Teitl Casgliad: Carmarthen journal and South Wales weekly advertiser

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 3 o 8 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
15 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
Advertising

SPARATOR. A t"(1\-1 A TIC LUBRICATION to ¡';YERY BEAIUKG easy tui-itiug, silent working, long wear and cheap repairs. IT PAYS to use the ALFA LA VAL" instüd of llwclrines of othcr mal-es, for which liberal ter.ma are given in part I AWARDED 1,000 FIRST PRIZES. Fixed in any Dairy )n One Mouth's Free Tri3l, AGENTS— W. THOMAS & SON, Hall Street, Carmarthen. T. M. WILLIAMS, Ironmonger, Llandilo.

AGRICULTURAL HITES

AGRICULTURAL HITES [By A PRACTICAL FARMER.] WHEN DEAREST IS NOT BEST. When profits are higher there is always a tendency for waste to increase, and some forms of waste are exceedingly hard to prevent. There are however, wavs of wasting money winch are easily avoide i One of these is in the purchase of fertilisers. Of course, some backward farmers waste money, time, and labour through not using enough fertilisers. On the other hand, very enterprising men may lose money through using the manure that Joes not happen to give the best results for its cost. I find an interesting demonstration of this point in a point on experiments just issued by the feomerset County Council. In connection with some tests in manuring swedes, an opportunity was taken to test the results, according to cost, cf different kinds of phosphatic manures. The dressings of these manures tried were 5cwt. of superphosphates; 5cwt. of pure dissolved bones; 3c\vt. of superphosphate and 2cwt. bone meal, and 3cwt. of superphosphate and 2cwt. of fish meal, ine results of the use of these -dressings on the average ot fire farms are interesting, for they are nearly all the same. The lowest yield was 20 tons 6cwt. per acre given by the steamed bone flour, and the highest 21 tons 6cwt. given by the super and bone meal, the others all being between these two figures. When potash at the rate of lcwt. of sulphate of potash per acre was added to each of the above dress- ings the positions were somewhat altered, the smallest crop, 20 tons 12cwt. per acre, being given by the super and bone meal. and the largest by the 5cwt. of super. 23 tons 5cwt. per acre. It is noteworthy that in each case the most profitable dressing on the average of the five farms has been the 5cwt. of super per acre, for it has not only .given quite satisfactory results, but it has cost less. There has been little or no additional benefit to the crop from the use of the more costly bone manures. Thus, in this case, at any rate, the dearest docs not happen to the best. WASTING GOOD FERTILISERS. This question of economy in manuring may be taken a stage further. Just as there is waste in using a high-priced fertiliser that gives no better results than a cheaper one, so there is waste in using on any soil fixed quantities of certain fertilisers just because those quantities have proved to give good results somewhere else. It is just as true, and perhaps even truer, to say that what is one soil's food is another soil's poison as it is to say that what is one man's food is another man's poison. If a farmer wishes—as all must wish—to get the best value for the money he spends on fertilisers he must go to the trouble of finding out by all means in his power the special requirements of his own land as regards the three principal manurial substances. It even happens frequently that these requirements differ on various parts of the same farm. There is no better way of finding out these requirements than by making tests on small marked plots, using measured quantities of different manures, and care- fully watching and recording the results. As a good illustration of what I mean there are :n the report I have already referred to records of some ordinary manuring tests with grass and mangels on different farms. These records show that on two or three of the farms the use of 421b. of sulphate of potash per acre gives large and profitable results; yet it is shown that on others it does nothing, or practi cally nothing. Superphosphate on some farms does well; on others the results are small, either because the soil is already sufficiently well supplied with phosphates, or else because the lack oi other ferti- lisers makes it quite impossible for the