Teitl Casgliad: Carmarthen journal and South Wales weekly advertiser

rhifyn: First Edition

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 8 o 8
Full Screen
19 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
UNITARIANISM

UNITARIANISM PARK-Y-VELVET' CHAPEL RE-OPEXED. UNITARIAN CONFERENCE AT CARMARTHEN. On Sunday last, Par k-y-Bel vet Unitarian Chapel, Carmarthen, whicn has been closed lor several years, Carmarthen, which has been closed lor several years, was re-opened after restoration. Services were held in the morning and evening conducted by the Rev. Professor Phillimore Moore, rresbyterian College, Carmarthen, who is the minister of the chapel. The special preacher was the Rev. T. P. Spedding, of London. This Chapel was built through the strenuous exertions of the late Dr. Lloyd, Principal of the Presbyterian College, in this town. Previous to the present buildings being erected, services were held in a schoolroom in Lamrn treet, at the back of Mr. Joseph Isaac's premises, where the late Mr. Evans, father of the late Mr. Alcwyn Evans, the historian, kept a very flourishing school Dr. Lloyd was the first minister, and received no salary what- ever. After the death of Dr. Lloyd, the Rev. Stephenson Hunter was appointed Principal of the Presbyterian College, and took to the ministry of the chapel for a number of years. After Mr. Hunter's death, the Rev. J. Gwenogfryn Evans, the Welsh historian (who married the youngest daugh- ter of Mr. Hunter), was pastor for a short time, but had to resign owing to failing health. Follow- ing him, Dr. Vance Smith, the great European scholar, and one of the revisionists of our present Revised Version of the Bible, was appointed Princi- pal of the Presbyterian College, and undertook to minister at the chapel. Dr. Vance Smith's Sunday evening discourses drew crowded congregations, and were reported at full length in the Carmarthen papers. After Dr. Vance Smith's death, Mr. J. Walter Evans, M.A., then a professor at the Presbyterian College, was appointed Principal, and the Rev. Philemon Moore was appointed professor, and undertook to minister at the chapel. The other rev. gentlemen who took a lively interest in Park-y- Velvet Chapel was the father of Principal Evans (the late Rev. Titus Evans), who kept a most flourishing school at the rear of the chapel, and 4 Professor D. L. Evans, Hebrew tutor at the Pres- byterian College, and father of the antiquarian, Mr. Geo. Eyre Evans, of Aberystwyth. Professor Moore will conduct services, both morning and even- ing, at the chapel. i On Monday a conference of the South-east Wales Unitarian Society was held at the chapel, when papers on The greatest need of the Unitarian Churches to-day were read by the Revs. T. A. Thomas, Llandyssul, and E. T. Evans, Aberdare. The Rev. T. Arthur Thomas said that the great world upheaval occasioned by this unprecedented war had stirred up all the sluggish poois of men's thoughts and activities. Nothing could ever remain the same again. New horizons were emerging and new oudooKs would arise. The vexed problem of right relations between capital and labour, would assume a new form. The claims of individuality as against society, of personal liberty as against state necessity, of poverty against wealth, these together with many more grave problems by reason of the war, would be presented for fresh consideration on the lurid light of the European conflagration now raging. Our most cherished hopes of slowly evolving progress and advancing civilization had been blasted. Poor and peasant 'had, at last, found their equality as a common sacrifice; learned and ignorant, rich and poor had discovered the secret not, as of old, of their ditference, but the secret oi tneir common nature. When this war would be over proiouud spiritual changes were oound to come. It his diagnosis of the present situation were even approxi- mately correct, he was not afraid to assert that the most urgent need of Christian churches to-day was the need of vision. They had eyes, but reiusei to see, they preferred the destinies of the world, to the hght that came with Christ. Spiritually they were short-sighted, they were in blinkers. Their great I defect then was the defect of vision. Speaking of Christian churches in general, what did they have in place of this heavenward-moving vis.,on: iney had for breadth, narrowness; for depth, shallowness; for loftiness of vision, a vision focusaed upon non- essentials; upon denominational prejudices and bigotries. Their Christianity was a Christianity without the Christ-spirit, and under the strain of the war, this Christless Christianity had broken down and had shown itself not to be the religion of Jesus, but a false imitation of it. German Protestantism, Austrian Catholicism, Hungarian Lnitarianism, had lifted no effective finger to avert the eiuse of war. He supposed they regarded this war as being quite in harmony with their view of Christianity. He was willing to believe in their sincerity and aid not find fault with them for holding such views ot Chris- tianity. It was the Christianity that had been taught ior 1,500 j'ea.l. It was also the Christianity of Great Britain-the Christianity of the churches—a Christianity without Christ in it—a Christianity divided against itself. It was an abnormal occur- rence lor the nations of Europe to be at war, but- the Christian churches of Europe were always at war with one another; they were never at peace. Always they belittled each other and always they denied each others claims to be true Christiana ot Christ. The Christianity Europe boasted 01 was a house divided against itself and it had fallen; in fact it never stood. When the present war catastrophe loomed in the near distance European Christianity was powerless to arrest it. The spirit of Corsica had triumphed over the spirit of Galilee. That calamity could not be undone. It wtt to be solved as best we could. With stout hearts and clear consciences, for we believed our conscience to be clear in this matter. He repeated more emphatically than ever that if the Christian spirit and not the theologian's spirit had been at work in Europe during the last 1,500 years, this war would not have been possible. Our para- mount need was a fresh vision of the Christ and of God as revealed by Christ. Through this war, we were being slowly taught to live not fox ourselves, but for our country, and there had been a salutary check upon our selfishness. They as Unitarian churches especially justly prided themselves on the freedom they enjoyed-but had they used it, or abused it7 Was. the desire to worship dying out amongst them? Were there churches destined to die out soon, through the cruel and cowardly indif- ference of their church members Was it nothing to them whether their churches were closed and con- verted into picture palaces and billiard saloons? What was the root cause of their icy coldness and the selfishness which permitted the faithful few to bear the burden of the unfaithful many? It could not be that God was no longer a crying need of their souls. Rev. E. T. Evans, Aberdare, declared tnat to him the greatest need of the Unitarian Churches to-day was a renewed missionary spirit in the fullest and best sense of the term. He did not mean that they should become subscribers towards missionarising the Blacks, the Yellows or the Reds: there was quite enough work in this country yet without going out- side. What he meant was that every professing Unitarian should become a missioner, not a prose- lytizer, but a missioner—one that felt the love of God and man so acutely that he wanted to give and do his beit for both. His experience was that Unitarians were too esoteric in their practice of religion. They wanted to keep it all to themselves. A stranger was an intruder. A crowded congrega- tion was too common, too coarse to harmonise with their highly developed aesthetic and intellectual. taste. They were apparently satisfied with their faint sprinkling of churches and with their sparse attendance. The minister, he said, often times a well-meaning person, in numerous instances suc- cumbed to his environment and being relatively well paid, conceived it to be the better policy to preach either a thin intellectualism or learned abstractions that but few could follow, and thus save himself and his hearers from anything so vulgar as discomfort. Their theology was humanly and mentally sound. Their principles were eternal and universal, which by their very nature were they true to them, would necessarily see them engrossed in the noble work of reclaiming the world to morality, to religion, and to God. WThen he first entered the Unitarian ministry he thought he was going amongst people who knew their own minds, who held definite and elevated opinions upon all the great facts of the religious life; but in very many instances he had been sadly disillusioned. Such a medley of discordance the contradictory voices as there was amongst them, he had never come across and he did not believe existed in any other religious community. By making themselves everything to everybody, they had be- come nothing. The more deeply he thought upon the facts and problems of religious experience, the more firmly was he convinced that everything which the human soul needed for its development and sustenance at any rate as far a-s this world was con- cerned, was wrapped up in" good all-round Unitarian- ism. A combination of these two aspects of the missionary spirit—of the ideal on the one hand and of the practical on the other-was the greatest need of the Unitarian churches to-day for that alone had the power to silence the strange voices that were heard within their borders. An open discus ->n followed, in which practically all the speakers emphasised the significance of the Sunday school. Mrs. John Lewis, Maesycrugiau, described the preachers of to-day as actors in the pulpit. At 6.30 p.m. a public meeting was held, Rev. Professor Ph. Moore, B.A., presiding, when addresses on the subject of The Mission of the Unitarian Church in the world to-day" were de- livered. The speakers were Revs. T. P. Spedding, London: Simon Jones, B.A., Swansea; E. A. Jenkins, Llwynrhvdowen; T. Eric Davies, Ponty- pridd; Mr. John Lewis, Pontypridd; Mr. Gomer Ll. THomae, J.P., Merthyr Tydfil.

