Teitl Casgliad: Carmarthen journal and South Wales weekly advertiser

Sefydliad: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru

Hawliau: Nid yw statws neu berchnogaeth hawlfraint yr adnodd hwn yn hysbys.

Gwylio manylion cyfan

Cyntaf Cynt Llun 3 o 8 Nesaf Olaf
Full Screen
8 erthygl ar y dudalen hon
Advertising

REGENT HOUSE, NOTT'S SQUARE, i THE Shop for Men's Wear. 'WINTER OVERCOATS In Fleeced Tweeds, Navy Indigo Meltons, & Navy Indigo Naps. Styles that are really smart. INCLUDING S. B. RAGLAN. Full Skirt. D. B. ULSTER, Belt all round Leather Buckle. S. B. CHESTER, Velvet Collar, Shaped Waist, Belt and Inverted Pleat. Prices from 4 Guineas. SUITS to MEASURE FROMX4 15s. I NOTE THE ADDRESS — W. H. EVANS (Men's Wear Specialist), REGENT HOUSE, Nott's Square, Carmai then. (1671 Carmarthen County Schools. THE GRAMMAR SCHOOL. Headmaster—E. 8. ALLEN, M.A. (Cantab). Readmistree&-MISS B. A. HOLME, M.A. Late Open Scholar of Girton College, Cambridge. Fees, £1 V8. per term. Reduction, when tberf are two or more children from the same family. Boarders can be received at the Grammar School. High School for Girls, CARMARTHEN. President of the Council: THE LORD BISHOP OF ST. DAVID'S. Head Mistress: Miss E. L. SUTTON, B.A., Honours. Londcfti University (First Class in Classics). THE School gives an Excellent Education on very Moderate Terms. Admirable Accommodation for Boarders. Pupils prepared for LONDON MATRICULA- TION and other Public Examinations. Boys as well as girls can be received in the Preparatory Class and the KINDERGARTEN DEPARTMENT. For full particulars, apply to the Head mistress. High School, Carmarthen. The Grammar School, PENCADER, CARMARTHEN. BOARDING AND DAY SCHOOL FOR BOYS AND GIRLS. Headmaster: J. R. SAUNDERS, M.A. (Cantab). (Emmanuel College). Assisted by a highly qualified Staff of Resldeat and Visiting Masters. Preparation for all Examinations. Special Individual attention in single subjects. Pupils registered at any time. Charged pro rata. For terms and particulars apply to the Head master. OLD COLLEGE SCHOOL, CARMARTHEN (Held on the Parade, facing the beautiful Val. of Towy).' Ideal Institution for Direct Preparation and Great Production. Every pupil being taught the subjects future purposes require. Particulars available on application to the Headmaster, Rev. J- B. THOMAS, Under- graduate LONDON UNIVERSITY; Open Exhi- bitioner Cardiff: University; 1st Prizeman at Trevecoa College in Classics and Mathe- matics; Holder 10 Certificates South Ken- sington First Class and Honours in Chemistry. Staff-Qualified Dispenser. Pupils registered at any time charged pro rata. Successes of the Session:—37. Duties will be resumed on the 13th of January. Myrddin Collegiate School CARMARTHEN. Headmaster: Rev. D. GLYNDWR RICHARDS, B.A. B.D. Assisted by an Honours Graduate (University of Wales). Preparation for various Exams. School re-opens Jan. 6th, 120.

GORSLAS

GORSLAS. On Thursday evening in last week. the members of Gorslas and St. Anne's Churches fathered at the Church Hall to mark their appreciation of the 22 years of service rendered by the Rev. Anthony Brit- ten, who has just retired from the care of the churches. Mr. W. Williams. J3.PJ., Penygroes, presided, and dwelt on the Vicar's labour in the districts. Others who spoke were Mr. D. F. Davies, J.P., Mr. J. P. Morgan, lr. T. II. Child. Mr. Eben Griffiths. and Mr. Morris, Dafen. On be- half of the churches, Mr. John James, the oldest member of Gorslas Church. pre- sented Mr. Britten with a wallet containing £ 100. Earlier in the week, the district made him a presentation of E54. Mrs. Britten had previously been the recipient of presents from the Mothers' Union and the G.F.S., while on Thursday evening she was presented with a cheque by the boys of her Sunday School Class. Mr. and Mrs. Britten intend living at Porthcawl.