plant to do justice to the added food. It is also shown on some of the farms that unles they arc accompanied by phosphates, or phosphates and potash together, very little result may be pro- duced by fairly liberal dressings of nitrate of soda and sulphate of ammonia, and as the benefit of these nitrogen fertilisers does not last, being speedily washed away by the rain. the money spent on them may be almost entirely wasted. WEEDS AND PURE SEEDS. A remarkable record of good work is detailed in a report just issued by the Irish Department of Agri- culture. I refer especially to the proceedings under the Weeds and Agricultural Seeds Act. It is stated that thirty-seven temporary officers were employed, and reports of the prevalence of noxious weeds wero received in approximately 17,000 cases, in 12,166 of which it was found necessary to serve formal notices requiring the destruction of weeds. The effect of these notices is to bring home in a very forcible manner to careless and ignorant far- mers the imperative necessity of keeping land clean, and before long the effect should be to lay the stigma of disgrace on anyone who receives the attention of the authorities in this way. After a few years an enormous difference in the general condition of the land should be perceptible, 0 and the results of the necessary hoeing and harrowing should be evident in bigger crop yields per acre. The Department have been making an exhaustive examination of agricultural seeds sold in Ireland. Arrangements were made for having the premises of practically every vendor of agricultural seeds visited. Samples of seeds taken in every county by the offi- cial samplers numbered 6.246, an increase of 3,904 on the previous year. At the Department6 seed-testing station 866 samples out of the total of 6,246 were selected for testing, and 555 of them found to be unsatisfactory in varying degrees. THE WASTE OF LIQUID MANURE. It is bad enough to waste fertilisers that have to be bought; it is worse to waste those that are ready made on the farm. I fear I do not exaggerate when I say that hundreds of thousands of pounds, perhaps millions, are lost yearly in the form of liquid manure that is allowed to waste. I see that Professor Hen- drick, the eminent Scottish agriculturist, has been referring to this subject, speoially pointing out what large supplies of potash are contained in the urine of animals. Potash like nitrogen manures cost, weight for weight, more than phosphate ones, and therefore the constituents of any well-digested food which are excreted in the urine are much more valuable than those which are excreted in the dung. Professor Hendrick contends that this ought to be taken into account by valuers in determining the unexhausted manurial value of ifeedin,, o stuffs consumed on the farm. If, as he says, the liquid manure is not utilised the main part of the manurial value of eakei and other concentrated feeding stuffs has been wasted, and the unexhausted manurial residue can only be very small. Then it must be borne in mind that the nitrogen and potash contained in the urine of animals are in solution, and are in a very active form immediately available for the use of crops. The nitrogen and potash of urine, he says, are. weight for weight. as active and valuable as any other kind of manurial nitrogen or potash which the farmer can purchase. On the other hand, the nitrogen and potash in the bulky constituents of the dung heap are insoluble. break up slowly in the soil, and are slow in their action on crops. The dung and straw thus supply the lasting parts of the manure heap, which act gradually on plants, and aie very useful for building up by degrees the fertility of the soil. But it is the urine which supplies the quick-acting part, and which resembles expensive, concentrated, artificial manures in its value and in its rapid action upon crops. An analysis made some little time ago of a large number of samples of liquid manure showed that the actual manurial constituents present in 1,000 gallons of liquid manure would cost the farmer about J31 if he had to buy them in the form of artificial manures. Since then potash has become more valuable, and on the assumption that potash has risen to twioe its former value, the value of liquid manure is increased, so Professor Hendrick estimates, by about 8s. per 1,000 gallons, or about Is. 9d. per ton.