CARMARTHEN TOWN COUNCIL

CARMARTHEN TOWN COUNCIL TAXING THE WATERWORKS. INFANT MORTALITY AND MILK SUPPLY. The monthly meeting of the Carmarthen Town Council was held at the Guildhall on Tuesday night, tne Mayor (Alderman John Lewis) presiding. POOR WATERWORKS. Mr. Manson, the local Surveyor of Taxes, attended to explain why the Corporation were liable to pay Income Tax on the Water Works. Mr. Manson said he would deal with the subject under two head6-(I) Should the Corporation pay Income Tax on its water work- and (2) if that is o, how slioulJ the assessment be arrived at. Income Tax em- braced a very wide range: There was scarcely any- thing under the un which Inoome Tax could not get at somewhere or other. Income Tax was levied oil restaurants, gymnasiums, and on tne profits of betting and different things, and Income Tax was, and had been, charged on the profits of water works. In his connection, he might quote the in- struction supplied to him officially. That said that the profits of water works are liable to assessment, except so far as they were derived from the profits of a compulsory rate, that is to say, a rate levied on all the inhabitants of the district and payable by them whether tuey used the water or not, and in order to satisfy himself as to whether in Carmarthen the rate was compulsory or non-compulsory, he went back over the grounds of his predecessors for several years, and found that Mr. Belsham had taken some extracts from the Carmarthen Borough Water orks Act. Section 28 of that Act said, '-At the request of the owner or occupier of a dwelling- house, or part of a dwelling-house, the Corporation shall supply water under specific rates. Did not the words "at the request of the oa-iier" expressly convey that if a man did not want the water be need not have it, and that the Corporation were not bound to supply everybody with water,, but only at the request of the owner or occupier. It was well-known to him that there were houses in Car- marthen where the people did not get the town water at all. He knew of one house within a half- mile radius of that hall, where the owner had sunk a well at the back and got his water from there.. S) for that reason he would say this as his first argument that the water rate is not a compulsory one. It is a non-compulsory one, and therefore for that reason the Corporation ought .to be charged on the profits of the Water Works. He drew the Council's attention to the High Court case of the Mullingar Rural District Council versus Rolls, Sur- veyor of Taxes. This was a case where the Rural District Council were bound by Act of Parliament to supply water to any ratepayer within the district boundaries who might apply for it. In this case there was no obligation tor anyone to take the water. They only covenanted to supply water to those who applied tor it, and it was hc!d in this case that the relation between tiie District Council representing the general body of ratepayers and the consumers of water respectively was that of vendor and purchaser, that the profit was subject to Income Tax. He thought the Carmarthen case was really on all fours with that. The two cases resembled each other in this wav. that the householder was not obliged to take the water unless he wished to, and the corporation was not obliged to supply anything unless he applied. Referring to what had been generally held by many judges on the bench, Mr. Manson said that whenever it could be proved that trading was carried on income tax applied to the profits of the trader. Was it trading in the case of the Carmarthen water works? He would say it was, because the object to buy and the object to Bell were not coincident at all. The party to bell the water represented tne mayor, corporation and all the inhabitants, and the party to buy the water did not represent all the inhabitants, because there were inhabitants who did not buy or take water, and con- sequently, for that reason, trading was carried on. Therefore he thought the Carmarthen corporation were liable. How were they to arrive-at the assess- ment? According to the abstract oi accounts of the corporation for the year ending March, 1914-he had not been able to get a copy of the accounts for the year ending Marcn. ISJO, as it was inconvenient just now—the revenue account showed that the income consisted of two sums— £ 2,107 2s. Id. received from a rate of 2s. in the £ for domestic purposes and 2s. 4d. in the £ for manufacturing purposes, and the total received from the supply of water amounted to £2,702 12s. Id. The items in regard to labour and repairs were allowable deductions, but an item of £ 13 2s. 2d. in regard to rents was not assess- able. There were also two items—prin- cipal paid off, £ 743, and interest £ 1,116 12s. 2d. Tiiei-e wac, in ex(-ess of income 'over expenditure of £92 12s. bd. With regard to these two items it was expressly provided that in arriving at the amount oi the assessment, no deduction should be allowed for interest paid. He thought it was clear that so much ot the surplus aB was utilised for paying off the principal wa§ assessable. Mr. D. Williams stated that all the ratepayers were part-owners, and the town did not supply water outside the borough except to the G.R. Co. Therefore their case was not on a par with the decefsor Water"works 1uotl-'d b>* Mr. Manson's pre- Mr. W. V. Howell Thomas-if we have a com- pulsory rate, I take it we escape from income tax? Mr. Manson-Yos, but only so far as it relates to prohts on water. „ "Fj: ,W" V. Howell Thomas—The sooner we pass a bye-law making it compulsory the better. 