounted to £ 337 10s. 5d., as against 2330 18s. the previous year. Alderman Walter Spurrell was re-elected vicar's warden and Alderman J. B. Arthur people's warden. Messrs. C. Nash Phillips and F. G. Humphreys were re-elected auditors for tho Churchwarden's accounts. ST. DAVID'S (CARMARTHEN). The St. David § Easter vestry was held on Monday night, the vicar, Rev. Griffith Thomas, presiding. The churchwarden's accounts .for St. David's showed an adverse balance for the year of JMO Os. 9d. Dealing with this defioiency, the Vicar said he was very sorry to find that the collections at St. David's would not meet their expense by at least JMO per year.. The collections were not large enough to meet the expenses which were by no means heavy, and he had urged the matter upon the congregation on more than one occasion. On one Sunday they only received 16s., and he had said some things which he did not like to say; that was that they gave much more to keep one soldier per week than they were giving towards the maintenance of the whole of that huge building. It was evident that they could not leave things go on as they were, and it was decided that a meeting should be called to put the matter strongly before the congregation. The Vicar referred to a valuable gift to Christ Church of three stained glass windows by Mr. Morgan Grif- fiths. These. windows he said, would be a credit, not only to Christ Church, but to the county, as they were being made by the finest makers in the kingdom. Mr. Dd. Rees was re-elected vicar's warden for St. David's, and Mr. Dd. Harries. PPremain-street, was appointed people's warden. The following were annointed s'desmen:—Messrs. Thomas Wil- liams, Cemetery Lodge: E. Jones. Emporium; Richard Oliver, Trevaughan; Dd. Phillips, Tre- vaughan, and John Daniel. Choir sidesmen: Messrs. Charlie Davies and John Evans, Johnstown. The Vicar re-elected Messrs. Morgan Griffiths and Howell Davies churchwardens for Christ Churcn. The sidesmen appointed were Messrs. Dd. Davies, D. H. Thomas, W. H. Evans, W. J. Evans, and B. A. Lewis; choir sidesman, Mr. A. J. Evans. Mr. G. E. Bushell was re-elected warden of St. Barnabas. Mr. Bushell's report for St. Barnabas showed a balance in hand of over -65. On the motion of the Vicar, a hearty vote of thanks was accorded to Mr. Harry Davies for his generosity in executing a beautiful reredos at St. David's. On the motion of Mr. E. Colby Evans, a resolu- tion was unanimously passed urging the Govern- ment to pass without delay the Welsh Church Act Postponement, Bill in order to eliminate some of the injustices of the Suspensory Act. KIDWELLY. The annual vestry meeting was held in the Parish Room on Thursday evening, the 8th inst. The Rev. D. Ambrose Jones, M.A., vicar, presided, and re- ferred to the position of the Church under the Welsh Church Act, which was at the present moment in operation. He stated that in the event of a change in the incumbency the parish would be deprived of the endowments, which would be trans- ferred to the parish to which the outgoing incum- bent would be preferred during his life-time. Pro- gress in church matters could not be measured arithmetically. It was something which figures could not estimate. He pleaded for more generous financial support for the various parochial organiza- tions, and more especially for the Curate's Fund. In the period of transition it was most important that the churchwardens should be men of experi- ence, well equipped to deal with the serious matters which would engage their attention. Mr. D. O. Jones proposed the re-election of Mr. H. E. Smart -who was possessed of all the qualifications re- ferred to by the Vicar—as churchwarden. Mr. W. D. James seconded, and the proposition was carried unanimously. The Vicar, in re-appointing Mr. W. Jones, Heolfawr, as his warden, expressed appreci- ation of the services which Mr. Jones, in conjunc- tion with Mr. Smart, had rendered him since his advent to the parish. The church accounts pre- sented by the Vicar's warden, showed a falling off in the collections as compared with last year. There was an adverse balance of 210. The ac- counts were