Teitl Casgliad: Carmarthen journal and South Wales weekly advertiser

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 8 o 8
Full Screen
9 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
Moored Memories

Moored Memories. (Continued from Page 5. ) things are very small; who smile and endure pri- vately the worst that can cross them and still have enough sunshine to spare for their neighbours; who know that the main object in this garden is to plant and tend the beautiful flowers of service to others—these I think will find a glorious garden awaiting them when, in that last silence, they must stand alone and face the door in the wall." L. G.

Progress of the War

Progress of the War. Friday. WARSAW MENACED. MR. ASQUITH ON TARIFFS German troops have closed in on W a-saw from the west and south-west; between Warsaw ard th) fortress of Iwangorod the retreating Russians Lave reached the Vistula; Iwangorod is threatened, for two main bridge-heads of the Vistula to the aouth have fallen to the invaders. Such is the German Headquarters' report covering the operations west of the Vistula. Whether the Russian retreat to the Vistula was carried out voluntarily is not known, but, except in the neighbourhood of Iwangorod, when Austrian troops carried out the attack, the fighting does not appear to have been heavy. War- saw is now threatened from three sides—north, west, and south, the line having been swung back to the Vistulaf at Gora-Kalwarja with Blonie as the pivot. The German report sums up tin" position in these words:—" South of the Vistula the Rus- sians were pressed back into the enlarged bridge- head position of Warsaw on the line running from Blonie to Nadarzyw and Gora-Kalwarja. At no point on this new front have the enemy yet reached the railway communications between Warsaw and Russia, which are still protected by the Vistula on the south and the Narew on the north. The Lublin- Cholm Railway is still intact, though Mackensen's phalanx has been driven closer to Cholm. In the North-Courland and in the country between the great curve of the Nïemen-the position is more threatening- for our Allies, while the threat on the Narew is not so pronounced. On Tuesday and Wednesday there was violent fighting in Alsace to the west of Munster. The French in the last two months have been working' up the valley of the Fecht from the south towards Munster and have taken Metzeral and Sondernaoh; lately attacks north of the valley have been launched with success. The threat on Munster from three sides, with a possible advance on Colmar, has roused the enemy to many counter-attacks, which have so far had no success. The battle for the gateway to Trie-ste-Gorizia and ,the Carso heights—is still in progress and ex- tending. General Cadorna reports the capture cf part of a line of heights dominating Gorizia, and that the enemy have been driven from more trenches on the Carso. The Italian attack from Plava (against Monte Santo to the north of Gori- zia) is also progressing, as is that against Podgora on the right bank of the Isonzo. The names of 64 officers and 831 men of the two Services occur in the casualty lists published to- day. Sir Ian Hamilton reports that since July 18 our forces in Gallipoli have made steady progress in consolidating, and in some cases extending, the trenches already won. The agitation against our present policy in re- gard to. cotton cargoes forr neutral/ countries is growing in the United States. Replying to a deputation of City bankers and merchants, headed by Lord St. Aldwyn, who urged the necessity of public and private economy and advocated more taxation of imported goods, and income-tax for all, Mr. Asquith said that with regard to a direct tax on lower grade incomes he had for a long time been of opinion that such a measure should be proposed. He also thought that an exhaustive inquiry should be entered into upon the subject of taxation of imports. Saturday. RUSSIA'S SPLENDID STAND THE GOVERNMENT AND COTTON. The last news from the Eastern front is of Ger- man origin, and, though still couched in terms of assurance of continued success, on the whole throws a more favourable light on the Russian position. It is clear that little further progress has been made by the enemy to the north of Warsaw, that the Russians have been able to take up their new positions around Warsaw without serious im- pediment, and that the great offensive of the Ar :h- duke Joseph and von Mackensen has yet failed to pierce effectually the armies ranged along the Lublin-Cholm front, protecting the important rail- way from Warsaw, through Iwangorod, Lublin, Cholm, and Kowel to South Russia. The points mentioned in this German dispatch are a continued advance in Courland from Windau towards Riga, a small action near the fortress of Rozan on the Narew. the failure of Russian sorties from Nowo Georgiewsk, the clearing of Russians from the west bank of the^istula above Iwangorod, and the breaking 01 the obstinate resistance of the enemy at several points between the Vistula and the Bug." No mention is made of the fighting near Sokal on the Bug, where. according to the last Russian report, the Austrian forces on Macken- sen's right have been driven back to the left bank with serious losses. At two points on the French front, the Argonne and the Fecht Valley, the heavy fighting which broke out recently continues. In the Argonne Forest, through which the massed forces of the Crown Prince tried in vain to reach the Verdun communications, the French are gradually winning I back their slight loss of ground. On Thursday night