1 r" • ^ptui(>ll said that the water mains laid tZ-l m Prnai',th,'n had a llf* estimated at 60 aCC°[dlng to general practice, I1over 60 ynears, the idea being that by the the nines tho repaid the loan borrowed for the pipes, the pipes were gone. No one could make out there was a profit at ail in regard to the pines AH the money paid back in that way was monev paid foi the pipes. A large amount for deprecia- tion on the plant used must be struck out. P the Incime^Tax^tor^rJ?'? <>Xprossl-v laid down » oil J. Act that expenses which were lib™ for earning profita k.S«pl!?""the one, 'thcre'Scred The,6' "mPJf Co^cTwJ%tTeTt:t. the Survejw °" de'>'?ci»ti°n. The profit profit JSryS aSThat the he was quite prepared to ^onsid^rlt. maiDS certainly be a!lowedS ^he^ defredation should not satisfied would we haV^topa? SEto*W SUrpluS' Mr. Manson-Yes (laughter). Re"; nlu'r\ef,t the meeting. was one'of veiy^rea^D^t^1^ the questioa it be deferred for alpT T''ii proposed that should then take fnto lv,^1 the Council question of income tax bu lS'^ n0t onJ-v the water for the town. ls° the Question of The Borough Sufvevnr—u the question of water coral n„ .Wh«never KiS .SfSs «iTSWno £ where they had not a dron Jfh mfln J° ^Tcheldir Waning. That is series enoVIeh r !ht up indeed, and it aluare to water. ( s trouble in regard PenFwyn P^k^eVavVnot0! ?°heWf onlJ-- In 2 o'clock. a droP of water until Mr. D. Williams—We are rw *.i i out water. It is the v8 ? y town with" .be well if the prei ask The ^7 an Tt WT?uId water as possible. People to use as little The motion to defer mattora fn* o 1 riecl iters tor a week was car- BILLETING OF TROOPS. •W? S'ZLtli?* loffieeI'eofh*d,h7i,2/;th "V n!i receIved any reply. JJh Wn,"h,W if ihey did it Col. Jones a^ well to wait on. l! P- ^e°Ltr fiMt The uyor saId that both he and the Town Clerk had wntten and were waiting a reply. The Clerk read a letter to him bv the Head Constable (Mr. A. K. Mavall) stating th- 7th Welsb Cyclist, at the ,o,,I(i .stay in th" town on Thurs. y cht on their way fhrough on a loute march. THE ROADS. Mr. W. J. Martin drew the attention -nf Surveyor to what he described dep'orab!e the very bad state of Richmond-terrace P I he Surveyor 8aid he had received instructions not to carry out anything very extensive. fi V: Thomas said that several residents harl called.on him complaining of the bad state of the road. It was m a most deplorable etate. Mr. H. S. Holmes—May I point out that Mr. road. It was in a most deplorable etate. Mr. H. S. Holmes-May I point out that Mr. < Thomas is the man who said at the last meeting the roads in the borough were in a very good con- dition (laughter). Mr. Thomas—What I said was that the main roads were in a good condition. Mr. Holmes-No, no; you said the borough road6. WASTAGE OF LIFE. Dr. Bowen-Jones (.the medical officer of health) asked if the Council would form a small committee so as to carry out something in connection with the Notification of Births Act. It was a, reflection upon the Counil, he stated, that they had not already done something, because this was being taken up in consequence of the war, and in order to prevent the great wastage of life which was going on at the present time. The Local Government Board were sending a man to each'district to see what was being done. They in Carmarthen had done nothing, and it was a reflection upon them. The Clerk said he had written with regard to the matter, and they could not do more just now. The doctor said that the idea was to prevent the wastage of life. Mr. David Williams said that if it was to prevent the wastage of life, Parliament should first of all have passed the Milk Supply and Cow-shed Act which had been brought forward some time ago. He was sure it was more important than this. A small committee of four-The Mayor, Mr. Wal- ter Spurrell, Rev. Fulfer Mills, Mr. Thomas Davies, together with the Medical Officer—was appointed to deal with the matter. INCREASED PRICES. Mr. David Williams drew attention to the abnor- mal prices ranging at the Carmarthen Market on Saturday last. When the war broke out, he said, there was a big uproar in the town with regard to the tradesmen and the rise in prices. Last Satur- day, at Carmarthen Market, farmers charged Is. 7d. and Is. 8d. per lb. for butter, and he thought the Council should pass a resolution protesting against such high prices. Unless something were done now, butter would be 2s. 6d. per lb. in the winter. Mr. J. B. Arthur-What can the Council do? It is simply the operation of the law of supply and demand. It is all nonsense for the Council to take any stepe in the matter. Mr. David Williams-In Llanelly they have done so. Would not these high prices come under war profits? I think we ought to draw the attention the authorities to it. If things go 'on like this, we shall be in Queen-street. Swansea, for instance, will be in an uproar next Saturday, according to whitt I see in the newspapers. Mr. H. S. Holmes—The best way to keep the price of butter down is to take it on tick and not pay for it (laughter). Mr. J. B. Arthur-I do not see how we can by any possibility deal with a matter like this. Rev. A. Fuller Mills said they could appeal to Government to protect them bv fixing the prices of butter and cheese in the same way as they had fixed the price of coal. Nothing was done in the matter.

