Teitl Casgliad: Carmarthen journal and South Wales weekly advertiser

rhifyn: First Edition

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 3 o 8 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
13 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
MARKETS

MARKETS ( GRAIN, &c. NEWPORT, Wed., Oct. b.-There was a small attendance at to-day's market, prices showing that there was a strong upward tendency due to some extent to advancing freights consequent upon the withdrawal of Greek ships. Maize was 2s higher on the week. Barley a quiet trade, with a rise of Is to 2s. Flour 6d up, and a fair trade passing. Bran firmly held at last week's prices. Sharps in big request at 5s advance. HEREFORD, Wed., Oct. 6.-110derate supply of English grain, and the tone of the market generally was good. Wheats were quoted at a rise 6s, bailey 5s to 5s 9d, oats 3s 6d to 4s, and beans 5s 6J, and maize was Is per quarter lower on the week. CATTLE. NEWPORT, Wed., Oct. 6.—There was a large number of cattle, sheep, and pigs. Cattle met with rather better trade; sheep and lambs about late rates. Prices:—Best beef 9gd to lOd, second, 9d to 9ad, cows 8d to aid; best wether mutton 9d to lid, ewe 8d to 8 £ d; lamb, lid to ll^d per lb.; porker pigs 16s, bacon pigs 13s, and sows 12s per score. HEREFORD, Wed., Oct. 6.—A good supply ot tat cattle. Trade opened sharp, but was badly main- tained. Prices, however, were affected but little, I lp 9d and lOd being made for best quality. Fewer calves now coming in, and selling dearer. Sheep a little easier on the whole, but lambs still in good demand at lOd to 10s per lb. More inquiry for pigs. Bacons made 6d to 7d per lb.; porkers advanced, and made from 7d to 83d, or a fraction more. BIRMINGHAM (Pigs: daily).—Supplies included 1,020 from Ireland, 800 from Wales, 540 from the Eastern, and 220 from the Midland, counties, cW from Middlesex, 130 from Gloucester-shire, 470 from Somerset, 310 from Shropshire, and 140 from Cheshire. Bacon pigs, 1st quality, 15s per score (10s 6d per stone of 14 lbs.); 3rd quality, 14s per score (9s lOd per stone); porkers, 15s per score (Ids bd per 6t

GOOD NEWS FOR DOG FANCIERS

GOOD NEWS FOR DOG FANCIERS The invention of a veterinary form of Zam-Buk is irood news for dog lovers and all owners of valuable pets. There is a soothing and swiftly-healing power about this preparation that is as welcome as it is remarkable. The application of strong mineral liniments simply means agony to the animal- Veterinary Zam-Buk, on the other .hand, whether rubbed in briskly for SPBAINS. RHEUMATISM, CHAMP, Sore Throat, Bruises, or applied to an open cut or wound, gives instant comfort and ease from pain, and ensures quick recovery. For Canine ECZEMA AXD CANKEE, Veterinary Zam- Iuk is strongly recommended. It soothes away irri- tation. thoroughly destroys the disease, and replaces the sore patches with healthy new skin, on which the coat comes again strong and clean. A frequent rub over with Veterinary Zam-Buk will stop vermin trouble, keep the skm in a healthy state, prevent mange, and promote a "good coat." There are no poisonous ingredient- in Zam-Buk. It is of purely vegetable origin, and entirely free from animal fat or mineral irritants. Prices 1/li or 2/9. If your chemist, saddler, or medicine dealer is out of stock, send to the Zam-Buk Laboratories, Leeds.

LLANDEFEILOG

LLANDEFEILOG. DEATH.—The funeral of Mrs. Walters, Penymaes, Llandefeilog, took place Friday, September 30. The Rev. J. P. Evans and Professor Owen took part in the service at Penymaes and the Rev. B. D. Harries. Rev. M. T. Rees, and the Rev. D. Griffiths took part in the burial service at Moriah, Meinciau. The chief mourners were the followin. H. Walters (husband), Mrs. Reynolds (sister), Messrs. Thos. Jones, Willie Jones, Tom Walters, Richard Walters, John Walters (sons): Mrs. Davies. Mrs. Griffiths, Mrs. Richards, Mrs. Evans. Miss Walters (daughters); Mr. Reynolds, mayor of Kidwelly (nephew). Mr. Jones, vicar, Llandefeilog. and Mr. Davies. vicar, Llangyndevrn. were present. The deceased was very highly respected by all, and there i=i a general deep sympathy in the neighbourhood with the family who i-n, urn the loss of a good wife and an ideal mother..