MARKETS

MARKETS Gi-,AIN, &c. NEWPORT, Wed., April 28.—There was very little English v.-heat offered, and foreign wheat was 1B to Is 6d up on the week. Barley was 6d and maize 28 in advance. Oats were in request at Is advance, and bran and sharps at 7a 6d per ton in- crease. HEREFORD, Wed., April 28.-There was a scanty attendance, and very few samples of English wheat were on offer. Dealings took place at 7s 9d to 7s lOd, an advance of 6d and 7d on the fortnight and hall that on the week. The top price of 62s 8d per quarter is the highest in Hereford since the war began. Barleys nothing doing. Oats were firmly held. Maize was quite 2s per quarter dearer, and millers' offals from 2s 6d to 6s advance in some cases. CATTLE. NEWPORT, Wed., April 28.—There was a large number of sheep and lambs, a moderate supply of cattle and pigs, and a fair amount of calves. Buyers were numerous, and all stock realised good prices. Quotations:—Best beef 9.d per lb., seconds gJ to 9id, cows and bulls 8d to 8d, best wether mutton Is, shorn wethers lOd, ewes 9d to 9d, lamb Is 2d, calves 10d to Is, porker pigs 15s per score, baoon pigs 13s 6d, and sows 12s. HEREFORD, Wed., April 28.—A large market with store cattle, pigs, and fat calves, only shorter than last week. Fat cattle sold firmly at up to 9d for best quality, cow beef and secondary bullocks 7kd to the tone was a little easier compared with the past fortnight. Sheep in big supply, and, though varying in price, the average was main tained; on the whole a good sale. Lambs were sought after at Is or more per lb. Pigs. both baconers and porkers, dear as usual. Fat calves in keen demand, and store ditto were pretty well cleared on the upward grade. A few good store cattle changed hands, but the smaller sorts dragged somewhat. LEICESTER. April 28.—Very keen trade for cattle, best quality beasts making 10d, secondary i 9d, and cows 8d to 9td, per lb. Sheep also in good 4 demand, light-weight hoggs making llgd, heavy- weights 10d, and ewes 9d to 9d, while lambs sold readily at 12d to 13d, per lb. Pigs dearer, bacons making 12s 6d to 14s, and porkers 13s 6d to 14s 6d, per score. LONDON, Metropolitan Cattle Market, April 26.— Smaller supplies of cattle, no Devons, Scotch, or Irish beasts being shown: trade ruled better, and prices showed a rise of fully 4d per 8-lb. stone, best quality Shorthorns making 6s 8d per 8 lbs., while cows made up to 5s 6d, and bulls to 5s 2d, per 8 lbs. Very small show of sheep, practically all of which were clips from Lincolnshire and Yorkshire; York- shires were not of such good quality as last week, but trade was dearer by 2d to 4d per stone, or !d to il per lb., while other clipped sheep made fully 4d per stone more money than last week. A few woolled sheep were shown and made from 8s 4d to 8s 8d, while best Down ewes averaged 6s 8d, per 8-lb. stone. Lambs met with more enquiry at an advance in price of Id per lb., best Downs realising 8s 8d. and other sorts 8s. per 8 lbs. NORTHAMPTON, April 28.—Rather a firmer trade for cattle, prices ranging from 5s 10d up to 6s 8d per 8-lb. stone. Sheep were also a steady trade at 11ld for the best quality woolled, and 10gd for shorn, while lambs made about 15d per lb. Pigs were a 'fairly steady trade. bacons making 13s 3d to 138 9d. and porkers 13s 6d to 14s, per score, or about 3d per score in each case under last week. SALFORD, April 27.-Abcut the same number of cattle in the market as last week: trade slow owing to the higher prices, a few Herefords and light- weight Nor-folks making HJd to 10id per lb., while 4 1 prices for other classes had also a hardening ten- dency. Sheep penned in rather larger numbers than last week, but prices were well maintained; lambs made up to 54s each, the best quality maintaining their price, but Dorsets were difficult to dispose of at lid to 12d per lb. Bacon pigs at Manchester were a shade dearer, the supplies including 273 Irish via Dublin. 