PENCADER AND DISTRICT NOTES

PENCADER AND DISTRICT NOTES On Thursday, 7th inst, Mr. D. Derwenydd Morgan, The Pharmacy, Pencader, was married to Miss Mary Davies, daughter of Mr. Rees Davies, Aber- mawmor Farm, Pencader. The ceremony was per- formed at Tabernacle Chapel by the pastor, Rev. T. Ll. Jones, B.A., B.D., in the presence of the regis- trar (Mr. Gibbon). The bride was given away by her father. Although the wedding was intended to be a quiet affair, a large number of friends of both parties assembled to wish the happy couple long life and prosperity. The wedding party left Pencader by the 11.30 a.m. train for Cardiff for the honeymoon. We were pleased to see the following who have been home on furlough during the week:—Private T. W. Davies, 25th Service, King's Liverpool Rifles. He is a son of Mr. and Mrs. Davies, Glandwelly Cot- tage, Pencader. Also Private Harry Jenkins, Castelldu, 3rd Welsh; Private John Davies, Cwm- bychan, 3rd Welsh; Private Evan Enoch, uran Villa, 3rd Welsh. The annual fair at Llanfihangel-ar-arth passed off very quietly. In the morning, cattle fetched good prices, but there was a reduction of the late ab- normal prices. The horse section of the fair was larger than usual, and here again there was a reduction evident, although good prices were ob- tained in many cases for sucklings (carters). The pleasure fair consisted of the usual cocoanut shies, shooting galleries, and toy stalls, but the merry-go- round was missing, much to the disappointment of the young. We learn that Corporal Jack Evans, Ist.Weish, who was recently home on furlough, is now in hospital in Birmingham suffering from the effects of a blow in the back, from the butt of a rifle, received during a charge. We hope he will soon be fit and well again. The annual harvest festival at Llanfihangel-ar- arth was held on Wednesday, 6th inst., and was very well attended in the evening. The church was nicely decorated for the occasion, the pulpit, especially showing a profusion of beautiful Bowers kindly sent by Mrs. T. R. Jones, Pantglas. Efforts are being made at Pencader to secure funds to carry on the work of the Sewing Class, which proved of such great value last winter, in making comforts for soldiers and sailors, and a concert will be held on Saturday, 23rd inst., in aid of the above. It is hoped it will secure the support it deserves. The practice of adopting the names of places which have become famous in the present war, for houses, &c., has become very popular, and we under- stand that the names of the two houses just com- pleted for Miss Evans, Farmers' Arms, Pencader, are "Mons de Ville and Marne Chateau" We congratulate Miss Evans on the happy choice.