Begone Carmarthenshire

Begone Carmarthenshire Any information in the possession of our readers, or any comment respecting the various matters re- ferred to in these notes, will be welcomed by the Editor for publication. FROM THE "CARMARTHEN JOURNAL," FRIDAY, OCTOBER 20, 1815. We understand that a plan will be carried into effect at the approaching Meeting of the Com- mittee of the Proclamation Society for the Diocese of St. David's, which cannot fail to be productive of much practical and substantial benefit to the poor. The Committee appointed to carry into effect certain resolutions respecting- a Monument to the memory of our late illustrious countryman, Sir Thomas Picton, have put the business in a train which must shortly lead to the accomplishment of that desirable object, and we are happy to perceive the progressive augmentation of the fund. Our first Winter Assembly, at the White-Lion, on Wednesday evening last, Charles Morgan, Esq., Mayor, -Steward, was, notwithstanding the un- favourable state of the weather, well attended; and we need not add, that the usual polite attentions of that gentleman to the company, augmented in no small degree the pleasures of the evening. Caution to Constables.-At the Michaelmas Quarter Sessions for the county of Carmarthen, Wm. Rees, Constable, of the parish of Llangunnor, stood indicted for disobedience of a warrant issued by the Rev. Evan Holliday, one of his Majesty's Justices of the Peace for the said county, for the apprehension of a man at Llangennech when the Court, in consideration of Mr. Holliday's inter- cession in his behalf, the said Wm. Rees having shewn great contrition for his misconduct, ordered him to pay a fine of 20s. to the King, and that he be confined in the House of Correction, to hard labour, for the space of one week, and until he shall have paid such fine. The sloop Blessing, Lloyd, master, trading from Tenby to Bristol, foundered on Wednesday even- ing last, off Sandersfoot, in a gale of wind; and we regret to state, that both the owner, Mr. Lloyd, and the master lost their lives. Several other persons were on board, but fortunately escaped the sad fate of their employers. Certain disciples of Tycho Brahe,' in this town, had their attention very suddenly and forcibly arrested yesterday se'nnight, by a phenomenon calculated to. impress them with an idea,, that Taurus had quitted his post in the zodiac," for the purpose of making a terrestrial tour,' and that he had selected the ancient metropolis of South Wales for his debut.' This phenomenon, however, turned out to be nothing more than a homer bred Welsh bull, whose novel situation alone distinguished him from the mass of his horned brethren.—Our distant' readers will hardly credit us when we state the appearance of such an animal on the roof of a House, but it literally occurred in this town, on the above-mentioned day. A bull, closely pursued by men and dogs, to a spot called the Mount, which adjoins the Castle wall, on the north side, and overlooks some out- buildings belonging to houses in Upper Market- street, got into a nook from which he could not possibly retreat. In turning round, he made a breach in the roof of an outhouse, and his legs becoming entangled with the tiles and rafters, the poor animal struggled hard to disengage himself, but in his struggle he fell into the yard below, from whence. the doors being opened, he walked quietly into the street, and shortly after, as we are informed, died of his bruises. Murder.—A most horrid and wanton act of fratricide was on Saturday last committed in the town of Cardigan. Thomas Morris, butcher, having had a quarrel with the wife of his brother, John Morris,—John remonstrated with him on the subject, upon which he, with a large knife, wounded him in the face.—John, as the only means of self defence, immediately knocked his assailant down but the monster upon getting on his legs, plunged his knife into the body of his brother, and left him dead 'on the spot. The following is a description of this blood-thirsty villain, who we sincerely hope will shortly be made to pay the penalty of his crime :-Aged about 50 years; about 5 feet 10 inches high, rather thin but muscular; round shoulders, sandy coloured hair, large whiskers, a long visage, pale complexion, wild look. and sharp eye: pitted in the cheeks, and wrinkled chews tobacco; speaks very little if any English had on a blue short coat with large metal but'ons, red cotton handkerchief, sky blue waist- coat. corduroy breeches much mended, light blue stockings, and hat turned up behind.

Family Notices

BIRTH. On Tuesday se'nnight, at Towy Castle, Carmar- thenshire. Mrs. Evans, wife of the Rev. Mr. Evans, of that place, of a daughter. MARRIED. On Sunday last, at Stainton, Lieut. James George, R. N.. to Miss Elizabeth Parsell, daughter of Mr. William Parsell. of Ford, near Milford. On Thursday last. at St. Martin's, Haverford- west, Mr. Benj. Davies. Malster. to Hester, second daughter of Thos. Morris, Esq., both of that place.

No title

TEMP. QUEEN ELIZABETH. 1609. (By R. E. WILLIAMS, Llanllawddog). INDUSTRIES. The following Industries were carried on in the town:— a Composition of Tanners b Cordiners or Shoemakers c The Corporation of Hammer men as gold- smiths, cutlers, pewterers, metallers, and tinkers. J The Corporation of Tailors. e Saddlers. f Weavers. g Tuckers. h Glovers. i Hatters. The composition of Tanners was renewed, en- larged, and granted the 17th day of November, L609, in the time of Martin Beynon, Mayor, and again parsed by Thomas Wood, Mayor, 1633. RULES. 1. They are to choose their master upon Tuesday in Easter week yearly, and to swear him before the mayor the next court following the said day yearly. 2. The one half of their fines and amerciaments to come to the town. 3. No Tanner within this county borough to tan or buy any hides for any foreigner. 4. None of the said company to sell any hides before they be sufficiently tanned, to any foreigner, upon pain to pay 6s. 8d. the one half of the said 6s. 8d. to come to the town. 5. No foreigner to buy any raw hides or sell any leather within this county borough, upon pain of the forfeiture of the same so brought or sold (fair times only excepted). 6. No burges sons serving 7 years in a foreign place shall be admitted free of the fraternity, without the consent of the master and the most part of the company. 7. Everyone serving 7 years to the Trade within this county borough shall be made free of the fraternity, paying 3s. 4d. to the box and a breakfast for hi admittance. 8. All persons as shall be made free of the said fraternity shall enter into bond with sufficient sureties to the Master and wardens to observe and keep all such laws as are made by them. 9. The said fraternity to pay yearly to the town for their composition the some of fifty shillings, and for nonpayment thereof, to distrain upon the goods of any of the said company, and to be brought to court to be praised. 10. The Master of the said company to yield a true account whensoever the mayor requireth of all fines. forfeitures, and amerciaments by them imposed, taxed, and received, the half thereof to come to the town, and undelayed payment to be made thereof. 11. The said company to pay unto the chamberlain of the said town by the appointment of the I m mayor for their composition the 50s. already mentioned. 20s. of which is towardi3 finding of a priest to maintain Divine Service in St. Peter's Church. Carmarthen. The following words are thus spelt in the original copy:— Finding-fyndinge. Maintain—men t a yne. Forfeiture-—forfeiatures. Received—receaved. Foreigner-forreyner.