205 via Birkenhead, 205 Welsh, 177 York- shire, and 169 Lincoln. NORTHAMPTON, April 24.-Large supply of store cattle, but. with buyers attending in good numbers, trade ruled very firm; one bunch of 12 gopd strong Runts realised £ 23 7s. 6d, 10 prime Shorthorns £ 23, and heifers up to £ 22. while other strong steers sold readily at £ 18 10s to E21. per head. Younger stock also sold well, two-year-olds making up to iCl7 10s, and yearlings to £ 14 7s 6d. per head. Dairy cows more plentiful, and demand better, the top quotation being L26 15s, while other good cows fetched JE25, per head. Store sheep in good request, grass tegs making up to 63s. turnip tegs to 56s, and Down ewe with lambs to 95s. SHREWSBURY, April 23.-At this special sale 1.409 store cattle were on offer, including several good lots of farmers' cattle; demand keen and good prices realised. One bunch of 8 very fresh Here- fords, weighing about 10J ewts. each, made E26 10s per head, or 49. 3d per live cwt. The highest price per live cwt. was realised for a level bunch of West Highland heifers, of 6 cwts., which made E17 5s per head, or 53s per live cwt. Hereford yearlings made up to 51s 6d, Shorthorn yearlings to 46s, and Short- horn-Hereford crosses to 50s per live cwt. A bunch of 22 Polled Angus bullocks, good grazing beasts, weighing 65 cwts. each, realised £ 15 17s 6d per head, 4 or rather over 49s per live ewt. The average price 'for the best cattle may be quoted at 48s to 51s, and for .good quality grazing beasts 45s to 47s 6d, while beasts not in such forward condition made from 42s to 44s, per live cwt. A satisfactory number got sold. PROVISIONS. LLANDILO, Sat., May 1.—There was a plentiful supply and a quick demand. Quotations: -Butter- fresh Is 2gd and Is 3d, tub Is 2d per lb.; eggs, Id each, 13 for Is; cheese-Welsh 8d, cream and Caer- philly lid per lb.; honey, Is per lb.; rabbits, lid and Is each; poultry—chickens (trussed) 3s to 3s 6d each, fowls (trussed) lid per lb., ditto alive from 5s to 5s 6d per couple, ducks (trussed) Is 2d per lb.; fish- trout Is 3d per lb. flannel-wh' to Is Id and Is 2d per yard, shirting Is 3d, blouse flannel Is 3d and Is 4d, serge coloured Is 9d, apron flannel Is lOd; turnovers 2s lOd and 3s each, nursing shawls 13s and 14s. ready-made shirts, men's full size 6s 6d to 7s; blankets, white 248 a pair; wool-white in the grease 2s 4d, brown and grey 2s 10d, black 3s. and best black 4s per lb. CARMARTHEN, Sat., May I.-The supply at the weekly market was well up to the average, and the attendance was large. Quotations :—Butter in pats and casks Is to Is lkd per lb.; poultry—chickens Is 3d to Is 4d per lb., boiling fowls 2s to 3s 6d each, turkeys Is per lb. eggs, 13 for Is; rabbits, 10d and Is each: Welsh cheese 8d per lb., Caerphilly cheese lid.

LLANSAWEL

LLANSAWEL The vicar (the Rev. L. H. Walters) presided at the annual vestry for Llansawel. Messrs. Thomas Morgan, Courtsart House, and H. M. Ellis were appointed churchwardens. Reference was made to the large number from the parish who had enlisted for the war. An expression was given to the feeling that the Welsh Church Act could be well postponed indefinitely. At the Churchmen's meeting the accounts showed that substantial amounts were con- tributed to outside objects, inclusive of the war funds. The Vicar intimated that the offerings for Easter would be allocated to the vicarage fund, and to this another sum was added from the parish church. Appreciation was expressed of the genero- sity of the Earl of Jersey in presenting a site. It was decided to adopt the patriotic pledge of absti- nence, and workers to organise the movement volun- teered enthusiastically.