ABERGWILI NOTES

ABERGWILI NOTES The war, in all its horrible aspects, has now come to our very doors and many letters have been re- ceived this last week testifying to the heroic stand our boys make in Gallipoli. Parente were delighted to fill the necessary particulars on the forms of the Carmarthen Soldiers' Welfare Fund," as no one knows better than a parent how the smallest parcel is welcomed at the front. Miss Owen, The Palace, deserves the thanks of the parish for thus interest- ing herself in the welfare of its heroes. Miss Owen has for some months diligently cared for the woun- ded at a London Red Cross Hospital, and is now enjoying a hard-earned holiday. Mr. Perry Owen-the Lord Bishop of St. David's second son-was in the thick of the fight If or Hill 70. and on more than one occasion miraculously escaped being hit. In his last letter to the Palace, Mr. Owen appears to be confident of the immediate sucoess of the Allies, and says that if matters pro- gress as at present Britislj Tommies will eat their Christmas dinners on the banks of the Rhine. The absence of so many of our young heroes has made city life rather dull. and winter evenings already seem to bang heavily. The monotony was somewhat suddenly relieved on Sunday morning last. A detachment of the Carmarthen Volunteer Corps, marshalled by Mr. Holmes, vice-principal of the Carmarthen Training College, was out on parade, and the villagers appear to have gained new life. The firm and (h-en tread, with an occasional decided left mark, made a few anxious mothers almost rush to hail, what they momentarily, took to be the triumphant entry of their soldier sons. One old dame capped the lot when she vociferously ex. claimed, Ie yn wir y bechgyn i nhw. a dacw vr hen Kusar yn saff yn y canal, vr hen flagard." Needless to say that this again was a false estimate, as ón closer inspection the old lady's Kaiser proved to be one of the highly esteemed middle-aged in- habitants of Carmarthen town. On Tuesday, the 12th inst., Mr. Charles Davies, son of Mr. and Mrs. David Davies. Castle Pigyn Crossing, commenced duties as headmaster of Ffair- fach Council School. Mr. Davies has been highly successful in his college career, and has proved him- self to be an excellent teacher. He has, for years, been a faithful member of Ebenezer Chapel, and a readiness to assist in everv good cause has always been a marked point in his character. Ah Abergwihans wish him the best of success. We are again in the midst of the water trouble. The well, it appears, is sucked drv, and the water- rate pavers have to be satisfied with a limited early morning supply. Where are our district councillors ? Last Ioniay evening a young horse, the property of Aid. John Lloyd. J.P.. Penybank too* fright and bolted from the station yard. ft made '"its way for home at a terrific pace and in attempting to make a short cut at Castle Gree.i came to gi-ief. Both horse and cart were thrown completely over to the other side of the road, but tht- frii/btered animal was soon on its feet again an i r.ttemplod another bolt, but eventually Mr. Tom Harri? astis ted by Mr. Tom EVans. Bodarddu brought it to bay, and Mr. Lloyd was able to continue his home ward journey in peace.

ABERGWiLi JOTTINGS

ABERGWiLi JOTTINGS The harvest thanksgiving services were held at Ebenezer Chapel on Tuesday, 5th inst., and, as usual, took the form of prayer meetings. They were conducted by the pastor (Rev. D. Williams), and were well attended. A pretty but quiet wedding. took place at Eben- ezer Chapel on Saturday morning last, the contract- ing parties being Mr. Thomas Jones, eldest eon of Mr. David Jones (ganger on G.W.R.), Rose Villa, and Miss Fanny Simon, daughter of Mrs. Simon, Glangwili Village. The Rev. D. Williams per- formed the ceremony. Mr. Willie Jones, of Ponty- pridd (brother of the bridegroom), acted as best man. After the ceremony the happy pair left, amid showers of rice and confetti, and the well- wishes of their friends, by motor-car to Carmarthen en route for Swansea bo spend their honeymoon. They were the recipients of a large number of use- ful and costly presents. Congrats, to Miss Evelyn Arthur, daughter of our respected Postmaster, on her appointment as assis- tant mistress at the National School here, and best wishes for a bright future in the cholastic profes- sion. Our readers are reminded that Mr. Wm. Lewis, 60. High-street, has been appointed local agent for the sale of the JOTTBNAL in place of Mrs. M. Arthur, who acted in that capacity for many years, but has had to resign on account of ill-health. It is hoped that Mrs. Arthur will soon be restored to good health.

KIDWELLY NOTES

KIDWELLY NOTES The news of the death in action of the gallant Lieut.-Col. Lord Niman Stuart has been received with feelings of genuine regret at Kidwelly where, not so very long ago, he addressed a big meeting in support of the candidature of Mr. Alfred Stephens for the West Carmarthenshire seat. His manly and winning personality, and his whole- hearted advocacy of the Conservative cause, won the admiration of even his political opponents. One little incident was eloquent of his true nobility. During his speech he was subjected to frequent interruptions by Coun. E. Cole, who took strong exception to his criticisms of Mr. Lloyd George. The interruptions were dealt with very good- cl humouredly and very effectively by the noble lord, who appeared to have an unlimited store of pati- ence, and at the close of the meeting he strode across the seats to the back of the hall, where he shook Coun. Cole warmly by the hand, and held brief converse with him. The sight of the scion of a noble house fraternising with a humble son of toil will never be forgotten by those present at the memorable meeting. 2So one is more sincere in mourning the death of the heroic Lord Ninian Stuart than Councillor Cole. There was a large congregation at St. Teilo's, Mynyddygarreg, on Wednesday evening, the 6th inst., the occasion of the harvest thanksgiving ser- vice. The little church had been very tastefully decorated by Mrs. Harries the organist, and Miss Odell, Velindre; assisted by Mrs. Gravell. Even- song was intoned by the Rev. W. Evans, L.D., curate, and the lessons were read by the Rev. D. E. Thomas, Pencader. a former cijrate of the parish, who was also the special preacher. The Rev. D. Ambrose Jones, M.A., vicar, also took part in the service, at the close of which a collection was made in aid of the Additional Curates' Society. A prettv wedding was solemnized at St. Mary's Parish Church on Saturday last, the contracting parties being Mr. Edward Walters and Miss Mar mur u -j k°*h of Wesley-terrace, Kidwellv. The bride was given a"-ay by her brother, Mr. W. Wright. The Rev. W. Evans, curate, officiated All the schools of the town have been closed by order of Dr. T. R. Griffiths, medical officer of health, for a period of three weeks on account of affected measles. Scores of little ones are (A nii-ber of local military pars appear under our War Jottings).

