Teitl Casgliad: Carmarthen journal and South Wales weekly advertiser

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 8 o 8
Full Screen
15 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
THE WARS PROGRESS

THE WAR'S PROGRESS HOW WE STAND. MAIN INCIDENTS OF THE WEEK. War news just now is very nebulous, not; to say vmsati-sfactory. The Official Communique s fror" Xft o ■dS tell us cf trenches taken here and lost there by one side or the other. Sometimes he recital is relieved by the narruuv^ Ox ie.Upio- gross and sublime heroism, such as that at Aeu\ Chapelle. and of aiiiazin- bull-dog tenacity, such as that at Hill 60 These incidents, trivial or no.e- lorthv are reeved somewhat of their monotony by the' enterprise and optimism of cerUl^ L""(J° journalists and the still Oi I journalists and the still Oi late 'however" son™ o" the daily papers, notabiy those on the Unionist side have been soundinDa grave note of warning. The Times |j?sdP°^ out recently that the position of the Allied troops from the coast of Belgium to the frontiers ot Switzerland, is practically just the same as after the German retreat from Pans had corne t anchor. During the past week we have the tidinoS new and tremendous energy all along the Ger- man lines. This comes at the same time as news of similar activities by the Germans on the frontier. On both sides enemy successes ofanim- r>ortant kind are renorted. It may be that tn exaggerated, but they establish the unmistakable fact that with the close of winter and the advent of sT>rinr officers of 21 men were saved by a trawler. lhe% German vessels were caught in the afternoon by a destroyer flotilla, after they had torpedoed a traw- ler. There was a running fight of about an hour before the German vessels were sunk. Two officers and 44 men were rescued from the sea. and made prisoners of war. We had no casualties. TUESDAY.—German and Austrian official re- ports. which are so far unconfirmed, indicate that the Russian Southern Armies have been heavily de- feated in Western Galicia. Several more merchant ships have been sunk by enemy submarines. WEDNESDAY.—The Allies- have lost ground to the North of Ypres after a tremendous attack by the enemv. The Germans claim this as a great victory. They and the Austrians also claim to have achieved triumphs against the Russians. The Rus- sians themselves give no news of this. THURSDAY.—The Germans have obtained a footing on Hill 60 under cover of poisonous gases and favoured by weather conditions. Poisonous gases were also used for another attack oast of Ypres yesterday, which was easily repulsed. Here the enemy were punished heavily bv our artillery. On the right of the British line at Givenchv four of our men have been poisoned. On Monday there j was an attack on our extreme left. It was re- pulsed, and, caught on their flank by French artil- lery, the ei^my suffered severely. The Germans are poisoning wells in South-West Afrioa..