fighting went in their favour near Baga- telle, the scene of the fiercest conflicts in the forest. So far the Bavarian troops in the Vosges have failed to check the French offensive towards Mun- ster. The last positions won by our Allies, on the crests of Linge and the Barrenkopf. were pene- trated by the enemy after heavy bombardment, but were very soon won back. A battle is still in progress on the Isonzo front from Tolmino to Monfalccne. and at several points Italian troops have advanced. Italian airmen have raided the line between Nabresina and Triest. Austrian warships have bombarded Ortona and the Tremite Islands, causing slight damage, according to the Rome official report. The news is published in the United States that the British Government is considering a s-heme for compensating cotton producers for our interference with their trade. The Times" Washington Cor- respondent urges the importance of a prompt de- cision on this subject. and of making cotton contra- band. The King continued his inspection of munition works in the Midlands yesterday and returned to Windsor. In a speech at Saltley the King said he ereatlv appreciited the evident zeal and cheerful- ness with which the hands were working, riot only to maintain the present output, but to increase it. He was confident that this would be done and there would be one certain result—victory. The names of SO officers and 660 men are in the casualty lists published to-day. Monday. GERMANS CROSS THE NAREW. BUT PROGRESS SLOWLY. The Germans claim to have broken through the defences of the Narew between two of the northern forts. Obyrte Pultusk and Rozhan. The two for- tresses, the Berlin official report says, were stormed irresistibly. The enemy are now approaching the ug and the Narew. They are meeting with tena- cious opposition. Warsaw and Iwaricrorod fronts have not bern subjected to heavy attacks, for all available enemy forces south of the Polish capital «"■ still concentrated on the T.ublin-Cholm front. "The T.rnes" PetroTrad Correspondent says that si -s are not wanting that here the German offensive has been weakened by their excessive battering against a stone-wall defence. A fresh success by the French in the Vosges is reported. The German defensive positions from La FontelJdle to Launois were stormed on Saturday night, and over 300 prisoners, belonging to four different battalions and to a machine-gun company. were taken. La Fontenelle is 12 miles to the north of bt. Die and south-east of Luneville. Sir John French reports further activity on the British front east of Ypres, caused chiefly by our success at Hooge on July 21. On Friday a Turkish attack on the left flank of our Southern forces in the Gallipoli Peninsula was repulsed. The Turkish force that invaded the hinter- land of Aden from the Yemen, before which our forces retired on Aden, is now being driven back. By an action last Wednesday, in which we had 25 casualties, the Turks were foroed to fall back to Lahej. General Cadorna reported yesterday that the battle of the Carso—in which a concentration of &OO guns gained the Italians an important success on the 22nd—is developing favourably. A convention ceding to Bulgaria the Turkish por- tion of the Dedeagatch Railway, with the territory between the River Maritza and the frontier, has been signed. The railway runs through Turkish territory in the Adrianople vilayet, which was lost to Bulgaria after the second Balkan war. The Times Corres- pondent in the Balkan Peninsula telegraphs that the cession implies no engagement whatever of a politi- cal character. President Wilscn's unequivocal Note of warning to Germany has stirred a wave of enthusiasm in the United States. The belief is expressed that the door has been shut upon all further argument about the main issue. There is no talk of war or rupture of diplomatic relations. It is hoped, and believed in many quarters, that Germany will in future refrain from imperilling more American lives or property. Mr. vrn son has directed the Secretaries of War and of the Navy t, -submit to him a programme of national defence. The week-end casualty lists contain ihe names of 55 officers and more than 2 000 men. Nearly half the casualties are reported from the Dardanelles. Tuesday. GERMANS CHECKED. The absorbing question cf the war just now is, will Warsaw fall. úp to a few days ago the enemy seemed to be sweeping all before it, but thew has been a sudden check, and Russian strategy is revealing itself as one of intentional re- tirement up to a point 'only. Such progress as the Germans have made is according to their own claim. and is not wholly confirmed by the Russians. A German submarine has cun an American ship on a voyage from Archangel to Belfast with a cargo of flax. The crew were .saved. Wednesday. GERMANS CRObb THE NAREW. The enemy has crossed the Narew at one point, but are checked there; other German claims are not confirmed and their progress is very slow. Three Norwegian vessels, one Danish vessel, and 10 British trawlers were reported yesterday to have been sunk by German submarines in the North Sea. Mr. Asquith in Parliament said that the total British naval casualties up to July 20 amounted to 9,106, and the military casualties up to July 18 numbered 321,889, making an aggregate of 330,995 Thursday RUSSIA'S TPIAL. The struggle around Warsaw is a life and death one, and although the Germans are showing signs of exhaustion the Russians are undergoing a great trial. Mr. Lloyd George told the House of Commons last night that the Government is setting ten new national arsenals."