LLANSTEPHAN NOTES

LLANSTEPHAN NOTES As briefly announced last week, the sad news of the untimely death of Mr. Jeti Rees, third son of Mr. and Mrs. Tom Rees, Union Hall Hotel, through a motor accident in Roumania, cast a deep gloom all over the neighbourhood, and the sincerest sym- pathy is extended to the bereaved family. "Jeff," as he was fondly known to all was apprenticed at Mr. Richard Marsh ci, trainer to the King, at Eger- ton House Newmarket, in 1896. Upon the com- pletion of his live years in 11:101, his services were much sought alter, and he determined to accept a responsible position in one of the leading stables in Roumania, where he had since resided, and met with great success in his profession. He was a born "d.erV, or some years past he trained and rode for Uanboi at Bucharest, and had ridden at all the principal race meetings in France, Italy, Germany, and Austria, as well as Roumania, and as one of the foremost riders had headed the list of Rou- manian jockeys on several occasions. On his occa- sional visits to the home country, nothing gave him greater pleasure than a visit to the popular Carmar- then and ienby race meetings, with the pleasure of piloting to vutory one or other of the horses trained by his father at the Llanstephan stables, among some of his most popular wins being that on "Off »,> -Miss Canacia, "Phil Cristo," and Bedgrove. With a bright past and a glowing future, it was a cruel act of Fate that at the early age of 34, his career should be so ruthlessly cut short, and all ms friends and acquaintances feel it as a personal loss, for a more lovable character never breathed. Quiet and unassuming, he was always kind and cheerful, and brimming with good humour; and his presence always added pleasure to the company. In a touching letter received by Mr. and Mrs. Rees, they have the satisfaction of knowing that everything possible was done during the half hour of life which remained after the acci- dent. The interment took place at the English Cemetery at Bucharest, the service being conducted by the English chaplain, Mr. Adney, and most of the English trainers and jockeys attended, as well as Col. Canbol and Madame Caribol. Representa- tives of the Roumanian Jockey Club were also present Many beautiful wreaths were placed on the coffin; and the service was most impressive. Col. Caribol, the trainers, and his brother jockevs propose to erect a suitable headstone over the last resting place of one of the most popular and respec- ted lads ever turned out ot old WTales. Mr John Morris, chairman of the Parish Council, presided at a parish meeting of Ward I. on Fridav evempg, 8th inst., called to fix a rate for lighting the ^reet lamps during the coming winter. In view of the necessary stringent lighting orders in force on the sea coast, and the necessity of doin, away with luxuries at this critical time, the meeting wisely decided to levy ten shillings only, which means that this winter the lamps will not be lit. A little inconvenience and a few bumps on Sunday night when the various forces meet, will not do anyone much harm. It may serve to bring the fact that there is war on a little nearer home to some of us. 

FERRYSIDE

FERRYSIDE. WIIJ^ Mrs. Martha Taylor Stephens, of Glanvr- aton Ferryside. formerly of 7, Quav-strcet, Car- marthen, who died on Mav 25th. left estate of the gross valiie of EIO.112, of'which £ 8,016 is net per- sonalty Testatrix left E100 to her grandson, David John Montagu Stephens- L50 to her former house- keeper, Anne Evans; B18 per annum to her house- keeper. Rachel Griffiths; her wearing aoparel and trinkets to her housekeeper. Mary Lewis and the residue of her estate she left upon trust for her T^.n w-lir wn+ TayJ?r t Green Stephens and John Williams Watson Stephens, m equal shares.

NEWCASTLEEMLYN NOTES

NEWCASTLE-EMLYN NOTES (By JoxES.") Before Dr. Lloyd at the Police Station on Friday. Private J. Williams, 9th Battalion, Somerset Light Infantry, was charged with being an absentee from his regiment without leave. Williams stated he was ill and under the doctor's care. The magistrate expressed his sorrow for him, but he had to carry out the law by handing him over to the military authorities. He lives at Penralltfach, Penboyr. Masters David James, Tyrdref, and Santley Jane", Bridge-street, were riding the same horse on Cwm- coy road on Saturday morning, when the animal stumbled and threw both jockeys. Santley escaped injury, but David fell awkwardly on his nasal organ, whioh bled profusely. The engagemeht is announced of Lieut. T. O. Jones, 1st Monmouthsshire Regiment. and formerly of Lloyds Bank, and Miss Ruby Thomas, eldest daughter of Mr. and Mrs. J. M. Thomas, Victoria House. Mr. T. M. Jones, London City and Midland Bank. was driving his motor-car near Blaengwcnllan last week, when he met two cyclists from New Quay. They collided and the cyclists fell, but sustained no bodily injury. Their bicycles, however, were damaged. Mr. John Lloyd, son of Mr. Wm. Llovd, Lloyds- terrace, has enlisted in the motor transport section. Good luck. P.C. Richards. Adpar, has returned from Aber- ystwyth where he had been stationed during the summer months, and he hopes to resume the drilling clashes during the winter evenings. One of the songs of the season published by Messrs. Clay and Co., of High Holborn, is "A Comrade," and the words are by Mr. T. Walter Parry, Adpar. The words were originally composed in memory of Private Tommy Harries, Police Station, who fell in France a few months arc. The music is by Mr. Henry Caffin. Mrs. Llewellyn, White Hart, has been instrumental in collecting Z7n7s. towards the fund for upplying comforts for prisoners of war. Mrs. Lleweilvn has a son who is a prisoner of war at Doeberitz since the naval engagement at Antwerp.