goo WAR JOTTINGS I

-goo WAR JOTTINGS Mr. Dd. B. Evans, son of Mrs. Morris, Ffynon Villa. Llanstephan, who recently joined the 3rd Monmouths at Abergavenny, has been promoted to orderly oorporal. The Rev. J. Evans, son of the late Mr. James Evans, Water-street, and of Mrs. Evans, 84, Lam- mas-street, Carmarthen, has enlisted as a private in the Welsh Fusiliers. Mr. Evans was a curate at St. Peter's, Syston, Leicester. In the matter of joining the colours, a lead has been given to the theological students at Carmarthen by Mr. Ben. Davies, of Llandyssul, a student at the Presbyterian College, Carmarthen, who recently joined the R.A.M.C. Bravo, sir! Mr. Tom Randies, Church-street, is the latest recruit from Llanstephan. He had Volunteered his services earlier, but for reasons of height had not been enrolled. He has now been accepted in the Royal Engineers. We are informed that Capt. C. L. Veal, who has acted as recruiting officer for the 41st area with offices at the Guildhall, Carmarthen, for some months, has been appointed Brigade Major to the 115th Brigade 43rd Welsh Division. A White Paper dealing with the financial position of the various County Territorial Associations in Wales in March, 1914. shows for Carmarthenshire a loss of JE348, making a total deficit of £ 600; Car- diganshire, loss of £ 72, surplus funds of £ 645; Pem- brokeshire, deficit of J6211, bringing liabilities to L344. A number of the Pembroke Yeomanry Reserve, stationed at Carmarthen, including the Llanelly Public Band, which recently enlisted en bloc, left for Lampeter on Thursday in order to carry out a vigorous recruiting campaign in the great Datis Fair now in progress in Lampeter. Two more Henllanites have rallied to their coun- try's call, Mr. D. Jones, Waunderwen, has left a good post on the G.W. Railway and is now with the R.A.M.C. at Aldershot Mr. Tom Havard, Neuadi, eon of Mr. Ben Havard, late of the White Hart, Cardigan (himself an old volunteer), has been admit- ted into the Welsh Guards, and is at present at Caterham, Surrey. A third unit of the Welsh Field Co., R.E., is now being raised at Carmarthen and Llanelly by the Carmarthenshire Territorial Force Association. The conditions of enlistment are for the duration of war or for further service. Applications should be made to O.C., Barracks, Carmarthen, -or 7, Hall- street, Llanelly. The following officers have been transferred from the 1st Line to the 2nd Line 4th Battalion Welsh Regiment, now quartered in Pembrokeshire:—Major and Temporary Lieutenant-colonel W. J. Jones. Captain and Temporary Major J. R. Williams. Captain J. Lloyd, Captain W. H. Bowling, Lieu- tenant and Temporary Captain D. J. Lewis, and Second-lieutenant and Temporary F. A. Matthyssens. The Llanelly Public Band, who since the outbreak of war have given their 5Crvices gratuitously to the Llanelly Battalion of the 2nd/4th Wdsh Regiment, have joined en bloc the Second Pembrokeshire Yeo- manry now stationed at Carmarthen. The band headed the men on church parade to St. Peter's Church on Sunday, and played beautiful selections of music. We understand that the following arc among those who have volunteered for servicc abroad in the 4th Welsh Reserves who recently left Carmar- then :—Majors W. T. C. Jones and J. R. Williams, Captains J. L. H. Williams. D. J. Lewis, J. H. Hughes, T. H. M. George, Lieuts. WT. Lewes. R. Grant, F. S. Thomas, M. H. Rogers, F. A. Matthys- sens, W. H. Dowdeswyll, 2nd Lieuts. J. S. Gri- ffiths, E. P. George, R. W. Tallis. J. A. Bonny- man. The youngest officer in the 15th Service Battal- ion the Welsh Regiment (Carmarthenshire) is Lieutenant Hamilton Owen Lloyd, of Greenmeadow. Ammanford, who has recently been granted a. com- mission. He is the son of the late Mr. John Lloyd, .v d, contractor, of Bridgend and Ammanford. Prior to taking up lieutenancy duties with the 15th Welsh, he was a member of the 28th Battalion London Regiment (Artists' Rifles). Mr. Thomas J. Rees. an electrical fitter at the Devonport Dockyard, a brother of Mr. David Rees, postman. Carmarthen (now with the Royal En- gineers at Cambridge), has received the following complimentary letter:—"I am very pleased to be able to inform you that a communicition from the Admiralty states that it has been reported that you hav,p recently rendered good service in connection with the carrying out of certain work on one of H.M. Sfiips, and directs thnt this is to be recorded in your favour.—Z. H. Kingdon, electrical en- gineer." C A movement is being organised by the Carmar- thenshire Society in London to render assistance to wounded soldiers from Carmarthenshire who are m the London hospitals. The suggestion was sub- mitted to the society by Mr. John Hinds, M.P.. and a ladies' committee has been appointed to visit the various ho«r»:f"J' Tt is necessary, however, that s from Shir Gaer should ° societv, and friends and 1 soldiers from the county retaries, Mr. Tim Evans, and Mr. T. B. Stephens, e Newington.

LETTERS FROM OUR DEFENDERS

LETTERS FROM OUR DEFENDERS APPEAL TO MINERS NOT TO STRIKE. In a letter to Mr. Thomas R. Evans, station- master, Mae.:ycru.gi;«u, Private John Dudley, of No. 2 Mining Section, Royal Engineers, in France, expresses the hope that ihe editor of the CABMAB- THEN JOURNAL will allow him space to state the views of the soldiers fighting gallantly in the trenches on the attitude of ti.e luinerc. 0; S-ut,h W ales at this critical time. Now as I have been always a Trade L nionist. myself,'1 ,e says, 'together with my comrades out here in the firing line, it is our place to appeal from the trencher for the miners not to strike, and*every miners' leader with any common- "Inse will give them that advice. If they do strike, they wilfully hand over the trump card to the enemy, and leave us out here in jeopardy, for the sake of a few shillings in more pay a week. Bear in mind that we out here are doing our work, and facing death every minute of the day and night,— and remember that we are doing it for the honour of the people we left at home. The same men who were cheering us when we left them a few months ago are now threatening to crucify us. Miners of South Wales, are you going to forsake us out here after all the blood we have shed on the battlefields of Belgium and France? Consider this,—we fellows out here have left good places, and the majority of us were earning good money, and we left our wives and children and all that was dear to us. Now we are only getting a shilling a Jay, and you won't hear anyone of us grumbling about it. Remember, I want you all to get fairplay. and to get your right's, but don't strike at this critical time. I will put it to you from another point of view. Suppose all of your soldiers and sailors turned round and told sir John French and Sir John Jellicoo that unless they got more money, they were not going to fight any more. No. you miners of South Wales, how would it be looking on you then? It is a pity that some of you have-not seen the state of Belgium and France. the way women and children have been treated, and their homes blown from their foundations. Think of the way you would be treated if the Huns happened to cross the North Sea, for, believe me. they would have no mercy on you. And another thing for you is this.—they would compel you to work for them, at the point of the bayonet. So for humanity's sake don't strike at this critical moment."