mft JQTUKGS

mft JQTUKGS Mr. T. E. Jones, mathematical master at the Carmarthen Grammar School, has just received a valuable appointment as coach under the Admiralty. We understand he will be engaged with the Fleet in the Noru. Sea, or wherever it may be. The following letter was received at Stangrach Farm, Llanfynydd, that weekly subscribes eggs for the wounded: Loyal ty Ward, Bethnal Green Military Hospital, Cambridge-road, London, N.E. 17/7/15. Dear Miss Riebards.-I hope you will excuse me writing to you, but I wish to thank you for your egg which I had while in hospital at Boulogne. I have been sent home after having had enteric fever. Am going on well. but still weak, so hope you will excuse writing, as I am shaky. Kind regards to your father and mother.—Yours truly, Pte. G.- W. Turnpenny, R.A.M.C." The local committee at Llanfynydd have been very industrious in their work, over 700 eg having been collected in the last month. The vicar has received the accompanying letter:—41 Chief Office, 154, Fleet-Street, London. The Committee of the National Egg Collection beg to acknowledge with grateful thanks trie receipt from the parish of Llan- fynydd of eggs for our wounded soldiers and sailors. and are glad to note that you hope to continue send- ing us more. I need hardly assure you that every egg we can possibly collect is urgently needed and that any assistance you can give us will be a real national service." Mrs. Spence-Jones has given another proof of her practical sympathy by taking four wounded soldiers to pass their convalescent stage at Pantglas. They were visited during the week by two of their com- rades accommodated at Maesteilo, and by a party from Llwvnybrain, near Llandovery. Private J. Griffiths, 1st Welsh Regiment, No. 1, Brigstocke-terrace, Ferryside, who volunteered at the beginning of the war, has been through some heavy fighting. He was gassed and wounded early this month and is now in a military hospital in London. Mr. H. Griffiths and Mr. Thomas, both masters at the Llandovery County School, have just joined the Chemical Corps attached to the Royal Engin- eers. Mr. Fred Warry. who for the past eleven years has been baker at the Crown Stores, Llan- dovery, has also enlisted in the Army Service Corps. News has just reached Llandovery that Private Willie Land, of the King's Royal Rifles. has been wounded in action. He is a son of Mr. W. Land, a gamekeeper on the Llwyn-y-Brain Estate. Lance-Corporal Matthew E. Gray, of the Welsh R.A.M.C., who has been on duty for some months at the Cambridge Military Hospital as an operating- room assistant, has left for foreign service. some- where in the Mediterranean." Lance-Corporal Gray has held positions on the reporting staffs of The Welshman, Carmarthen; "The Narberth News." Pembrokeshire: and "The Bath Herald." While on The Bath Herald," he was one of the gun section of the 4th Somerset Light Infantry, com- manded by another Bath journalist, Capt. Egbert Lewis. He transferred from this regiment to the Welsh Regiment. When war broke out he was in the office of a Cardiff shipping firm. Recently, the three sons of Olivp. Boar's Head Hotel Carmarthen, were home on leave to- getber. George was from the trenches and had to go back in 96 hours. Tim is in the Glamorgan Yeomunry, and Oswald in the Duke of Wellington Rough Riders. This was the first time George had leave of any kind since the early part of the war. He has been in the trenches all the time and his friends felt it very much that he and many good fellows like him have to return to the trenches while there are thousands of young fellows who have not enlisted at all and who ought to do so. Recently we published a paragraph inadvertently. taken from a Cardiff paper, with reference to the Rev. H. R. Evans, son of Dr. and Mrs. Evans, Llan- dyssul. The paragraph seemed to imply that Mr. Evans had only j.ust joined the Army. but as a matter of fact he joined long ago and has been out in the Front for some time. Not long ago we published an extract from one of his letters written from the Front to his former vicar, the Rev. W. Merlin Davies, vicar of Llangollen. Two smart young ofiicere were passing np a certain street in the old town a week or two ago. The one had been there some time. the other was a new arrival. The old hand was heard to say to the new" I say, old chap. don't look up at that window or those wenches will be down in a jiffv, and their arms around us, and we shall be jet in for the picture palace. I know them; only rub your right foot along the ground and I Second-lieutenant Baldwin, Black Lion Hotel, Lampeter, has been transferred from the 11th (Servioe) Battalion Royal Welsh Fusiliers to be second-lieutenant of the Welsh Horse Regiment. That a German mine had been found on the beach was the hue and cry throughout Bury Port on Fri- day. Hundreds of people hurried to the Pier to see it. The discovery was made by two coast- guards—W. Bevan and John Hughes-who very carefully brought it to the coastguard station. It laid outside during the day, and the broad arrow was very prominently chalked on it, with the words Not to be touched." It was cone-shaped, 57 inches in diameter and about 2 feet 6 inches in length. Later in the day an officer from the Mumbles arrived and immediately reported that the grim" discovery was nothing more than an automatic light buoy, whioh had drifted into the bay from tlme Irish Sea. During the past week four St. Clears boya have gone out to the Dardanelles to do their bit, viz., Privates S. Brigstock and Gilasby, of the 4th Welsh, and Sappers William James and Thomas, of the R.E. Evidently these young men have made excellent progress, as they have only joined during this year. Pte. Gilasby is the landlord of the Blue Boar Hotel, and leaves his wife in charge. All wish them every success in their dangerous work against the Turks, and trust that they may escape all the perils of this terrible war. On his return to the trenches on Friday evening, Corporal Alquin Thomas. 2nd Welsh, had an en- thusiastic send-off at Llannon. As the motor left, the crowd cheered heartily. A collection amonsr the crowd realised a good sum for cigarettes for the corporal. He has been engaged in most of the great battles on the French frontier since the outbreak of the war. Sergeant Fuller, V.C., addressed a well-attended recruiting meeting at Newca-stle-Emlyn on Friday last, under the presidency of the Rev. G. Evans, B.S.R.D., vicar, making an eloquent appeal for recruits. He said 36 of his relations on his father's side were serving the colours and 23 on his mother's side, and a cousin of hi-a Fuller" of the Guards —had won the V.C. Sergeant Longden, D.C.M.. Major B. R. M. Glossop. 5th Dragoon Guards, Capt. Margrave, R.O., Carmarthen; Messrs. D. T. George, solicitor, and D. Roy Evans, also spoke. Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Davies, of Kanowna Villa, Brynamman, have three sons with the colours. Mr. and Mrs. Davies spent some years in Western Aus- tralia, and when the war broke out two of their sons were in the Colony. David, the eldest, joined the 3rd Brigade cof the 1st Australian Contingent, but Morgan, the other, was not accepted. David has been in the fighting in the Gallipoli Peninsula, and Morgan returned to the Mother Country and joining the Royal Field Artillery, is expecting to go on active service. The third son, Emrys, is with the R.A.M.C. in France. P.O. Matthew Davies, of the Carmarthen Borough Police Force, has joined Lord Tredegar's South Wales Battalion of the Royal Naval Division, now at the Crystal Palace. He was enrolled on Mon- day last bv the local Hon. Recruiting Agent, Mr. W. J. Wallis-Jones (solicitor), who will be glad to see a few more of his type. We are sure P.C. Davies will obtain rapid promotion in this popular bran-h of the Senior Service, which is intended for both land and sea duties. Pte. Wm. Williams, 9th Battalion Welsh) Ser- vice Regiment. Cambrian House, Llanstephan, is at home on a ten-days' furlough, recuperating after a dislocated shoulder. This has prevented him going with his battalion, which is already somewhere in France." An uncle has already laid down his life for his country in the present war. Mrs. Llewellyn Phillips, who has been mentioned in Sir John French's, dispatch, was matron of the Duchess of Westminster's hospital at Le Touquet for several months, and is now matron of the Red Cross Hospital at Giza, Egypt, the commandant of which is Temporary Major Llewellyn Phillips, R.A.M.C., son of the late Dr. Phillips, of Bank House, Cardigan. Corpl. Holt, of the Royal Flying Corps, 6th Squad- ron, one of the wounded soldiers now at Carmar- then, has been all over the world. He was cut off at Ypres for three weeks, and, as he says, lived all that time on soldiers' boots. He won the first prize at the -clay-pigeon match at Mr. Kenneth Walker's the other day. He brought down nine pigeons out of ten, and was given a prize of a silver fox. After the farewell concert given to the soldiers on the eve of their departure for the front from Kidwelly, a sum of £ 7 10s. was distributed among them. It is only fair to state that, included in this amount, is the sum of 16s. 8d., which was collected amongst a few friends by Mr. Emlyn Williams, Water-street, who spent some months with his brave comrades on Salisbury Plain, but was afterwards found medicaly unfit to remain in the Army. In a certain nook the other day a number of lively boys in khaki were gathered—Canadians, Scottish. English, and Welsh. They were very warm, and, perhaps, a wee bit elevated. A lady came in holding a bundle of tracts in her hand. She noticed that a Canadian spoke hoarsely and coughed very badly, and, accosting him, she said:—"You have a verv bad cold, sir." "Yes," he replied, so would you if u had been in Salis- bury mudpools as I have for weeks." And do you take anything for it?" Yes, Madam, yes, as mucn whisky as I can get." The good lady meant well, but we regret to say that the tracts were un- delivered. The Velindre House family, Lampeter, have shown their patriotism in a very worthy manner, and have set an example worthy of emulation. Two sons, Messrs. Alun and Arnold Davies, are officers in the Army; Mr. Ernest Davies has and is doing effec- tual voluntary work in connection with the Red Cross Society; and Miss Minnie G. Davies has been appointed a nurse in a military hospital. Such noble sacrifice deserves special mention, as thiso. four patriots have volunteered of their on accord. May they all return safe to their home after their hard work. Petty Officer Thomas Thomas, Maesyfallen, Llan- dilo, who is on H.M.S. Revenge, was home for a short leave during the week end, and returned on Mondav to Chatham. Sapper W. Davies, R.E., spent a five-days' fur- lough from Tidworth Camp with his brother, Mr. Ben. Davies. butcher, Llanstephan. The sapper joined early last August, and after thorough train- ing in Ireland and other centres, expects soon to be under orders for the front. Then—look out. Kaiser. Lance-Corpl. Hill, of the "Carmarthen Woun- deds," had a curious experience the other day. When walking through the town he saw a gentle- man he thought he knew and accosted him. Are'nt you Mr. Kenneth AValk(,r? he asked. That's right," was the answer, and thereupon fol- lowed recognitions. Lance-Corpl. Hill used to be Mr. Walker's assistant game-keeper at Whitland be- fore he went to the war. It was a coincidence that he' should have been invalided to Carmarthen so near his former employer's house. He was with the party invited to Mr. Walker's house, as re- ferred to elsewhere. and won the second prize in the clay-pigeon, shooting match. Mr. T. Stanley Nicholas, son of Mrs. A. Nicholas, of Wellfieldroad, and formerly of the "Welshman reporting staff, has joined the Royal Navy as a boy 2nd eLls seaman, and after passing hig final medical and educational tests at Bristol, proceeded to the Royal Naval Barracks at Portsmouth on Friday last. Mr. Nicholas, who is sixteen years of age, intends serving in the Na,vy for twenty-four years and all his friends join in wishing him every success and pros- perity in his new career. The Army Orders for July contains the announce- ment that the St. David's (Carmarthen) Church Lads' Brigade is a recognised cadet company aft, ¡i- ft ted to the 4th Battalion Welsh Regiment. Serct. Baker, of the Coldstream Guards, who is among the wounded soldiers quartered at the Car- marthen Red Cross Hospital, has quite a literary turn. While he was invalided with German measles (!) at Boulogne some time ago he com- posed the following excellent verses, and sent them to his nurse on behalf of himself and his ward com- |panions:— We are twelve war-worn warriors Who. bj1. a slight mischance, j' Are doomed to isolation At a camp somewhere in France. We're a fairly, happy party, Although we've got no band; W- pass onr leisure hours away I In carrying stones and sand. Our Sister hails from the Emerald Isle, And she never puts on side; You could not find a better one No matter where you tried. Our Doctor, too's. a decent sort, If you broke a bone he'd set it, I He orders poisons by the ton, But it's Sister see's you get it. I But now, Alas! our time is up, There's none caught German Measles, And soon they'll pack us up the line To pot off German weasels. j But ere we leave this compound, We will give three cheers for Sister; Who gave us physic every day, But never gave a blister. The Local Itar Munitions Bureau at 34, Quay- street, Carmarthen, is still open for the enrolment of suitable Volunteers for Munitions Work. The members of the Spy to Methodist Church at Llanfynydd are busy gathering money for the Red Cross. They are doing wry well, but the full amount is not yet known.