DIOCESAN CONFER ENCE AT CARMARTHEN

DIOCESAN CONFER ENCE. AT CARMARTHEN THE WAR AND THE CHURCH. THE FINANCES OF ST. DAVID'S DIOCESE. The St. David's Diocesan Conference was held at the Guildhall, Carmarthen, on the 5th inst., Bishop Owen presiding. In his address the Bishop of St. David s spoke of the relation of the war to the cause of religion. The dominating fact, he said, was that our country engaged in this war for the cause of righteousness. The whole future of our country was now at stake, but something even greater than that was at stake, and the real issue wr.a nothing less than the para- mount question whether might or right was to govern the dealings of nations with each other. This being so, it was their clear duty to do their utmost to support tiie country in this sacred cause of righteousness, in faith that the great sacrifices which were necessary would, by Divine blessing, not be in vain. He exhorted them to prayer, and pointed out that there never was a time which made a greater demand upon all the resources of the Church. In proportion, as they realised the seriousness of this question, they would recognise their duty to do all they could to maintain the temporal resources which helped the Church to discharge its spiritual mission. That was the point of view from which he invited the conference to enter earnestly upon .e business before it that day of considering carefully the reports of the diocesan board of miance and other diocesan committees. The reports would show that special efforts were being made for the improve- ment of Sunday school and tor the cause of tem- perance. They oould not but feel very strongly that the legislation of last year had placed new and unnecessary difficulties in the way of Church work at a time when that work was more necessary for the country than ever. A time of national peril was not a time for controversy, but their duty of silence must not be taken to imply any acquiescence in what had been done. The time would come when the country would be asked to re-consider the question, and they might hope that it would not be asked in vain. Meantime, the joint committee appointed by the four Welsh Diocesan Conferences had been provisionally considering -he best way of meeting their difficulties. It had not been possible, on account of the war, to hold meetings of Church- people to consider the situation, but as soon as cir- cumstances would allow, the result of the delibera- tions of the joint committee would be submitted to the judgment of the diocese. DIOCESAN FINANCE. Mr. A. F. Eden, moving the adoption of the re- port and aocounts of the Diocesan Board of Finanoe, of which he is chairman, said the system of voluntary assessment by the-parlslies had worked satisfactorily to a certain degree, but while some parishes were doing excellently, others were still not giving adequate support to diocesan nuance. For the period ended 30th June last the Board estimated a revenue of £7,000, and allocated grants to bring the revenue of the seven standing committees up to that amount. The actuhl revenue received was £ 6,753. For the current year June, ,1915, to June, 1916, the Board estimated a probable revenue of £ 6,500, but in view of the credit balance in the Diocesan Fund, the Board felt jusiiiied in proposing grants to bring up the incomes for the various com- mittees for the year to B7,800, or LSOO more than for the previous year. As the estimated revenue for the year was only L6,500, unless the revenue was in- creased in future years, the allocation of grants to various parishes would have to be reduced. They ought to have a revenue every year of at least £ 8,000. Si< John Llewelyn, who seconded, said the clergy and laity of the Church in Wales were working together, and meant to work up to the responsibilities which were placed upon them. Although they were silent, that did not imply concurrence. They were thinking very deeply upon the responsibilities placed upon the Church in these extraordinary times, but let no one say that they did not try to put matters in such a shape that when the war was over they would be stronger than they were at the beginning of their responsibilities. Canon Lloyd, Llanpumpsaint, submitted the report of the Maintenance Committee. Dealing with the distribution of the income grants, he said a con- siderable number of incumbents received, £100 to £ 150 a year as stipend, and some less than a JB100 a year, and the object of the grants was to improve the stipends of the ill-endowed benefices. They were able last year to raise the salaries of all incumbents in the diocese by means of this grant to £ 160 a year, with a house, and in the case of a few to B170 and JE200. There was no more firm believer in c permanent grants than he. but he would be sorry to see the income grants reduced in any way. The President, explaining the reason why under present circumstances were mentioned with regard to a certain grant, said the Ecclesiastical Commis- sioners were not in a position to make grants for the augmentation of endowment. Their endowment fund depended very largely upon the Commissioners' grant. Through the particular wording of the Welsh Church Act the Church in Wales was losing every year between the passing of the Act and any future occurrence over £ 25,000, very nearly £ 30,000. It was not In the least from any difference of opinion between the Maintenance Committee and the old Diocesan Fund Board. The old board spent a very large sum, by far the greater part of their fund, in augmentation of endowment. They could not do so now. PENSIONS FOR CLERGY. Referring to the clergy pensions scheme, Mr. Dc Winton said he was surprised to find that this was the one received with most hesitation in the rural districts. It was a vital matter that they should have an efficient parson in a parish, and that could only be provided for by means of a decent pension's fund. A clergyman, who had failed to perform his duties owing to age, ought to be enabled to retire. Every beneficed clergyman ought to have no less than J3500 a year if he was doing duty, and if he failed, he ought to retire at £ 200 a year. (Hear, hear). The President said there was no question more vital to the welfare of the Church than this. He hoped the clergy would have no false delicacy about the matter. It was not good for the clergy and the Church that parishes should be left with insufficient care during the failing health of faithful men who had for many years laboured there. NEED OF NEW CHURCHES. Mr. Eden, alluding to the report of the building committee, said that in the aggregate, over £ 100,000 was required for adequate church building in the diocese. The industrial parts of the diocese needed special attention. In the parishes of Llannon, Trim- saran, Ammanford, and Cwmamman they wanted six new churches which would cost something like £ 25,000 to £ 30,000. These churches were wanted at JB25,000 to 930.000. These churches were wanted at once. There was a population of over 60,000, and there was only seating accommodation in the churches for 5,000. They were in the future going to be a large spending committee. The President said that in the diocese it was an increasing difficulty to provide for a rapidly growing population in the industrial parts. CANDIDATES FOR THE CHURCH. Archdeacon Williams, Llandilo, in presenting the report of the Training Committee, said it was time to say that of all the religious bodies in the country they as a church had been the most backward in committee wished to help by grants suitable candi- might become very useful ministers of the Church. They wanted to cure themselves of that. The com- mittee were appealing to the clergy and laity in the parishes to encourage young men with a vocation for the ministry. They owed a great deal to the older universities, but they should not forget that there was a possible source of great power for the ministry also in the newer university colleges of Wales. (Hear, hear). Moreover, while they were ready to pay tribute to the old grammar schools of Wales, he did not think they had yet tried, as they should, the possibilities of the county schools of Wales. They wanted to tap possible sources. The committee wishes to help by grants suitable candi- dates. and required for this purpose no less than £ 850 .to £ 1,000 every year. WAR AND TEMPERANCE. The Temperance -Society's report showed that the Rev. J. Caleb Hughes, Carmarthen, had been ap- pointed organising secretary for the diocese. Sir Stafford Howard and Lady Howard, Llanelly, had guaranteed to give half the stipend for a period of three years. The Bishop of Swansea had promised to find B50 per annum towards the expenses for the same period. The Bishop of Swansea said he was sure all had been disappointed at the poor response to the example set by the King. That unique challenge seemed to have been overlooked. There had been a very small response from public men in the country, and not a very large response from the main body of his Majesty's subjects. The President said that the King's example pro- vided a unique opportunity now. In regard to temperance work, nis lordship's feeling was that they must not treat it in isolation, but that they must look upon it as a very important and urgent feature of the spiritual mission of the Church. OTHER REPORTS. The report of the Mothers' Union stated that the number of branches in the diocese was now 129, the number of member? and associates being 5,869. In this time of stress and anxiety the Mothers' Union was called upon to face many serious problems, present and future:—(1) The need for economy in food urged by the Board of Trade; (2) the need in large towns for clubs for women, especially those whose husbands were fighting. The Rev. Harold S. Williams, vicar of Oyster- mouth, in his report as chaplain of the Diocesan House of Mercy, referred in glowing terms to the good work performed by the sisters, and said that the uniform success of the past 20 years was very remarkable. The crying needs of the institution were-more workers and more income. A report of the Church Lads' Brigade dealt with the part played by the brigade in the war. One full service battalion of 1,200 with its required depot companies had been almost completed, and a total of 120,000 members and ex-members had joined the Army and Navy. Three V.C. N several D.S.O.'s and D.C.M.'s had already been won by "Church Lads." The brigade movement in the diocese had considerably increased during the past year. The Lay Readers' Association and the Girls' Friendly Society also presented favourable reports. -40