A PRISONER IN GERMANY

A PRISONER IN GERMANY FROM THE DIARY OF A CARMARTHEN LADY. The following interesting extracts have been kindly sent us by a lady resident of Carmarthen- shire, who was detained in Germany on the out- break of war. Previous instalments have already appeared in the JOURNAL: Aug. 1,0.-We think England must have gained & victory, as Frau S. came raging into the dining- room at lunch, declaring that blood had now been shed, and that we might starve or perish for all she eared. She then insisted on the N: s vacating their rooms at once, and occupying seme attics, and deprived all but ourselves and the G. family of our sitting-rooms. All the public rooms are closed to us from now on, and we are to have our meals in a basement-room. We cannot understand what has come over her, especially as the few Germans re- maining here have remonstrated with her, and the servants are uniformly civil and attentive. Surely the war affects them as much as it does her! She is very anxious that we should go to Erfurt, but how can we do so? The Burgomaster and Chief of Police come up to romonstrate with our three officers for breaking their parole, by walking in the park, but accepted their denial of this at once, and hardly troubled to con- ceal that Frau S. was the informer. The C. has just had a 'phone consultation with the U.S.A. Consul, who says it would be madness to go to Erfurt, where there are already forty Americans as hard-up as ourselves. So the C. went to another hotel to see what arrangements could be made. The manager is quite unable to understand Frau S.'s attitude to- wards us, "for," he said, "though we all feel very sore and very disappointed that England has made what we consider such a grave political mistake, that is no reason for insulting a body of English people who are not responsible for it, and who bring so much money into the town." The manager can accommodate our entire party on the third-floor, which is self-contained, guarantees that we shall receive proper attention, and will accept cheques, if guaranteed by the U.S.A. Am- bassador. The other hotels say much the same thing. A messenger has come from the U.S.A. Consul, saying he is making the most urgent representations to his Ambassador as to the necessity for providing us with money and getting us away. But it does not look as though we are going to get any more money from that quarter, in fact, the little we have had is from the Consul's private purse, and we can- not expect him to do more. The messenger says that the American ship, Tennessee, may be expected about the 15th, bringing gold for Americans, English and French, and a hint was dropped that the may take us across, only that is much too good to be true. Aug. 13tb.-The heat is intense, yet the military element is unusually busy, men and heavy guns are passing all the time. Frau S. opened the day oy announcing that her charges would be doubled from to-day and re-doubled from Saturday, but as we can t pay them, it is really useless to worry, especially in this heat. There was an article in the local paper yesterday, describing the celebration of the victory at Togo by the English here. This is the first we have heard of such a victory, and not one of us knows where Togo is, but it is true that on Wednesday,—whilst the seniors were holding a meet- ing—the juniors were noisily protesting against the present "public room." This will have to be ex- plained to the Burgomaster, but he and the other official* know that Frau S. is at the bottom of all this, as there is nothing to fear. She reported Mr. N. for "spying on. and insulting the troops'' but on his denying it. they just told him to go about as usual. Now D. has been summoned, so T. must go to the Town Hall to-morrow. Telegrams are up in town to the effect that the French have been driven out of Alsace, leaving ten officers and 400 men in the enemy's han Is, whilst German gunboats are up in the Shetland Isles. It is fortunate for us that only news favourable to Ger- many is published, so we can't be accused of cele- brating British victories, but we should be thankful to hear whether there have been any. The Chief of Police came up urging us to go to Erfurt, but on being told that we had no money, he offered to put a train at our disposal and provide waggons to take our luggage to the station. Unless we accept this, all he can do for us is to give us a wing of the poor-house, and .set a guard on rhat. Now. seeing we have no guard here, that we go about exactly when and where we like, that no man, woman or child has yet shewn us the slightest in- civility, and that our only enemy is Frau S. herself, what need have we of a guard? (To be continued).

LLANFYNYDD

LLANFYNYDD The above Parish Council at their meeting last week elected Mr. Chas. Edwards, Maesifan, as chair- man, and Mr. Thos. Jones, Briskenuchaf, as vice- chairman -for the ensuing year. Messrs. Gwilym Lewis, Ralltisaf; Dan Lloyd, Penrhosisaf, and Thos. Jones, Briken, were appointed overseers.

Advertising

RCHER GOCDEMRETORNS I R&g fifec*3TEBED >dj 1#3 .1" Facsimile of One-Ounce Paålt, Archer's Golden Returns I Th* Perfection of Pipe TobaCCO. ¡ COOL, SWrL-r AND