passed, and Messrs. W. D. James and D. O. Jones were appointed auditors. The list of sidesmen was revised, the names of those do had died or left the parish being removed. The re- mainder were re-elected, and the names of Mr. T. R. Wild and Mr. D. J. Hughes added to the list. The Vicar returned thanks for the Easter offering presented him by the parishioners. LAMPETER. The annual Easter vestry was held at the Churoh Hall on Monday evening in last week, when the Rev. Canon Camber-Williams, vicar, presided. The chairman having read the notice convening the meeting, Mr. D. F. Lloyd, solicitor, read the minutes of the previous vestry, which were parsed and eigned I-).v, the chairman. On the proposition of Mr. W. Lewis, Arfryn, seconded by Mr. Evan Evans, Col- lege-street. Mr. J. S. Parry, Glyn. was appointed vestry clerk.-Me chairman made some remarks on the way in which the Government had broken its pledge in connection with the Disestablishment Bill, and referred to the 6traits in which the Church would be placed if the Bill as at present should become law. He also expressed his pleasure at the fucoess of the collections in aid of the Dioceean Fund in the parish, and the satisfactory way in wfiioh the services were carried on during Holy week and Easter Day.—Mr. Tom Jonfe, Ivydene, was re-elected parishioners' warden, and the vicar appointed Mr. Daniel Jenkins, College-street, as his warden.—Mr. Tom Jones read the balance-sheet for the year, which showed a balance on the right side of £86 6! 3d. The balance-sheet was adopted subject to audit.—The vioar very kindly, as usual, handed over a substantial sum to the ohurchwardens' fund, which had been received as churchyard fees, and a cordial vote of thanks was aocorded him for his eencrosity. On the proposition of Mr. Walter Davies, seconded by Mr. W. Jones, votee of thanko were accorded the churchwardens and the auditors (Messrs. W. Lewis and D. Jones) who were re- elected. The votes of thanks having been acknow- ledged by Messrs. T. Jones and W. Lewie, a dis- cussion took place regarding the repair of dilapidated tombstones, and it was decided to write to the rela- tivee on the subject. LLANARTH. The vestry meeting was held on Thursday evening of last week. The Rev. J. D. Lewis, vicar, pre- sided. Mr. D. P. Rees and Mr. E. Jones were re- elected vicar's warden and people's warden respec- tively. Mr. Watkin Davies and Mr. E. Evans were re-appointed sidesmen and the members of the Church Council were also re-elected. GOLDEN GROVE. The annual Easter vestry was held in the School- room on Friday evening, the 9th inst., the vicar (Rev. Aldred Williams) presiding. The annual statement of accounts showed that there was a satis- factory balance in hand. The Vicar appointed Major the Hon. R. A. Campbell as his warden and Mr. W. Fisher was re-appointed people's warden. The following sidesmen were appointed:—Messrs. D. Watkins, T. Rees, E. Bellamy, David Jones. J. S. Lewis. and J. Griffiths. The parochial lay repre 8entatives appointed were:—Messrs. J. Hobbs, J. Samuel and D. Morris. The members of the paro- chial Church Council were re-appointed. Mr. T. Rees, Carmel Post Office, presented a statement of accounts from the Church Hall, which gave entire satisfaction. LLANDEBIE. Last Friday evening the vestry was held in the National School. The Vicar (Rev. D. W. Thomas, M.A.) presided. The churchwardens presented their balance sheet duly audited, which showed that the financial position was in a very satisfactory condi- tion. The Vicar re-appointed Mr. A. E. DuBuisson, J.P., Glynhir, as his warden, and Capt. J. Jones, Gwarnant, was re-elected people's warden. The fol- lowing were appointed sidesmen:—Messrs. Daniel Rees. Edward Morgan. Fred M. Jones, H. Noyes, Daniel Harris, Wm. Lewis, David Pugh, David John. Thomas B. Davies, H. Tanner, David Lewis Thomas, John Lewis, John Roberts. and Theo Harris. The district wardens were re-elected and Messrs. A. Noyes, Tom Rees and Tom Thomas were appointed auditors for the ensuing year. Owing to great pressure on our space we have been compelled to hold over a number of reports of Easter vestries tilt. next week.