Advertising

"PPRppfT" CREAM I i SEPARATORS T T1 You Want More Butter, lr You Want Better Butter, You Want Less Work to do, You Are Shorthanded Owing to the War, Get a PERFECT SEPARATOR. For a month's free trial. You will wonder how you have gone so long without one. Stocked, Sold and Fixed free by DAVID LEWIS, Aeron Villa, Pencader. OWEN EVANS, R.S.S., Brongest Smithy, Newcastle-Emlyn.

TIVYSIDE HORSE SHOWI

TIVYSIDE HORSE SHOW I FINE EXHIBITS AND GOOD" GATE." In spit of the serious obstacles arising out of the war, this well-known and firmly-established Horse Show was a success beyond expectation. Even the oiierjge&ci secretary, Mr. HarvQy Griffith, whose optimism cannot be beaten, had a most agreeable surprise. The day turned out highly favourable, and what good horses are left in the district were all to be seen on the show field. The various imple- ment stands, and food and medicine stalls were present as usual, and attracted great attention. Al- though the motor industry has done its best to oust the horse carriage from the market, yet Messrs. D. James and Son, Cardigan, continue to manufacture excellent turn-outs, and after all, there is nothing to surpass a tidy trap or gig be- hind a smart, well-groomed horse. The general arangements of the show as usual were perfect. The secretary will have everything, done in the most thorough manner. That fact, coupled with his fine personality is largely accountable for the yearly success and popularity of the show. Some of the exhibits were perfect models, and reflected much upon the good breeding and training. The Shire stallion class brought eight entries. The first three stood out by themselves, but we were rather of the opinion that the second horse should have been the winner in this case. It was certainly a better show horse than the young one. Mr. Ed- wards' horse, which was 3rd, might well have been placed higher, and then probably the judgment would have met the general approval of the public., who, after all, are good judges. In the hackneys class, we thought the winner won well. It was quite a good sort, and a good goer all round. Here again we would have preferred the 3rd prize winner to the 2nd. The cob or pony class we considered to be a very difficult one to judge as there were animals of all sizes and almost every type. We were rather inclined to think that the pony ought either to have won or to have been out altogether. It hardly seemed consistent to have a little one placed between two or three big ones. In the thoroughbred class there was only the King's Premium horse, and, no doubt, as the Government this year reduced the fee to 22s. 6d., farmers wÜl patronise this horse very largely. Remount horses are. undoubtedly, the best class of liorht V>orF<<; in the public market at the present time. The classes for young cart horses were not very well filled, 1 and this was only to be expected considering the great clearance of horses of all sorts during the last two or three months. In the class for gelding or mare to be shown in hand, Mr. Mathias was first and second with two very good goers, and Mrs. Elizabeth Rees came third with also a very useful animal. Mr. Mathias' winner in this class won the championship for the best light horse in the show, and we thought very rightly too. The winner ot the championship for cart horses—Mr. Thomas 0 DaVies, of Gilwen's, "Rmlvn Jewel"—is an ex- ceedingly nice and promising filly. The judge commented uDon Mr. Mathias' cup-winner, and re- g marked that it was one of the best movers he had ever seen and was fit to be shown in any part of the world. This horse was bred by Mr. Davies, of Penalltvbie, and was by a son of "Rosador." the London chamnion. The medtl winner of the Welsh Ponv and Cob Society was Mr. Evan Jones, Caer- wedros, and came in an easy winner. The show officials were as follows:—Judge. Mr. Owen Davies, Llanmaes Stud Farm. St. Fagans; veterinary surgeon. Mr. J. Clayton Jones, M.R.C.V.S.. Newnstle-Emlvn; hon. secretary. Mr. TTirvev Griffith, National Provincial Bank of Eng- land. Ltd.. Newcastle-Emlyn. AWARDS. > Class 1.—Entire Cart Horse—1, Messrs. D. Evans and Sons, Llwyncadfor, Henllan, "Emlyn King"; 2, Messrs. D. Evans and Sons, do., "Norbury Elec- | tor"; 3, Mr. Edward Edwards, Myrtle Hill, Llech- ryd, "Ash King." Class 2.-Entire Hackney over 15 hands high—1, Messrs. D. Evans and Sons, Llwyncadfor, Henllan, "Emlyn Wildfire"; 2, Messrs. D. Davies and Sons, Newcastle-Emlyn, "Caxton Polonius"; 3, Mr. Thomas Jones, Troedrhiwrhwch, Llandyssul, "Duff- ryn Relish." Class 3.—Entire Cob or Pony not exceeding 15 hands high-I. Mr. Thomas Jones, Troedrhiwrhwch, Llandyssul, "Rhen Gymro"; 2, Mr. Tom James. Myrtle Hill, Llechryd, "Little Horace"; 3, Ml-. Evan Davies, Mount Mawr, Aberporth. "Royal Trustful"; 4, Mr. D. Davies, Blaenpisfyll, "Pistvll Cob." CARTER CLASSES. Class 5.—Yearling Colt or Filly or Two-year-old Gelding or Filly—1, Mr. Thomas Davies, Gilwen, Newcastle-Emlyn, "Emlyn Jewel"; 2, Mr. T. Beynon, Pengellifach, Newcastle-Emlyn. Class 6. Mare or Gelding, three years old and over 1 and 3. Messrs. D. Davies and Sons, New- castle-Emlyn 2, Mr. E. Rees, Pengelli, Newcastle- Emlyn. Class 7.-Silver Cup for the best Exhibit = [} Classes 6 and 7,—Won by Messrs. D. Davies and Sons, Newcastle-Emlyn, "Parknest Surprise." LIGHT HORSE CLASSES. Class 8.—Mare or Gelding, any age or height, to be shown in hand—1 and 2, Mr. Tom J. Mathias, Cardigan; 3, Mrs. Elizabeth Rees, Pengwern-uchaf, Cenarth, "Sunshine." Class 9.-Mare or Gelding, any age or height, to be shown in harness—1 and 2, Mr. Tom J. Mathias, Cardigan. Class 10. Silver Cup for the best Exhibit in Classes 8 and 9-1, Mr. Tom J. Mathias, Cardigan. Class 11.—Silver Medal, offered by the Hackney Horse Society for the best Hackney or Pony Mare. Filly or Filly Foal registered or eligible for registration in the Hackney Stud Book—1, Mr. T. J. Mathias, Cardigan. Class 12.-Sil-ver Medal and Illustrated Certificate of the Welsh Pony and Cob Society, for the best Stallion, Mare, Filly or Filly Foal registered or eligible for registration in the Society's Stud Book -1, Mr. Evan Jones, .Cross Inn, Caerwedros. ( Cass 13.-Musical Chair Competition—1, Mr Dick Jones, butcher, Llandyssul. I