NEWCASTLE EMLYN

NEWCASTLE EMLYN. The ex-service men are going to have a good dinner early in the New Year. It will be quite a grand affair, and several of our leading townspeople will be incited, but "NIr Pussyfoct" has been asked to keep away. The town clock is suffering from a bad liver and wants tuning up. A thorough good wash out should be given it. It has never had a cleaning since it was built, and it is therefore no wonder that it gets on the "war path" sometimes. The Rural District Council are asked to place this notice on the Penrherber and Blaengwyddon Road.t. This road is closed o all traffic except traction engines. Pedes- trians are asked to use stilts or boats. Aeroplanes are allowed, provided they do not effect a landing in the trenches

Advertising

I William Isaac & Son Mechanical and Automobile Engineers, Iron and Brass Founders. (Official Repairers to the Automobile Association andI.Motor Union of Great Britain). MOTOR REPAIRS by Expert Engineers. Spare Parts made same day in Bronze and Gun Metal, Steel, or Wrot Iron. Small Repairs or Complete Overhauls. Structural Iron Work a Speciality. sko %ITG SIC S tock THRESHING MACHINES J Over 3,000 in use. Specifications and Quotations on Application. OLD FOUNDRY, CARMARTHEN. G. B. ISAAC, A.M.I.M.E., Proprietor. Sole:Agents for Tangye Gas and Oil"Engines, Lifting Appliances, &c. T. CONWIL EVANS & SON Tailors & Costumiers, CARMARTHEN. Decorators' Supply, Swansea Telephone}178, Docks> Swansea. (Wallpaper Stores, Ltd., Leeds.) 28, Waterloo Street; 13/16 & 73, The Strand, SWANSEA. Wall Papers. Walpamur Water Paint. Glass Lead Lights, Silvering, Bevelling, Oils, Colours, Varnishes, Z5 C, 0 Brushes, Decorators' Sundries. Quotations Given. Manufacturer's Prices. 1707 SHAFTING AND BRIGHT STEEL ROUNDS. Large Stocks, tin. up:to 4 in. Diam. 4 Govan Shafting and Engineering co, LTD., TELEGRAMS- f^T AQflOTXT" PHONE- Pedestal, Glasgow." \J L/AvJUV/ VV • Govan 653-654 — THE — Aeolian 'Voealion' THE WORLD'S GREATEST GRAMOPHONE. This superb instrument plays music-every manner of music—with a tonal beauty which is not mere musical imita- tion, but which is actual musical realism. The deeper tones- base and baritone, 'cello, bass viol and tuba-are reproduced with a new and remarkable richness and "body." Thehigh notes of soprano, violin and flute come forth from this wonderful instrument with the sweetness and purity of the origina renditions. When a record is finished, the instrument stops automatically. You are invited to come and hear the Aeolian "Voealion." Apply MANAGER, "JOURNAL." The following, among many other reeords, may be heard .— f Caprice Viennois, played by Kreisler. Scherzo-Tarantelle (Weiniavski)—Jascha Heifetz. Concerto for Two Violins (Bach), played by Kreisler aud Zimbalist. Overture 1812, played by the Royal Albert Hall Orchestra Unfinished Symphony (Schubert) do. Songs by Caruso, Tamagno, Tom Burke, Galli-Curci, b Kirby Lunn, etc. • SPARE BATTERIES & BULBS. •lor Pocket-lamps and Torches are. obtainable under GUARANTEE. 0 2/rom A. IVOR JONES, M.P.S.,4 • T 0n Ph a nn a cy, Caritiartlieti.0 The wife and son of the notorious Landru have, says the Pa-ris Correspondent of the "Morning Post," been arrested on charges of complicity with the alleged multi-mur- derer in his monetary transaction with the women supposed to have been his victims.