KIDWELL YNOTES

KIDWELL YNOTES On WTednesday afternoon in last week a motor accident occurred on the Parc-y-box Hill just above Park House. The car, which was driven by the owner, Air. Higgs, of Swansea, who was also the only occupant, was proceeding at. normal speed down the hill when, at the point indicated, it was seen to "wobble"; then to swerve with force into a telegraph post on the roadside. The rebound sent the car right across the road into the opposite hedge, from which it fell back into the road turn- ing over on its side. Messrs. Geo. Jones, Boro' Stores, and Mr. Binet, a Belgian refugee, who saw the accident rushed forward to render assistance, but Mr. Higgs was quite unhurt, not even a scratch having been sustained. In a short time several people arrived on the scene, and, with their asisstance, the car was righted. It was learnt from Mr. Higgs that the steering gear had refused to act just as he began descending the hill, and the accident was a result. Had the "works" gone wrong a few hundred yards lower down, the acceleration of the car would have caused a terrible smash. The damaged vehicle was taken down to the Masons' Arms Garage, whose proprietor, Mr. E. Thomas, repaired it sufficiently to enable Mr. Higgs, who was returning from a visit to Hartle- pool, to proceed on his homeward journey t a late hour in the evening. The anniversary services of the Morfa C.M. Church were held on Sunday and on Monday evening last. The powerful preaching of the Rev. W. Davies, M.A., Bethania, Aberdare, was gTeatly appreciated by the large congregations. We glean from the balance sheet submitted for our inspection by Mr. Geo. Jones, secretary of the local branch of the Free Church Council, that the amount collected at the recent mission conducted by the Re% Seth Joshua enable the committee to for- ward a sum of J67 13s. 4d. to the Central Fund and JB5 5s. 9d. to the local fund The Kjidwelly Troop of Boy Scouts have this week become the proud possessors of two 'very fine side-drums, which will add considerablv to the effectiveness of the small, but capable, bugle band. The acquisition of these instruments has been made possible through the efforts of Scoutmaster H. E. B. Hutcheson, who is showing a laudable interest in the troop. Mr. Hutcheson hopes to have a record season, and has drawn up a very practical programme for the summer. Several boys have, within the last week, joined the troop, and it is to be hoped that a large number of recruits will swell the ranks early in the season. A practical sermon, eloquently delivered, was preached at St. Mary's Parish Church at the evening service on Sunday by the Rev. W. Evans, curate, who made a fervent appeal to the people to think of the immense issues which were involved in the great drama now being enacted on the battlefields of Europe. They would then, perhaps, realise the gravity of the situation- There are signs of big things being done within the area of the ancient borough in the near future. Steps are being taken to select a site for the ereo- tion of a huge water-works to supply the new powder works at Pembrey with the necessary water, which is computed to be 2,000,000 gallons per day. The resident enginoer of Messrs. Nobel, the pro- prietors of the powder works, paid a visit to Kid- welly on Saturday, and tentatively fixed on a t!it near the Aqueduct Farm. He was accompanied by Mr. W. R. James, town clerk; Mr. J. Morgan, Gwenllian, late surveyor, and Mr. David Edwards, borough surveyor. In the event of the projeoted sohemc taking tangible form, Kidwelly should reap great advantages, as the erection of a water works of the suggested capacity, would mean the employ- ment of hundreds of men. The first resident of the town to suffer bereave- ment by the death on the battlefield of a relative if u' Greenwood, The Priory, whose youngest brother, an officer in the 5th Royal Lancaster (T.F.), died on the 25th of April from a wound sus- tained on the previous day at Ypres. General sympathy is expressed with Mr. Greenwood and the members of his family.