CWMDWYFRAN

CWMDWYFRAN COMPETITIVE COXCERT.—A successful competitive concert was held at the above place on Thursday evening. April 29th. In the absence of Mr. John Hinds, M.P., the Rev. Samuel Evans (pastor) con- ducted the meeting. The adjudicators were:— Music, Mr. J. T. Rees, Mus. Bac., Aberystwyth; recitation. Mr. Eirwyn Rees. Pencader; and accom- panist, Mr. T. S. Puddicombe, Carmarthen. The treasurer was Mr. John James, station-master, Bron- wydd. while the duties of the secretary were in the able hands of Mr. David Williams, Forge Mill. Awards:—Tenor solo: 1, Mr. Richards, student, from Carmarthen. Bass solo: Private Gordon Rees. Danarth. Contralto solo: 1, Hannah Jones, Cwm- dwyfran. Soprano solo: Miss Beattie Richards, Pen- cader. Penillion singing: Divided between Jones Brothers, Blaenbowy. Cilrhcdyn, and D. Davies, Pencader. Open recitation: Miss Francis, Ystaly- fera. Open chaupion solo: Mr. T. Edwards, Moun- l tain Asb. t ¡,; 11 :dlf

DYFFRYN TEIFY NOTES

DYFFRYN TEIFY NOTES The adjourned question of the roadmen's applica- tion for increase in wages came before last Friday-s meeting of the Newcastle-Emlyn Rural District Council. Mr. Ben. Rees again took up the case on their behalf. Mr. Hughes, Pengwern, was of opinion that the roadmen were better off than he was. It would be an injustice to his sort to grant them more wages. Mr. Morgans, Hendy, con- sidered that every good workman was entitled to 20s. weekly, and the Surveyor should be instructed j to see that they did their work. The question next arose with regard to those who had been granted a war bonus in respect of their children. As the period for which that special bonus was granted would expire in about a month, the matter was adjourned in order to deal with all the roadmen to- gether. Some hauliers appear that the roads were meant for them and for them alone. When giving their horses rest on a hill they have not the good grace and common sense to cast into the ditch the big stones used for scrotching." Many -a cyclist nas had a nasty fall, especially at night, owing to these, but what do these thoughtless carters oare for anyone else's welfare or life as far as that goes! On Saturday, at Penboyr, the funeral took place of Mrs. Hannah Williams (84), Spring Cottage. The Revs. J. G. Owens (Cong.), Soar, and D. Jen- kins, rector, officiated. Deceased leaves four grown-up children. Private J. Williams, Pennant, of the S.W. Bor- derers, is home on a fortnight's leave recuperating. He was wounded at Neuve Chapelle, and will re- join his regiment in the course of a few days. It is plea-sing to state '-hat the Tivyside Rifle Club is making satisfactory headway, and the hon. sec., Mr. Tom Evans, Orllwyn-terrace, reported at the annual meeting that they were commencing the new year with all the debts cleared off. There are at present over 4C members. This is highly satis- factory, considering the number of men who halve joined the army from the district. The committee have appointed Mr. Ben. Havard, Neuadd, as instructor on the range. A shooting competition for the Donegal Bronze Medal, presented by the National Rifle Association, will take place on Saturday, May 22nd, when three cash prizes will also be given. Competitions are confined to mem- bers, but the public will be admitted to the grounds. A marriage has been arranged, and will take place early in June next, between Miss Maud E. Davies, the only daughter of Mr. and Mrs. W. R. Jones, of Dyffrvnceri, Rhvdlewis, and the ReT. Edward Richards, rector of Troedyraur. A billiard match took place at the Henllan Insti- tute on Saturday evening between the Cilwendeg and the Institute teams. The scores were as follows:—A. D. Jones, 89, v. T. M. Jones, 150; D. Williams. 150. v. E. B. George, 99; E. Lewis, 116, v. D. Ll. Jenkins, 150; Ben. Jones, 150. v. E. Powell, 148; S. Phillips, 115, v. T. J. Jenkins, 150; total. Institute 697, Cilwendeg 620. The highest break was made by Mr. D. Williams. Cilwendeg,- 26. The annual meeting of the North Pembroke and South Cardigan District of the I.O.R. was held at the Hawen Vestry, Rhydlewis, on the 28th ult. It was the first occasion for the conference to visit this place since the Tent was established, and it had been eagerly looked forward to by the mem- bers. Out of the large number, only three dele- gates and one officer did not respond. The meeting commenced at 10 a.m., Bro. Owen Evans, D.C.R., Brongest, presiding. The balance sheet, which was adopted, showed a great increase in membership and funds. Particular notice was drawn to the fact that only ffve deaths had occurred during the year, out of 3,000 members,—a fact which speaks for itself. One member had been killed on the battlefield. It is estimated that there are 20,000 I.O.R. members in all either out at the front or in training. The sick payments under the State section were less than what the actuary had pro- vided for in his estimates for the Friendly Societies. It was reported that a large number from this dis- trict had joined either the Army or the Navy, and it was decided to send a letter of sympathy to the parents of Brother Cloake who has been killed at the front. (Cloake was employed at Cwrcoed Farm, Henllan, and was a member of the Glannau Cwerchyr Tent, Henllan.) Owing to the increasing number of members in the district, it was decided to hold the conference half-yearly in future. In view of the alterations in the National Health Insurance Act the following were appointed to attend the High Movable Conference at Bradford, which will be held in August:—Bros. W. Melchior. Macnclochog: T. Lewis. D.S., Henllan; and Owen Evans. D.C.R., Brongest. The following were ap- I pointed officers for the year:—Bros. R. Rees, Park- au. D.C.R.; W. Thomas. Glandwr, D.D.R.; Owen Evans. Brongest, P.D.C.R.; T. M. George, Kil- L-ori-in. •D.aJLT.: W. H. Lewis, Saundersfoot, | A.D. S.J.T. with J. Lewis, Hebron, District Trea- 3prer; and T. Lewis, Henllan, District Secretary. The next conference will be held at Lleohryd.

Advertising

When Your Chicks mope it's a sign that they are not digesting their food-the fore- runner ef Roup, GaPe4 Indiges- tion, Chill, or Bowel Trouble*. TO COMBAT THIS foods must be given which pro- duce greater warmth of bodr. strengthen the digestive organs and fortify them against the evil effects of cold and wet. SPRATT'S I Chicken Meal & "Chikko are the best foods preeurabte for this result. Samolesof Foods and book on *y-7\ "Poultry Culture" will be sent I 8n receipt of tliree penny § stamps to cover the cost of M. packing and postage. t fljp SPRATT'S PATENT LTD. M-25 Fenchurch St., London, E.C. II