Life Undep the Terrible Bolshevik

Life Undep the Terrible Bolshevik LADY SPEAKER'S ADDRESS '10 CARMARTHEN UNIONISTS. -AIR. MERYYN PEEL AND COALITION. Despite the stormy weather, there was a good attendance at a social evening held a' the sale-room o £ the Ivy Bus'.i Hotel on Ihursday evening, 18th inst., in connection with the Carmarthen Borough Conservative and Unionist Association, and he audience were deeply impressed by an n:shudiyc address OIl life in Soviet Russia given hy Mrs. E. Urch, a. British woman, who, with her hnsbnnd and family. has lived under P.olshevik rule for about 18 months. Mrs. CTch narrated harrowing- stories of cruelty and oppression, starvation and mas- sacre under the Lenin and Trotsky govern- ment. The other speaker was Air. Mervvn Ppel, Danyrallt (chairman of the Carmar- then Division Unionist Association., who delivered a rousing address. Aid. Walter Spin,'roll (vioe-pnesident ol the Carmarthen Division I'nionist Associa- tion), presided, and was supported on the Puitform by the speakers. Miss P. Richards, Picton-ter^ace (vice-president Carmarthen Woirjpn's Unionist Association); "s. Alfred Thomas (secretary Carmarthen Di.vi^on Women's Unionist, Association); Aid. Wm. Evans (chairman Carmarthen Borough t-iiionist Association); Aid. J. B. v rthur (vice-chairman), Mr. James Davies (treasurer). and Mr. T. F. James, Unionist Agent for the Division. The Chairman explained that they hoped that meeting would be the first of a series 0; meetings to be held. Letters of apology for inability to attend were received from Lord and Lady Dyn- evcr, Sir Owen and Lady Philipps, and Col. Delme DaVies-Evars, D.S.O. Mrs. Urch. who was attired in one of the Russian national costumes, explained that her husband opened a. school at Riga to teach English, but when the Germans entered during the war, she and her hus- band and children removed to Moscow. She ventured to assert that not one British worker who had escaped from Soviet Russia could be induced to say one syllable in favour of Soviet Russia, neither would h0 deny what she was going to relate to 'hem. Was not the question of the struggle of Russia against Bolshevism of impor- tance to us? Did they not know that the Bolsheviks boldly declared that their foreign policy was a guarantee of a world 'revolu- tion: When the Tsar and his bureaucracy was overthrown, all classes were agreed on the country's stagnant state of corruption nnd the great need of reform..No right- minded man denied that the lahouring and peasant, classes had been greatly oppressed, lnd when the first revolution came the hearts of the people swelled with patriotic pride, and they expected the wonderful ad- vance of new Russia, but the stupendous problem of that. hour proved beyond the grasp of Kerenskv, who at that time was held as the saviour of his people. The Bolsheviks, a small party in the Provisional Government, knew what they wanted, and unlike Kerensky, they did not mtml descen- ding to any depths in order to obtain their ends. That, coupled with the apathy of the people, was one explanation of the Bol- sheviks' successful seizure of power. The -Jjarty was composed chiefly of political exiles of Jewish or Geifnan or^in and a P:: few scoundrels, who pursued their own views of what government should be by ^exterminating all who differed from them. Zenovia, the head commissaire for Pet-ro- grad. said ol the second Petrograd Confer- ence. "We must win over 90 millions out of the 100 million people in Russia, and those who oppose us must be annihilated." In August. 