ST CLEARS NOTES

ST. CLEARS NOTES A well-attended recruiting meeting was held on Thursday evening, 22nd ult., at the corner of the Milford Arms. Two gentlemen-Messrs. Harman and Weir—who are touring the country in a motor wagon, addressed the crowd on the subject of the war, with illustrations on a screen. Mr. Weir made an impassioned appeal for recruits. Mr. Griffiths, Bournemouth House, proposed a hearty vote of thanks to the speaker, and said that he had served his country at home and abroad for 26 years, and through the effects of the Indian climate was no longer fit to go out. He begged all young men to join without delay. The vote was seconded by Mr. James Phillips, C.C. (in Welsh)), who also impressed upon his hearers to do their best for the country. The singing of "God Save the King" brought the meeting to a olose. The funeral of the late Mr. Alfred Narbett took place at the Parish Church on Thursday, 22nd ult. The Rev. J. M. James, vicar, officiated. The mourners were the widow, Mrs. Narbett, her two daughters, and her son, George, who is a bombar- dier in the R.F.A. in North Wales, and deceased's nephew, Richard Howell, also in the R.F.A. Vhe coffin was covered with wreaths principally made of primro". The committee who organized the entertainment in the Gwalia Hall on Wednesday in last week are to be congratulated on the success of the venture. The committee—Mrs. R. H. Harries, Mrs. Salmon, Mrs. Jenkins, Mrs. James. Miss Williams and Miss Lewis worked very hard during the previous fortnight and with the help of a considerable number of ladies had made the hall present a very fine sight. The stalls had been tastefully arranged around the large room, and at the opening a -fairly good number of people was present. Soon after 4 p.m.. Mr. R. H. Harries in a few appropriate words called upon Mrs. Protheroe-Beynon, of Trewern. who in performing the opening ceremony in a dainty little speech, sain she had very great pleasure in coming among them that afternoon, to do what she could towards the good cause they had in view. She understood that this fine hall was being used for the first time, and a better cause could not have been selected to give e. good set-off to the splendid hall which the people of St. Clears now possessed. She trusted all would oo their utmost in spending money, and bring in a good sum for the good work.—The stalls were under the care of the followingFancy stall. Mrs. R. H. Har- ries, The Croft; Mrs. James, The Vicarage Mrs. Dr. Phillips and Miss Carver. Farmers' stall: Mrs. Morris, Gardde. Farm: Mrs. Salmon and Miss wiirlam- Brynawel. Sweet stall: Miss Audrey Har- ries; Miss Vvima Buckley, and Miss Peel. Fish pond: Miss Peel. Tea -till: Mrs. Jenkins, Mrs. Salmon, Mrs. Howell. Doorkeeper: Mr. Jonah Rees. In spite of the large dimensions of the hall. a huge crowd filled the whole place. Soon after 8 o clock the youno- people took possession of the floor, and dancing was indulged in. under the guidance of Mr. J. C. Lewis as M.C. A meeting of the com- mittee was held on Monday evening to receive a statement of accounts. This showed that .649 hud been received, the expenses amounted to a little over £ 5. leaving a net balance in hand of £ 43 13s. 6d. The committee decided to allocate this in the folio* ing manner:— £ 30 to the Serbian Distress Fund, £ 2 10s. each to the Societies of Prevention of Cruelty to Animals and Children, and the remainder (JES 'M! 6d.) towards the local British soldiers who are prisoners of war. On the proposition of Mr. R H. rl Harries a hearty vote of thanks was. accorded to all the workers for their great help. Among those who subscribed to the cause were the following:—Mr Seymour Allt-ti. Ll: Mrs. Morgan Joiie-, 21: Mr. R. Lewis. Gilfach. JB1 Is. Mr. Stephens, Arlais 10s. -6d. Mr. T. Nicholas. Penvcoed, 10s.; Mrs. Gwvnn- Hughes. 5s. Mr. Lionel Jones, 5s. M. Saunders 5s. Mrs. Lain?, 2s. 6d.: Mrs. Starke, 2s. 6d. Mr. W. Williams. 2- During the evening songs were given by Miss Peel. Miss Lewis. Miss A. Harries Mirs P. Davip". The St. Clears Male Voice Party. under the leadership of Mr. W. N. James, rendered several choruses. The St. Clears public will bo glad to hear of the promotion of the Rev. W. Evans, elder son of In- spector Evans, who recently retired from the police force. Mr. Evans has been curate in West London for the past seven years, during which time he has done excellent parochial work and which was not unrecognised by the Bishop nf London, who recom- mended the rev. gentleman to Mr. Benyon, of Reading, who offered Mr. Evans the important living of St. Peter's, of Beauvoir-square. Bishopsgate. E.. which he has accepted. The living is worth 2630 a year, and a house. It is a large parish of over 12.000 inhabitants. Another promotion of one of our townsmen has to I be recorded. Mr. Sidney Ash by some five weeks ago thought he would do his little bit for his country and enlisted in the Army Service Corps. He has been for the last few weeks stationed at Aldershot with another St. Clears boy, Mr. Jack Thomas, youngest son of Mr. J. Stone Thomas. Young Sidney applied for a commission, and during the past week his father received the news that his son had been offered a second-lieutenancy in the South Wales Borderers. A public meeting of the inhabitant ratepayers was held in the Town Hall on Saturday evening last to elect five representative trustees on the Town Trust for the ensuing five years. This body represents the local parliament, but very few of the people take much interest in it, for only some 30 to 40 ratepayers were present. Mr. Lyons was elected chairman, who in the event of a poll becomes the returning officer. The following were nominated:—Messrs. Wm. Evans, D. Evans, J. Evans, D. T. Davies, James Phillips, W. H. Thomas, J. Morris, T. H. Yeoman, Morrell, and the Rev. D. C. Davies. The names were submitted to the meeting, but is a poll was demanded, an election takes place on Saturday, May 22nd, in the Council School, to elect five out of the ten.

LLANSTEPHAN NOTES

LLANSTEPHAN NOTES The Ferry is now entirely under new manage- ment. The services of George Treharne have been retained by the proprietor, and his long experiences of the ever-changing courses of the river and the knowledge of local requirements will be of great value to the new system. Two motor-boats are to be put on for the public orossing. The prize-drawing arranged in connection with the Tennis Club and Bowling Green was postponed from November last year to May 1st. Enquiries from ticket-holders stat that they are eagerly awaiting the results. A few tickets are still left. There are eighteen prizes, and the selection is very varied, ranging from a pair of bots to a set of teeth. The seine net fishing season opened here last Monday week. There are only two nets on this side of the river this season, and Mr. John John rll and his son Willie was fortunate on the opening day in netting one salmon and three fine sewin. Tlie ladies' sewing class which has been so assidu- ously at work since last August brought its season to a close on Tuesday. The following interesting letter has been re- ceived by Mr. D. James Hughes, Laques Fawr, from his uncle, Mr. John R. Hughes, Albany, New York. Mr. Hughes, who is 84 years of age, Í3 a brother of the late Mr. R. R. Hughes, Laques Fawr, a family lor generations established in tne parish. Writing of the war he states:—" We are so inter- ested that we get three papers each day, so as to get the latest news. We arc supposed to be neutral, but where is there a Carmarthenshire man that does not sympathise with his fellows who dare face the cannon's mouth. Public opinion seems to favour the Allies, and America has the credit of saving the Belgians from starvation; in fact, the subject is too horrible to dwell upon. How is the old farm and the condition of the crops generally, for 1 am interested still in the spot where I first saw the light of day." We hope Mr. Hughes may long be spared, and once more cross the Atlantic to the land he loves so dearly. (A report of the presentation to the Rev. J. M. James, the former vicar, will appear next week).