AMMAN VALLEY SCHOOLS

AMMAN VALLEY SCHOOLS COUNTY AUTHORITY CRITICISED. Mr. J. Harries. J.P.. presided over the monthly meeting of the Amman Valley School Managers, held at Ammanford on Thursday in last week, when there were also present: Messrs. T. V. Jones, R. D. Powell, D. J. Jones, B. R. Evans, David Davies, and the Rev. J. Edryd Jones; also the Clerk (Mr. D. J. Morris. MONTHLY LETTER. The monthly letter from the County Education Committee showed that in consequence of the re- fusal of the Local Government Board to give their consent at the present time to a loan which had been applied for, the Committee ere unable to proceed with the extension of the playground at the Bettws School. With reference to the Garnant new school, they could not provide the materials, furniture, etc., enumerated by the Managers, and were also unable to sanction any further apparatus for the present. The school had been supplied with a far larger quantity of goods than any other new school of a similar size. The question of improving the lighting at the Saron, Tycroes, and Penyg-roes Schools would receive attention at the commenoe- ment of the next session. WATER FOR TYCROES SCHOOL. The Clerk stated that an agreement had now been arrived at between the Education Committee and the Llanelly Rural District Council for con- necting the Tycroes School with the public water supply, each bearing haV £ of the cost, and a tender for the work had now been accepted. PAINTING. The Penygroes School Managers regretted that it had been decided not to paint the Penygroes School this year. The Clerk mentioned that Blaenau, Parcyrhun, Bettws, and Penygroes were to have been painted in the ordinary course, but owing to the present exceptional circumstances it had been decided to leave out the latter two schools. Mr. B. R. Evans—They have left out the two worse schools, and put in the two best ones. The Clerk was instructed to write to the Com- mittee pointing out that the Penygroes and Bettws Schools needed painting badly, and that in case it was found impossible to proceed with all the four, it would be preferable to paint these two instead of Blaenau and Parcyrhun. TABLES WANTED AT GARNANT. Mr. T. V. Jones drew attention to the need of three trestle tables in the Garnant School Central Hall. Many children brought their dinners with them to school, and there were no tables there for them to eat their food on. The matter was discussed, and although the Com- mittee's definite refusal to the supplying of any more goods at present for this school had been re- ceived, several of the managers urged that they should try again for those tables. The Chairman suggested that the local managers might consult each other again and bring in a re- port by the next meeting. This course was agreed to. A MAP-LESS NEW SCHOOL. It was decided that Messrs. R. D. Powell and J. J. Hughes and the Rev. J. Rees should serve as mana- gers for the Ystradowen now school as well as for the Cefnbrvnbrain School. The Headmaster of the Cefnbrynbrain School re- ported that the building was opened for education purposes on April 12th. There were 101 children on the books in the mixed department and 86 for the infants' school. The Chairman said he must congratulate the Edu- cation Committee upon the modern .school) they had erected at Ystradowen. Mr. R. D. Powell mentioned that all the requisites needed had not been received. There had been no maps provided and the walls were quite bare. Rev. J. Edryd Jones said the very same com- plaints arose in regard to the supplies for the Gar- nant new schools. He thought there ought to be a special request made to the Education Committee in regard to these two schools that these most essential requisites should be supplied on account of the fact that they were new schools. The Com- mittee, in his opinion, were penny wise and pound foolish. Mr. David Davies—They had it very hot at the' last meeting. It was agreed that the local managers of the respective schools should recommend to the next meeting. CHILDREN AND SHORTAGE"OF LABOUR. A circular letter from the Education Committee was read in reference to the releasing of school children to meet the difficulties that had arisen to procure an adequate supply of labour. The Com- mittee were prepared to give every facility for the withdrawal of children from school that was not inconsistent with their by-laws, and for that pur- pose an arrangement had been made with H.M. Inspectors to hold labour examinations quarterly instead of half-yearly. Also, when the period of the annual holidays came to be determined thev recommend that in agricultural districts one half of the holidays be given during the harvest and the other half during the corn harvest. WHITSUN HOLIDAYS. It was decided that a week's holidays be granted during Whitsun instead of the usual two days, and that the Christmas holidays be curtailed. MANAGERS' CRITICISMS. The Chairman referred at some length to the report recently issued of H.M. Inspectors on educa- tion in the county, and mentioned that there were references of an encouraging nature in that report to the strong attitude taken by the Amman Valley Managers with reference to various matters. Mr. B. R. Evans said there was one drawback, and while it existed the managers may recommend this and that without effect. The county should be divided into agricultural and industrial divisions. The representatives from the industrial portion were now outvoted and overwhelmed, but what the men from the agricultural part wanted they always got, and the money generally came from the in- dustrial valleys. The Chairman agreed with Mr. Evans, and thought the Amman Valley should be formed into an education authority of its own. Perhaps they were far off from that day. but thev could start an ^agitation. He hoped they would pull strong and oull together with a view to attaining that end. Mr. T. V. Jones said they were thankful to the Education Committee for the two new schools they had recently erected. But after all it was no I •'1rf1°d rayin? £ 7-000 for a building unless that building was sufficiently supplied with requi- sites. He mentioned that at Garnant the highest number of readers in each classroom was 34 whereas the average number of scholars in each class was 50. He would like to press on the Edu-, c cation Committee to be a little. m)re sympathetic. when requisition lists were sent to them. It seemed to him there was a. clerk kept at Carmarthen simply for the purpose of cutting down requisition lists, and whatever the articles may be twenty-five per cent was struck off without rhyme or reason.