1918, one of the proclamations posted up in the streets of Moscow con- tained these wards; "All who are not on our side must be swept from the face of -it the earth," and a later proclamation de- clared: 'All Socialists who are not extre- mists will be treated as traitors. At the beginning, the Government regarded the Bolsheviks as a harmless minority. Was. not that the attitude of the British public to-day towards our Bolsheviks? Referring to the second Revolution, Mrs. Urch (des- cribed the scenes in Moscow, and said that after a week of fighting under their very windows, the noise began to suddenly cease, and people begtan to steal out of their houses. On reading the declarations in the streets that the Bolsheviks had won, their astonishment was very great. The dead had all been removed, but the gutters of some of the main streets, especially the t/ramway junctions, were riming with blood. Whole blocks of buildings were destroyed. How many perished would never be known. It was only a matter of a few days for might to have become right. All laws were abolished, and the govern- ment depended on the will of the head Bol- sheviks, whose decrees appeared every few days on the walls in the streets. Limita- tions and restrictions increased until the people expected nothing, were sure ot nothing, save death. Neither were they free to leave the town. Liberty—there was ISO much of it that an ordinary individual was afraid to go out. Not content with enslaving the body, they deprived the in- dividual of mental and spiritual liberty too. The Russian ikons were covered with a red flag or removed or replaced by a placard stating, "'Religion is opium to the people." All newspapers were suppressed save the Bolshevik press. The anti-Bol- shevik movement originated in the bitter experience of the enslaved people. She had been reading of Britishers calling them- selves Bolsheviks and who were looking forward to a Soviet Republic in this country. Let the people of this country not awake from their apathy and neutrality to the danger of these extremists too late, as was done in Soviet Russia. Let them realise that such a flood of ruin would engulf not only the titled, wealthy, and middle classes, but also the working-classes themselves. The horrors of Bolshevik war- fare outrivaIled the cruelty of the Germans. Speaking of what she saw al Moscow, the headquarters of the Bolsheviks, she stated that whilst the head Bolsheviks travelled in luxurious motors and well-upholstered trains others had to go on foot. Last March prac- tically all the horses had died and had been eaten. In Moscow, with over two million inhabitants, there were no trains, only a few military trains and one French Mission train once in six weeks, by which foreigneis might leave the country. No Russians could travel by that train. Rotting away outside the drill hall in Moscow- were numbers of motors which had been taken from the caoitalists and were 1101. needed by the head Bolshevik? How did the worker- profit by all this? Whilst the head Bolsheviks lived in the finest houses. fli(, pavements ot which were blocked nnd well guarded, others were without a roof. ould any worker