CARMARTHENSHIRE MAIN ROADS

CARMARTHENSHIRE MAIN ROADS A meeting of the Carmarthenshire Main Roads and Bridges Committee was hold at the fcihire Hall, Carmarthen, on Wednesday, when Mr. W. J. Wil- liams, Bryuamman, was re-elected chairman for the ensuing year. Mr Williams, in responding, thanked the committee for the honour, and said that with their assistance he hoped to carry out his duties to the entire satisfaction of all.-It was reported with reference to the road over Sandy Bridge, Llanelly, that the Council were still awaiting the award of the Board of Trade w'ith regard to the portion re- pairable by the tramway company before com- mencing to repair it.—Mr. T. P. Jones said the roads were in a very bad state. He was continually being taunted by people about its condition, and he was really ashamed that he was a member of the council when they had roads in that condi- tion. Many accidents to motor-cars and vehicles were taking place and unless something was done the council would have a lot of claims to deal with.—It was decided to defer the matter until re- ceipt of the award.—A petition signed by 200 people was submitted from Brynamman asking that re- pairs should be effected to the road leading from Brynamman over the Black Mountains to Llan- gadock. It stated that the road was in a terrible condition and dangerous to vehicular traffic.-It was decided that the Surveyor should see to the matter. —Mr. W. B. Jones drew attention to the small space which was left for traffic at the terminus of the tramway at Felinfoel. He said there was a horse which had a court in front of it just here; it was the only house with a court in the whole dis- trict. He proposed that they should purchase this court so as to do away with it, and therefore widen the road.—This was agreed to-

FARINERS FATAL FALL

FARINER'S FATAL FALL Deep regret was felt throughout the whole dis- trict when it came known that Mr. Walter Gri- ffiths, Pant Farm, Llangunnor, had passed away suddenly on Sunday last. Deceased was 27 years of age, and was of a quiet disposition, and was held in the highest esteem by all who knew hiirf. Much sympathy is felt with his wife and one child who survive him. On Wednesday, Mr. J. W. Nicholas (coroner) conducted an inquest at the house.—Rachel Ann Griffiths (widow) said the deceased left home in a spring garnbo about 8 a.m. on Friday to go to then. He complained of not feeling very strong before going. She did not see him after- wards until 5.30 p.m., when he was brought home in a motor-car.—Wm. Thomas, licensee of the Three Salmon Inn, Water-street, Carmarthen, said that as he was proceeding through Priory-street be- tween 2 and 3 o'clock on Friday the deceased asked him to come with him to see a horse (which he had bought) in a held behind the White Horse Inn. De- ceased caught the pony, and after taking it outside to the street, tied it to the spring gambo. In mounting his gambo, the deceased placed one foot on the spoke of the wheel, and was on the point of sitting down, when the mare moved, and he fell on his back to the road. Witness went to his assist- ance and found that he was bleeding a little from his mouth and nose. He was conscious, but could not walk and had to be carried into the house.— Dr. Denzil Harries said he attended to the deceased after the accident at the White Horse, and found a srtiall scratch on the back of the head and marks of blood about the nose. There W

Advertising

II j I m mm Ii l HOME MADE 1 • SPONGE I t MIXTURES I JL I for jam sandwich || and Swiss roll can 1} be made with 1 439^^ home ingredients j| ^°U ra*se is with fafctyEteur" The SURE raising powder. 1 The house-wife's help to economy 1 in war time. k; No expensive powders needed. || Paisley Flour" brings everything || out of the oven light, fully raised, || and ready to eat — wholesome || even when new. /-Tn— "nI! 7d., 31d., and id pkts, jf with recipes for jam sandwzch & jt Swiss ro14