NATIONAL UNION OF TEACHERS

NATIONAL UNION OF TEACHERS CARMARTHENSHIRE ASSOCIATION. [To the Editor of the CARMARTHEN JOUHNAL.] SIB,—At the monthly meeting of the Carmarthen- shire Education Committee, held on July 8th, an application by the teachers of the county for an improved Scale of Salaries was considered, and de- ferred until after the war. Mr. John Lloyd, Peny- bank, is reported to have said that he believed on the whole the teachers were satisfied, and this was an agitation got up by a few in one corner of the county." The Council of the Carmarthenshire Teachers' Association met on Saturday, 24th July, to consider the Education Committee's decision, and strong criticisms were passed on this statement of Mr. Lloyd. I was instructed to reply to the statement on behalf of the teachers. The annual meeting of the Carmarthenshire Teachers' Association, held at Llandilo in May, | unanimously adopted a resolution to apply for an improved^ Scale of Salaries; every teacher received notice of the meeting, together with notice of the motion, but no teacher said at the meeting that he or she was satisfied with his or her present salary. The signatures to the application include Mr. D. C. Evans, headmaster of St. Clears Council School; Mr. T. Thomas, headmaster of Glanamman Council Schools; Mr. D. Thomas, headmaster of Kidwelly National Schools; and Mr. E. R. R. Lewis, certificated classmaster of Llechyfedach Council Schools,—all duly elected by the Carmarthenshire Teahers. Mr. Lloyd received a copy of this application, yet he raises the childish argument that this is an agita- tion got up by a few in one corner of the county. He knows quite well that the teachers of Carmar- thenshire are dissatisfied be-oaiise- 1. 200 Education Authorities in England and Wales-iiieltidin,- Glamorgan and Monmouth coun- ties—pay better salaries than Carmarthenshire does. 2. The Carmarthenshire Teachers give as good service as the Teachers working under those 200 Education Authorities: and 3. The standard of living is as high in Carmar- thenshire as in the areas of those 200 Education Authorities. Mr. John Llovd is also reported to have said that the "Increase in raising the maxima of teachers' salaries last year is costing the countv 25, 000. Through the courtesy of the Press I showed, a short while ago, the inaccuracy of this statement, and I beg to repeat now that the present scale will never cost anything like such an increase. What good purpose can Mr. Lloyd hope to serve by making use of such transparently false statements? He knows they are false, for he has the facts to his hand. The teachers regret the necessity of having to contradict these false statements. Thanking you for inserting this.—I am. yours respectfully, E. J. STANBURY, Press Secretary. Felinfoel C. School, Llanellv. 27th July, 1915.