TREGARON TOPICS

TREGARON TOPICS (By" JONES.") The Sanatorium.—Much local interest is being evinced in the work of altering and preparing the old building for its new sphere of usefulness. Though at present its old name (workhouse) seems to fit ijs condition better than does its future designa- tion, yet it is already giving promise of being a considerably more up-to-date structure Anent the Sanatorium, an amusing tale is now going the rounds,- for the veracity of which, however, I cannot vouch. The tale concerns "five officials," not all resident in Tregaron; but, by a strange coincidence, all bear the common surname of "Jones' Whether these officials were in "mufti" or uniform is not told. It is said, however, that more than one county was represented and that amongst them was at least one special constable." A few nights ago these five strolled in company to- wards the Sanatorium. During a lull in the con- versation, when opposite the building, one of them intinotively scented trouble." Was there any- one on the premises? "—the question seems to have arisen in each one's mind simultaneously. They immediately held a council of war," and, having their plans" well and truly laid," commenced a systematic search of the building,—presumably, two remained outside on guard," while the others searched for the trouble," or did three stand "on guard," or (perish the thought!) did the stalwart five keep each other company during the search? The search, doubtless, was thorough, and, the premises being large and rambling, the time was spent must have been considerable. After long and vain searchings in the many nooks and crannies they apparently ran the culprit to earth (or was it to the sky?). It was not a Zeppelin or a German spy-truth to tell, the villain (?) was but an innocent owl. Too-whit! Too-who!! Who, indeed!! IS IT TRUE? That Tregaron is going to have electric light? That, in consequence, we shall have more light on the dark subjects affecting the ratepayers? That the, water supply scheme is up to the spout" —of the new pumps? That, according to a celebrity, Tregaron is the centre of the universe? That, in consequence of the hub-bub," some of the councillors have "water" on the brain? That the number of recruits from Tregaron is less than the number of "eligibles" still left? That some of the members of the Board of Governors are "thinking" of resigning? I don't think!

BURRY PORT AND PEMBREY NOTES

BURRY PORT AND PEMBREY NOTES We heartily congratulate Mr. T. M. Evans, Burry Port, upon his success in passing the Inter. B.Sc,. examination of the London University and has secured a scholarship of £;)5 at Aberystwyth. At a meeting of the Health Committee of the Burry Port Council on Thursday evening, the medical officer of health (Dr. Owen Williams) re- ferred to the unsatisfactory condition of the existing slaughter-houses in Burry Port, and urged forward the work of the public slaughter-house, for which the Local Government Board Jiad given consent to the necessary loan. The site had been selected, the land secured, and plans and specifications completed. He therefore could not see why this work should be delayed. It would also be a profitable undertaking. Mr. R. T. Hammond proposed that tenders be in- vited and the work proceeded with. The committee decided that such step be taken. An accident happened at the Explosivès Works on Wednesday evening on the Lands NN-ett contract, when a man named Thomas Howard, lodging at Swansea, was killed outright and another employee James Pearson, was so seriously injured that little hopes are entertained for his recovery. It appears that a looomotive became derailed and collided with a structure upon which was a huge water tank which overturned. Mr. W. W. Brodie held an in- quest at Pembrey on Saturday. The jury returned a verdict of Accidental Death." The housing problem is still a serious question at Burry Port, and is likely to be so for a considerable time to come judging by the daily influx of workmen to the district. Plans for six wooden huts and four villas were submitted to the Council at their last meeting. It is a pity that there would not be plans for a few hundred workmen's dwellings.

ANSWERS TO CORRESPONDENTS

ANSWERS TO CORRESPONDENTS. PKO PATRIA.—We will gladly insert your reply to .iNoiinulius if you will follow the usual rule of1 sending us (not for publication) your name and address.

FARMERS AND RECRUITING

FARMERS AND RECRUITING. [To the Editor of the CAKMABTHEN JOURNAL.] Sir.-There is a lot of tall talk against the farmers in this war, and I notice that one speaker, Captain Margrave, is very fond of insulting them openly. Does he think such methods are going to persuade the farmer or anyone else? Moreover, can anyone say that the agricultural industry in Wales, already crippled for want of labour, is not doing its dutv in proportion to the number of men it has available compared with other callings?—Yours Carmarthen. THOMAS WILLIAMS.

AN EXPLANATION i

AN EXPLANATION. [To the Editor of the CARMARTHEN JOURNAL.] T, the ac

Family Notices

DEATII. RCHARDP,On the 10th instant, Hannah. the mfant daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Richards, Bronfa Bryn-road, Lampeter, 1 month. «

LONDON AGAIN RAIDED

LONDON AGAIN RAIDED EIGHT KILLED AND 34 INJURED. Press Bureau, Thursday Morning. Th." Press Bureau have "received instructions from the Home Secretary to announce that a Zep- j tfl: raid was made yesterday (Wednesday evening) over a portion of the London area, when a certain number of in endiary and explosive bombs were dropped. The material damage done is small. A few fires resulted, but were quickly put -out by the fire brigade. The Admiralty will issue a statement to-day when particulars are available. At present it Is only possible to say that no public buildings were injured, and the casualties so far reported are: —Two women and six men killed, and about 34 per- sons injured. With the exception of one soldier killed, all of those were civilians. These figures in- clude all the casualties reported at 11.45 on Wednes- day evening. 4110