LLANDIL0 URBAN DISTRICT COUNCIL

LLANDIL0 URBAN DISTRICT COUNCIL The monthly meeting of the Llandilo Urban Dis- trict Council was held at the Public Hall on Tues- day evening, Dr. Richard Jones, chairman, pre- siding. There were also present: Messrs. D. Pntchard Davies, J. H. Rees, D. W. Evans, Rev. E. L. Jones, Messrs. Benj. Hughes, E. A. Harries, H. W. Jones, John Stevens, Claud R. Davies, and D. W. Evans. Arising out of the minutes, the Clerk said he had written to the Local Government Board with re- gard to the compulsory notification of the first case in each house on certain diseases, and had received a reply stating that they would issue an order in aocordance with the wishes of the council. Dealing with the annual report -of the medical officer of health (Dr. D. Phillips), the Chairman said he considered it a very favourable one. The birth-rate, though, was very low, but it was higher than the death-rate. According to the report the births registered during the year were 32 (18 boys, 1^ giving a birth-rate for the district of 16.02" per 1,000 persons, as compared with a rate of 23.6 for the whole of England and Wales. The rate was considerably lower than in 1913, when it was 23.30 per 1000. The number of deaths regis- tered in the district during the year was 26. giving a rate per 1000 of 13.52 as compared with 13.6 for the whole of England and Wales, and 14.18 for the year 1913. HOUSE REFUSE. It was stated in the report that the refuse is to bo cleared from each district every other day. This was not always done, causing inconvenience and annoyance as well as a nuisance, the refuse beinjj left outside houses for two or more days. Mr. H. W. Jones thought it was due to residents! placing refuse outside alter the cart had passed. Ifye men could not go round the second time for it. Mr. A. E. Harries said he was still of the same opinion that there ought to be a bell attached to the horse. He was ready to give a bell free of charge. Mr. J. H. Rees—Cannot the people place the re- fuse outside in the night in readiness for the morn- ing. Tho Surveyor said he could not account for it, but he knew that they placed refuse in casks weighing two to three hundred weights, so they could not expect one man to lift that weight up. The Chairman pointed out that they had been served with notices with regard to the weight. No resolution was passed. The doctor advised that all private slaughter- houses should be prohibited, and that the town slaughter-house be open during certain stated hours, in order that supervision could be efficiently carried out. Mr. D. Pritchard Davies—I understood we could close all private slaughter-houses. The Clerk explained that he had always advised them to register slaughter-houses for a fixed period. Their slaughter-houses, however, were not regis- tered for a fixed period, and consequently as long as they were kept clean the council could not touch them. A small committee was appointed to see that the slaughter-houses were kept properly. With regard to the condition of inhabited dwel- lings in the town, the Medical Officer, in hia report, stated that out of 522 houses. 41 required some re- pairs. There were six vacant houses which were absolutely unfit for habitation, and he asked for a closing order. The Surevyor said two of the houses were m South Bank and four in Bank Buildings. Mr. Claud Davies said that when he proposed & resolution that they should grant a closing order, he understood that noticee had been given first of all to the landlords. If notices had not been issued he wished the resolution to be withdrawn. The Medical Officer said that there were really several houses in the towm that ought to be seen to. Notices had been served on some people, but they had not done anything. What he asked for was not exactly a closing order, but that these houses should not be occupied until repairs had been carried out to their satisfaction. 1 ■^I"; Claud Davies said he did not think it was beneficial to the interest of the town that they should be raising questions continually with regard ro the condition of certain houses. He proposed that a small committee should be appointed, and that the whole thing should be gone into orice and for all. He was in sympathy with the officials, and de- sired to carry out what they required. A small committee of four, with the Medical Officer and the Surveyor, was ultimately appointed to deal with the matter. Dealing with the water supply. the Medical Officer. in his report, stated that he advised last yejir a reconsideration of the engineer's report of the unsatisfactory supply to thef upper part of the town. For five months last year, they had to resort to the intermittent system. He had raised an ob- jection about ix months ago against making use 0lI-J "aeslV:in water, but his protest was over- rided. He was however, still of the same opinion. They had an abundant supply at Llandyfan. hut on account of repeated permits to tap the main in its course, and numerous leakages in the town a lower pressure was produced. When the long-delayed re- iayincr and the cleaning of the pipes in Geortre- street had been carried out. they could look for- ward to a more abundant, supply to that part of the town. Mr. Claud Davies said that according to the re- port of the expert who they emploved to Lraiige the water, the supply was enough for a town .seven times as hrge.-The Clerk agreed with ATr. Davies. INFECTIOUS DISEASES. 1 AIfr<1'cal Officer again complained that he had found great- difficulty in getting parents to appreciate the importance of perfect isolation. He said it \v,is impossible to restrict epidemics or any other infectious diseases when parents allowed their childlen to go about before time. He knew of a case only a short time ago when a patient, who was notified to him, suffering from diphtheria, was walking the streets within eight days of the time he v.as notified. He stronglv advised the council to provide a steam disinfecting apparatus in connec- tion with the electric light station in order to deal with infected articles. ^The Surveyor said the apparatus would cost about On the motion of Mr. Claud Davies, the con- sideration of a new apparatus was deferred. r 1 n t r l n -he hafl roceived a letter from the Llandilo-fach Parish Council, stating that their part of he arrangements with regard to the Carregcrug pathway had not been carried out, and the twelve £ .°uPp8sr' "hich h*d*" The Clerk explained that the resolution was sunply to■ supp'y twelve tons of gravel at the station without the haulage, but the parish council were there1" ,mPression that they were to have it haulage? Jones—What would be the cost of The Surveyor—Abo\it 3s. 6d. per ton. I do ot think you will have anybody to do it under that Mr. J. H. Rees—I think that is a very big pn -.2. It was decided to adhere to the original resoln- tion and supply the gravel at Llandilo Station. A letter was read from Mr. Tom Rees. scavenger, asking, owing to the increase cost of commodities' for an increase of 4s. in his wages. A simrar letter was read from Eel ward Lewis. Mr. Claud Davies said that although they had I resolved not to grant a war bonus he was now convinced that a bonus should be given. Lord Dynevor had granted war bonuses to his empires and even the County Council, which were pennv wise and a pound foolish, had done so. ITe was satisfied that a £ 1 now was not so good as 16s. before the war. He proposed that the whole of th employes be dealt with at the next finance meeting, to A. E. Harries seconded, and this was agreed Notice was received from the County Council pointing out- that if the Council required lectures on horticulture and bee-keeping delivered to classes in the town (lecturer, Mr. Pickard), they should make application. Several members spoke very highly of the addresses delivered last year, and it was decided to make application. The Surveyor, in his report, drew the attention (If the County Surveyor to the road (near the (County School), which, he said. was in a verv dirtv condition. Mr. D. W. Jones said there was a bisr hean near the entrance to the County School, and for the benefit of the children's health it should he removed at once. He proposed that they should write to ^lrv.ey°r with regard to the matter. Mr. p. P. Dnvies said he would like to go further jud ask the Countv Council to extend the path as far as Gloucester House, so that the children should have protection on both sides of the road. Mr. Claud Davies said the Countv Council had gone into very heavy expenses recently in doing the new path down to White Hart, and he did not think they should ask them to go to a similar ex- pense just now. A small committee was apoointed to see Mr Gomer Henry with a view to having the matter remedied.