PENCADER LLANFIHANGELARARTH

PENCADER & LLANFIHANGEL-AR-ARTH MUSICAL SUCCESSES.—At the recent examination held under the auspices of the Associated Board of the Royal Academy of Music and London College of Music, the following pupils of Miss L. A. Johns, A.L.C.M., A.T.S.C., Pencader, were successful:— Elementary stage: Miss Jane Thomas, Vaerdre Facli, Llandyssul; Miss Mary Hannah Jones, 7, Davies- Street, Pencader; Miss Bessie Eileen Thomas, Green- field Stores; Miss Bessie Olwen James, Pantteg Shop, Maesycru,giau. Preliminary; Enoch L. Davies, Maesglas, Gwyddgrug; Dilys Eirwen Johns, Dyffryn Gwen, Pencader. The two latter obtained distinction, a very creditable performance. Con- gratulations to all. PERSONAL.-P.C. Thomas Jones, Castle View, Pencader, has again come home from Llandilo for a further period of rest. He has been at home recently nursing a broken leg, which he had sus- tained while on duty. The injured limb is still somewhat swollen at the ankle, and a further rest was ordered by the medical officer. It is hoped he will soon be quite fit and well again. AcCIDE-NT.-On Wednesday, 21st instant, while engaged in pitching hay at the Farmers' Arms, Pencader, Mr. Andrew McNally had the misfortune to injure his hand which was damaged by the pitcher. He had to be attended by Dr. A. T. Evans, Llandyssul, and we are glad to learn that lie is progressing favourably. MILITARY.—Letters from Sapper Evan Davies and Sapper Tom Davies, sons of Mrs. Davies, Dol. bautau, Llanfihangel-ar-arth, show that both are enjoying good health. Sapper Evan Davies has been at the front since last August; while Tom recently arrived in France. Both are in the Signal Co., Royal Engineers. Good luck to both, and a safe return. MENAGERIE.—On Friday, 23rd inst., Bostock and Wombwell's Menagerie visited Llandyssul, and a large number from the district took the oppor- tunity of seeing the show, which was much appre- ciated. MUSICAL SUCCESS.—We are pleased to learn of the success of Miss Bessie Eileen Thomas, daugh- ter of Mr. and Mrs. J. R. Thomas, Greenfield Stores, Llanfihangel-ar-arth, in passing the Ele- mentary Examination in Pianoforte Playing, held recently under the auspices of the Associated Board of the Royal Academy of Music and London Col- lege of Music. We congratulate both pupil and teacher. BEE-KEEPING.—The honey bee still continues to gain popularity, especially the noted Italians." Perhaps regard for our latest ally may have in- spired the "boom" in Italian bees. Anyhow, there is another enthusiast for this interesting and profit- able "hobby," and quite a respectable number of bee-keepers are now to be found in the district. The latest converts have. selected Italian bees in preference to the ordinary black bee. WEDDING.—On Tuesday, the 20th inst., at St. Peter's Church, Lampeter. Mr. Samuel Evans, son of Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Evans, Brynawel, Llanfi- hangel-ar-arth, was married to Miss Mary Evans, College-street, Lampeter. The bride was given away by her brother, Alderman Evan Evans, Col- lege-street; while the bridegroom was attended by his father, Mr. Samuel Evans, and brother, Mr. Daniel Evans. The occasion was of enhanced in- terest owing to the fact that the bride's brother, Mr. David Evans, was married at the same time to Miss Thomas, Arthog, and so a double event was celebrated. The ceremony was performed by the Rev. Canon Camber-Williams, assisted by the Rev. D. Evans and Rev. R. Keble Williams. The wedding breakfast was partaken of at College- street, and later the newly-married couples left for Llanwrtyd Wells. Hir oes a llwyddiant." MUSICAL.—Congratulations are extended to our boy soprano. Master Idris Daniels, of Gwen Cot- tage, upon his recent successes in securing two first prizes at the Penclawdd eisteddfcd, near Swansea, on Saturday last --the children's solo (under 16) out of eight keen competitors, and the open soprano solo out of nine competitors, including one National winner. He was very highly eulogised for his fine renderings. We understood that he was engaged to sing at a concert the following day in aid of the hospital, and also at Drefach. Henllan, next Banlc Holiday. Bravo!