LAMPETER TOWN COUNCIL

LAMPETER TOWN COUNCIL The monthly meeting of the Town Council was held at the Town Hall, Lampeter, on Thursday evening, October 7th, when the mayor (Alderman Walter Davies) presided. There were also present:- Aldermen" Evan Evans, Lewis Jones, and William Jones; Councillors David Davies, Ll. Bankes-Price, J. S. Jones, William Davies, D. Idris Jones, D. F. Lloyd, D. Thomas, and D. Jones, with Mr. J. Ernest Lloyd, town clerk; Mr. C. D. Rees, assistant clerk, and Mr. Ashman, surveyor. INSPECTOR'S REPORT. Mr. R. W. Ashman, surveyor and sanitary in- spector, read his report, which was as follows: "I beg to report on the work done during the past month. A storm water overfLw has been fixed in one of the fields on the Bridge-street sewer. Up to the present no severe storm has occurred to test this, but 1 believe it will abate the nuisance at the man- hole in Bridge-street. The new lamp has been fixed in New-street by means of a bracket kindly given by the chairman of the Streetti Committee (Councillor David Davies). This bracket has been fixed on Mr. Price's house with his permission. I may aAd that the inhabitants of this street are very pleased to be able to see their way, there being no j light there previously. A new burner has been fixed on the Harford-square lamp. This burner is of the inverted type, and gives a better light at considerably less cost than tne one formerly. in use at this point. The coping of the bridge over the i river by the gas-works has been repaired, and the Pentrebach road is being cleaned. I have disinfected at two cases of infectious disease: one fresh case has ) been reported since the last meeting. Fire brigade drill was held on the 25th of September, when five members were present. Fruit. to the amount of 1621. has been seized as unfit for food, and de- stroyed. An exceptionally good mart was held on September 25, when a very large number of animals were offered for sale. We are glad to see hat the farmers are appreciating the advantages of the mart with the good prices now realized, and it is to be hoped that they will continue to bring in a good and regular supply of stock, and more buyers will attend regularly. A great deal of the success is no doubt due to the untiring energies of the auctioneer, attend regularly. A great deal of the success is no doubt due to the untiring energies of the auctioneer, his assistants, and thanks are due to them ior the great success achieved. Mart tolls to the amount of £ 4 15s. lid. have been collected, and paid into the bank. The water in the reservoir is two feet down, and it behoves every consumer to see that any leak- age is immediately remedied, and all waste avoided." The Mayor intimated that the Mayoress's Relief Fund desires the co-operation of the Town Council to secure comforts and Christmas gifts for Lampeter soldiers and sailors. On tiie proposition of Councillor D. Jones, seconded by Councillor J. S. Jones, it was decided to render all the help possible to the com- mittee, and that collections should be made in the town in aid of this movement. Lady Lawrence, wife of Mr. Justice Lawrence, who has been residing at Peterwell, Lampeter, wrote to the Mayor suggesting that there was such large quantities of apples, &c., in Lampeter and neigh- bourhood, that an effort should be made to induce people to send quantities for the use of sailors, who would be very glad to receive them. She had also written to Lord Charles Beresford, and it was de- cided to open a depot at the Coronation-buildings for the reception of apples, which would be de- spatched to the central depot in London. The Mayor informed the Council that the members of the Institute were giving all their magazines to men in the army and navy, and lie proposed a hearty vote of thanks to them for their kindness, and hoped others would follow their good example by sending magazines, &c., to the post office, and the officials there would despatch them free for the use of soldiers and sailors. Councillor J. S. Jones having seconded, the vote of thanks was unanimously passed. The Mayor said that he had been informed of a despicable practice indulged in by farmers, who, it Was asserted, bought large quantities of margarine at Lampeter, took it home, and mixed it with butter, the concoction being sold to poor people at Is. 4d. to Is. 6d. per lb. It was disgraceful that such a Practice was cai-ried on, and the poor people de- frauded in these hard times. It was time for the police to be more energetic in the detection of adulterated bread, butter, milk. &o., and Lie pro- posed a motion to that effect, which was seconded by Councillor J. S. Jones, and adopted. The Mayor referred to the fact that Cardisranshira had been depleted of a large number of its horses for the war, and referred to the consignment of horses which were sent to be sold in different parts of the country by the Board of Agriculture. Several consignments had been sent to Carmarthen, and he felt sure small farmers in the county would be glad to secure some. He proposed that Ll, Town Clerk should communicate with the Board of Agriculture on the subject. Councillor D. Davies seconded, and the motion was passed. The Mayor spoke of the desirability of placing a list of all Lampeter men who had joined the forces in the Victoria Hall, and Councillor D. F. Lloyd volunteered to compile the same. It was decided to invite Mr. Gomer Morgan, Pont- ypricld, to present his final report on the water- works extension scheme at the next Council meeting. It was decided to accept the offer of £11 per annum rent from Mr. Ashman for a piece of vacant land adjoining the reservoir, which will be converted into a garden. Councillor ldris Jones read the report of the Markets and Fairs Committee, which suggested that the Christmas market should be held on December 21. The Lighting Committee suggested that a lamp should be lit in Market-street, and the suggestion was adopted.

OUR FOOD SUPPLIES

OUR FOOD SUPPLIES MEETING AT CARMARTHEN. A meeting of the South Wales branch of the Agricultural Organisation Society was held at the Ivy Bush Hotel, Carmarthen, last week, Mr. W. J. Percy Player presiding. It was reported that the agricultural co-operative societies in Glamorgan had been appointed centres for developing food suplics by the county council in connection with Lord Selborne's scheme. Haver- fordwest, Brecon, Llangadock, Garth, Tregaron, Crymmych, and Rhayader were selected centres for demonstrations in wool grading for next season. The importance of ,the organisation of agricul- ture was emphasised as a means of developing the production of food in war time by enabling farmers to procure seeds, manures, and other requirements at the lowest cost and of the best quality, and also as a means of putting farmirg on a better basis to meet the reaction which will set in after the war.