RAM NEAR LAMPETER

RAM, NEAR LAMPETER The Ram Sewing Class has been most energetic and has done very excellent work under the able guidance of its energetic officials. The final meet- ing of the society will be held on Wednesday, 21st 1 April. This class commenced on November lilth, and about the end of November a committee met at Coedmore Council School to oonsider the best way to provide money for materials, &c. It was decided to make a house-to-house collection, and oyer £ 31 was collected. The Rev. D. James, vicar, was ap- pointed chairman of the committee; Mr. D. J. Rees, Velindre, treasurer, and Mr. G. Davies, C.M., Glyn- Ilifon, secretary. The sewing class appointed Mias J. M. Davies, Glynllifon, as secretary and Mrs. James, the Vicarage, as treasurer. The following articles were sent to the Welsh soldiers:—90 shirts, 70 pairs socks, 35 scarves, 12 pairs mittens, 3 helmets, 8 body-belts, 2 undervests, 3 bedjacketa. 19 towels, 2 pairs sheets, 12 triangular bandages. Eighteen of the 90 shirts have been sent to the men of the parish of Pencarreg who are in training. Three sacks of clothing were also sent to the Belgian Refugeo Fund.

Advertising

WHY WASTE IIONEWi by paying an abtnrdly hie-b price for a eresin gepamtor I IAB Has proved Itself to be eqoM to otilers at doable the prion. Awarded Silver Med&l 1909, and the German Agricultural Society's Medal, 1911. THE HIGHEST^ A^WAKDS IN Jar ft l« GUARANTEED for 10 ysara, JHBKjr and to skim as clean, torn aasier, and be. nifH simpler to manage than many of the' hifhei^prioed machines, and superior In every respect to the lower-pncedonw Sales over 120,000 la 4 Yeus. 15 as!? £ 3 9s. I M 27 SSI!,? £ 5 I H 50 SSi1, £ 9 7s. I .BH. "• FULLWOOD*BLAKD, 31 to 35 Beyenden SpAmgt,

IAMMANFORD URBAN COUNCIL

AMMANFORD URBAN COUNCIL ESTIMATED EXPENDITURE FOR THE HALF. YEAR. A special meeting of the Council was held on Wednesday evening, the 28th ult.. Mr. John Harries^ presiding, for the purpose of considering the various committee's reports as to the estimated expenditure for the half-year, and to decide on the rate to be levied. THE COMMITTEE'S RECOMMENDATION3. it was recommended by the Health Committee that the estimated expenditure be 2175 10s. Id.— In moving the adoption of the report, Mr. J. C. Shaw saitl the estimate was within a few shillings of that of the last half-year, with the exception of i.50, which had been added as a contribution to- wards the Amman Valley Joint Sewerage Board. The amount of the Roads Committee's estimate came to £ 690 3s. 4d.-Mr. T. Fletcher moved the adoption of the committee's report, and said they had been modest in their demands; in fact, they were only asking far 100 tons of stone. The total was far below that of the preceding half-year. THE PROPOSED RATES. The Finance Committee, having considered the estimates of receipts and expenditure for the half- year recommended that a general district rate of Conding, Mr. Dayid Jones said it was no en. Couragement for tliem to get their rates reduced P an increase m th^ county rates — The motion was caxrie<3. ELECTION OF COMMITTEES' CH 4IRMEN sir of chairman until the aext meetfng aPPoint™ent

CARMARTHEN HAS THE BEST

CARMARTHEN HAS THE BEST Carmarthen has the best possible proof not nnlp because .t comes from a clmar LrSiden, bit because years have passed since the proof was firs indeed l stands as good as ever-better, be than that of Cndorseme^ oould there On September 8th, 1911, Mrs. E. Rees, 0f 4 Friar's mart'hen 1D€ar the Chnst Church, Car- from k-ldney disorder. I could hardly sit at my work shooting pai- across my back, no doubt arising sometimes troubled6 ST" ™ "kid?"* were unnatural. ie kldneys e*<*etions S9'nofjgS £ et ^» re^mmeLWDl £ lfe" 'wayl with the kidney, ^Ld) «14th' 1914~OVER TWO YEARS ai^ Mn ^lea^ed ^recommend D^n'^pj]]^^ Ti 1 think know suffering from their kidnevs. I think them splendid, for they cured me." If you have any such unmistakable symptoms of kidney or bladder trcuble as sediment,' or' pains m the loins and back, dropsical swell,ngf S- cnn.t ,mU e? a"d ioints> rheumatism, and a constant feeling of drowsiness and heaviness th« above experience will encourage you. Doan's back ache kidney pills are special kidney help; they reach PnW?/q°f feeaS^hat i8 Why -res^e lading ,^°X' lboxes 13/9' of a11 dealers, or from Foster-McClellan Co., 8, Wells St., Oxford St London, W. Don't ask for backache or kidney nills' -j.sk MS-nKCTLY for DOAN'S backa^ Ky pills, the same as Mrs. Rees had.

FERRYSIDE

FERRYSIDE IMPROVEMENT.-On Monday, S5th ult., the Ferry crossing over the River Towy was taken over by a new firm. A motor-boat has already arrived, and will ply to and from Llanstephan. An additional boat is to be used to convey passengers to and from Carmarthen. This will prove to be a public benefit, and an immense improvement upon the old-fashioned slow method. FROM THE FRONT.—News is anxiously awaitei from our bovs at the front. They were with the 1st Welsh in the great action on Hill 60. A letter has been received from A.C. Wm. Evans, who is at the Dardanelles.