Life Undep the Terrible Bolshevik

of Carmarthen or any other place tolerate being ordered by the authorities to quit his own house. which he had bought from his savings, without (receiving any compensa- tion? Would he like to be robbed of a few pounds he had put in the bank for his old age? Yet so it was in Soviet Russia. Mcs- cow was supplied with wood and not coal, and last autumn, the Bolsheviks, who must come first, seized all the fuel, and whilst their houses were well-heated through the winter, other people froze to death. Mcs. Urch described the intense severity of the Russian winter, and how last winter, chil- dren cried with cold until mothers were driven to distraction. They could well eoni- pare their lot with Capt. Scott in the South Pole. Occasionally, they might be able to buy a few logs from a speculator, and they would drag them home in the early dawn for fear of being seen by the police. She had herself dragged logs of wood home in that way. Whilst the head Be lshaviks and the Red Army had plenty of good bread and meat to eat, others had to sustain themselves on a pittance of sour bread and cat and dog- meat. Would some of the worshippers of liberty and equality have five or six of the authorities come into i their houses, thoroughly search the premis- es. and having discovered no evidence whatever of a counter revolution, arrest them and imprison them for two months without accusation or trial? Yet all that happened, not to a capitalist or landowner, but to a Britisher with no ea.pital,-it was her own husband. All were liable to that fate on the word of a Bolshevik,—very often ¡ to avenge a private grievance—and might be shot without trial. Being a Socialist would not sarve him, unless he were an extremist. Former officers in the Russian Army suf- ered untold agonies. She had known numbers of former Colonels and Generals, who of course had lost everything they possessed, who had been driven to keep themselves from starvation by becoming porters and what, not. and now they were forcibly mobilised by the Bolsheviks because their technical knowledge was indispensable, and were driven to fight, against their fel- low-countrymen in a civil war of unparal- Jelled horrors. Were they not veritable slaves? Russia was still honeycombed with corruption. She knew a general's wife from whom a thousand roubles (£100) was accepted to buy her husband's release from imprison- ment. Let them imagine her distraction on hearing that he had been shot a few days prior to the payment of the money. An acquaintance of hers disappeared, and his father, after hunting for him for two weeks, learnt that his boy had been shot on sus- picion of being a counter-revolutionary. By bribery the old man had permission to see Peters and rung from him permission to bury the body of his son. When he learnt where the body, lay, a soldier told him to hunt for it amidst a heap of bodies, and the father drew uot what he recognised had been his son. Through bribery, her own husband was temporarily released from prison in a starving condition. Numbers of his fellow-prisoners died from starvation. On occasions a jailor would enter a cell containing 25 to 30 prisoners, and would read out a list of five or six names, and say, Come without any of your belong- ijigs." That was the first intimation to them of their end. Amidst silence that could be felt and heard, they were marched out, and arriving in a park, they dug a big hole, then they were shot in the neck from behind, and they would roll over into their self-made grave. They were lucky if they were killed, because then they would escape torture or being buried alive. She and her children were allowed to see "our prisoner" once a month through a screen for a quarter of an hour. They had to stay hours and hours on the road to get per- rrission to enter. There were many other women also standing outside, and when two or three handed in at the office their petition to see their prisoners, they received one word in reply. "Shot." Just so, wives learnt that they were widows, and mothers that they were bereft off their children. In June, 1913, the Bolsheviks arrested and shot all .the members of the former Keren- sky Government whom they could find. One of them, when fleeing, said to her and family, "Had the police come to arrest me in the days of the Tsar, I would not be afraid, because I would be sure of a trial, but now I shall simply disappear." During the last few days she was in Russia, the Bolshevik press were making much of the miners' strike in Britain, and had startling headlines, Our Brothers in Wales." Mrs. Urch referred to dukes who were doing compulsory labour of the meanest kiqd, and q:lid whole villagers had been wiped out. and the peasants exterminated. When her husband was in prison in Moscow, there were hundreds of manual workers there be-" cause they had held meetings and dared to speak against the Bolsheviks. Dealing with the exorbitant price of food. Mrs. Urch said that in the last month she was in Moscow, she and her husband worked 10 and 12 hours a day and earned JMOO a month, but that did not buy them food. They had to sell other things in order to buy sufficient. food. She had paid B40 for a pair cf children's boots. Whilst the earn- ings of the professional classes had risen seven or eight times, and those of the labouring class fifteen times, food was 200 and 300 times dearer. She gave a list of prices ruling. Blacik bread, lartlv made of straw, potato pealing and rye. 14 oz.. cost JE2 in English money; Tea. E,30 per Ib" but l imitation "feit of burnt carrots and dried herbs 30s. per quarter; sugar and butter. per !b. each; cocoa, eggs, fruit, bacon and fats of any description, could not be had for any money; milk, £ 1 10s. per measure of a little more than a pint; pota- toes, 14s. per lb., and £5 10s. for a bucket- fnll; maize. 