TRIMSARAN

TRIMSARAN What is left of the Trimsaran St. John's Ambu- lance Brigade held their annual re-examination at the Council School on Thursday of last week. The examiner being Dr. Owen Williams. Burry Port. Dr. Williams was highly pleased with the efficiencv of the class, and said that it far exceeded his ex- pectation and that it was the best class he had ever had the pleasure to examine. They also journeyed to Llanelly last Thursday for the re-inspection, the inspector being Sir Stafford Howard, mayor of Llanelly, and Deputy-Commissioner Mr. Herbert Lewis, Cardiff. After the inspection in the Town Hall grounds, a march was made round the town till they reached the Drill Hall, where a lantern lecture was given by Mr. Herbert Lewis. A nursing class and ambulance c1ao:s are shortly to be formed and all those who intend joining should give their names to the secretary at the earliest opportunity. The evening continuation and mining classes have commenced this week under the tuition of Mr. Evan Davies, county mining lecturer. and Mr. J. Evans, headmaster of the Trimsaran Council School. The harves* thanksgiving services in connection with Llander: y Church are to he held on Sunday, October 17th. when the officiating minister will be the rector rf Loughor, Rev. Hugh Rees. late of Llanderry. The vicar of the parish is to be con- gratulated on securing the services of Mr. Rees. as no doubt he will draw a big crowd to hear him, as he was very popular in the district before he left.