No title

Between £ 30.000 and £ 40,000 damage TO is caused by a fire which broke out at the Orch.ird Sugar Re- finei>. Greenock, on TVednesday. A verv larcfe quantity^ of refined sugar was destroyed, and the warehouses and stores were completely gutted.

WELSH VICAR SUED

WELSH VICAR SUED CHURCH BUILDING DISPUTE AT AMMANFORD. An action was brought in the King's Bench Divi- sion last week, before Mr. Justice Atkin, by the ice trustee of the property of Arthur Joseph Colborne a builder, carrying on business at Baldwin-street, Bristol, against the Rev. John Wal-den Jones, of Ammaniord, and others, for the recovery of £ 2,560 168. 7d., for work done and materials supplied to the defendants in e erection of a church at Amman- tord. Ihe plaintiff was represented by Mr. Morton J1.U, and Mr Compton Smith (instructed by Messrs. Tarry. bnerlook, and King, a.gents for Messrs. Townsend, Jones, and Wood, of Swindon); and Mr. Me J 'c a? Mr' DouShty (instructed by ? Walt R K Df°??an' and Co- agents for Mr. ieSTt, B"b°P' °' U'n^ «■"> t" «>= Mr. Morton, in opening the case for the plaint;if, said the action was originally commenced by Mr Colborne against the defendant, the vicar of A,n- manford, but since then the plaintiff had filed his pUmon, and had been adjudicated a bankrupt, and the action was being continued by his trustee in bankruptcy. Other defendants had been added who were members of the church building committed Ster^' mtonfc fT1 alk'g0d that a contfact was entered into on February 16. 1911. between the plaintiff and the defendant for the erection of a church at Ammanford. There was an alternative bv'the bmld° the °ffeCt that th° contr;,ct was made w s tt fluT^TV"0?; Pe Cause of the 'ction committee! £ ° CS? fullv°ttnl>er 21,-a"d Novornber 7, 1912,' wror- and" declin'd P'"PJtl'd,0e of tho agreement repudiated thon af/e °n f T Part t0 P°rform the same> and thereafter wrongfully entered and took possession of and excluded Colborne from the site ofTe Xrch proccwLW1 W°rkS'• and pr°vonted from date nf t erection of the church. At the Material in?n.evanco e had done work and supplied £ 5 158 T"rr0d °/pcnse9 to the amount of ±- £ >.158, and had received cash amount,n- to £ 2 597 wP lance due t0 of £ 2,560 16s 7d for which he now sued. Tho defendants ,et a counter-claim for delay in completing the church and special damages and damages were claimexMo the amount of £ 884. claimed to wi°« ™ rearim rosunK>d his opening statement. After M^reVPS 'gir Corre9<,ondc!nce. he said that on for the"re^oi a T™ WUS ,S9Ued against Mr. Jones and for d*m 6ry P'oncy due under the oontract and for damages for breach of contract. After le«al proceedings a certificate was at last extracted from buddi^ h rf Jh°WOVOr' triod complete the building himself and complained of delay Work was work prcperly Th0 thai the delay, which he attributed to the keeping the whole of the work back, And th2" the* zszsrzs™*for de,ay tha< sa^\ifrLh"lJrPhA,b0rne- givin* ev*<*ce, said h* bankruptcy had n > connection with the building of the church at Ammanford. He had to'fiM fSo T?e t?nuaC^ SOme them amounting h. CdSS. t0 tha' The V was adjourned till 9Mursday, when Mr. A .J. continuing his evidence, said Amm f /n W,th hnildine of the church at Ammanford as expeditiously as possible, and was most anxious to carry out the contract. Cross-examined by Mr. Hawke, witness said he was anxious to get the contract, as he had never built a church before. He denied that there was an in- sufficient number of labourers on the excavation work. He could not deny that he had not sufficient cro?vation' As soon a5 he got the specifications he made proper preparations for carrv- mg on the job. He did not think thev ha.1 got the and for the cement, although the contract hnd been going on for five months. There was a sand famine in that district at the time. He had calculated on getting sand from Swansea, and there was no sand TTJ"!0 i° 1?°^' ,In fo"r months after the work started the shell of the building ought to have been weL advanced, but. as a matter of fact, very little had he^n done. Witness denied that he was in financial difficulty at that time. At the end of four months the amount of work done was lamentable, and witness had not meant it to cost so much as it was costing. The job was very