LLANDYSSUL

LLANDYSSUL MARRIAGE.—On Saturday, the 3rd instant, the marriage was solemnized at Seion Congregational Chapel of Private T. Pal Jones, of Llandyssul (now of the Royal Engineers;, and Miss Maggie Thomas, the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John Thomas, of The Arcade, Ammanford. The bride was given away by her uncle, Mr. Ebenezer Thomas, of Pantolwen Mills, Llandyssul, whilst Mr. O. C. Harries, iron- monger, acted as best man. The nuptial knot was tied by the Rev. Ben Davies, pastor. The young couple are well-known and popular in the locality. PEBSONAL.—The many friends of Mr. George Evans, Plasbach, Llandyssul, will rejoice to hear that he has successfully passed the final examination of the Pharmaceutical Society. Mr. Evans was apprenticed to Mr. Joshua Evans, chemist, of this town, and is an old pupil of Llandyssul County School. SPECIAL CONBTABULARY.-It is very pleasing to not 3 that the local squad under P.C. Young has done exceedingly well in the matter of supplying recruits. Out of a body not exceeding eighty, 36 have already joined the Colours. Bravo, special constaibles.

LLANDILO

LLANDILO The "B" çompany Reserve Pembroke Yeo- manry, who for weeks past have been stationed on the premises of the Llandilo Town Mart, were on Monday last transferred to Carmarthen for the en- suing fortnight. The "A" Company on the same day filled their place at Llandilo, where, we under- stand, better facilities are afforded for general train- ing purposes. The" B" Squadron were escorted for some distance by the band of the Reserve 4th Welsh, who also returned to town with the "A" Squadron. j I FISHING.-Although the water in The river last week wa§ everything that could be desired, the baskets obtained were rather disappointing. The wielders of the rod and line, however, were Ilot dls- posed to attribute the bad luck to any fault of their own, but as usual blamed the weather or believed that there must have been snow in the river. One disciple of Izaak Walton was successful in basketing two salmon and we have it on his own authority thilt they were beautiful clean fish. There is no oubt that the Towy and its tributaries are weH stocked with fish, and given suitable weather and water, good baskets should be procured in the near future. WEDDiXGS.~At_rhe Registry Office this week, Mr. Davies, Gorse ilia, Crosshands, was married to Miss Jane Davies. Tyrbach. Llandilo; and at Taber- nacle^Chapel. Ffairfach, Dd. Davies, Angel Cottage, Lkndebie, to Elizabeth Francis, Towy-terrace, Llan- tlJw MR. RICHARD EVANS.-The remains of the late Mr. Richard Evans (saddler), 34, Rhosmaen- street, Llandilo, were laid to rest on Thursday last Chnn^ K6'Pi of, interment being Tabernacle ^nP;' bu"al ^omid. The large attendance at the fiineral bore testimony of .the high esteem in winch deceased was held in the town and district. AT aVie*' pastor- officiated. Amongst dare T Tf"' ^rS' Ab,r- o' jVV rr 4116^ D" M" Evan9> Swan- p"' Ev.aris> G«Wen Key, Llandilo; W. Llovd Evans London; A. Evans, Llandilo; B. E S-r T 6ll-y! ETans' Llandilo; and H. O Evans, Tonypandy (sons): Mr. W. J. Wilkins Llan- Mr Bertie FW)' DudIey.Evans- Aberdare, and B R Fr'n, A3"9' 7anwa fejandsons); Councillor T i.n Wk Ammanford (r^ephew); Mr. Dd. Evans nr?,y u(nfp wl '• Mr- Tom Evan9- Lampeter (nephew)-, Messrs. Phillip Jones. J.P.. Cilfynydd "ra)g (brother-in-law1: Messrs' Dd. Francis Morgan and Dd. Morgan Mom Ad FlorS°tPhh7K and Th°maS Thomas: Bri^- The d^Jh! e £ were sent by the following Mrs T H Pv home: sons at home; Mr. and fnd MreHWETw ikr- Mrf," D" M" E—• Mr. O Evans- u L,»n<>Hy; Mr. and Mrs .J at Swansea and from Abe^are> grand children were th,^ de^seJwmempI°^e9- The bearers Sans, W. J. Thomas, Dd DavieTV mM Colour-Sergeant T. Davies. BaileT> and CoIfC1ŒT.-A conefrt in connection with the -Soldiers' Club wts li,-Id on Friday -veninQ- at the that took T>St3w Mt,prr8,Vlin?- All the artistes porLf YeoPmanrTr9 S °f Tnv Crawford. X usuaW^0™ Lieut" on Sundav evening +L k^ concert was also held Mervvn pi? Jf ^\°Hair occupied by Mr. w '-s crowded Th t it pI!ev,OUs occasions the hall w; Th° lowing took part:—Mrs. Hugh Williams. Miss MaurJ H-;ir i. "UM' Mr. D. J. "ft" IW* Bowpn. Mrs. DanieU' TJjk'stor. Mr..T. thr> aooompanists. xioPk]na were bar 86thSyci?eoMMre R°>| PU<¥ on Saturday, in ■- « -S irsi «ras fron? tini* •" the unsiVhtlr and WI M J. these columns oi iron yet been effected. Recentlv '» ° jmpro^ment has finger severely cut t},™ u ■ had her a splinter with MS FT3&S? dz SS# It more modern and PlOturque- tubing similar tQ ginally, Bridge-strit .as™ a Wel^STthe °t bridge ma^yeaS °f the"^ s^etneCeUnd^ttei fPS a? principal entrance to thn 'Appearance of the Hon- immodiaX will be °L w. 7/"™ ,rb"nd wiS Horn I Zt f rehred about wA ^?turdav" About 2.30 a.m. Sunday he heard her fir nff "TT if f°W minute* afterwards he? W ji'S* T °Ut °f W and ,d,„ n at the bottom of the stairs. His TW 1 nr "ave. ,0T'dencG to the same effect. Dr LJoyd Ow('n said the deceased was It woman of fairly good health. Death was due to injury to the cerebro spinal central, caused by the fall The jury returned a verdict of "Accidental death'' of M W,'th r,e?r0t that many friends of Mr. John Davies (plumber). Bridge-street Llan- d-Io. learnt of his death on Tuesday last about'1 a.m. The deceased, who was in his 69th year, was well known m Llandilo and district and had been in the plumbing business for nearly 40 years. He was a man of fine physique and was for many years a member of the old local volunteer corps. During the last three or four years he suffered at frequent intervals from attacks of bronchitis. He was an exceptionally good craftsman, and was employed by some of the leading gentry, not only in Carmarthen- shne, but also in Cardiganshire and Pembrokeshire. He was a Churchman and a staunch Conservative. He is survived by a widow and four grown-up ehilrjen (two sons and two daughters), with whom the deepest sympathy is felt.