AMMANFORD URBAN COUNCIL

AMMANFORD URBAN COUNCIL The ordinary monthly meeting of the above Council was held in the Y.M.C.A. Institute on Wednesday night in last week. Mr. J. Harries, J.P., presided, and those present were: Messrs. J. Davies (vice-chairman), J. Morgan, B. R. Evans, Da'vid Jones, D. G. Davies, Evan Lewis, J. C. Shaw, Thomas Fletcher, Robert Thomas, Evan Evans, W. N. Jones, and Wm. Evans; also the Clerk (Mr. T. M. Evans. M.A.), Assistant Clerk (Mr. A. Ernest Evans), and the Surveyor 'Mr. David Thomas). CEMETERY SITE. The Health Committee reported having had the cemetery site question under discussion, and it %vi-s recommended that the Clerk write to the owners of the field on Tirychen Farm, which had been found satisfactory in so far as tiie natùl,' of the ? ii %V.-i t, and to inquire on wnat terms the said void be acquired. MART AND MA .Li' Pit-)I le I A communication from Mr. J. L. VViuiums, Maesyquarre, urging the need for the establishment of an auction mart was read by the Clerk, and Mr. David Jones proposed that the Health Committee be asked to consider the question and brtu; in a re- port to the next meeting. Aid. W. N. Jones, to whom the •■ttor had been sent by Mr. Williams, explained that that was the first opportunity he had had ut bringing it forward as requested. The suggestion was whe.der the Council would entertain the acquisition of land and the putting up of a few hurdles so that a start may be made by next May. Mr. D. G. Davies asked that the C< muiittje should also consider the advisability of sta,tz,- a msrktt at the same time. This was agreed to. ULGIIT IN THE TOWN. The Roads Committee recommended that the Clerk write to Lord Dynevor drawing his attention to the nuisance caused by the flooding of Margaret- street through a defect in the culvert near the Drill Hall, and asking him to remedy same. They also recommended that additional lamps be fixed, one on Iscennen-road and one on Brynmawr-Lane, at sites to be fixed by the Roads Committee. In moving the report, Mr. Thos. Fletcher said the question of those two lamps had been before the Council previously. An application for a lamp had been made by the owners of the lower portion of Iscennen-road early in the spring, but the Coun- cil did not think it advisable to do so then. How- ever, they agreed that it be done this winter. And the same applied to Brynmawr-lane, which was now one of the roads leading to the new" ohurch. A large number of people passed through that lane on a Sunday night, and it was highly desirable that a lamp be fixed there. Mr. B. R. Evans agreed, and mentioned that last Sunday night as people came down from service they were going against the hedge. They could not see at all. There was an elbow in the road, obscur- ing the lamp in College-street. Mr. Wm. Evans—They did not go intentionally? (Laughter). Mr. B. R. Evans-No, they simply could not see in front. Mr. David Jones asked if they did not think it possible to have a reduction in their lamps. The rates were going up. Did they not think it possible to save some lamps in place of those re- commended to be put up? They would find every Council now going in for economy, and he thought they should take into ,comideration whether they could reduce their expenses in the present crisis. Mr. Wm. Evans suggested whether Mr. Jones would be prepared to have lamps taken away in Pantyffynon. Mr. Jones-I am n-ot going to dictate in what particular place. I only suggest whether it is possible. Aid. W. N. Jones-Put them all out and every-- that a lamp be fixed there. The Chairman thought the suggestion made a very wise one, and the Roads Committee would perhaps agree to see to the matter. Mr. Wm. Evans—I don't think you can spare a single lamp, because we have been very cautious in fixing our lamps. Can't we do something in regard to. curtailing lighting hours, and put them out earlier? Mr. D. G. Davies suggested that the Roads Com- mittee bring in a report on the matter to the next Council meeting. i n'i" The Chairman said a few of them discussed the matter the previous night, and he believed it would be a good thing if they could reduce the number of lamps by taking a few lamps away here .and there. Mr. Wm. Evans-No, no. Chairman—I know of several places where we can do it. In Bettws road-I can speak for that-we could do away with four or ftve lamps there in time of war. Mr. Wm. Evans—What are you going to do then? Chairman—Walk in the dark (laughter). Mr. David Jones wished to make it clear that he did not object to putting up the two additional lamps recommended. The report of the Committee was adopted, and the suggestion, as to the reduction of light, 'referred to the Committee. Mr. D. G. ',Davies said there was another aspect of the question that the Council should take into view, and that was the quality of electric light they were getting at present. There was something radically wrong. They were absolutely unable to depend upon it. They never knew what minute it was going out, and very often they wanted to light a candle to see it. The Council was bound to pro- tect the ratepayers and consumers. They had cer- tain powers over the electric light and gas com- panies, and he thought it was time the Council take the matter in hand and see that they got the proper power. He proposed that it be referred to the proper committee for report. The Chairman said he also believed they wanted an improvement in that direction. The electric light had been bad lately. Mr. D. G. Davies—Perhaps the Clerk will be good enough to tell us by next time what our powers are. Clerk-In addition to our powers under the Act. there is a special agreement between the Council and Mr. Herbert which increases our powers. He would tell them the next time what these powers were. Mr. J. Davies (to Mr. Davies)-Might it be an accident? You made no inquiries, did vou? Mr. D. G. Da'vies—It has been for the last six weeks. Mr. J. Davies-Not so bad. The Chairman observed that accidents, of course, could not be avoided, but they would have to speak to the proprietor about it. TENDERS. Tenders were received for the removal of houses refuse and street watering for the next twelve months, as follows:—Daniel