Family Notices

MARRIAGE. HARRIES-EVANS.-July 21st, at Ormskirk Parish Church, Lance-Corporal William Blethyn Harries. A.S.C.. only son of Captain James Harries, Cardiff. to Frances, only daughter of Mrs. Evans, and the late Captain Thomas Evans, The Croft, Llanybri, Llanstephan. DEATHS. DAVIES.—July 2nd, at 6. Bryniorwg, Tanerdv, Carmarthen, Mr. David Davies. aged 29 years. PHILLIPS.—July 23, at the North British Stores, Lammas-street, Carmarthen, Ceridwen. daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Rowland Phillips, aged 25 years RICHARDS.—At the residence of her son-in-law, 5, Denham Green Place, Edinburgh, Anne, widow of the late John Richards. Mapsland, Lauaharne aged 75 years. TOBIN.— July 25th, at 6, Wood's-row. Carmarthen Anna Cissie, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. E. Tobin, asred 22 years. INIT,T,IA-%fS.-Jizl v 23th. Mrs. Margaret Williams wife of Mr. Wm. Williams, Llamrain Mills. Llan- stephan road, near Carmarthen, aged 70 vearsu WILLIAMS.—July 21st. at Pen-y-lan, Great D^rk- gate-street. Aberystwyth. Leah. widow of the late David Williams, and mother of Captain R D. Williams, A.V.C., British Expeditionary Force.

Advertising

THE LONDON CITY & MIDLAND BANK LIMITED L 30th June, 1915. SUBSCRIBED CAPITAL Z22,947,804 PAID-UP OAPITAL 4780792 REfEJWE FUND CASH — 36,356 672 *C 62,648,711 DEPOSITS 142,388,314 FOREIGN BRANCH 8, FINCH LANE, E.C.