92 10s. per lb.; yellow soap, B2 per lb.; cheese, £ 4 a lb. matches, 5: a box; reel of cotton, jSl. They lived mostly on sour cucumbers., beetroot, onions, and sour cabbages at 11s. to 12s. per lb. Beef was E2 10s. a lb. according to quality, and oat and dog meat, 14s. a lb. Last Christmas a fearful disease was discovered called the disease of the horse. It was transfererd to humans not by eating horse- in«at. but by handling it, and it mostly affected women who cooked the meat. It was considered incurable, and persons sus- pected of having it were shot, In Moscow profiteers were overwhelmed with entreaties to sell their foodstuffs, and the people did not mind how they outbid one another in their mad hunger. People were also starr- ing because Lenin and his colleagues so willed it. She had known scores of cases of hungry souls who had died silently, stoic- ally of hunger. She had known of mothers murdering their children, having been driven to do so by hunger. Horses dropped dead in the street. One day her husband met a schoolboy who was dragging home on a sleigh a fellow scholar who was dead. What could people hope from Bolshevism, the pawn of Germany? May God speedily staunch the flow of blood of Russia, that torn, weak. distracted land, for with all her suffering Russia still remained the land of 1he future (applause). Col. Lloyd Harries, Llwvndewi. gave an /■xcellent violin solo. Mr. S. J. Mundy, F.R.C O., accompanied. Mr. M ervyn Peel, who was accorded a rousing ovation, said he had never in his life listened to so powerful an appeal and so heart-rending a speech a a that made by Mrs. Urch about the state of Russia. Mr. Peel dealt with the policy of the Unionist Party, and said the part borne by Unionists din ing the war and after was a matter of tr.'ide to them. Afc no period in their poli- tical history had the Unionist Party borne s ;ch a great part in any crisis, and at no period was the Unionist Party more respec- ted or In greater ascendency in this country than it was at present. There were some people who held that the time had arrived for a declaration of a party policy by the I'nionist leaders. So long as their leaders were members of a Coalition Government in which the Liberal Party was taking part, and all were working together for national ends, they quite understood that it would be impossible to have a. separate policy for cach party in the Coalition. If Mr. Bonar Law was anything, he was a gentleman in politics (applause), and he had stated time after time in response to calls that Unionists should adopt the party system again, "1 must be loyal to my Liberal colleagues in ;he Coalition. We have got to work to- gether for the good of the country and con- sider things from a national and not a party point of view. We have buried the hatchet for the time being, and we "have buried it for the good of the country." The Unionist Party had to exercise the spirit of self-sacri- fice, and its policy at the present time was to support the Coalition. Mr. Asquith went about the country, and said the Liberals W0r,. ready to take office and manage the whole of the affairs of the country, and make all the arrangements about peace all over the world and also carry out the work of 1 construction in this country. Mr. Asquith and his friends apparently did not v ant to share with others such terrific bur- dens. an ] they had the sad spectacle of men like Mr. Asquith, who they all admired revered, going about the country and simply indulging in petty cavilling at a government which was trying to seek the best method of solving the great national r>roblems confronting us in consequence of the war. Those leaders of a former great party were really only to be likened to a spoilt child who had been naughty and was put in the corner. M'r. Asquith said ihat rhe Coalition was necessary for the great cnergency of the war, but that after the armistice, it became unnecessary, and that we ought to return to party politics. Mr. P-onar Law did not think so, and he (Mr. Peel) did not think there were very many sensible people in the country who thought so. Those who did think so really could uot understand the extreme dangers with which the country was faced at the pre- sent time,-dangers which were not one whit less great than any of those we had to face during the war. The Coalition Government won the war for this country in spite of the greatest difficulties, in spite of every obstacle, and in spite of the tre- mendous forces arrayed against us. They could never forget that, and we wanted a Coalition in order to win the peace which, in view of the dislocation of dverything social, economic and industrial caused by the war. was perhaps a more difficult tak ntdl. We could* not do it by party govern- ment with an opposition taking advantage of every slip to turn them out of office. The Coalition Government not only won" the war, but they had done more in the way of par- liamentary work in one session than any par. li-iment in previous years. And why? Be- cause there had been a whole-hearted feeling that we were all brothers after all, and that we have got tc work for the nation and put party aside sometimes, and that we have got to make1 things right in this country, otherwise we might fall into the to*, liblo state of Russia. We were faced