Morgan, Foundry-row, Ammanford, 9s. per day for the former, and Is. 2d. per hour for street watering; David Griffiths, Wind- street, 10s. per day, and Is. 3d .per hour. The contractor has to provide two men, two horses, and two carts, and it was stated that Mr. Morgan had no horses nor carts. It was then proposed by Mr. David Jones, secon- ded by Mr. Evan Lewis, and resolved, that the tender of Mr. Griffiths be accepted. It was under- stood in regard to the removal of house refuse that the contractor would have to be in the service of the Council wholly until 11 o'clock in the morning. ANOTHER BILL. Mr. Hy. Herbert, drainage engineer, wrote in reference to the Ammanford Sewerage Bill, stating that Messrs. Strong and Weeks had sent him their bill for consultation, which, of course, he had to pay. They informed him that they had sent another account to the Council for coming down to inspect the ground on account of opposition to the Bill. He should therefore be glad if the Clerk would lay the same before the Council at the next meeting. He did not think it was intended he should pay for bringing an engineer down here, but only to pay him for corroborating his evidence be- fore the Committee. Considering all his work, with only his expenses paid. he did not think he would be unreasonable in asking the Council to pay that account. Chairman—How much is that account? Clerk—It is not clear. It contains items other than for the visit to Ammanford. It comes to £ 44 11s. Aid. W. N. Jones—Refer it to the Parliamentary Committee for them to deal with it. On the motion of Mr. T. Fletcher, seconded bv Mr. J. Marg ans. this was passed. CORRESPONDENCE. A circular letter was read from the Treasury urging economy in the use of gold coin, and asking employers to substitute notes for gold in the pay- ment of wages. The report of the Medical Officer (Dr. D. R. Price) showed that for the month of Septeml r seven cases of scarlet fever, one of pul nonary tuber- culosis. and one of erysipelas, had been notifi; d. During the month there had been 14 births, 9 girls and 5 boys. ChairmaIl-Ammnîord is going in 'or s'lrif, G i- though all the boys Are going away (la.U'hter). w Mr. J. C. Shaw—That does not apply to the Chairman (laughter). CWMAMMAN ACCUSATIONS. I The Chairman drew attention to accusations made against the Council from the Cwmamman Council, reports of which had appeared in the papers, and he thought in fairness to the ratepayers it would be wise to give the Clerk an opportunity to repudi- ate what the Cwmamman Clerk had said in refer- ence to the Ammanford Sewerage Bill. The re- marks required explanation, because probably a slur had been cast on the Ammanford Council. "We want to know whether this man is right or we axe right," he observed. Aid. W. N. Jones—Do you want him to do it now or send a letter to the papers. Mr. D. G. Davies said a very nice way of clear- ing the matter would be to call a public meeting of ratepapers, and explain the whole thing to it. He was sure the public would like to know what had been done with this Bill, and if they would allow him he would suggest that they as a Council call a public meeting, and N the whole question before them, and they would be satisfied then, as they would know who was in the right and who was in the wrong, and whether the money had been wisely spent or not. Chairman—I have no objection. I am prepared personally. I don't know what the opinion of the Council is. The Clerk mentioned that a public meeting was not the sort of meeting to go into details. He com- men ced to reply to the statements pointing out that the Ammanford Council had first-class evidence .1 on their side in the minutes of evidence. Mr. Thomas Fletcher said the Clerk had explained the matter to them before, and, as there was no good in giving them a repetition, he proposed that the Clerk reply through the Press. Mr. Win. Evans felt it was not policy to take much notice of the matter. They as a Council- knew very well what had been done and what was their position, and if the Cwmamman Council could not appreciate what transpired it was not their fault. Their position was exactly now as before, with this difference, that every scheme they had taken had succeeded and almost everything Cwm- amman had done had failed so far. They were on the most friendly relations with them, and were goins to join them in the sewerage scheme and possibly in some other schemes, and no good what- ever could be derived from taking the matter up with them. If they went through the report they would find there was nothing there ontradicting what they had done. The Cwmamman Council were entirelv at sea. They did not seem to have understood the matter from beginning to end. Let everything drop. Ald. W. N. Jones, while not imputing for a moment inaccuracy to the report, thought the beet way would be for their Clerk to communicate with the Cwmamman Clerk inquiring if he had been correctly reported, and then to take the matter up. This course was adopted. Ald. Jones adding that they were making too much fuss of the matter. If any ratepayer was really aggrieved or felt that the Council or the members who went up to London had not done their duty properly, he could call at the Clerk s office, and read the minutes, and get the information necessary to satisfy him whether they had done right or wrong. HONOURING OUR HEROES. Mr. David Jones suggested that the Council should take in hand the arranging of public recep- tions to Ammanford boys returning home wounded. The suggestion was enthusiasticaly taken up, the Chairman and several members alluding to the great obligation of the people at home to these brave lads who carried their lives in their hands, and the rous- ing welcome that should greet them home. It was unanimously agreed to that the Council and officials be elected a Reception Committee, with power to add to their number. TYCROES REFUSE. Attention was drawn by Mr. David Jones to the fact that refuse from- the Llanelly rural dis- trict was being carted and tipped to the River Amman at Pantyffynon by a Mr. H. Pugh, making a dumping ground of the place. It was resolved that both the contractor and the Llanelly Council be written to.