THE PflGRIMjS CHURCH

THE PflGRIMjS CHURCH A POPULAR ANNUAL SERVICE. The 34th annual memorial service was held oh Sunday last in the ruins of the Old Pilgrim's Church, Llanfihangel-Abercowin. This service has now become a regular institution in the district, and people of all sects look forward to it. A large-and representative gathering from all parts was present, and as the* rain kept off the service was carried on without a hitch. As a precaution a platform with awning had been erected in the ruins under the south and east walls in case of rain. The service was the usual Evening Prayer to the 3rd Collect, and was conducted by the Vicar (the Rev. W. Davies). The members of the Llanfl- hangel Church Choir, under the leadership of Mr. W. N. James, were pl-esenv and led the singing of the congregation, whichr was of a very hearty nature, especially the singing of the well-knovrit hymns "0 God our help" and "O fryniau Caer- salem." The special preacher for the day was the Rev. D. Powell Richards, M.A., F.R.A.S., of Carmarthen. Since Mr. Richards came to St. Clears last October as curate-in-charge on the death of the late Vicar (Rev. C. F. Owen), nis fame as a preacher, has spread over the district. Hence a large number was present to hear him. Taking his text from Psalm 127, 1, the rev. gentleman, in the course of his English sermon, said:— There is a tide in the affairs of men Which taken at the flood leads on to fortune." So wrote Shakespeare; and this is true of nations as well as of individuals. Blessings, privileges, opportunities fall to the share of men and states alike, and if they arc properly used, they must lead to success, strength and prosperity. But if the blessing is spurned, if the privilege is abused, if the opportunity is neglected, they may become instruments of punishment, and lead to weakness, failure and disaster. In my Welsh address (which, I hope, the majority here were able to understand), I endeavoured to shew how the history of the Jews supplies a striking illustration of this law. God had specialty chosen them to- be the channel of His divine revelation to the world; so that "in them all the nations of the earth might be blessed." He had preserved them from unparalleled vicissitudes. He had been educating them, over long periods, by means of His inspired prophets. In their wonderful his- tory he had been gradually unfolding his merciful scheme for the redemption of the world. With infinite patience he had been preparing them for the greatest event in the world's history-an abso- lutely unique event-the coming of His only be- gotten son into the world. And yet, when in the fullness of time God's great purpose was realised; when Christ the Lord appeared among them, they rejected Him-they persecuted Him-and finally they slew Him. They spurned God's greatest blessing; they neglected their supreme opportunity! He came unto His own and His own received Him not." By this re- jection of the Son of God-the promised Messiah— the Jews condemned themselves-they sentenced themselves to utter ruin and destruction as a nation and as a state. Our Lord Himself suggests this. What a glori- ous opportunity the Jews had! But they despised it; they rejected It, and the consequence was nat4onal disaster. According to our Lord's sug- gestion, and, indeed, quite apart from that, -eme » ientific historian would find very little difficulty in traci.ng the relation of cause and effect-the destruction of Jerusalem and the dispersion of the Jewish nation were the moral and historical conse- quences of the rejection of Jesus of Nazareth as the Messiah. Thus the history of the Jews forms a most striking illustratfon of the Law of the irrecoverable opportunity." My brethren, I would submit to you another illustration of this law of abused privileges and noglected opportunities—a striking parallel to the history of the Jews. During the past half-century Germany-or that federation of states known as the German Empire —has made immense progress in many directions. Its commercial development has been phenomenal. It holds its own-and more than its own—against all the nations of Europe in point of scholarship, theology, philosophy, and many branches of science. In point of organisation and efficiency, the German Empire stands unsurpassed in the world's history, for all its forces—commercial, social, and especially its military forces—are scientifically organised so as to^ obtain the best results from the least outlay. We may regard the German people as highly favoured—highly blessed in many directions. But what about their aims and ambitions? And what ahout the methods adopted by them to reach their goal ? Surely, their aims have been material through and through. Their ambitions has been to secure temporal prosperity at any cost; to extend their territory; to make their military power invincible, and to dominate the world by brute force. Such being their aims, the means adopted to secure them have inevitably been wicked and unscrupulous. Low cunning, falsehood, organised lying, treachery, brute force-these, in German eyes. are legitimate weapons wherewith to secure their ambitions. They have adopted as their ideal-not the highest that civilisation and history can offer-the Christian ideal; they have practically rejected that, and have taken for their models not even the simple barbarian, but rather the most savage of the brute creation—the tiger, the vulture, and the anaconda! The one man chiefly responsible for all this is the Emperor William, without whose knowledge and enproval nothing of importance can happen in Germany. And he appeals to God for His support and blessing. To us such appeal sound presumptu- ous and even blasphemous. How can he. or any one else, expect the God of truth, of mercy, of love ana of righteousness to bestow his blessing on such low ambitions and sinful methods? And yet the Germans have been successful, but their very success will prove to be the instrument of their downfall. The thoughts which absorbed them temporal wealth and military power—have also moulded them, so that they are blind and deaf to the higher forces- the moral and spiritual elements—which make for the highest welfare of a nation-its stability and permanence as a blessing in the world. God matches his gifts to men's ambitions; he bestows upon men what they crave, and withholds from them what they despise, and thus through and in themselves carries out His great purposes of re- tribufton. That nation which despises God's law, and does not order its actions in accordance with the entcrnal principles of truth, justice, and righteousness, contains the seeds of its own decay: it must lose its power and its influence among more righteous nations and finally it must sink into in- significance and perish through its own inherent corruption. Spiritual decay and spiritual death is the inevitable result of material ideals and ungodly practices. The terrible words uttered by our Lord as he wept over Jerusalem and foresaw its doom should be a solemn warning to all nations against the abuse of their privileges, and the neglect of their opportunities. We learn practically the same lesson from the words of the Psalmist-" Except the Lord build --=:=:8 the house, they labour in vain that build it: except the Lord keep the city, the watchman waketh but in vain." We muat not take the words house and "city" in their literal sense. They ire evidently used metaphorically. The "house" represents the family —the amplest element of the social organisation: the basis of all civilisation. The city again would mean the State—the complex political organisation of the national life. Juat as the" city" is the extension of the house," so the JI? the extension of the familv. The one fwi f6 •f°tner eX'ldtS for the Prot<*tion and the wel- fanhiv mT^rS-u these two ^remes, the orsamW the state, embrace all human ooSTHISC™"0^, °rP pf r1- the faH- +W rojisions- I he Psalmist emphasises nature-must 7/ Um,al1, o^msation-of whatever r highest sense, be vain and worthless a curse and not a blessing—unlesa it is built up according to the will of PrJ „ j formity with His eternal liw". m Con' The same divine and eternal principles must govern the family and the state, if they are to be permanent and stable-if they are to J I « £ > to the nation and to the world at large. In our fact ,s education. lVc- seem to derive our morality from two differnt accordl' jlg as it is concernd with private or with publio life. Our private morality is bMed oil the Gospels; our public morality we borrow -from paganism. Once we have crossed the national frontier, our neighbour ceases to be a fellow I tian; lie becomes a foreigner and an alien, and, in our relations to him, We obey a different moral our 'internaVonaTdeanngVTmnrd which describes dealing," and when tlmf fn^f means double- appeal to brute force uttel"" "a'Ura11/ IS contrary to tho teaching of the p"™ft }* less- a curse and L7li be.come vain and worth- bora to haiX -tS? 'h6ir °™ ',h6 ,ifc »re inti- natioiial life be JJ* l*m,ly ,fe » *° »'H the which the homo teachea th i P"nc;P!«s evU toiSth0frf°*l0fUlai!>'e f" word ixi r^^a^'3e', *'4 snperi„rT!?sSctp:L,nB^^h "*1 ness of heart (which is the basis of good manners), which delights in a'- good action and avoids its tp- naCr Br,her takes the '«<* '"ong the s\bP?" ™rj'. «rinh" many generations of Britisber-, have lived among- foreigners and ba-ve impressed them with their stpr- ling qualitie. The process life and may be, cen. tunes ago when the home life and ;nHe;er.;nPsnr" reputation?'"Shau'w" preter^e T.n.'ullW^'a,1 fSr'S* Zt TJ'tbI"™ bequeathed to°ue! Ii

FORTHCOMING HORSE SALE

FORTHCOMING HORSE SALE. It is scarcely necessary for its to draw further Saturdav nevt fTiiN- *i It -rie'd. Carmarthen, on Messrs trLrili feu undor the hammer of aniS J.lSht m?f t"' 31 ™ar« "etc "n" hames, horse^LSer tb,t- imi-)ortnnee of the sale. and that there will. be II good attendance. Work., 8, Kin* Str^t, Oans»rth«a.