with Syn- ———————————————— dicalism. and all such things had a ten- dency towards Bolshevism. NN-e Nvei-e told that there was a great campaign being started by the extremists erf the Labour Party, who said that they were going to convert the people to nationalization of the coal mine, in the first place. Of course, they all k; ew that once they nationalized one industry, it was only a stepping-stone on the part of the promoters in getting all other industries nationalized. In the end, that would be the ruin of this country. All would become slaves of a bureaucratic government. There were many things in the Coalition Government he did not like, but he would like to ask, what was there in which everything was perfect? They could always caVil at something. They always made slips, but on the whole it was their duty to support the Coalition Government because they could not see anything better. Those who were cavilling at the Coalition ought to say what their alternative was. We had never had an alternative placed before us, except that Mr. Asquith and his party could manage tho whole affairs of this country. The great point Mr. Bonar Law made in a recent speech was that France had a coalition, Ei/gland had a coalition, but America. had retained her party system and were the only people who had drawn away frcm the Peace Treaty on account of the clause relating to the League of Nations. Why were they doing that? Because they had not got a coalition government. They had a party govern- ment, and this action of theirs was done from purely political motives of one party, and they were running the risk of wrecking the whole of the work of the peace conference. Mr. Bonar Law told them that that was a pretty good warning against party govern- ment at such a time as this. Government by coalition might go on for some years, because they could not say what time it would take to reconstruct the country. We wanted the old fabric reconstructed not on the old lines, but on new and better lines, so that we might arise from the ashes of the great war a better and a purer country than we were before. The w as a stu- pendous one, and they could not expect it to be done by a party government. Let the Unionist Party be content with the great, part it played in the war, and in the reconstruction that so far had been done, ,nd let it go on in the same spirit, until the time came when their leaders gave the ord, and said, "Now we can go back to the old party system of government." Re- construction must be done on the lines of true democracy. The extremists at the Trades Union Congress stated that if they could net get what they wanted in the ordinary constitutional method, they were going to over-ride the majority by force, that is by syndicalism and direct action. That would lead to civil war, and it would be a long and bloody war before the people who wanted to over-ride our democratic insti- tutions won the day. Those were some of the dangers we had to face. "Vie admit there are many grievances that ought to there are many grievances that ought to have been remedied long ago," said Mr. Peel. "Let us put aside some of our old party preju- dices and try to march with the times, Al- though our principles remain the same, we must not let them be hampered by bigotry and prejudice. We are not going to frame our policy 011 the old party cries and shib- boleths." He had been a Unionist because tl" believed the policy of the Unionists was he best for the country. He had always put country before party (hear, hear), and it he had been in parliament he would be very much ashamed of himself if he voted for or against something because it would "dish" the other party although he knew it would be a good thing for the country. Ii You may in this constituency have to put your pride in your pockets once more to support a Coalition Liberal," said Mr. Peel. Never mind, you are doing the right thing," said Mr. Peel, "and people who do the right thing, always have the greatest satisfaction to the end of their days" (applause). In proposing a vote of thanks to the chairman and speakers, Ald. J. B. Arthur said although he agreed with Mr. Peel that they should support the Coalition, still he believed that the Unionist Party was a very sound bulwark against anarchy and Bolshevism.. They were indebted as a party in that constituency to no one more than to Mr. Peel (applause). Ald. Alm. Evans seconded the motion, which was carried. In reply, Mr. Peel referred to the sug- gestion of the formation of a great Centre Party composed of Coalition Unionists and Liberals with the extremes on the wings, and said it was not impossible 'hat sueh a party might be formed. It would be great pivot of safety on which the State would rest, and they ought to support it by all means :n their power (cheers).

No title

sunshine, the well-known hackney m are, property of Mr. David Harries, Dyffryn .Stores. lirvdui), Ammanford winner of over 30 prizes, including cups, also award at the Royal Show, Cardiff.

CARMARTHEN SOLDIERS DEATH

CARMARTHEN SOLDIER'S DEATH. At a special court at Fermoy on Friday six men were remanded on a charge of murder- ing Private William Jones, Shropshire Regi- ment (a native of Blaencoed, Carmarthen- shire). on September 7th. The prosecution's case was that while a detachment of the Shropshires were about to enter the W es- leyan Church for service, a party of men attacked them. Revolver shots were fired into their midst, and they were beaten with staves. Jones received two shots, and died almost immediately. None of the accused recognised the Court.