MOTOR VOLUNTEER CORPS

MOTOR VOLUNTEER CORPS A meeting of motorists in the county was held at the Shire Hall, Carmarthen, on Thursday, the 7th :ilsl.. presided over bv Mr. D. W. Drummond, Hafodneddyn, when Major-General D. C. F. Maclntyre, C.B., delivered an address with refer- ence to the proposal to establish a corps of motor volunteers in Carmarthenshire in connection with the Volunteer Training Corps already existing. The Chairman at the outset explained that the matter had been inaugurated by Mr. T. P. Jones, Lianellv, who about six weeks ago brought the question before the County Council. The Council gave him a very sympathetic hearing and a com- mittee was appointed to go further into the subject. This committee, in order to know how to proceed, had been .in communication with the Central Asso- ciation of the National Volunteer Corps and as a resiilt. General Maclntyre, who had organised similar corps in other counties, had come to give them details. General Maclntyre said he had started many corps of the same nature all over England and lately in Wales. Wales, he said, was doing ex- tremely well in the movement, and he had started corps in Cardiff and Swansea only a short time ago. These corps were already doing useful work for their country and preparing themselves for further duties.. He pointed out that now that the authori- ties were permanently recognising the National Motor Volunteers, he thought there would be a mat

OUTRAGED TO DEATH

OUTRAGED TO DEATH Quarter-Master-Sergeant T. F. James, Unionist Agent lor East Carmarthenshire, writes from .trance. Readers will notice here confirmation of the story of the German atrocitiea as told in our Welsh translation of the Bryce Report. Among other very interesting things he says: We have now been in France some time. We were soon rushed to the firing line upon our arrival. Our battalion went into the trenches delighted with the prospect of being face to face with the Huns, after twe.ve monthe hard. training at home. Every man seemed full of confidence and fired with a determination to uphold the noble traditions of the gallant W elsh. When we got into the trenches we found that they had hitherto been occupied by the Trench troops, who informed us that they were being continually being asked by the Huns when b — British were to arrive, declaring that they wouid receive a warm welcome. A board with the word 'Welcome' had been put up by them this soon became a target for our boys and was quickly smashed. As we entered shells fell 'all arounc, and we had a few casualties. Our artillery is great, their fire being so regular, effective "and accurate-far more so than that of the enemy. shells are whistling overhead now on their errands ?u °^s"'llc^Ion to the German trenches. Our boya ^out as they go, Another message for Fritz the Bounder,' or something very similar. We are now fettl»S q^te aocustomed to trench life, and har- l unet"n-°ra?e rare fun sometimes nunt.ng rats which are as large as hares, and of which there are thousands. The lice, too are faithful companions in fact, too faithful to' be p.easant. Huge, awful looking things with two i,0^5 f6 i, ?ye fTe a^e occasionally to get the 1 Xlu'.y Of a bath wlnoh we manage by using two tne best of it. The villages near the firing line are eronif TlJ'at8' bOUS7 ueaily level with the ground. The experiences of the villagers here are ready too horrible to listen to. We found one pooi lady sitting by a smouldering fire in a cottage ™ b^re °n.f but was now redSd to io^r owe wdls W! kut a roof. Across the road y buried her husband, her two sons, and only caughter The males were shot by the Huns, while the daughter was outraged to death. Doubtless there are thousands of similar cases. One cannot neip leoling thankful that he is strong and fit \nrl «ble. to fight with the millions of British boys to save our dear ones from 7^ treatment. The weather is very co d nWful niffht when we have white frost W*>' P00.1,8, y a' I may tell vou-needW tn J a 1 t?eto' choice. I often SIO-H for a LINT "J T. •R°I? beer. The stuff wo o-J a Pint of good British i £ r. I am t%Z 

LLANYBYTHER CLEBRATlON

LLANYBYTHER CLEBRATlON HISTORIC CONGREGATIONAL CHCRCH. gr^at^n6,1!?8*8' unn?'s;V> in the annak of Con- wtrt lnpnn VV ak'9 ls bein« celebrated this ertc-e i fi i yeai's since the denomination Sneci, ti'r CJmpel f^M-Vbont, Llanybyther. I eetings in celebration of the event were t'iLi' Sunday, and attracted large congrega- p 1 church was established as a branch of Pencader i and was under the control of Pencader T 5f?era^1 years. A call was given in 1775 to Mr clones, \vho was ordained in August of Mr Ttar" In,.17?8.a second chapel was erected retired in 1818. The next pastor wR«i lege. 1 J°ne8' a 9tudent at Carmarthen Col- There is a tradition in the district that Fi,hgrrd S" had bark with the news of the French Ynvl!, ™ 96: excitement prevailed amonc the mno-roiMt' Great in the turmoil Nancv Jone! annenlerf ti°D4. a bling preacher to continue X to restore quietness Nancv Tnnps -m- ,orc^er t? b'" tw'VKi ,,1" • 'mpos.d, OU 1 20 }fn .i, jXenj™V^l.wi1ir Hen?d77' !iam, (Nonnil H?v T I V- y DJ5ne?i Dr- >ViI" t>- „ np rp Jones, B.A. (Brvn and for t,he Proprietors Pr:nG^ESNITPT £ II9''R f°r Pr°Prie*or8 by LEWIS Worb, 8, King