LLAKYBYTHER

LLAKYBYTHER CONCEBT.—A grand concert, organised by the Llanybyther Men's Institute. was held in the organ hail Highmead, on Wednesday, April 7th, the pro- ceeds of which were .given to the Red Cross Society. The president was Colonel H. Davies-Evans, Lord- lieutenant of Cardiganshire. The President opened the proceedings by giving a short account of the foundation and work of the Red Cross Society. H<* hoped that there would be a handsome surplus Jo „ after paying the expenses to .send to head- quarters to further the society's good worK.—The artistes gave the audience a real musical treat Madame Thomas, the Llanelly soprano, sang with vi vr ^aa aS popular 39 c'ver with the audience, while Miss Bronwen Williams (a National Eisteddfod winner) showed she possessed a voice of rare quality. Mr. David Hughes, the famous bass. seemed to have lost none of his singing powers, and was great in his favourite song, "I'm a Roamer." Mr. John Thomas was possibly at his best when he gave a delightful rendering of the song. « Babylon The committee is to be congratulated on the eelec- t.on of these four vocalists, each of whom waa enthusiasticany encored. Miss Dora Jones, R.A.M. ITvof 7f ? J7- de9Crved encore she was oe- r in, J interest was added to the con- 7 rsfc appearance locally of Miss Bettv llhama (A.R.C.M. and double diplomatist of the Royal Conservatorium, Leipsig). who until the out- break of war last August was a student in Germany. She gave an exquisite rendering on the piano of Chopin's impromptu Fantasie." and won the further applause and enoore of the audience for her charming playing of the 'cello. Mr. A. V. Edwards (Mus. Bac., F.R.C.O.)* added greatly to the enjoy- ment of the evening: by his clever playing of the organ. Mr T. S. P. Morgan, C.M., Lland^Ul. did his work well as accompanist, and was ably assisted bv Mr. Edwards. At the conclusion Mr. D. E. Phillips. Lloyds Bank. proposed a hearty vote of thanks to Colonel and Mrs. DarieLs-Evans for their kindness in giving the full use of the hall, and +his was seconded by Dr. E. Cambria Thomas. The evening was a jrre.it success, and the secretary. Mr. r>. Morgan Williams, and the treasurer Mr J J Davies M.P.,S., are to be congratulated on the completeness of their organisation. It was as the president said. the best concert he had attended in is part of the country. A lengthy programme was gone through.

No title

The annual Te-ifv Side Horse Show. to be held on Friday, the 30th of this month, promises to be well up to the high standard of pre- vious exhibitions held at Newcastle-Emlyn, and there is every prospect of its being attended with its usual success. Printed and Published for the Proprietors by LEWIS toES at the "Carmarthen Journal" Printing Works, 8, King Street, Carmarthen.