FARMERS AND FOOD PRODUCING

FARMERS AND FOOD PRODUCING APPEAL BY LORD SELBORNE. As Minister of Agriculture in this present time of war, I desire to appeal to you who live by the land to assist your King and Country by producing as much food as possible on your holdings in the coming year. It is always a wise precaution for a nation at war to provide as much food as it can within its own borders. You must remember that this war has to be fought with money as well as men, and every additional pound's worth of food which you can grow means a reduction in the quantity to be pur- chased from abroad and is, therefore, a direct con- tribution to victory. The chief needs of the nation are more wheat, meat, milk, oats, potatoes, bacon, and cheese. I cannot hold out any hope of a special financial in- Jucement from the State; on the other hand I do not ask you to do anything which would diminish the capital necessary to enable you to farm well, but, subject to this reservation, I ask you to do your part in producing larger quantities of the commodities mentioned above as the special war service which you can render to your country. I invite also, all market gardeners, cottagers, and allotments holders to do their share by increasing the production of vegetables, pigs, and poultry, and by living on the produce from their gardens and allotments as far as possible. By this means they will save money for themselves and increase the amount of food available for others. The conditions of farming vary so much in the different localities that I cannot attempt to make any general recommendation for your guidance as to the means you should adopt for increasing the pro- duction of food on your holding. That must be left to your judgment and to the advice of your friends and neighbours. But I suggest that you should con- sider whether you cannot attain the object in view by one or more of the following methods:- (a) By ploughing up those of your poorest perma- ment grass fields which are suitable for con- version, and so increasing your arable land. (b) By shortening the period for which your existing arable land is kept under clover or rotation grasses. (c) By improving your remaining grass land so that it will carry more stock. (d) By reducing your acreage of bare fallow wherever possible. I realise that increased production cannot be ob- tained without a great effort, and that farmers have to face many special difficulties in these times. It is my desire to help you to overcome these difficulties by all the means in my power. The chief one which now confronts you is that of labour, and in this connexion I have arranged with Lord Kitchener that, as soon as the analysis of the National Register has been completed, men of the classes of working farm bailiffs, shepherds, stockmen (including milkers), horsemen, thatchers, engine- drivers, and mechanics and attendants on agricul- tural machinery, steam ploughs and threshing machines will not be accepted for enlistment, even if they should offer themselves. This valuable concession will enable you to retain the services of your skilled workers, upon whom I desire to impress that they are serving their country best by remaining at their accustomed occupations. But the difficulty will still remain in respect of the supply of ordinary farm labour. The staff of the Board of Agriculture are ready to assist you as far as possible, but they cannot cover the whole country, and in order to help you in respect of labour and of any other difficulties which may arise, I have asked the County Councils to assist the Board of Agricul- ture. and they have willingly agreed to do so. Steps are being taken for the appointment in each county of a War Agricultural Committee, representative of all the agricultural interests of the county, and for the appointment of local committees in each dis- trict. I ask you to consult these local committees on any problems and difficulties which may confront you. They will consist of your neighoours and friends who know the local conditions and in many cases they will be able to assist and advise you. If they cannot do so. they will refer to the County Committee, which will have at its disposal the ser- vices of the county staff for agricultural instruction and of the experts connected with the Provincial Councils for Agricultural Education, and which will be in touch with all the available sources of the supply of labour. The County Committee will be assisted by a representative of the Board of Agricul- ture and will report any special difficulties t. the Boara. By means of this machinery it will be passible for me. as Minister of Agriculture, to be kept informed of the needs of farmers throughout the country, and to secure that all the help that can be given to you is placed at your disposal. I ask you for your part to devote all your energies to the task that is set before you, and I am confi- dent that I shall not ask in vain. SELBORNE. Board of Agriculture and Fisheries, 28th September, 1915.

LLANLLWCH

LLANLLWCH. On September 1st. the members of Llanllwch Mothers' Union presented Mrs. Davies, Trebersed, who has now left the parish for Tenby, with a hand- some brass flo.wer bowl and plant. The presenta- tion was made by the Vicar, who spoke in high terms of Mrs. Davies, whom he had known for over 40 years.